The Eugene City guard. (Eugene City, Or.) 1870-1899, February 10, 1877, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    r
in
IMTT
c
TY
6
ARB.
( r t
H
ESTABLISHED FOB TUB DISSEMINATION OF DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES. AND TO EARN AN HONEST LIVING BY THE SWEAT OF OUR BROW
WHOLE NO. 48.
EUGENE CITY, OR.; SATURElAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1877.
$2.50 per year IN ADVANCE.
Sbf ugcne (City (Dunrd.
CEO. J- BUYS, Pro'p.
OCB ONLY
BATK3 OF ADVERTISING-,
advertisements inserted u follow. :
his square, 1 line or le one insertion 13; each
.utjeqaent insertion $U Cadi required in ad vanes
;Tims advertisers wiUH charged at the following
rate.:
One squara three month 6 00
" ail month. I 00
" one year ,. "00
Tranaient notice! in local column, 50 centa per line
for each iniertion. ,
Advertising bill, will be rendered quarterly.
-All lob wor must be aid roa ns delivkbt.
POSTOFFICE.
Office Hour. -From I a. m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.
from 2: JO to 3:30 p. m.
. Mail arrives from the sosth and leaves Roinn north
10 a. m. Arrives from the north anil leaves fuing
oath at 2:33 p. m. for Siuislaw, Franklin and Long
Turn, cloee at 8 a.m. on Wednesday. For Crawford.'
ville. Camo Creek and Brownsville at 1 r.U.
' Letter, will be ready for delivery half an hour after
a . rural of train.. Letter, .hould be lef t at the office
on hour before mail, depart.
A. 8. PATTERSON, P. M.
SOCIETIES.
Edoehk Lodoi No 11. A. F. and A. M
Meet, flrrt and third Wednesdays in each
month.
jrJS. Bnwcxn Btma I-ODOl! No. 9 I. O.
fij, fiO. F. MeeUevery Tuesday evening.
fMti WlU A WH A LA KSCAMPMKKT No. 6.
aeet. on the Id and 4t!f Wedneaday. in each month.
LOU. CLEAVER,
iD ENT.IST.
ROOMS OVER MRS. JACKSON'S Mil
linery Stcire,
WILLAMETTE STREET.
DENTAL.
TaR. F.WELSH
J has opened
Dental Rooms per
manently in the
Underwood Brick
Eugene City, and respectfully solicits a eliareof
Joe public patronage. weiors Dy permission w
li. Cardwell, Portland.
G. A. MILLER,
TYEVTAT. HfimfS in dttnn's
is$r z BUILDING. EUGENE CITY.
fnfniei DENTISTRY AND ORAL SURGERY
A. W. PATTERSON,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Office on Ninth Street, oppoalte the St.
Cbarlee Hotel, and at Residence,
ECGKNE CITY, OUKG-ON.
-DBS. NICKLIN & SHIELDS,
TTAVINfl ASSOCIATED IX THE nrac
JJ tice o( Medicine, offer their professscnal
services to the citizens of Eugene City and the
surrounding country. Special attention Riven
tn U OHSTETR1CAL VASES and UTER
INE DISEASES entrusted to their care. Bills
An when the service ia rendered
'Offices on Ninth street and at the residence
of Dr. Nicklin on Willamette street, between
Ninth and Tenth streets. ' se2
DR. JOSEPH P. GILL
C AN BE FOUND AT HIS OFFICE or res
Idence when not professionally engaged.
Office at the I
4 POST OFFICE; DRUG" STORE.
! Residence on Eighth street, opposite Presby
terian Church.
Chas. M. Horn.
PRACTICAL G UNSMITlt.
-DEALER IN GUNS. RIFLES,
'and materials. Repairing done in
the neatest style and Warranted.
etc., repaired, ,,
Guns loaned and ammunition furnished.
Shop on Ninth street, opposite Star Bakery.
mi
15.
