The Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.) 1862-1899, January 30, 1880, Image 1

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    Corvallis Gazette.
PUBLISHED
tVcRY FRIDAY MORNING
BY
W. 13. CARTER,
Editor and Proprietor.
TERMS:
(coin.)
Corvallis Gazette.
Ww
crrtraUi
Ir tear,
tlx Moutlia
Ibrcc WuiiiiiN,
Si SO
1 Ita
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
M. S. WOODCOCK,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
OSVAtLH : : OKKOOX
OFFICE ON FfRST STREET, OPP. WOOD
COCK BALDWIN'S Hardware store.
S;ecial attention given to. Collections, Fore
closure of Mortgages, Real Estate cases, Probate
and Roa.l matter.
Will also v ami sell City property and Farm
Lands, on reiu-nnubie terms.
March 20, IS7. 16-I2yl
VOL. XVII.
CORVALLIS. OREGON, FRIDAY. JANUARY 30, 1880.
NO. 5.
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
CORVALLIS
Livery, Feed
.AND...
SALE STABLE,
P. A. CHENOWETH.
F. M. JOHNSON.
CHENOWETH & JOHNSON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
COKRALLW .... OBEfiON
September 4, 1879. 16:36tf
J. Wv RAYBURf ,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
lOHTALLIS, S OKIUOV
OFFICE On Monroe street, between Second and
Third.
j2Special attention given to the Collection
of Notes and Accounts. 16-ltf
JAMES A. YANTI8,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
iOKVALMK, . OBfcOON.
Mm in Ht., Co.val lti. Urciron.
SOL. KING, - Porpr.
tyiLL PRACTICE IN ALL THE CODRT8
of the State. Special attention given to
matters in Piobate. Collections will receive
biimpt and careful attention. OiBce in the Court
fouse. 16:1 tf.
DR F. A. ViNCENT,
BENTIST.
COltVAI.MH
KEOON.
(IFKJ.CE IN FISHER'S BRICK OVER
Max. Friendley's New Store. All the 'atest
improvements. Evcrythng new and complete.
All work warranted. Plea e give ine a call.
15:3tf
G. R. FARRA, M. O.
PHYSICIAN AND MJRaBIW,
QFFICE OVER GRAHAM A HAMILTON'S
" Drugstore, Corvallis, O.-ogon. 14-2titf
J. K. WEBBER,
Main St., Corvallis, Oregon,
SEALER IN
Stoves, Ranges,
FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS.
H3UJE FURNISHING HARDWARE,
AWNING BOTH BARNS I AM PREPARED
: " to offer superior accommodations in the Liv
ery line. Always ready for a drive,
GOOD JBRrtf
At, Lo-w limes.
My stables are first-class in every resp.ct. and
competent and obliging hostlers always
ready to serve the public.
REASONABLE CH AftUS-i FOR h IKE.
Parilralnr attention Hi I tu Boitrdiuc
ELEGANT HEVRSE, CARRIAGES AND
HACKS "0K FUNERALS
Corvallis, Jan. 3, 1879. 16:iyl
Woodcock & Baldw'm
Successors to J. R liayley A Co,)
EEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND AT THE
old stand a large and complete stock of
Constantly on hand, the
NEW RICHMOND RANGE,
Beat in Market. The
BONANZA COOK STOVE,
Something New. And the New
VCCTA PARLOR STOVE.
Jan. 1.1880. 17:1 tf
W. C. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
WATCHES.
CLOCK8,
JEWELRY, SPECTACLES, SILVER WARE,
? etc. Also,
Musical 1 nstrum ents fco
&Repairing done at the most reasonable
rates, and all work warranted.
Corvallis, Dec 13, 1877. 14:50tf
GRAHAtt, HAMILTON & CO.,
CORVALLIS ... ORRGOS.
DEALERS IN
Drugs, IPaints,
MEDICINES,
CHEMICALS, DYE STIFKS,
OILS,
K
Heavy and Mulf Hat du are,
IRON, STEEL,
TOOLS, STOVES,
RANG ! S, ETC
Manufactured and Home Made
Tin and C-ipr "War,
PumpH Pifo, Etc.
A good Tinner constantly on hand, ami all
Job Work neatly and quickly done.
Also agents for Knapp, Bttrrell & Co.,
for the Bale of the best and latest im
proved FARM MA"III NEItY,
of all kinds, together with a full assort
ment of Agricultural Implements.
