The Eugene City guard. (Eugene City, Or.) 1870-1899, March 25, 1876, Image 1

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    Mi
CITY
111
:iwi
ESTABLISHED FOR TIIE DISSE.UIXTI0N OF DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES, AND TO EARN AN HONEST LIVING BY TUB SWEAT OF Ol'R BROW
V0L.1X.N0.23.
'EUGENE CITY, OREGON, SATURDAY, MARCHES, 1870.
$2.50 per year IN ADVANCE.
oua ONLY
RATES OV ADVEXtTISINO
. .-.i.ment inserted u follow. :
,, square, 10 line, or lew, one insertion 3; each
.oent Insertion,!. Cash required in advance
's advertise wiUU charged at the following
Jono.inu three montlm
i month.
a anfi Tear -
(I) 00
8 00
11 00
Trniicirt notice, in local column, M eonts per line
VeMblMCrt'un-
. ... -11 1 Jt..-r1 fliiriftnv-I V
Advertising. Mil" wm oe ra. i 4
AU lob wo'
OaUSt D P-1U run uw i,r.r..
" roSTOFFlCli.
,. offlne Hoar. -From I a. m. to T p. m. Sunday.
frlii:rrii frora'the.outh and leave. Koinir north
i a ib Ariives froiu the north ami Iwva Komir
' ,h .a.-' n m. ForSitiislaw, Frtuikim und Ung
'If I ch-ea t Wedneslny. For Crawford..
''f1, uT, Creek and Brownsville at 1 P.M.
wiU t-llf for delivery half an boar after
Jj of train.. Ittemhould he If ft at the oriice
cu. lr btf. """rS.T'ATTERHOX, P.M.
' S iHiCitcuEs.
.. r.n IT G. Davenport, pastor. Ser-
,I,sVvory Sunday at 11 . ra. an 1 ! p. ui. ennday
.fchorf at ,3 p. m- Prayer meeting every iitduy
evening. " .''
- ,.-,- A C. Fairchild.rator. Services
1 io-so. m. and 7:20 D-ni.
r.,m-0. M. Whitney, Pastor. Service. 67
.pecial announcement.
SOC'
ft
Vnnr.NH LoDO
v A. F. and A. M.
diieadays in each
MeetsSrst ud
month.
, .-jriXyvt. bcesttb uottk im.r. ..... a .
-'W'&V; O. F. Meet every Tuesday evening.
5mW"" tVlMAWBALA r.XCAMPMKNT No. 6,
meets on the Id and 1th Wednesdays in each nmatn.
ScEKrr.n BotTE T-oiwh No. 9 I. O.
. GEO. R nonius,
JTTOSNET AND C0HSEL10R AT LAW,
OCce on Willamette -trcet. Eugene City.
Q. A. f'ilLLEH,
DENTAL BOOMS IN DUNS'S
a
BUILDING.
Eusene City, Or.,
iProfmt. DENTIST.Y AND ORAL SURGES?
DR. JOHN HERRBOLD,
SC6RICA AND MECHANICAL DENTIST,
'Underwood's Urick UuiMiiiC. Up Suir.
nour.cctliillv (iftorshi. BervicesWi
. the citizens of this plare and vlc-
fitv.inall the braucheaof hi. pro.
-eion,
T!ij. Lc.trt!t lmpaiement in
Plate Work
'eieniiled in a satisfactory manner.
STOCK IS CASH, and All Work Hurt bePuid
;00 Delivery.
"VR. F. VVIFII has opened Dental Ronnn
il) p'eryantly in Undcrwcmd'a bmldinjr, EuRene
A.'
Uity, ana respeciiuny ooutun p-u-,
e patronage. j ,.
1 Reference by permission, Dr. J. R. Card-ell,
Portland, Oregon.
, A.' W. PATTERSON,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office on Ninth Street, oppoxlte the St.
Charles Hotel, and at Kenldence,
.TniXKNK CITY. OBKGON.
DR. GEO. W. ODELL.
Office Up Stairs, first Xorlh of Astor Housj,
EUGENE CITY, ORtGON.