LAKE.
Purchasing Agent,
SAN FRANCISCO,
- CAL,
JEWELRY ESTABLISMENT.
J. S. LUCKEY,
DEALER IX
i
Clocks, Watches, Chains, Jewelry, etc,
Repairing Promptly Executed.
C-"AU Work Warranted.
J.H LUf'KKY",
POST OFFICE BUILDINQ.
- - Willa"ette & Eighth Bts., Eugene City.
Bonk and Stationery Store.
POST OFFICB BUILDING, EUGENE
City. I have on hand and am constantly
receiving an aseortment of the Bent School and
Miscellaneous Books, Stationery, Blank Books,
Portfolios, Cards, Wallets, Blanks, Portmon
Metorto. A. S. PATTERSON.
CALLISON & OSBURN
ARE OFFERING TO THE PUBLIC
SUGARS. TEAL. COFFEE,
CANNED GOODS, TOBACCO
CIGARS, GLASS AND QUEENS- -WARE,
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE,
BREAD CAKES AND PIES,
And In fact everything usually kept tn a finfr
class Grocery Sum or Bakery, at BED HOCk
PRICES for cash or ready pay. Satisfaction
guaranteed. ....
Goods delivered to any part qj the city free
of charge. .
NEW HARNESS SHOP.
CHAS.HADL.EY,
At Dunn's Old Stand.
KEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND A
Goad assortment of
Hack, Boggy & Team Harness,
Saddle. Whip.
Sport, Halters,
Collars.
Curry Combs and Brules
And sverrtliinj usually kept in a first-class
Uarsees&i
F..
RED MIXER,
TAILOR,
Mrs. Renfrew's Brick Building.
All styles of Garments made to order, and
FIT AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED.
Cutting done to order.
FOR THE
SPRING & SUMMER TRADE
WE fiEO to inform anr friend, and the pablle
that we have Just received direct from ban
rranciaco and the juuiern markets
AN IMMENSE STOCK
OP
GROCERIES, HARDWARE,
DRY-GOODS,
FANCY GOODS
NOTIONS. CLOTHING,
FURNISHING GOODS.
IATS AND CArS,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
Clocks, Faints, Oils, Etc.,
Selected bv our MR. S. ROSENBLATT.
which we offer at
Deduced prices.
Parties will find it to their advantage to call
and examine our stock and prices befoie pur
chasing elsewhere.
Highest price paid for all kinds of Produce
S. ROSENBLATT & CO.
SELLING AT COSTI
FOR SIXTY DAYS.
-yyM. pkestox,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
Lead, Hack arid Wheel
warranted California Leather.
ADDLES OF ALL KINDS,
BRIDLES, HALTERS,
SURCINGLES, HORSF. COVERS,
' LASH and BUGGY WHIPS,
COMBS and BRUSH KS,
HARNESS DRESSING,
ETC., ETC.
Thankful for past favors I would respectfully
solicit a continuance of the same.
Important ! '
Persons knowing tliemselves indebted to me
cither by note or account, are requested to make
settlement by Jan. 1, 1877, or payment must be
enforced. WM. PRESTON.
CHEAP READING.
The "WAVERLY MAGAZINE" is the
handsomeKt and largest literary in the United
States. The articles are all complete in each
number? It also contains a page of music for
the Piano, and double the reading of any other
paper. Sixteen different numbers will be sent
to any part of the country, post-paid, for one
dollar. No one will rei-st taking a dollar's
worth as it will give good reading for three
months.
'ddress,
MOSES A. DOW,
lioston Mass.
GEO. J. BU1S,
BOOK AND JOB PRINTER
F.UOESE CITY. OTtEOOX.
TIIK II EST MIOKS EVER BROl'UBX TO
to this market, at the lowent price, at,
T. l. MKNDHICK8'.
University Subscriptions.
All subscriptions to the State University are
now over due. The pnierty has been accepted
by and turned over to the State, and I am in
structed by the pro)er authorities to proceed
and collect all sums at once.