Sole Agents for the celebrated
ST. LUIS CHARTER Of K S 0VE8
the BEST IN THE WORLD. Also the
Norman Range, and many other patterns,
in all sizes and styles.
I" Particular attention paid to Farmers'
wants, and the supplying extras for Farm
Machinery, and all information us to such
articles, lurnished cheerfully, on applica
tion. No pains will be spared to furnith our
customers with the best goods in market,
in our line, and at the lowest prices.
Our motto tdiall be, prompt and fair
dealing with all. Call and examine our
stock, before going elsewhere. Satisfac
tion guaranteed.
WOOKCOCK & BALDWIN.
Corvallis, May, 12, 1879. 14:4tf
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
CLASS
AND
PUTTY.
PURE WINES AND I QU8BS
FOR MEDICINAL USE.
And also the the very best assortment of
Lamps and Wall Paper
ever brought to this place.
AGENTS FOR THE
AVCRtll CHtAMCU Pl
BUPERIOR TO ANY OTHER
LINDS I FRMS! HOMES!
1HAVE FARMS, (Improved and unim
proved,) STORES and MILL PROPERTY,
very desirable,
FOR SALE.
These lands are cheap.
Also claims in unsurveyed tracts for sale.
Soldiers of the late rebellion who have, under
he Soldiers' Homestead Act, located ami made
final proof on less than 160 acres, can dispose of
the balance to me.
Write (with stamps to prepay postage). '
B. A. BENSELL,
Newport, Benton county, Oregon.
16:2tf
U E & WOODWARD,
Druggists
and
Apothecaries,
P. O. BUILDING. CORVALLIS, OREGON.
Have a complete stock of
DRUGS, MEDICINES. PAINT?, OIL,
SI ASS, IT ITS.
Sohooi Pooks : ationcny, feo.
We buy for Cash, and "have choice of the
FRESHEST and PUREST Drugs and Medic nes
the market affords. - r r-
S- Prescriptions accurately prepared at half
the usual rates. ,,; 2Myl6:l8tf
LOODS
rvalll l.adffe Ho 14, r. A A. M.
Holds stated Communications on Wednesday on
or preceding each full moon. Brethren in good
standing cordially invited to attend. By order
W. M.
Bnrnuin Ledge No. 7, I. O. O. '.
Meets on Tuesday evening of each week, in
their hall, in Fisher's brick, second story. Mem
bers of the order in good standing invited to at
tend. Bv order of N. G.
J. R. BRYSOIM,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
All business will receive prompt
attention.
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY.
Corvallis, July 14, 1879. 16:29tf
HARRIS,
One door South of Graham A Hamilton's,
COKVAI.MS, osKuaai.
GROCERIES
PROVISIONS,
AND
Dry Goods.
Corvallis, Jan. 3, 1873. l:lvl
DRAKE & GRANT,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
C'ORVAI LIN.
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A LARGE
and well selected su-k oi Cloth, viz:
Wri' of ntfluiirt Broad
lot Iim. roneh asslmeres,
eoleh Tweede, and
A imrleuu njli ng..
Which we will make up to order iu the most
approved and fngli onaljle styles. No pains will
be si a red m producing good tilting garments.
Parties wishing to purchase cloths and have
them cut out, will do well to mI1 and examine
our stock. DRAKE & GRANT.
Corvallis, April 17 1879. I:16tf
Boarding- and Lodging.
HlilloiuatU. Benton ' , Orfgo.
GEORGE KISOR,
RESPECTFULLY INFORMS THE TRAV
cling public that he is now prepared and in
readiness to keep such boarders as may choose to
give him a call, either by the
SlMC E MEU, DAY. OR WEEK.
Is also prepared to fu n sh horse feed. Liberal
share ol public patronage solicited. Give us a
call. GEORGE KISOR.
Philomath, April 28, 1879. I0:18tf
Al.EJtT Pi'OAliIi. Wixmam Ibwin.
TYGALL & IRWIN,
City Trucks& Drays,
CTA VINO PURCHASED THE DRAYS AND
Trucks lately ownf d by James Eglin, we
are prepared to do nil kinds of
4 it y lluu lour, tirlivtriiiii of
Wood 1 to.. 2'C,
in the city or country, at reasonable rates. Pat
ronage solicited, and sai inaction guaranteed in all
ow. ALBKBT PYGALL,
WILLIAM IRWIN.
