The Eugene City guard. (Eugene City, Or.) 1870-1899, June 23, 1877, Image 1

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    r
ST
m
GENE
C Y
6
ARD.
ESTABLISHED FOB TUB DISSEMINATION OF DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES, AND TO EARS IN HONEST LIVING BT THE SWEAT OF OCR BROW
WHOLE NO. 503. EUGENE CITY, OR., SATURDAY, JUNE 23, 1877. $2.50 per year IN ADVANCE,
7
Ut tfttgcne CitJ Guard.
. R. ALEXANDER, W. H. ALEXANDER.
ALEXANDER BROS.,
Publishers and Propricton.
OFFICE In Underwood' Brick Building,
over (tain's Jewelry Store.
OUE ONLY
RATES OF ADVERTISING,
idvertiwments inserted as follows:
hi. iqiun, 10 line, or lew, one insertion S; each
afcjeqoent insertion l. Cash required in adTanoe
Time adTertiserewMb. charged at Ui. following
rt ! 16 00
One square three month
ii month. - .J
one year " "
Transient notice. ln.local eolumn, !0 oents per line
tor each insertion.
Advertising bills will be rendered quarterly.
AUiobwo- must be f up " " ueliyk".
POSTOFF1CE.
,MBcs noar. -From T a. m. to 7 p. m. Sunday.
VuiUn froh. south an! leT ol north
10 a. in. Anive. from the north an I eaves n
ardth at i p. m. For Biuislaw, Franklin and Txmg
T S? at. "at. on We.lnay. For Crawford.
ille, Cam. Creek and Brown.ville at I ;
Utter, will be ready for delivery half an .hour after
a riral of train.. Utter "hould be left at the office
cue hour before " XpmBR80S, P. M.
SOCIETIES.
Vn n. A. F. and A. M.
Meet. Brst and thirl Welneadaya iu each
month.
u-g.ii.vv Kirrrl TllMlK No. O I. O,
meet' on' the Jdand 4th Wednesday in each month
LON. CLEAVER,
XS 2?cT S? X 3 "57
OOMS OVER MRS. JACXS0JT3 -W-
linery Store,
WILLAMETTE STREET.
DR. F. WELSH
HAS OPENED
11ENTAI. KOOM9
Permanently in the Underwood Bnek, tugene
Jity, ami respectfully solicits a share of the
jiulilic patrona re. Refer, by permission to J.
J$. Cardwell, Portland.
-a. rr. Patterson,
PHYSICIAN , AND SURGEON,
Ofllee an Ninth Street, oppolte the St.
Charles Hotel, and at llelteuee,
KJGKNK CITY. OIIKUO.N.
Dr. J. C. Shields
OFFERS HIS PROFESSIONAL SER
viees to the citizens of Eu,'eu City an.l
surrounding country. Special attention (fiveii
onll OBSTKTMCAli CASES and U11.U
INK DISEASES entruteJ to his care.
Office at the St. Charle IIoteL
DR. JOSEPH P GILL
CAN BE FOUXD AT HIS OFFICE or res
idence when not professionally eugajod.
OUiue at the
POST OFFICE DRUG STORE.
Residence on Eijjhth street, opposite Presby
terian Church.
Chas, M. Horn,
PRACTICAL G UNSMIT1L
.DEALER IN GUNS, RIFLES,
land materials. Repairing done in
the neatest style and Warranted.
Sewing Machines, oaies, iak.,
etc., repaired.
Guns loaned and ammunition furnished.
opiwsite Star Uakery.
GEO. B. DORRIS,
1TT0RNEY AND tOCNSELLOR AT LAW,
Office on Willamette street, Eugene City.
VM. Purchasing Agent,
B. SAN FRANCISCO,
LAKE. CAL
JEWELRY ESTABLISH EXT.
J. S. LUCXEY,
DEALER IN
Clocks, Watcnes, Chains, Jewelry, etc.
Repairim; Promptly Executed.
tAU Work Warranted. J3
J.S LUCKKY,
Ellsworth 1 Co. s brick, Willamette Street
M and Stalionery Store.
POST OFFICE BUILDING. EUGENE
City. I have on hand and am constantly
receWng aa assortment of the l "u
Miscelhuie.nl Books, SUMonery, Blank Books,
Portfolic. Cards, Wallet. Blanks. Porwn
paea, etc., etc A. 8. PAfTbliUA.