GEO. B. DORRIS,
Attorney-at-Law.
.3
H
c e
5 -
S -3
a
li
j i
1 at
ih
coal! z
"2.5-4
-
"a
.3
i
a
JAS A. STERLING,
Dranesville, Douglas County, Oregon.
Dealer in
General Merchandise.
NOTARY PUBLIC. . .
Full line of Legal Blanks on hand.
Manager of
STERLING'S EXPRESS.
TO COOS COUNTY.
AD business promptly attended to.
ASTOR HOUSE,
EUGENE CITY, : : OREGON
5. . DI noiJi, Proprietor.
Formerly of St. Charlxs Hcrrrx, Aleut.
THW HOUSE WILL HEEEAFTER BE
conducted as a
FIRST CLASS HOTEL.
ROSEBURG AND SAN JUAN LIME
fur sale by T. G. HEN DRICKA
m ..
I i
3 M list
K ?. &s-?
SPECIAL C'OKREMl'OXDEXCE.
The Electoral Count Some of the In
. vestigattoni An Arizona man is. Aston
ishedNew Senators A few words
about Life Insurance Senator Antho-'
, ny's Health The President's Organ
arid Poverty in other Shapes.
' WAfmiNOTON, D. C, Jan. 22, 1877. -,
Telegrams and letters aro coming
from all sections ia support of the
Electoral bill. Every business cen
tre which has so far communicated
with it's Representatives in Congress
has urged the adoption of tho measure.
The most Radical ot Republicans on
ly aro opposing it. A lew aro tindo-"
cided, but there is no prospect of de
feating the bill, unless the members
of the court, as is unlikely, shall sug
gest objections on constitutional
grounds. Democratic objections to
tho bill are disappearing. Judge
Hoar attributes his election as Sena
tor from Massachusetts to tho active
part ho took, as a member of the com
mittee, in tho preparation of tho bill.
Tho investigations hero for the last
few days have not been as interesting
as before. Mr. Murtagh, tho Presi
dent s editor, under investigation lor
using the police of the city for im
proper purposes, was on Saturday
shown to have violated tho confidence
reposed in hira by a brother Mason
who was trying to servo him. Pre'
ious developments in tho case had
prepared tho publio. to expect any
thing from Murtagh.
J. Madison Well, of the Louisia
na Returning Board, was examined
on Saturday as to the number of votes
thrown out bv tho lioaru. lie said
)o did not know whether a hundred
or a thousand were thrown out, and
did not know whether or not the re
sult was changed by throwing out
votes. IIo is in the hands ol a very
ablo committee hero and his knowl-
will increase before he gets away.
Tho people of Arizona have sent a
gentleman hero " Ou a mission." IIo
came the otlicr loy and presented to
the Attorney General letters from the
priccipal men ot tho Territory asking
for tho removal of a'U. S. Judgo
out there. Tho Attorney General
said he had some other papers in the
case, and showed them to our friend.
They turned out to be from the same
men for whom tho missionary from
Arizona was acting, but they strange
ly enough urged that the Judge bo
retained. The ono set ot letters ac
cused tho Judge of drunkenness and
of having a finger in every ring west
of the Mississippi, while the other lot
spoko of hira as an upright judge and
an ornament to the bench. Tho am
bassador from Arizona will go bock
to his homo a wiser and sadder man.
It is not a pleasant thing to look
forward to six years of Senator Hoar,
of Massachusetts, for in many things
he is a narrow man ; but ho was, by
all odds, the best man who had any
chance of election. He is a strong
friend to this District, and his election
therefore gives pleasure to all who are
permanently located here. . ,;
In many States, especially in New
York, great interest is just now felt
in the subject of life insurance. This
is caused in part by tho fail tiro of sev
eral companies of repute! strength.