Corvullis, rV-.2i. 1S78. 15:51tf
J C. MOW ELAND,
(city ATTOBXKY.)
ATIOUNEY A.T LAW,
ruHiLA-lil), - OBEt)S.
OFFICE Monastes Brick, First street,
between Morrison and Yamhill. 14:38tf
THE MTAU BAKERY,
Sluts. airoet, orvalli.
HENRY WAkRIOB, PROPRIETOR.
Family Supply Store !
Groceries,
Bresd.
Cukes,
.Pie,
Candies,
Toys,
Always on Hand.
Corvallis, Jan. 1, 1677. 14:2tf
$66
A WEEK in your own town and no
capital risked. You can give the
business a trial without expense.
The best opportunity ever offered for
those willing to work. You should try nothing
else until you see for yourself what you can do at
the business we offer. No room to explain here.
You can devote all yor time or only your spare
time to the business, and make great pay for
every hour you work. Women make as much
as men. Send for special private terms and par
ticulars, which we mail free. $6 outfit free
Don't complain of hard times while you have
such a chance Address H. IIALLETT k CO.,
Portland, Maine. 16:3 lyl
$15
TO $6060 A YEAR, or $5 to $20 a day
in your own locanty. rio nsK. Wo
men do as well as men. Many make
more than the amount stated above.
No one can fail to make money fast. Any one
can do the work. You can make from 50cts to
$2 an hour by devoting your evenings and spare
time to the business. It costs nothing to try the
business Nothing like it for money making
ever offered before Business pleasant and strict
ly honorable Reader, if you want to know all
about the best paying business before the public,
send us your address and we will send you full
rtieulars and private terms tree; samples worth
tree; you can Wen mane up your mmu
If. Address GEORGE STINSOK
d, Maine i 16:31yl
AN UN FORGOTTEN LESSON.
The time was about a fortnight before
Christmas. There were not many trav
elers, and I had a compartment in the
early tidal train to myself. My destina
tion was Paris, my errand to convey from
my father Ca London jeweler and silver
smith) to his agent in that city a very
valuable ring. "The diamonds in it are
worth 500 if they are worth a penny,"
my father had said to me, "so I hope yon
will take special care of the ring, lied,
and neither lose it on the way nor allow
yonrself to be robbed of it. I smiled
a little superciliously as my father spoke.
As if it were at all likely" that I should
either lose it or allow it to be stolen from
me! I was just turned one and twenty,
and my father had no right to speak to
me as if I were still a boy.
I had got the ring safe in an inner
pocket of my waistcoat, as I took care to
assure myself from time to time. I had
not seen it since my father put into a
little velvet box, in which it was still
shut up. When I had finished my first
cigar, and had got through with the
morning news, the thought struck me
that I might as well have another look at
the ring. There could be no harm in
that you know. 1 took the box out oi its
hiding place and opened it. My eyes
were dazzled as I looked. There laid the
darling in its nest of purple velvet. Who
could have resisted the pleasure of tak
ing it out and trying it on ? Certainly
not I. First on one finger and then on
another I tried it. Had it been made
for the third finger of my right hand it
could not have fitted me better. I looked
simply exquisite.
Now I come to think of it, was there or
could there be a safer hiding place for the
ring than my finger? I had only to
keep my glove on and not a soul would
know anything about it. It was far
safer there than in my pocket. In such
a case to hesitate was folly. I placed the
ring on my finger and put the empty box
in my pocket. As I was alone there was
no occasion to put My glove on just then;
so I mused and smoked, and watched
the many colored rays of light that
flashed from the brilliants, and wondered
what great swell's finger it was destined
to decorate. How I wished that I could
call it mine.
There was no harm in dazzling the
eyes of the ticket collector with it. He
was only a railway official. But I took
care to pull on my glove and button it
before alighting from the train. A quar
ter of an hour later we were steaming
out of Dover harbor.
There were not more than a dozen
passengers on deck. The day was cold
and clear, with just enough sea to make
the voyage unpleasant for bad sailors.
Only two ladies were visible. One was
a stout, middle-aged person, who was
fiatino- ftnrl drinkinsr nearlv all the wav
across evidently an old salt. The other
was well, simply the most charming
creature I had ever set eyes on. In
point of fact, I could not keep my eyes
off her. I passed her and repassed her
as I paced the deck from end to end, and
every time I passed her I looked at her.