, For.eonvenieneeof.olf and patron, nil Vwdrc rl
aeeounUwill lie left in diarKO of O. M. COOrER,
EI., oiiposite the rtone .tore, who i. fully author.
iied to collert the wnt. It ia tully exrvrted that
'liaeconnurorwrucea will I nrrewnted tor pay
ment in thirty days, and collected in .ixty.
Euirene City, Apid Jth, 1675. -
Chas; M. Horn,
PRACTICAL GUNSMITH.
DEALER IN fiUN. RIFLES,
Tyand Material.. Iteparirinn .June iu
ffS the netint Btv'e and Warranted, .
'sfYS Sewing Michine, Snfes,
f Locks, rtc , Keptir d-
feyns loaned and ammunition furnished.
. fehop' on Ninth Street, opposite Star B ikery.
JEWELRY ESTADLISMENT.
J. S; LUGKEY, mn
DEALER IN
Clocks, Watches,' Chains, Jewelry,' etc.
Repairing Prornptly Executed.
CiT All Work Warranted.)
J.H IXTKKY,
post office ncir.Pixo.
Willa'Tette 4 Eighth Hi., Eugene City.
pOIt SALE.
.A RUGGLES ENGINE PRESS,
tlx) Inrhe. inside of chase; in inxid runninir order.
Will be Kild at a bargain. AdUraa tin. othce.
8ook , and. Stationery Store.
POST OFFICE BCILDIXO, EUGENE Clir. I
nave on hand and am constantly nee. vies tn
amortment of the Uest School und Miscellaneous
book. Stationery. Blank B Port.'ulii. Cards
Wallet., Blank. P.irtmounarn.rtc-.etr. All or
der., promptly Billed. A. 8. P4TTERS0N.
For Sale. .
Household Furniture, Etc.
BETNO ABOCTTO XF.AVE FOE THE EAST
I ofl-r fsr aale all ay Hmweluit) Fnraitore,
enaiarisifHr l'artw, f-ntrn an t fc town txtt,
Kik-ea Fararwre, Cooking Vt-ni!.f. - -
CHABLH I,in.
For Sat;.
rTrvroooon
JL , DWELLING HOUSES,
nick are ftKC.y sn.1 wi.i b. t a bar.
pa. Term. easy. Eaqun-.t trn-m o.-.
J. B rNPIP.woOD.
BEN. F. DORRIS,
DEALER IN
Stoves and Ranges,
Tin Ware,
PLAIN, FANCY 4 JAPANNED
Shovels and longs,'
Fenders y Fire Dogs,
Cauldron ? Wash Kettles.
Hollow, Iron and Ccpper Ware,
PORCELAIN, TINNED 4 BRASS
PllESEll YING KETTLES,
Driven Well & Torco Pump3,
Lead and Iron Pipes,
'-Hose ." m: d Eoe
N FACT, Everything helnnRinR to my bust
ne.se, ull of which I will sell at the
LOWEST CASH PRICES.
JOB WORK
Cf all kinda done promptly and in a aatisfactlorr
manner.
VEUS DRIVEN PROMPTLY
AND '
Satisfaelion Guaranteed.
By attention to LihIiissk and honorable dealin
' hope to merit a uliare of your patronage
Ja6 BKN. F. DORMS.
AW pei sons knowing themselves iu
tlebtcd tc me wi'l please call and.
SETTLE WITHOUT DKI.AT.
S. F. DOltRIS.
Vmilii-ii .J
IIAYEXEB 'MARKET !
CEGStR & B9Y0, Proprietors.
KEf.l'S CONSTANTLY ON HAND,
roE-j: and
aiCTTox.
Drinl Mi :it of all tin la. Tard, Tallow.ctc. Will
sell Beef in chuuka from 3 to 5 ctuU.
Bricli Slorr. cor. Willamette t Eighth S!s.,
EUGENE CITY.
A.Y. X'ETERS & CO.,
Are now in receipt of a vui y largo stuck of
sew sPKirvt; goods,
Selected with murh care fl ora the l:'r;wit acd bent
importing houae. in Sun Fiunciuco.
Our Stock of
DRESS GOODS
la unimually laipe and attractive, and oompriaes the
very latent iitylen au 1 noveltiin, and of ull grak.
nd pneen, .o us to incut the view of ull.