One or two of tho strongest compa
nies have requested men ot high
standing to examine into the assets
of tho companies and their manner of
doing business. Other companies will
have to follow suit and whenever the
result is favorablo the companies will
find their profit in such a course. A
very strong company was organized
here six or seven years ago, but the
failure of a single large business house
connected with it completely deprived
it ot business, though its assets were
not affected. These tilings seem . to
show that something beside individu
al credit, or the high standing ofta
company's officers, is necessary to
make a company successful. Now,
what company will enrich itself and
give standing to this enormous branch
of business, by adopting tho plan of
investing a certain proportion of its
assets in Government bonds, to be
held by the Secretary of the Treasu
ry? A fixed percentage of its re
ceipts could be so invested from year
to year, and absolute security to the
policy holder ensured. Tho necessary
legislation to authorize the Secretary
to receive such deposits would be
very simple and could be readily se
cured. The assets oft single compa
ny are repotted to be as much as
1 80,000,000, and others have amounts
not much less. Whenever ono of
these companies shall adopt this plan,
other companies will find it neccessa
ry to follow suit. No business re
quires security so much as this; no
security would be so good as that
proposed.
Despite reports to the contrary,
there is reason to believe that Sena
tor Anthony, of Rhode Island, is
threatened with dangerous sickness.
He is verv feeblo." He has served
longer than any other man now in the
Senate, and has tho respect of every
man, Democrat or Republican, in
either Houso. Ht Cannot well bo
spared from tho New England dele
cation, which is not now what it has
been.
Over ono thousand families aro now
being fed, clothed and suppliod wit
fuel by charity, at this tiiuo.in Wash
ington. I he utter prostration of a
classes of business and tho prolonged
cold weather, accounts for this. A
bill has been introduced in the Houso
cmtmg money for tho temporary re
lief of the very poor. Private charity
is insumcicht.
, The National Republican, tho Pres
ident's organ, appears this morning
reduced m sizo but otherwise improv
ed. It is not a profit ablo paper and
it is not a good paper, but it has been
poorer and nearer worthless than it is
noir. Nemo.
Tbe Oregon Vote'.
The N. Y. Herald, of Jan. 11th
says tho oenato committee which is
investigating the Oregon case, is com
ing to the melancholy conclusion that
there has been no bribery, no corrupt
use ot money and that the hopes they
at one time entertained of fixing upon
the national democratic committee or
upon somo of Mr. Tilden's persona
friends, complicity in the misuse ot
money, are doomed to disappoint
ment. This is especially vexatious,
becauso of lato there has been an in
creasing conviction, among Kepubh
cans that the Urcgon case was
stronger than they hoped, and that it
noeded to liavo some taint ot corrup
tion fixed upon it to break it down.
Sound lawyers have been struck with
the merits of tho defence made by
Gov. Grover before tho committoo,
and particularly with tho fact that he
appears to havo acted, not in . haste,
but with great deliberation, in strict
accordance with the laws of the State
of Oregon as these havo been settled
in an analogous case by decision ot
tho Supremo Court. A lawyer said
that ho found Gov. (.trovers case
nuch stronger than ho had originally
thought it.
"The Governor," said ho, "makes
two points. Ono is that under tho
Constitution of the United States,
Walts, the postmaster, was incapable
of being chosen elector, and that the
Governor, who had sworn to support
the Federal as well as tho State Con
stitution, was by bis oath compelled
to take notice of incapacity. 1 here
upon arises tho question, whnt is a
vacancy, and this must be decided by
the State law, to which tho reueral
Constitution leaves all' those, details.
Now. whatever tho law of other
States mav be. Grover shows in a let
ter from tho Chief Justice of Oregon,
which ho has put in evidence, that
. ,
this precise question was decided by
tho highest court in Oregon in 1873.