What lovely gray eyes ! What superb
yellow hair ! But as for the complexion,
it would take a poet to describe the wild
rose tints. Once or twice her eyes met
mine just for a moment, and it struck
me that they were full of a wistful sad
ness. So far as I could judge she was
entirely alone. We were about half
way across when, as 1 passed ner lor tne
fiftieth time, she spoke: "Would you,
Monsieur, have the goodness to ask the
steward to bring me a little Cognac?"
She spoke in French. As the song says,
"Her voice was low aud weet." I was
too flattered to answer her. I could only
bow and grin and make a bolt for the
steward's den. Of course I took the
Cognac to her myself. You should have
seen how prettily she thanked me. She
sipped it as a canary bird might do, if
that bird were in the habit of drinking
brandy. "I hope Mademoiselle is some
what revived," I ventured to observe
presently.
Yes, very much revived, thanks to
Monsieur. I am not mademoiselle. I
a widow. She pressed her handkerchief
o her eyes as she spoke. How interest
ing, nay, how touching, was the simple
confession. This wistful sorrow in her
eyes was at once accounted for. Would
hat it had been my happy lot to com
fort her.
There was a camp stool close by. Pres
ently I ventured to draw a little nearer
and sit down on it, blushing at my tem
erity as I din so. She did not seem at
all offended, and we were presently in
the midst of an animated and interest
ing conversation. There was no hauteur
about Madame. On the contrary, she
was candor itself. She had only been
three days, she told me, in London. She
had been staying with Sir Henry Fitz
Evans, who had charge of her late hus
band s interests in England. hc was
now going back to seclusion, going back
to the little cottage in which she dwelt
ever since her husband's death. She
would not be able to go forward by the
tidal train, she told me, having a busi
ness call to make in Calais. SJbe would
gXforward by the eKreniptraip.
AHJhis was toldc me with a charming
franki There was no reason why I
shovlH cot Tjy ana (5 forward by the
evening triqjj if she would only allow
me to do S0-. Wiren I threw out a hint to
that effect, she offered no objection. She
3 tona oi so
ft me, and
orn that she
d her that I
ecial errand
t said a word
ever seen it.
Ore leaving
em.
admitted at once that she
ciety,And then she looked
well, J could almost have s
blushed. I had ai-ady tbl
was bound for Pans on a
for my father; but I had
about the ring, -or had hi
I had put mv gloves
luncheon in kid gloves. The question
was whether I should partake of mine
with the ring on my finger, or whether I
should put it carefully away in the box
and hide it out of sight. If you have
any knowledge of what human nature
at 21, especially when there's a pretty
woman in the case, you will know the de
cision arrived at.
Madame pecked a little at this and
that, but hardly ate more than a sparrow
might have done. How swiftly the min
utes seemed to ny ! 1 could have anger
ed on in that cozy little room for a year.
When the cloth was drawn and we were
left to ourselves, with a bottle of hock
on the table between us, somehow our
chairs seemed to gravitate towards each
other. Or, perhaps, it was the stove
that attracted us, for the afternoon was
chilly. In any case we found ourselves
in closer proximity. Then said madame.
"Do you smoke, monsieur?" "Yes, con
siderably more than is good for me, I am
afraid." "Then smoke now. Oblige
me. I like to see a gentleman smoke."
I rose to get a cigar-case out of the pock
et of my overcoat. Madame laid her
hand lightly on my arm and what a
charming hand it was! "Tenez. I am
going to make a confession," said she. I
smoke, too moi. Cigarettes. I lived
for several years in Spain, where nearly
all the ladies smoke. You are not shock
ed at the idea of a lady smoking cigar
ettes?" .
"Shocked, madame "
"No, of course not. You are too much
a man of the world. You are above such
insular prejudices. Eh Men, you shall
smoke one of my cigarettes." From the
satchel by her side she drew an embroid
ered case which she opened, and bade me
choose a cigarette." I did so, and she
took another. Then with her own fair
fingers she struck an allumettc, and held
it while I lighted the weed. Then she
lighted her own. She could not fail to
see my ring as she lighted the match.
"I dare say you find the flavor a little
peculiar," said madame a minute or two
later. "These cigarettes are made of per
fumed tobacco. I never smoke any oth
ers. I hope you don't find yours disa
greeable." "On the contrary, madame, I am quite
in love with it. AlS you say, the flavor
is slightly peculiar, but aromatic and
pleasant very pleasant. 'JtfKo tell the
truth, I don't like it at all, I wouldn't
have said so for worlds.