WHITE GOODS.
A Urg. assortment of Eleinpi and Inserting., new
and beautiful patterns.
STAPLE GOODS.
A large stork of Mleached Mmlins anu I.mein,
Tiilde Linens, Towelinir. and Hosiery; Corsets,
Handkerchiefs, Lace und Linen Collars iu all grades
WOOL
WE WILL PAY THE HIGHEST MARKET FEICE
In cash fur any number of pound, of
GOOD MKUCI1 AN i'ADLK WOOL
COUNTRY PRODUCE
Of every description wanted, for which, we
the highest market pure.
rill pay
A. V. PETERS & CO.
Eugene City Brewery.
MATHIAS Mi:LLi:ii, I'ro'p.
Is dow prepared to fill all orders for
LAGER BEER
OF A SUPERIOR QUALITY.
Come and for yourself. A good article needs
rei-om mendat ion.
ASTOR HOUSE.
B.C.PENNINGTON, - Proprietor.
THIS WF.I.L-KNOWS UNDI.OBD has aeain
taken rlia'ire of the AS10H H(llK. and has
le-fltted and re-tiunisl,el the ssnie. and (ill ke-p it
second to no hnuao in the Mste. You need not frur
to give ln:n a rail, for hi taUe will be supplied with
the besl the country affords. Chaige. reosonahlL
Come one, come all.
Real Estate For sale.
gEVEX CR EIGHT HUNDRED ACEES OF
Farm and Grazing Lands
For Sale on Easy Terras."
Abo, IIOt SE AD LOTS ia Eugene.
In. "j acre of
GEO. II. TIIIRSTOX.
Carding and Splnnlnj
HATryfJ PrprnAr;Dthe Michlwry-rnH
by C. OoodchilJ. I am now prepared to make
all kind of
YARN, DATTS, ice,
For etutomeri
Altlie Lowest Living Rates.
WM, IRVING,
EUGENE CITY. OHEGONi
WASHINGTON GOSSIP.
Washington, Feb. 29, 1870.
' Tlio celebration of Washington
birtlulay this year was notably supe
rior to many ol its predecessors, Phil
adelplna especially making two mos
of it as a prelude to centennial busi
ness, ntnl onr sleepy old neighbor At
(,'xandria awakening to somo of her
old time enthusiasm in the eilort to
do honor to the day which gave birth
to the boy of "the hatchet," and the
man ot whom Artemus Ward said "it
was the. fate of G. Washington not
to have many take copy after him."
Alexandria really git up a tine mm
tary anil civio display, "i which the
celebrated Maryland Fifth Regiment
participated by invitation. This an
cient city has peculiar claims to Was!i
ingtonian honors, for il is associated
with the entire career of the rather
of his Countfv. The Lairfa.ves. of
Alexandria, were the special friends
ot his youth, and Irom there ie start
ed in 1753, with Jacob Van Uraam,
on ins perilous tourney to deliver
Governor Dinwiddie's letter to the
French commander at Fort Du
QucHiie. It was at Alexandria that
he galheretl his Virginia troops 'lor
Fort Necessity, and afterward became
aid di'-catnp to General 15raddock
He was a leading Mason iu the Lodge
then organized at Alexandria, and a
member of the town council iu 17G7,
a vestryman ot the parish church, and
a representative of tho county iu the
Iousi ot burgesses. He kept 'Ins
otlice in Alexandria to attend to his
private business after bin retirement
to .Mount Vernon, and rode iu twice
a week on horseback, always taking a
great interest in the prosperity of the
city and its inhabitants to' the day of
his death. It is not surprising there
fore that the people of Alexandria jil
ways take pn.le in celeuratin, tin
bin Inlay of Washington in a becom.