OPPOSITION
IS THB
LIFE OF TRADE
SLOAN BROTHERS .
i it ILL DO WOEK CHEAPER thaa aay ather
IV ahapiatowa.
HORSES SHOD FOR $150,
vtii r autsrial, aU rusod. BeMttiag old afcos
A Ceata.
AU warrat4 ( gw aatlalaetloa.
Slop on Eighth at, opposite Earn
parey's Stable.
DR. J0ILY HERRBOLD,
lUSCICH in IECB15ICH DEJTIST,
TTAS KrVVTP TO rTTTTf-!.
ST. NICHOLAS,
"The king of all puhlicationt iuntil for the
young on either tide of the Atlantic." South
wiiMn (England) Observer.
' The third Tolume of thi. incomparable Hsqarin
i. nw completed. With it 800 royal octavo pure.,
and ix hundred illustration., 1U aplendid aerial.,
it. ahorter .torie. poems, an 1 sketches, etc., etc., in
it. beautiful binding ol red and gold, it I. the moat
splendid gift book for boy. and girl, ever iuued from
the pre.. Price, It ; in full jilt, IS.
ST. NICHOLAS FOR 1877. '
Which open, with NoTemher, 1S74, beirin. a short
and very entertaining; aerial from the French, " The
Kir,irom of the Oreedy," A story adapted to the
Thauksiriring season. Another serial of absorbing
interest to boy.,
' HI8 OWN MASTER,"
UT 1. T. TROWBB1UOK,
author of the "Jack Haiard Stories," in the Christ,
ma. Holiday Number. Bennies serial .torie,
Christ mm .tories.lively sketches, poems ind pictures
for the holiday., and sonie astonishing illustration,
of Oriental sport, with drawings by Siamese artists.
THK tJHRlSl'MAS HOLIDAY NUUHER OF
ST. NICHOLAS, superbly illustrated, ooutain. a
very interesting paper. . -.
" XUB HOYS OF MY CHILDHOOD,"
By WILLIAM MILLS B4YAXT.
Do not Fail tn Buy St. Nicholas for the
Christmas Uolldsys. I'iim, 'ia I tuts,
nnrini the vmrthere will be interest ine pane, for
boys, by WilUni Cul'en Bryant. John H. Whittier,
. .:!!: TT ... ft- II ..II I
l nomas nutfim. nui'siu numi,, muh,,',,
O onre McDonald, 8auford B. Hunt, Frank K.
Stockton, and others.
There will he .Uiries, sketch's and poem, of special
intcrct to girls, by Harriet Frescott Spuffortl, Bu-
r....l;.l u. .f. vu1l.wMr VIiuImi1i Rtn.
art Phelps, Loui.ii Aloutt, l.ucretia P. Hale, Celia
lhaxter, Mary Mapc voage, anu many ouiois.
There will be also '
"TWELVE 8KY PICTURES,"
lit PltOr. PBOCTOR,
the Astromer, with mans, showing "The Stars of
Each Month," will tie likely to surpua in interest
y series m popular science recently given to me
public.
. - . .... . . ....... . . . I 'TT A.' ; . 1
FUN ANU r llOLIU, ana wil u wi9iw.ii,
will be mingled u heretofore, and St. Nicholas will
continue to delight the young and give pleasure to
the old.
OOOD XEWS FOR BOYS AND GIRLS.
Tn meet the demand for a cheaper St. Nicholas
Oift-Iluuk. the price nf Toll. Isnd II has been re
duced to 13 hwU. The three volumes, in an eleirant
library ease, are sold for tin (iu full gilt, (la), so
that all limy give their children a complete set.
These volumes contain moreattractive material than
fifty dollar' worth ot ordinary children s books.
Kutiscription price, 13 a Tear. The three bound vol
n men an 1 a sulmcrintion for tliln year on It 12. Huli-
scrilie with the neaieKt newsdealer, or send money in
check, or P. O. Money order, or in registered letter,
to Bchiiuieh si Co., Hi Broadway, N. Y.
ffrs.SAMcCain&Miss C. Conner
DRESS MAKING
AND
FANCY HAIR WORK of all Kinds.
WIGS, SWITCHES, BRAIDS,
WATCn GUARDS, BRACELETS, ETC.