U. Uibbs was elected state 1 rose
cuting Attorney ot the Fourth Judic
al district in 187 fi. Whilo holding
this ollrce in lot 2, ho was appointed
United States District Attorney for
Oregon, and insisted upon holding
both offices, contrary to the statute of
the State. The Governor thereupon
assumed that ho had vacated his Slate
office aud appointed ono Bellinger to
bo Prosecuting Attorney in his place.
Gibbs refused to give up tho office,
and the case Was brought up to the
Supreme Court on appeal, Gibbs hold
ihg in argument that tho Governor
could not determine for himself that
a vacancy existed in the ofliueof Pros
ccuting Attorney in tho Fourth Ju
dicial district, so as to authorize the
appointment ot the relator, for the
reason that the determination of-that
fact involved the exercise of judicial
functions by tho executive."
Chief Justice Prim writes i This
was the principal legal question in
the case, and tho Court; unanimously
declared that the Governor was in
vested with authority in cases of the
kind to look into the facts and pass
upon the same without awaiting the
action of the courts, "That is to say,"
added the lawyer, ''the State law is
declared by the Supremo Court' to
be that ineligibility creates a vacan
cy ; that Gibbs ceased to bo a State
officer when he accepted federal office,
and that the Governor had the power
under the State law to thus decide
and to fill the vacancy. The Court
held that Bellinger, the Governor's
appointee, was entitled to the place.
It is the opinion of some who have
watched the investigation that the
facts and the law will force tho Com
mittee to the conclusion that either
Cronin's claim is good, as having re
ceived the highest vote as an eligible
candidate or that Oregon is entitled
to but two votes. The latter conclu
sion seems to be thought the most
probable.
Who you find a man whose voice li clear
and whose ryes are wide open yoo may
know tbtt be was in jail and couldn't shoot
over tbe election return.
A HarrUbnrg man fell forty feet, stnick
a joist with hit itomacb and wis aH right
next dT. Those PenonylvsmaDt bare good
digeetioo and strong itomarbt.
, Why New Hampshire dent flr.Rol
Una to Washington.
a mm ;
From the Correspondent of the Werld.
Washington, December 81. IIo
wos big and round and jolly. There
was no particular ro;sou why he
shouldn t bd lollv and round and hie
He comes from New Hampshire every
Winter and he draws a salary throuch
tho Wintjr and he goes homo at tho
endor.tno winter, and most of tho
timo ho sits in an easy chair. Not
that ho was sitting in a chair iust
then. Ho was covering, I should say,
about ten square" leet of a table in
the empty Senate Chamber, and in n
general and unsuspieinus manner ho
was telling about the next New
Hampshire Senator. E. II. Rollins.
ana wny no was elected.
"Uh, yes, we elected Rollins: vou Bee
tho Union Pacific does about as much
business in this room as anr othor
department ot tho Government, and
so wo put him in here on tho floor.
it will do away with all the bother
of calling a man out into tho lobby
to speak to him. Rollins, will be in
here, you know, on handspeaking
to a man at his desk give hira an
idea occasional I ', a ' real, solid, ser
viceable idea. Good thing" lelloct
ivcly "to know tho feelings ot these
senators. Tho real difficulty is, you
sec, that just as a man that the Com
pany sends gets acquainted and is
really useful tho Senators don't like
to be around talking to him. - So the
Stato chipped in and sent tho Secre
tary of the Company hero for six
cars."
"Well, Isupposo he will resign the
Secretaryship ?" :'
"Oh, bless you, no I Why you
must havo just come to Washington.
t s iust moving tho Secretary s othco
in hero. . 1 hear ho is going to set up
a big cylinder desk, pigeonholes ana
So on, to hold his ' passes" with sin
gular deliberation "passes and
t-h-i-n-g-s. IIo will inako a good Sen
ator, now, I tell yon. He's different
from tho rest. He's got somo busi
ness in tho Senato Chamber. They
used to send men who hadn't got any
business in tho senate Chamber. '
"Which did you say was' Sumner's
desk?" "
"Don't you know? It's tho one in
tho middle, on stilts; but that's not
tho oldest desk here, by a good deal.
lo yon sco that doskr There s a
puty remembers seeing Calhoun at
that desk and Webster in the one
behind him."