We smoked on in silence. What would
this superb creature say to me, I won
dered, if I were to tell her how madly I
had fallen in love with her? or would
she I gave a .sudden start, and was
shocked to find that I had been falling
asleep. Fortunately madame had not
noticed me. Her large, melancholy eyes
were bent upon the stove. There was
certainly something very soothing, some
thing that inclined to slumber and happy
dreams, about madame's peculiar cigar
ettes. If I had but 2000 a year now,
and this sweet creature to share' it with
me, how happy could I be! Certainly
she must have been some six or seven
years older than myself, but I never was
one to care for your chits or school girls,
who set up for being women before they
are out of their teens. Here was an angel
who bad been cast on a bleak and unfeel
ing world, who had pined for a heart and
a home for a heart" that brimmed over
with love. Gracious goodness! I had a
heart that yearned toward her that
that why, eh how was this? And where
was I?
I awoke with a shiver. But for the
court-yard the room would have been
quite dark. My head was aching fright
fully. I got up and staggered to the
window. When I looked out and saw
the familiar court-yard, everything came
back to me like a flash of light. Where
was madame? Why had I slept so long?
What a boor she must take me to be? I
groped for the bell and rang it violently.
Up came a waiter with a candle. "Where
is madame?" I demanded. "Madame,
he answered, "went out nearly three
hours ago, saying she wanted to make a
few purchases, and would be back in a
little while. On no account, she said,
was her brother, who had suffered terri
bly from mal de mer in crossing, to be dis
turbed. Madame," he added, "has not
returned."
Gone three hours ago! Her brother!
Mal de mer! What could it all mean? As
I' sat down, utterly bewildered, my arm
pressed against the little box in my
pocket. Mechanically I glanced at my
finger. The ring was no longer there!
My heart turned sick within me. I sank
down and buried my face in my hands.
The waiter thought I was ill, and ran to
fetch some cognac. I saw it all now.
Fool fool that I was! I had allowed my
self to be swindled, and by a common
adventuress.
At 9 o'clock next morning I stood be
fore my father a miserable, haggard,
woe-begone wretch. I told my tale, but
as I did so I could not keep down my
tears tears of mingled shame and vexa
tion. He listened to me with a curious
cynical smile. When I had done he went
to his bureau and opened a drawer. "Set
your mind at rest, Ned," he said. "Here's
the ring, safe and sound!"
I could only stare at him in open
mouthed astonishment.
"When madame, with the ring in her
possession, left you fast asleep, she was
just in time to catch the afternoon boat
back to Dover. The ring was in my
hands again before 10 o'clock last night."
"But but," I stammered out, "I
don't understand. When she had once
got the ring in her possession, why did
she bring it back to you ?"
"Because she was paid to do so. Be
cause she was hired by me, through the
agency of a private inquiry $ffice, to act
as she did act. ' Madame, by profession,
is not a thief, but a thief-catcher. Yon
had -srrown so half-conceited of late.
Master Ned, you had got such a mighty
tall opinion of yourself and your abili
ties, that I thought that it would do you
ilo harm to take you down a peg or two.
1 nope St nave succeeded in con w --?.
t tliere are people
cievar, or n
An hour or two later I said: "But
wasn't it rather a risky thing to do with
a ring worth 500 ?"
My, father winked at me with the
solemnity of a judge, "My dear Ned,
what do you take your old dad for ? The
diamonds were nothing but paste."
Mme. de Malntenon as a School Mistress.
The only character in which Mme. de
Maintenon becomes really lovable is as
a school mistress. Her first foundation
at Bueil was chiefly for poor children,
and to do her justice, she loved and
tended them as carefully as ever she did
the young ladies of St. Cyr; but in the
end the greater and more aristocratic es
tablishment swallowed up the less. Her
children are to be well fed; to have as
much bread as they can eat. This she
insists on several tunes. They are to be
warmly clad, in uniform, if possible, for
Mme. de Maintenon loves order in all
things; but if the expense would be great
she will be content with a partial one as
that all the girls should wear the same
headdress aud aprons, or handkerchiefs
of the same cut and color. She wishes
them to bo gayly dressed, and indeed
this element of brightness and cheerful
ness is a leading feature in her scheme of
education. "I think the black aprons
very lugubrious," she writes to Mme. de
Brinon; "let's give them green or blue
sergas" St. Cyr was brilliant with light
and color and song. Madame has a
hearty contempt for "the meannesses
and littlenesses of convents." She wishes
her dear children to grow up to be "rea
sonable persons." They are to live in
the world, and accordingly even their
school frocks are to be cut in the fashion
and their "coiffuir" to be that of the day.