iug manner. Would that a sent'iiient
ot gratitude- for his services, and rev
erence for his character, inspired some
ot our public nu n with the spirit ot
emulation ! His example might, just
now, bo followed with great advant
age to the public purse, as well as th
public morals. For instance, General
Grant might, by iinb ibing Ihe spiri
which prevented asliuigton, when
President, frour allowing the State ol
Pennsylvania lo pay the relit of the
house, he occupied in Philadelphia, as
well as trom accepting gitis of any
amount irom any source, have found
a worthy precedent tor declining
some hundreds of gilts which he ha
felt obliged to return in ollii iu! em
ploymer.t, and honors, to tho givers
A. T. Stewart was appointed Sec ret a
ry of the Treasury, and liltle Borie,
ot 1 Inladelphia, secretary of the Na
vy, because they were subscribers to
funds tor Giant's benefit. Hoar, of
Massachusetts, gave him a 110,000 li
brary and was made Attorney Gener
al ; ami Pierrepont, of New York,
subscribed C0,OOO to his election
fund and has succeeded to the same
place. Ueu Ilolladay found splendid
recompense for a gift horse in good
contract'! and extra pay, while the
whole civil service is demoralised
with tho results of gift taking and ne
potism reduced to a science.
Again, Washington as general of
the army and as President of the
United Slates, refused tho salaries
voted him by Congress, and accepted
for his services nothing, but allowed
the government to pay out of the
sums voted him only the official ex
penses incurred by himof which there
were no unnecessary ohes, and a st rict
account was kept. That hs would
not have signed a back pay bill for
Congress, containing a salary grab ol
850,000 a year, is very certain ; while
it is just as certain that Grant is in
apable ot refusing anvthtng he can
get. Grant cottons to rich men, ami
is especially fond of liberal civi rs like
Doss Shepherd; perfectly nidiflvrcnt
10 whe'ethe money comes from.
lie and his lamily and cabinet all at
tended a party given by this "practi
cal plumber and pestilent politician"
recently, said to have been the most
extravagant ever given in Washing
ton. It is nothing to Grant where
the ways and meats came from, and
that this man Shepherd, trampling all
law and rights underfoot, has saddled
on the .people a debt equal to one
fourth the value of the entire proper
ty of this District, a large part ot
which will have to be paid by the na
tion. All things considered, tho House
is doing, perhaps, the best thing that
can be tiono, under the circumstances,
in exploiting, fhronah its several com
mittees, the enormous frauds and
reckless extravagance ol the Admin
is'.ratior. and the corrnntionn nf the !
Prcaidcnt's chosen friends, and in
tra' iny almost every tdream ot plan
der t its source at the White Hoasc
Tho results of iheLbfr of these com-mitte-,
if properly dir. .-ruinated
throughout the country, cannot fail
to array ail the honesty and self re
spect of the nation against the repub
lican party. Kut i!n- Democracy must
dough off every demoralizing element
in in own rank, err. rid of erery job-
ber who seeks to uo tho party for
personal ends, and show its sincerity
in the work of reform by making the
deimicratio party tho reform parly of
me country.
Mr. S. S. Cox of New York was a
success in the Speaker's chair, as all
his friends capable of appreciating
him knew he would be. It is some
what of a misfortune, unhappily, in
the United States for a statesman to
be also a man of letters, an orator, or
a wit. because Proctor Knott of
Kentucky made one of tho most hu
morous speeches, "which, by the by, I
had the good fortune to hear, that
was ever made in a deliberative body
several lunkheads of botli .parties
thought it impossible that ho could
be a tit man to preside over tho Com
mittee on Judiciary. 1 lie tact is,
however, that Mr. Knott is a man of
gcod legal mind and superior profes
sional attainments. Cox, also, is a
w ii ami ntuiionst; oat lie much more
than that more, also, than a sharp
1 tiuian. He is a statesman, a good
substantial ami 'belles lettrcs scholar,
first class iournalist ami inairazine
writer, and a hard and steady reader
of more solid literature, than usually
finds its way into the daily journals.
lis knowledge ot tho parliamentary
aw of Great IJritain and tho United
Slates is equal, if not superior, to that
of any man iu the country. If Mr.
err s health should necessitate a
change in the Speakership ihere in
no man in the Union who would till
the chair more satisfactorily to the
louse and more creditably to the
country than b. S. Cox.
The Heat tine for '70.