"Not in this Chamber."
"Oh, no; in the old ono. They
changed tho Senate over sixteen years
ago.1'
"I think so."
The President on the Political Situa
tion.
New York, February 1st.
Tho Tribune's Washington special
says: 1 he 1 resident while convers
ing on the doctoral bill today,
branched off upon The discussion of
what he considers (the present ten
dency of political parties in this coun
try luwuru cuinpieie reeomKaiion.
Ie said ho has observed a movement
in this direo'ion for several years, and
that he accepts tho reaction of 1874,
known as the tidal wave as indisput
able evidence of it. He then said he
thinks the Republican party will be
ablo in great a measure to recover its
ost ground, and possibly to main
tain it through another Presidential
term, -but the experience of 1870,
though favorable to Republicans in
ocal elections, and to a great degree
in Congressional districts, proves to
him that on local questions tbe time
for reconstruction of political parties
has come, lie docs not mean by
this that he believes the Democratic
party will certainly secure permanent
control ol tho government, bin simply
that tho Republican party shattered
as it is by internal dimension will only
be able to rally its forces, and har
monize its elements when some new
question is presented. That ot course,
no one can know until the result of
the election is officially declared which
party will secure control of tbe exec
utive branch of the government with.
its extensive and only patronage, but
whatever the result ot the present
coolest, it will postpone the recog-
nani7.a' ion of which be spoke; The
'resident recognizes the fact that the
South now presents a united' front
ben permitted to act unrestrained
by interposition of local constituted
ulbority to prevent the white1 peo
ple from resorting to illegal means of
carrying elections in those Slates. In
sections of the North where Demo
cratic victories were gained, contrary
to former results the means by which
they were obtained my be excep
tional He thinks before the end of
the next Presidential term an entire
reorganization of parties will Uke
place in the Sooth, at least, and in
tbe contest of 1880 that section of the
country will not again vote any more
solidly for tbe Democratic candidates
than the North for Republicans. In
tbe South, as political contests are
ow earned on, there is, in his esti
mation, neither a Democravio nor a!
Republican party. The struggle is
simply for political power between'
the whhe people on the one hand, who
desire to ignore tho '' blacks entirely,
and the colored people on tbe other.'
.Tho loss tor the Republican party of
all the Southern States under these'
circumstances he thought the' natural'
outgrowth of the oppsitioh of the'
party ia power before the war to that
which grew oat of tho great struggle.
If Tildon is declared electod, the" Pres
ident thinks that tho two States nora--innly
yet held by the Republicans
will probably' suouumb. The mo-'
moot this result is socured he thinks'
the poople ot tho South will bogin to
disouss measures ot Slate policy, aud
that the icsult will be a division ot po'
litical organizations.. This condition'
of affairs w ill bo mora wholesome. It
nothing else caused division, joalousy'
of politisal' leadeYi and a desire to
control official patronage' will cause'
division. Whore one party has entire
control, then ho thinks both political
organiKilions will put forth their best'
oitorts to securo tbe negro vote, as
the Democrats of the North have ca
joled tho Irish and Republicans, cul-
. . i ki. j ci a
uvaiuu me vtermans ana scanainav
ians. Speaking of Florida, North
Carolina and West Virginia', the Pres.'
ident said he beliovod the introduction
bf Northern capital and immigration'
ot .Northern men will 'soon deprive'
them of their distinctive Southern pe-1
oulinrities, and cause the organization'
of parties on tho same principles a
in ne North. ' ' ' ;
Uosslp About nr. Bennett and the
Herald.
From the Cincinnati Oaaette. ' I ' '.'