Mado to order.
Corner Willamette and Tenth Streets,
apiSSm EUGENE CITV.
'61.
CHARLES HOTEL
EUGENE CITY, OREGON.
MRS. A. RENFREW, : Prop
Having again taken possession of the old and
well known
ST. CE1ARL.ES hotel,
Wliiah has been newly furnished and refitted,
is now open foe the reception of guests.
I have ntteen rooms in tue
FIRE PROOF BRICK BUILDING
niiikin? 50 rooms hi all It is the most commo
dious and beet appointed house in the State
south of fealera.
FREE COACH TO THE HOUSE.
A. HEN FREW.
DIt. O'COINiXOK,
SURGEON CHIROPODIST.
Cure CORNS, WARTS, MOLES, BUNIONS and
ingrowing TOE or CLUB NAILS
WITHOUT PAIN- OB AC I IK.
No Acid or Injurious Chemicals Used.
ItEXIEF IUGIIT AWAY.
rj,n Tftur tn some of the most eminent PIIYRI-
CIANS and HUROEON8 of the United States
men that I have done work tor.
May 12:1m JOS. NEFF, Agent.
CONSUMPTION
Positively Cured.
All sufferers from this dimue that are anxlnu. to
be cu el, .nimbi try r. Klaauer'a Olebiat
rd Consumptive Powder. TIm-m Fowders
t.h imlv Declaration known that will cure Con
aumpilosi ant all uimstea ox vne isrsii.no
s. n.i.ia -indeed, ao atroiur is our faith in them, and
Imi to convince you that they are no bumhuv, we
will forward to "very .uneier, ny mau, pon pniu
r Trial Rfll.
We don t want your money until yon are perfectly
satisfied ot their curative powei. If your life is
worth savin, don t leiay in giving tnee row
s.m . LumI. u thev will surelv cure ion.
Frice, for large ikii, f 3 uo, sent vt any pan oi ins
Unit-1 Mates oi Canada by mail nn receipt of price.
Address,
ASH A ROBimg,
SCO Fcltj tTr.r, Bkookltm, N. Y.
FITS EPILEPSY, .
OR
FALLING SICKNESS
Permanenlly Cured -o bnmbuc-ky
one m,tll'" naac el arr. iiuii.i. '
Irlebralrd I fallible Kit Powder. To
eonvin .uderers tlutt tues powder, will do all we
claim tor them, we will .end them by mail, pol
paid, a Ire Trial Buz. A. Dr. imiuh.
f,,..,nlrnl,v.lcin tlmt baa rrn madeth'a duw
a .peeial stu ly, and a. to ir knowledge trotmnri.
have tii efrmsiriiiT rarr. 07 uw
tone Powders, will oarnlee a per-
moainscnreinevrryc!, of mass
ruoory expended, i ll sufirrer. should rive
the Po-dci. a early tn.', aal be ftaramd of
their euratiT powei.
in. l.nM hnx. II 00. or 4 boxe for 110 00,
nt by' mad to aay part of United Kutr or Canada
oa receipt of prwe.or vj ,
ANII V KOBBI.VS,
K0 FrLTO Stbekt, BaooHra, N. Y.
CENTRAL
MARK ET
BOYD & RENSHAW. Proprietor!.
via
KEEP CONBTANTLT ON HAKD,
BEEF
Veal,
FORK ASD
PrW If mt of sTJ kiad.
I rl, Tallow, etc. V01
eeU Bref 1 chaaks (roes I to i seat.
1 -
' "KOCK OF AGES."
"Rock of Ages, cleft for me,"
Thoughtlessly the maiden sung,
Fell the words unconsciously
From her girlish, gleeful tongue ;
Sang as little children ling ;
Sang as ling the birds in June ;
Fell the words like light leave down
On the current of the tuue
"Rock of Ages, cleft for me.
Let me hide myself in thee.
"Let me hide myself in Thee.'
Felt her soul no need to hide j
Sweet the song as song could be-
And she had no thought heside ;
All the world unheedingly
Fell from .iia untouched by care,
Dreaming not they each might be
On some other aits a prayer
"Kock
Let me
of Ages, cleft for me,
hide myseli in Thee.
"Rock of Ages, cleft for me,"
Twaa a woman sung them now,
Pleadingly and prayerfully ;
Every word her heart did know.