When the so-called "reform" took place
at St. Cyr she thought it very hard that
"the tailors" were henceforth excluded
We find muslins and ribbons and even "a
li turning af lace" as part of the uniform.
Nry, peavls and girdles were not un
known. The education was as uncon
ventual as the dress. "A solid piety, far
removed from the trivialities of the con
vents, perfect freedom in conversation,
an agreeable spirit of raillery in society,
elevation in our religious feelings and a
great contempt for the ways of other
schools." The young ladies read Moliere
and Scudery; the religious world held up
his hands in holy horror. There was a
reaction for a time, but the blow had
been struck; a new ideal rose before the
world, and the sable throne of Ignorance
and Boutine received a shock from which
it will never recover. Madame is always
writing little notes to Mme. de Brinon.
Now it is to beg a holiday, now to an
nounce a sudden visit and to ask "for
some little treat for our Sisters of Char
ity. Let me see them dine properly."
When the children were ill she sends M.
Fagon, the first physician in Europe, to
prescribe for them and a whole list of
curious remedies for their disorder.
When they are well she despatches by
bearer "one pot of butter and eight pots
of jam," but the careful soul begs to
have her jam-pots returned, and the
"demoiselles" are to get twice as much
jam as the little peasants, for is not noble
blood to be respected in all things? No
wonder the children were free with her,
as she boasts with pardonable pride. She
has a special fondness for the naughty
girls. "I don't too much dislike," she
says, "what are called naughty children
I mean self-satisfied, boastful, quick
tempered children, a little wilful and
obstinate, for these faults may be cor
rected by reason of piety." However,
they won't get these rosaries they are, so
anxious for, if they are not "better than
they were Monday at work time." They
must have been better behaved when
Madame wrote to the school mistress,
"Haven't you some pastry-cook at Noisy
or Bailly whom you can help to a job
when your children are to have a colla
tion?" The woman who habituallyrote
and thought in this strain cannot have
been altogether bad and heartless, as her
enemies would have us believe. It is in
trifles like these, where there can be no
hope of publicity and no desire to de
ceive, that we can best discern the natu
ral working of Mme. de Maintenon's
heart. "These things which seem noth
ing and which are nothing really mark
character too much to be overlooked."
This pregnant sentence from her arch
foe must be our apology, and with it we
close our article on one of the most inter
esting characters in modern history.
FOB THE LAOIES.
royal
The young Queen of Spain prefers
shoes to boots.
The ex-Queen Isabellas'
calls her "Mamma."
New plaid stockings have the plaids
set diagonally.
Fountain foam is a new tint, a little
paler than sea foam.
Bonnets of close shape vary the poke
for evening wear.
Beception and dinner dresses have
trains three yards long.
Visiting bonnets are in combinations
of satin and velvet in all the shades of
red.
A new slipper is cut very low and
fastened across the instep by a real
gold bracelet.
During the last week bonnets came
out in distinct shades of crimson and
magneta.
A new waste basket is in the form of
a tall hat, and, strange to say, it is
very pretty.
Dressing bridesmaids in costume sug
gesting the four seasons is an English
freak.
The latest fancy in f ei
of birds with folded wi
eyes, suggests death
All departments of
sacrificed now to the all'
iof Holiday goods.
C. Jewc
is not o
ans i
teath
1
dim
ers is a group
and closed
are
shops
portent dis7p
RATE 8 OP ADVERTISINg.
I i w. i m. 8 M. M.TTtb:
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"I 00 I 7 00 I 18 00 I 18 00 I 30 00
H Col, i 6 CO I 900115 001200018500
' I 7 .'0 12 00 i 18 CO 85 00 48 00
V, " , 10 00 I 16 0:) ! 25 00 j 40 00 I 60 00
1 " 15 00 I fl) 00 ) 40 00 80 00 1 100 oa
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Transient adv, -tlsemeals, per .quart) of 13
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Yearly advertisement on liberal terms.
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Wdneda v.
The English Country Gentleman.