New York, Jan.' lD.-r-The depart-
uro of Bennett for Europe is, it is said,'
intended for a starling point for re'
formation. It is not expeoted that ho'
.will return iri' a long -time perhaps;'
never. Ho leaves America as Byron'
left England, seeking another home.
It is now well understood that during'
the intefval between tbe knock down
and the departure Bennett' was con'
coaled, in bin own mansion in the
Fifth avenue. The house being con
nected with the Herald establishment
by telegraph, he kept np an incessant'
communication with his down-town
offico,' " " ' '
it is undcrstoood that tho TeraW is
to bo placed in the hands of its chiof
editors, who aro to pay an annual,
rent, not less than $75,000 a year.'
This will leave them a surplus of
nearly as much more. The Bennett'
building in Nassau street will be farm!
cd out in a similar manner, This will?
give a wide margin for its agonts,
who ought to clear (5,000 a year by
its rental.
History of a! Pletnre. "
Two ol the most celebrated srtlsta the'
world bat ever koowa dwelt 'Id tbe tame '
city. One delighted lo delineating beauty '
In i its (races of tint, form, and motion.'
(Hi portraits wera Instinct with the charm'
of physical vigor. Tbe graceful, half-voluptuous
outline ol form and feature barmon-,'
ized with delicately blended tints. Oo bit
canvass, the homeliest faces bad an almost '
irresistible charm. ' Tbe othor found pleat '
ore only io depicting weird ' and gloomy '
tubects. Above all, did ha excel in paint
Ins tbe portraits of lbs dying "The ago-'
nlzing duath-throa, tha ghastly face and
iorni, were all depicted witb marvelous fidel
ity, There existed between these artists tbe '
moat intense dislike. At length this dis
like culminated, Tbe beauty-loving artist '
bad ben engaged In painting tha portrait'
of a beautiful woman." Connoisseurs pro-'
nounced it the most Wonderful piece of art '
that bad ever been produced. His brother'
artist was jealous of bis fame and sought'
revenge. By bribing the keeper of tbs tta-'
dio be gained access to tbs picture each'
night. At first he was content to only '
deaden the brilliancy of the complexion and '
eyet, educe the bloom from cheek and lip
and paint a shadow oo eithur cheek. Later, '
bit strokes grew bolder and frtoK, and ' one
morning the artist awoke to find tbe entire '
outline ol the portrait changed. He could
scarcely recognize in the emaciated form '
and haggard countenance 1 tbs glowing '
conception be bad embodied. Tbe pallid
face and expressionless eyes be bad attribo :
ted to a lack of genuineness in bit materials'
but when tbe outlines were changed be sus-'
pected ihe cauw and indignantly dismissed"'
the keeper. What tbe revengeful artist
marred by a few rapid strokes ot his skillful
bruh was only restored by years of patient '
industry Reader, need we name tbe art-'
isis, Health, rho paints the flowers and
"grassy script" no less than Ihe human form '
divine, Disease, tha dreaded artist wbo
revels among the ruins both of nature and
humanity, and Carelessness, tbe keeper to
whom ilealtb oftea intrusts his portrait. '
Arid It it not tba beauty of woman, tbe
most admired of all tha works which adorn
the studio of Health, that Disease otteneat '
seeks to mar T Tha slightest stroke of bis '
brnab opoo tbe delicste organisation' leaves '
aa imprint that requires much skill aod pa- '
tienee to efface. Restoration most be -
prompt. Carvleasoess mast be dismissed. '
lyt suffering woman heed tbs warning era -Disease
has marred tbeir chief beamy
Health boyood reparation. Dr. Pierre's'
Favorite Prescription baa been need bv '
thousands of these sufferers aod they are. .
unanimous id tbeir .raise of its xcelleort. .'
II too would be trsnstormed from Ih nal-
lid, nervous lo valid into a happy, yirtuoo
woman, try it.
The Democrats in New Jersey '
elected John IL McPherson to the .
United Statea Senate, over Freling
hoysen last week by a majority of
one vote.