Rose the song as storm tossed bird
Beats with weary wing the air,
Every note with sorro'v stirred
Every Byllable a prayer
"Rock of Ages, clett for me.
Let me hide myself in Thee.
"Rock of age, cleft for me"
Li grown aged sung the hymn
Trustingly and tenderly
Voice grown weak and eyes grown dim.
' "Let me hide myself in Thee"
' Trembling through the voice and low,
Ran the iweet strain peacefully,
Like a river in its flow.
Sung as only they can sing
Who life's thorny paths have pressed. ;
Sung as only they can sing
V ho behold the piomised rest
"Rock of Ages, clett for me,
Let me hide myself in Thee,''
"Rock of Ages, cleft for me,"
bung above a cothn-lid ;
Underneuth, all restfully,
All life's joys and sorrows hid.
Nevermore, O storm-tossed soul 1
Never more from wind or tide,
Never more from billow's loll,
Wilt thou need thyself to hide.
Could the sightless, sunken eyes,
Closed beneath the soft gray hair,
Could the unite and stiffened lips
Move again in pleading prayer,
Still, aye still, the words would be,
"Let me hide myself in Thee,"
A INT PuIJLY TO THE GlItLS OF
TO-DAY.
From the Alta California.
I rtm an old womnn an old, old
woman; hdvu bnrit'd' three husbands
aud am carefully nui'sinr the foiuth
iu hopes ol having loinebody to bury
mo ; s'ill my faculties are as clear ns
ever, and I can see a rent iu a petti
coat without my specs.
Now, jirlii, 1 want you all to come
lo me with your little joys and sor
rows, pleasures and disappointments,
lor I've had experience a whole li
brary full. Only ttiink, four hus
bands! But that you'd cull me a
ackling old hen, I'd give ycu the
hisiorv ot each. .
Now, my dear girls, I know you
are pretty, with the delicate peach
biossnm natural still on your
cheeks ; I know you are smart with
your high schools and colleges, and
your drawing and niunie, and though
you think you know it all, more lian
your mother, grandmother, and aunt
combined, yet pause a moment and
take the advice ot an old woman. 1
know its the one gift unappreciated,
yet often when followed, worth mil
lions. N. 1J. Don't always tollow
it implicitly when it concerns points
in stocks, tor once in a thousand it
may hnpocn to be lallacious. You
are willinir, nav. eager, to accept cho
colate drops, gloves, gum, candy,
narlers, in tact, almost anything that
has a pecuniary value, yet unwilling
lo take what has cost years oi pain
and trouble, care and solicitude ad
vice born of experience. I know
that advice in these days is like the
aloresaul stocks the bottom is gone
clean out, and it is not considered lo
be worth the assessment of listening
to. Yet did we not value the expe
riences of those who lived before as,
we should still believe the world to
be flat, and the long-tailed comet
would cause the sinners amon; us to
shriek in terror of utter annihilation
in a general smah up ; but as it is,
we serenely view his Ancient Terror
ship through the most improved
rlaset. and discuss the easts ot
which he is coinioed. we are tnou
sands ot years older in knowledge
I mean than the ancients, just be.
cauite we have had the sense to seed
and make use of their experiences
then why not take the experienced
advice of one who knows, especially
when it concerns your domestic hap
piness? Now all this is pretalory in
hopes to induce you dear angles to
listen to Aunt 1 oil y, and she say
"Girls, dear cirls. don I marry loo
young.
Now don't answer this with
"Pooh I pooh 1 Mie married young
herself, i es, my dears, I aid : that i
the reason I can help you, for what is
ridiculous than a person trying to ad
vise on a subject they know uolhin
about. Dut remember I have had
four husbands. You think, no doubt
faAh. I'm different than other reople
I shall manage my husband." . ily
dear; women have thought so since
the world began, but how many Lave
Succeeded r
Look at the gauct, hollow cheek
and the lines ol dissatisfaction
thousands of women who pass yoo
in an .afteniooa's walk: do their
vi is t' '1 "1 r-(', or t
dare hardly call their souls their
own ?"
When we are sweet sixteen, with
no more sense than can be easily ac
commodated in our pretty heads, we
re apt to think we are the motive
power of the whole world. But let
us begin at the begiuning.