The English country gentleman not
necessarily noble, not rich, not clever,
yet proud, respectable, doing his duty,
whether as Sheriff or as member of Par
liament, or as county magistrate, with a
sigh, grumbling at his hard fate, yet who
would not change places with the king
of any other country not only exists
now in England, but has existed amid
various vicissitudes of "state for six cen
turies, and possibly for twice that period.
His counterpart is the equally persistent
constituency which goes on from century
to century, preferring, though with re
curring fits of willfulness, to repose its
confidence in the representative of the
old stock rather than go afield for the
new lights of some new order of things.
His people came in with Hengist and
Horsa, with Ella and Cissa, with Cedric
and Cynric, and where they sat down,
there they staid, and there they are still.
"J'y suisjy reste," was and is the motto
which they share with Marshal Mac
Mahon, but with the diffe rence that they
have kept their work for some three
times as many centuries as he took years
to run away from his. Here and there
the names are changed, here and there
the blood. But, like the celebrated
knife, shaft and blade may come and go,
but the class, the folk, the position to be
filled, are the same. From it are re
cruited at once the orders socially above
and below. The squire grows into an
Earl, or degenerates into a yeoman, only
to rise again, and perhaps to go up
higher. A few families retain the lands
their fathers "won from the Romanized
Briton, a few those which came to them
from the gift of William the Norman;
but, in the majority of instances, lands
have not been held in any one place by
any one family for any great length of
time, but have been transferred by
marriage and barter from family to
family; one going down in the world and
another going up, yet all, as it were,
floating in the same temperate zone of
the stream of time. In the House of
Commons we have to-day men whose an
cestors were in the House of Lords six
centuries ago; and, on the other hand,
we have men in the House of Lords, and
even on the bench of Dukes, whose fore
fathers were yeomen under Henry III.
The burgesses have become squires; the
squires have become burgesses. There
has been a constant interchange between
town and country the town seeking to
the country for position, the country
seeking to tne town for wealth. London
drew its supply of Mayors and Aldermen
from the younger sons of the same
families that sent their elder sons to Par
liament. The younger became squires
in their turn, and the process was re
peated by their descendants, and still
goes on ca capo People who complain
that the accumulation of land in the
hands of a few groini, land-owners is a
modern anomaly, forget, or never
learned, the names of Earl Harold or the
Earl or Warvick, of the Bohuns or
Staffords, of the Wentworths or Villier
ses, of the Holieses or Harleys, who, at
various times and in various places ac
cumulated great estates, and then, cul
minating, faded away into obscurity
again. No entail is sufficient to pre
serve a family from decay. Sooner or
later the wheel goes round. The
middle-class man of to-day is the
millionaire of to-morrow, the duke of
the next generation. One great estate
becomes disintegrated, and another is
formed. But the great middle class re
mains ridiculed, admired, trusted,
despised the most peculiar English of
all our ancient institutions. Saturday
Review.
Bangor Whig: "The sweetest voice I
ever heard, said the Bishop, "was a wojj
man's. It was soft and low, but pene
trating, musical and measured in its
accents but not precise. We were on a
steamer and she murmured some com
monplace words about the scenery. I
do not remember what she said, but I
can never forget the exquisitely tender,
musical voice." "The sweetest voice I
ever heard," said the Professor, "was a
man's. I had been out fishing nearly all
day and got to the hotel about 8 o'clock.
The man came out and roared, 'Dix
NER' till it soured the milk in the cellar. .
I have heard other voices since then, but
I never" But the Bishop with a look of
intense disgust all over his face, had al
ready walked away out of hearing, and
was lighting a fresh cigar by himself.
The Boston Popt says: "Tennyson al
ways smells of tobacco." What does ho
smell it for? Why doen't he put it in
his mouth and chew it like a newsboy?
The Chilians don't brag much about
their Bunker Hills and their forefathers,
but "when called to the front they don't
lot nnVirvlv nor nothing drive em up
trees.
Mr. W. W. Corcoran says that the full
length portrait of Washington in the
White House is only a poor copy of
the original by Stuart, which is at JNew-port.-
Every time two women meet on the
stieSt-and kiss, the thermometer sinks
seventeen degrees and people hustle
ornnnrl and bank up their cellar win
dows. -tWs
dows
The plumber fell twenty-si?
house in Washington and lay for
hours in an unconscious condition
. . ... , i i j
tne owner oi tne nuuse uuu. m.
at tne rate oi twenty ueuus uu u
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