Under tho heading, "Duty of tho
Democracy," A. W. Kelsey publishes
in the Missouri Republican an article
which exhibits the political situation
in tho clearest light, and ventures
about tho best guess as '.o the result
. t r 1 . I I .
o. i;:e next . residential election, we
have yet observed. Mr. Kelsey snys
1 lie Conservatives of this cotinlty
are iu present possession of no lower
than eighteen Slates so far as their
Governors are concerned not count
ing either North Carolinn, Florida
Mississippi or Jjouisana, in each of
which Slates a carpet bagger is now
terminating a four years' Guberna
torial reign ; the Legislalutes of each
being possessed ot a Democratic inn
jority on joint ballots, und liileen of
the twenly-iwo Cung-essnien repre
senting llieiu being Democrats. Of
the eighteen States first mentioned
only one can be considered as doubt
ful in any degreo as between a Hard
Money and Union-loving Democrat
and a representative of Grantism.
The single exception is the little Slate
d Nevada, which may tully be con
filleted as a rotten "pocket borough,"
where the longest purse always wins
and where, in consequence, tho Radi
cals may hope to secure threo elec
toral totes, Of course, however, all
the remaining Democratic Stales north
of Mason and Dixon's line can only
bit depended upon on the terms above
mentioned. Auy deflection .from the
straight find narrow road leading to
Specie Payment and a restoration ot
fraternal feeling between the North
and South would as certainly lose the
Democracy New York, New Jersey,
Connecticut, California, Oregon and
Indit na, as they are certain to carry
them if the very essence ot madness
should not iu'ervene to prevent. The
New York Herald, id an elaborate
review ot the political situation,' sug
gests the names ot two candidates
who can bo depended upon by the
Democracy to sweep everything be
fore them-t-but onfot tunati-ly neither
Charles Francis Adams nor General
Wintield scott Hancock stand the
slightest chance ot receiving the nom
ination. Tho first comes Irom Massa
chusetts, w hich would suffice to kill
him iu any convention of Democrat)
mores the pity, as no would make
an ideal Centennial candidate.
The second is under the shadow ot
military antecedents, of which the
K-ojilo are justly sick and tired,
either are available. Bayard, of
Delaware, would be more acceptable;
Hendricks, of Indiana, more expedi
ent ; Tilden, of New York, would run
better than either of the four, and
would be triumphantly elected, even
if Ohio and Indiana should each vote
the Republican ticket. Few persons
seems to be aware of the great gains
the Democrats have made in electoral
voles since 1872., In 1SG4 the, Dem
ocrats carried but three .States New
Jersey, Delaware and Kentucky
with only Iwepty one electoral votes
altogether. . In 1SC8 they added to
these three States, which they re
tained, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland,
New York and Oregon, with fitly-
nine additional votes.
In 1&7 Horace Greeley proved io
strong a dose for Democratic stom
chi that, although they added the
electoral votes of Missouri, Teunessce
and Texas to tho.e of Georgia, Ken
tucky, Louisiana and Maryland, yet
they" sctuallv failed to carry Dela
ware, Neir Jersey and Oregon, which ,
even the unpopular "Seymour and
lilnr" ticket hud Niifticed to hold
Tne lesson of 1872 BhoulJ be suffi
ciently fresh in our minds to enable
us at least to profit bv the experieuoo
then achieved. Tho bomocraoy hold
tiiin day ot our Lord more than enough
electoral votes to enable them to name
the next President ! They havo ouly
to use thoir power with modulation
and sagacity to reclaim in November
noxt tne position thev abdicated in
1.SG0. They have only to show signs
ot a relapse into their fiftceu year-old
attack ot mania a po tn to get whipped
in 187Gas badly as in 1872 1 They
ca i pay their money and take thoir
choice. 1
The follow States can be depended
upon to vote the Democratic ticket in
November next il Samuel J. Tilden
is the Presidential nominee. The
twelve Southern States iu tho rinht
hand -column, however, are all that
can bo depended upon for any nomi-
neo :
Elertoril
Votes
31
, Electoral
Totes.
Missouri......... IS
Xew York,,
TuJia i
New Jersey
C-onuertii-iit
taliionna
O.eron ;
Wiscuuaiu
I.i.iernl Pem. vutes
MlHKlKSippi ,
l.oUHIitll.4
t'loii U
Total
11
6
6
9
10
Kentucky VI
Tennessee .