What is the first desire of nearly
every newly married man ? Why' a
son and heir, not a daughter and
heiress, you may bo-sure; and the
poor, luckless little female who hap
pens to be first ot the tamily is to be
pitied. So, you Bee, you almost
come into the world uncalled for, un
less two or three unruly Wyiejjccde
you. v" vM i
Why I heard tho olh&jfy. of a
mau who beat his wile, because their
first happened to be a poor girly;
and auother, because the third was
of the gentler sex when he wanted
auother boy, wouldn't speak to his
wife for weeks. A word iu your ear:
I should think such a person would
have noting but girls, being so very
uuroauly.
Then think oi the poor baby girls
ot China, India, and almost every
heatheu country. Think, also, of the
countries nearer home; tho son al
ways inheriting first, the son always
ruling first; the son, the son, always
first, in college, in business, in clothes.
Look at the country; the son always
President, always Seuator, always
Congressman, always voter, always
almost Everything doctor lawyer,
soldier anii sailor, Tbeu you, a mere
woman four or five feet high, w'uh a
hundred or tvo of avoirdupois, no
trade, no profession, with perhaps a
pretty face, and a handsome pull
back," can rule a trej born mau 1 Why
the idea is preposterous.
Look what somebody said of Eng
lishmen tho other day ; that they ao-
quircM their in. nly look of superiori
ty and independence, oy c-eing mas
ter in their own houses ; and I'll tell
you what that means : I lived in that
iittle Hand myself once.
"Jane," the wife, "brush my coat.
Al, do up my shoes. Sallie, fasten
my trousers straps under the shoes.
Elizabeth, brush my hat." a stovepipe.
Alarm, get my umbrella. And so
e stands in the middle of tho floor,
lis family flying about to obey with
acntv his slightest behest. 1 ve
helped mysi lf. Truly an Englishman
nt boss ot his own shanty.
hen the youni! mrl is about to
escape from pinnal'ores, has been to
two picnics, one grown up party and
a matinee, sho thiuks she is reauy to
be married. Why, a sixteen year
older, who can neither read, write or
cipher, told me to day she was tired
of this living single I And if a boy,
with the down just appearing on his
uuper lip, has danced with her twice,
squeezed hor hand, and perhaps kissed
her over the gale, she thinks sue can
not live without him; that he is Apol
lo, Hercules, and Jupiter combined;
and if he has stooped for her fan, car
ried her parcels, and given her a box
f gloves lor a phiiopena, uiai ne win
. . . . .. - ... i -,,
make a most generous and devoted
husband. Alas I she will find that
after marriage sho will go with holes
in her gloves, and have no tan to pick
up; aud as lor carrying parcels; how
oltcn have you seen the wile with the
ha v in her arms, the next hold 0!
' . aa)
her dross, and a bag and bundle, to
boot, while her lord and master walks
serenely ahead just a foot or two
empty handed ?
This is not uncommon, for I speak
bv the card. But this is the last
you II have to complain ot. Ker.iem
... . . . ...
her all men custom says so must
sow their wild oats; ol course there
are some exceptions; my third for in
stance, was a most exemplary man;
so that it you marrv such a young
man. who has not had time lo sow
the aforesaid oats before marriage
he'll find, or make time t6engage in
that de'iiMitlul to him occupation
alter. But that's no guide for your
actions he'll soon let you know; for
do you look twice at the tame man
or ride quietly to see the seals, as he
. ..i . .i t...n l.
mums uoimu'f, ui uuiuu, anu nc icv
von know woo boards ana ciotnes
. , .
you.
Does he think the house ever gets
tedious to you as it does to him in
less than a half hour consecutive stay
in it, and offer to take you for a walk
or drive? Not much. I've been mar
ried years upon years, yet even my
exemplary third only midly hinted at
it once, w'hen I looked pale and tired,
and called bis attention to the fact;
in all our other falks 'together, I led
him like a hrab to the slaughter, with
a rcsiirned look npon his dear face,
pathetic in its patience, especially if
we were accompanied by our ninin.
So if yoo marry young, you're apt to
have your ninth or tenth before your
hair is grey, and not to have visited
the next county to you, unless al
lowed to by your devoted, who
doesn't go himnelf, and can have such
a jolly time while you are away play
ing bachelor. Bend down your head.
Don't you go, at leaft alone.
IItv mvny psrMMi do yfiti tM'ik
most of that ceremony, for it will be
the last in which you are observed by
all observers, unless you happen to
become a widow several times.
"Why didn't you bring your wife,
Will?"
"Oh, (ho old woman's at home
minding the baby. She's always got
a baby to mind." The last part iu a
sneering, contemptuous tone. Or, if
there's no baby, alack and alasl it is
worse still, lor then it is the lodge
the perennial lodge, claims him al
most body aud soul, and ho pays you
in neglect, for the many jokes that a
child! iss married man has to endure.
And don't you dare ask him where
he's been, or why he's been, or ho
may answer you as my lourth para
lysed me with;
1 want nono of your chin musio
about it, either I"
I oould have fainted, but I was in
bod, and could thus make no sensa
tion falling in his arms, so I swat-
lowed my wrath. But there, 1 ve
ono for to-dav; another time I'll tell
you how I managed my exemplary
third with- the experience gained,
alas, and felt, by my two former ex
periments. Be patient, dear girls, and don't
marry till you hear from me again.
llor-o-Mi-luuaiH.
Wur l'ut sticks Din Young. A
writer fully accounts tor the reason
why printers die young, and why they
are continually tramping from plaoe
to place in search of pence and qui
etude. Uo says that working for
fortv editors and scores of authors.
every one of whom is as sensitive .as
a sore thumb, and as lively and inter
esting as a hornet, no wonder the
printers die young, and only pachy
dermatous, grizzly, mulish specimens
get their share ot life. The writer
wishes lLat he could otter bimselt as
an awful example of the perils which
environ tho man who muddles with
cold type. A thoroughly-trained
printer should naye a step-motber,
and then a step father, and then have
been bound out to a tanner, and then
have married a scolding wife and lived
in a.smoky house, aud have had a
family of babies who were afflicted
with the col 10. He should have added
to all this discipline a thorough
knowledge of science and law, lan
e . ... ...
guages, theology, history, and biog
raphy. If, in addition, be has a
vicious-looking countenance and an
amiable disposition, he may stand
some chance with theso authors and
editors; but the probabilities Sic,
after all, that they will worry him
to death, i his picture will have a
very depressing effect upon ambitious
boys who are anxious to learn the
"art preservative ot arts." The pic
ture, however, is a tolerably correot
ono.
Texas is undoubtedly the greatest
cattle producing region on earth. Ten
of her live stock breeders alone own
1,025,000 cattle, besides horses and
mules, and six ot them have C82.000
acres of pasture enclosed. Think of
her hundreds of cattle owners, great
and small, and realize, if you can, the
magnificent proportions to which tins
industry has grown in a few years.
Seven years ago the census placed
the figures lor the State 424,504 hors
es, 91, S22 mules and asses, 428,018
milch cows, 1.12,400 oxen, aod other
cattle at 2.933,015: or for al! the
owners in the Stale only 5,400,000
mere than are now owned by ten. par
ties. Vkrt Sap. "We know," savs the
New York Times, "that by various
scandalous devices, undercover of the
law, the Democrats of Georgia and
Alabama contrive to disfranchise lie
publicans, and to make those States
'close boroughs' in the interest of the
Democratic party." Whereupon the
Woild comments as follows: This is
very sad, but the Times cannot com
plain. The Ilepublicans, by various
candalotis devices, undercover of the
law, contrived last December to dis-
Iranchise Democrats and to make
Louisiaia an I Florida close boroughs
in the interests of Mr. Hayes. Thoss
who take up the Returning Board
may expect to perish by the election
law.
While secretlv on none J to the txl
icy ot peace in the South, the Radicals
desire Democrats, in recognizing the
benefits which we have received from
the Administration, to go further, and
indorse the means by which that Ad
ministration csme into existence,
And this is what Democrats will
never do. They recognize the good
which Mr, Hayes is doing, and will
continue to do so, and will ascord him
full credit. So far as sn indorsement
is concerned, it is out of the question;
so far ssan indorsement of Itepubli
can appliances" is concerned, it is an
impossibility.
A little Portland boy being asked
if he had reached the bead of the elat,
u'l I am w..-ie the l.fdd
u . ! :.. 1, :, b;t tU u.iJ.. r ' -x Vv. -
AN AVENGING SPIRIT.