11
lirima
Otoi)Tia
N'otth Cut-oliiia. .
Alitliiunit
M-nj-luul
'i'oxiis
At kslits
West Virginia...
Pclattare
hi
it
io
lu
8
a
8
s
s
.1111
Total Dt'io. votes...lll
In addition to the above the Demo
crats would havo au even chance to
carry every ono of the close and
do u hi Iu I Slates at the North, which
would ndd to tho above:
Ohio
New UiuniMhir.,.
Total
22 I Nevada S
4 1 Coloialo 3
S3
making 195 electoral votes or ten
more than sullicitsnt to elect, without
counting Florida, Mississippi, or Lou
isiana or tho four doubifui States last
named;, with these included, they
would have ii8 votes, requiring ouly
185 1 ; . 1 . " 3
Tho Republicans are weaker . than
i any but the Liberals among thou can
be mado to believe. In the event of
Gin n't ui'inination (now scarcely a
possibility), it is doubtful it he could
cany as many StiiUs as Gieeley did I
Certainly, life-long Republicans ad
mit, in such an event, even Massa
chusetts itself would vote for his nu.
lagonist. Clitirles Sumner's death,
following so closely upon his political
ostracism, has moused a deep feeling,
not only against Grant himsell, but
against all who aided or abetted him
in his selfish and despicable trertinent
ot the deceased Senator, This will
bo felt by any candidate upon whose
shoulders the Administration mantle
shall be placed, whether it be Jilaino
or Morton, Conkling or E. 15. Wash
biirue, and the popular vengeance will
be meted out to either of the abovo
exactly as it would be visited upon
Grant himself, alvvovs providing the
Democracy do not divert the course
of popular sympathy by some ill timed
trei.k or wilful obbtinauy.
The following are tho only Slates
t'lo Radicals can carry it tho Democ
racy make a proper nomination :
Sectoral
Electoral
vutes.
il
li
II
1
Pennsylvania.
votes.
... 2D
... 13
... ;
... 9
... 1
... 7
Illinois
Michigan. ..
Iowa
Minu -sola..
ftTiissacuusetU.
Mainu
Vuiiuout
ltholo Island..
Kansas. ,
4
South Carolina
Kwuraska ... S
Totul i 121
Rut it will be seen the Democrats
can well afford to give tho Republi
cans, in addition to tho twelve slates
last named, all tho close and doubtful
ones, as follows :
Electoral
votes.
, Electoral
" Votes.
Now Hampshire 1
liotiisiana &
Fioil'ia ,.......-.,' 4
Mississippi t
Ohio ... il
Wisconsin lu
Nevada '. 3
Colorado t
Cose and doutful vote.....
Uetfular Republican votu...
6.1
121
Total.,
This would leavo
184
Democrats
the
tho election, thus :
Electoral
Electoral
rotes.
Indiana IS
Virginia II
Oeoixia It
X ,itli Carolina 10
New York..
Missouri ....
Kentucky..,
Tennessee..,
Ala'siiua...,
Icxas
Arkansas ...
Cjt.ituruia...
Oregon
Totes.
., SJ
New Jersey.,
Maryland
Conne-ticut
We.t Virginia..
Delaware
Total 18J
. Every ono of tho last eighteen
States is strongly Democratic to day,
as demonstrated by its Utest election.
Out ot 149 Representatives in Con
gress, to which they are entitled al
together, there are but thirty Repub
licans. Ot their thirty-six Senators,
only eight are Radicals.
Senator Thurman is not withoit
fiiends in the South. While Gover
nor Hendricks has a good deal of sup
port in th Iriouth, there is a belief
that Senator Thurman is the mont de
sirable became his hard money views
would give the party a better chance
of carrying New York with him as a
candidate than Governor Hendricks.
The Atlanta Jftrald urges this view
earnestly, and concludes; "All things
considered, the signs now point very
sharply to Mr. riiurrnan as tho com
ing nun fur Democratic nomination.
He would be eminently acceptable to
Georgia and Georgians, uo mau could
be more eV
POLITICAL NOTES.