There is a story of a spectre that
stalks through the valley of the Big
Horn, where the Custer inassacie oc
curred. A path has been worn in and
out among the graves of the dead,
and both witcs aud Indians haye seen
the shadow on its tireless vigil, guard
insr the bones of the viutims ot that
terrible day; while many ot the led-'
skins have suffered death at the hands
of tho ghostly visitant a voriiable
Jibbonainosay. He is said to have
stalked into a camp of men uuder the
Cine! Dull Knife, and cut hve dusky
throats before the alarm was given,
when ho disappeared with a wild yell
tho well aimed shots of tho Indians
apparently passing through him harrn
lessly. A band of Indians under
Crazy Horse, who scouted at the
story, had the temerity to pass through
the valley, and seven of their company
... . . . r a. I
fell victims to the knife and nue oi toe
avenger. Now tho redskins are afraid
to go near the scene, and believe im
plicitly in the existence of the mur
derous spectre.
It is not a month since two army
scouts crossed the lonely haunt, ana
halted lorn enough to seo that the
graves had not been disturbed. They
saw the path ot the sentinel loading
from grave to grave. They saw the
sWlotoiis of tho red men slain by the
shadow. They were leaving the val
ley when their ears were greated by
a mocking laugh, and from a bed of
rank grass and dry weeds a quarter
of a mile away they saw the shadow
beckoning them to come forward
The shadow seemed to bo a man a
gaunt, longhaired human being,
dressed in rags, which had once been,
an army uniform. It held up in the
air and shook at them a carbine end
sabre, and when they galloped away,
it sont a leaden bullet whistling past
their heads.
If this shadow was a shadow
mist, a nothing it could not beat
paths, nor laugh and jeer, nor cut
throats nor fire rifles; and yet, if it is
not a shadow how does it live? Is it
some crazy hunter, whose befogged ;
mind drank in tho story of the awtul .
massacre and conceived this wild plan
of vengenco ? Perhaps one of the lit
tle baud of cavalrymen escaped death
in some strange way, and recovered
his strength is ho wanderod about
among rocks and valleyand hills
recovered strength of limb but not of
reason. Believing himself called
upon to svengo his comrads, ho lurks
in the valley, living like the wild
beasts around Inin and missing tio
chance to strike a blow.
Everlasting Fencs Posts. A cor
respondent of the Western Rural says:
I discovered many years ago that
wood could be made to last longer
than iron in the ground, but thought
the process so simple and inexpensive
thatjt was not worth while making
any stir about it. 1 would as soon
have popular, basswood or quaking
ash as any other kind ol timber, for
fence potts. I have taken out bane
wood posts after having been set
seven years, that were as sound when
taken up as when they were first put
in the ground. Time and weather
seems to have no effect on them. The
posts can bo prepared for less than
two cents a piece. For the benefit of
others I will give you the receipt:
Take boiled linseed oil and stir in it
pulverized charcoal to the consistency
of paint. Put a coav of this over the
timber, and there is not a man that
will live to see it rotten.
A Btory is told of a shrewish
Scotchwoman who tried to wean her
husband from tho public house by
employing her brother to act the part
of a ghost, and frighten John on his
way borne. ho are you r said the
guide-nan, as tho apparition rose be
fore him from behind a bush. " I am
lid Nick," was the reply. "Come
awa', man," said John, nothing daunt
ed ; giu's a shake o' your hand ; I am
married tae a sister o' yours."
A dandy of twenty-six having been
termed an u old bachelor," ap'aled
to an elderly gentleman to decide
whether be should be called old or
not, giving his age as " twenty-six."
Said the elderly gentleman, u It is
owing to how you tako it. Now, tor
a man it is young enough; but for as
goose it is rather old."
A Logical Just. An Exeter jury
found a man guilty and then recom
mended him to mercy because it was
not clearly proved that he had coil
initted the offence charged against
him. There was less logic in their
proceeding thn in that ot the Poole
jury, who, although a prisoner con
fessed himself guilty, yet acquitted
him because, as the foreman afterwards
explained to the astonished Judge,
the prisoner was such a liar that they
could not believe him.
Lawyer (to fVniale witnes-): Wli.'.t
nil.i vii tin, ma l.in, it' vti vtre a
r'ltnV V. . ; ' V. i ... w . V.
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