A Washington correspondent of
tho New York lYibane hm discovered
that Judge Edmunds', of Washing;
ton, has "superintended the prepara
tion ot special editorials on political
topics, which have been printed
weekly and furnished to Radical pa
pers all over tho country." .
Senator Conkling, in conversation
with a prominent New England pol
itician, has given him to understand
that in his opinion General Grant is
the most available candidate for tha
Radical party.' Conkling and his
wilo havo been Whito llouso guests
lately. 'His do'dgo will work better
than those, of lilaino. and Morton, i
Tho Chicago Times publishes an
editorial warmly eulogizing'Sccretary
Rriitow for his crusade against tho
"whiskey ring" and mentions him as
tho strongest candidate for tho Presi
dency whidi the Radicals 'can select';
and concludes that Bristow would be
certain of election unless tho Demo
crats should bring forth, somo candi
date not now prominent.
-. A persona! exploration in the Es
sex district lias convinced a writer in
tho Bostou llerul.l that there is very
little chance ot Butler's nomination
for Congress agaiust Thompson, this
Fall, and a very good chance of Df.
Loring's. Butler is much more likely
to emigrate into tho Fifth district
and try his luck against Banks.
Oliver P. Morton says that in shak
ing hands with him after ho had
voted for his impeachment, Andrew1
Johnson showed nobility of soul
But, remarks the Louisville 'Courier'
Journal, Andrew Johnson didnoth-'
ing ot tho sort. lie simply showed1
that he didn't care a tinker a d dash
v.'ljpoi he shock hands with. . . , $
David Davis,' of Illinois, Justico of
tho Supremo Court, is beginning to
be talked about as a Democratic
Presidential candidate. Sevoral prom?
incut Democrats have arranged a
combination to have his name before
the Convention. They rely, oir hhr
hard-money views, and his political
opinions as expressed in tho Milligen
decision.
If anybody takes any interest in
Senator Morton's great spcecb,'it may
be well to know that throe, of hid
chief witnesses in these intimidatioii
and outrage charges have been sued
by the Attorney-General of Missis
sippi for having fraudulently obtoined
from tho State about 123,000 acrcB of
land, sold $175,000 worth of it, and
failed to hand over any of the inoney
Tho negro members of Congress
don't seem to recognize as their stan
dard tho "bloody shirt" which Senar
tor Morton flaunts in the eyes of the
nation as the orillumme of tho Radical-
party. The Louisville Courier-'
Jounad Bays : They think that if hy
would burn tho shirt he waves and
wash the one ho wears.
ho would"
candidate
make a much moro decent
for the Presidency.
"These aro bard times," Bays the:
Brooklyn vlryKa'and l National
Republican Committee studied econ
omy in their Presidential Conven
tion." "Yes," remarks the Louisville-
Courier Journal, "they choso Cincin
nati on account of tho ''cheapness ot
whiskey there, but thev fleeia not to
have been awaro of the Well ktjown'
fact that it Cincinnati whisky ia econ
omy, it is also death."
Tho Springfield Iiejmbliean un-
kindly says of Jewell : "He found out;
some timo ago that it was one thing
to run a hideandleather establish--ment
at Hartford, and quite ajiothct
thing to run tho postal scrvico of tho
United Slates, lie. is a successful -business
man, but he is also a.uccess- -lul
politician. Having acquired tne
taste for politics rather late in life,'
it Was only natural, with his temper
ament, that he should give himself np
to the-new enjoyment. It is just
possible, we repeat, that, if ho had
been a less eager and ambitious poli-'
tician, he would have been a more '
vigorous and uncompromising re
former." It appears that a movement is on
fool among prominent radicals ot
Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and
Miohigjn to press the nomination of"
Senator Cameron, of Wisconsin, for
Vice President in case either Conk
ling or Blaine is given the first place.
The reason assigned is that Cameron
is the only radical of sufficient per
sonal sireugth to obtain the Liberal
and Granger vote of the Northwest.
It i ..id that figures wun't lis; but the
fin'urtjaj of loine. women -are wocJcrfuIly de
ceptive, to -17 tlte least.
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