The Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.) 1862-1899, January 23, 1880, Image 1

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    Corvallis Gazette.
PUBLISHED
EVtftY FRIDAY MORN! KG
BY
W. !0. CARTER,
Editor and Proprietor.
OTtRllli
TERMS:
(cots.)
mtttt
Per l ear,
tit Mnittba
three kaiki,
8 t no
I 'XI
Oi
VOL. XVII.
CORVALLIS, OREGON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1880.
NO. 4.
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
M. e. WOOD Or CK,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
itVM.IK
: Kf.ti-
r
OFFICE OK FIRST STREET, OPH. WOOD
COCK Sc BALDWIN'S Hardware store.
Sjiccial attention given to Collections, Fore
closure of Mi rt gaged, Real Estate cases, Probata
and iloal matter.
Will also i uy aei'l sell City Properly and Farm
Iji.i'ls, on reaonuli!e terms.
Marcb 20, IS'l). IG-I2yl
F. A. CHBKOWETH. F. M. JOHNSON.
CHENOWETH & JOHNSON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
CKSA1.LIS .... ORIHON
September 4. 1879. 16:36tf
J. W. RAYBUf?' ,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
t OHV.iJj1.1S, t OKI CIO.
OFFICE On Monroe street, between Second and
Tbird.
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
CORVALLIS
Livery, Feed
. AND.
SALE STABLE,
Muln Ht,, Co viil la, Oregon.
SOL. KING, - Porpr.
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
j5S39Special attention given to the Collection
of Notes and Accounts. 16-ltf
JMeS A. YANTIS,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
OHVALI I!, . . LKIO.V
frlTILL PRACTICE IX ALL THE COURTS
of the State. Spen'al attention given to ;
matters in Piobate. Collections will receive j
fc.ompt and careful attention. Office iu the Court
fouse. lG.ltf.
DR F. A. V NCENT,
1 E N T I 8 rr .
COUVALLIH - KEGON.
(OFFICE IN FISHER'S BRICK OVER
Max. Friendlev's New Store. All the 'atest
improvement'). Everytb'ng new ami complete
All work warranted, l'leaegivc me a call.
15:3tf
C. R. FARRA, MI. O.
PHYilCIAH AND SIRGE03,
QFFICE OVER GRAHAM A HAMILTON'S
v Drugstore, Corvallis, Oregon. 14-26tf
J. K. WEBBER.
Main St., Corvallis, Oregon,
DEALER IN
Stoves, Ranges,
FOROE AND LIFT PUMPS,
HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE,
"OWNING BOTH BARNS I AM PREPARED
to offer superior accommodations in the Liv
ery Hue. Always ready for a drive,
OOI TEAMS
At Low Bates.
My stables are first-class in every respect, and
competent and obliging hostlers always
ready to serve the public.
REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HIRE.
Particular attention Paid to Boarding
H ot sea.
ELEGANT HEARSE, CARRIAGES AND
HACKS FOR FUNERALS
Corvallis, Jan. 3, 1879.
18:lyl
Constantly on hand, the
NEW ICHMOND RANGE,
Best In Market. The
BONANZA COOK STOVF,
Something New. And the New
VEjCTA PARLOR STOVE.
Jan. Y, 18
,1880.
17:1 tf
W. C. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
WATCHES,
CLOCKS,
JEWELRY, SPECTACLES, SILVER WARE,
etc AN..,
Musical Instruments fco
r Repairing done at the most reasonable
rates, and ail work warranted.
Corvallis, Dee. 13, 1S77. 14:50tf
GRAHAM, HAMILTON & C0V
OOIVALMN ... OBISCOS.
DEALERS IN
Drugs, Paints,
MEDICINES,
CHEMICALS DYE STUFFS,
OIL8,
Woodcock & Baldwin
(Successors to J. R Baylry A Co,)
TTEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND AT THE
old stand a large and complete stock of
Heavy and Mirif Hardware,
IRON, STEEL,
TOOLS, STOVES,
RANCrS, ETC
Manufactured and Home Made
'Fin and Copper Wnre,
IrMtwip Pipe, Kt.
A good Tinner constantly on hand, and all
Job Work neatly and quickly done.
Also agents for Knapp. Burrell A Co.,
for the .sale of the best ami latest im
proved MArilfNERY.
of all kinds, together with a full assort
ment of Agricultural Implements.
Sole Agents for the celebrated
ST. LnUIS CHAIVttR Of K S OVES
the BEST IN THE WORLD. Also the
Norman Range, and many other patterns,
in all sizes and styles.
iflT Particular attention paid to Farmers'
wants, and the supplying extras fur Farm
Machinery, and all information as to such
articles, furnished cheerfully, on applies
tion.
No pains will be spared to furnish out
customers with the hest goods in market,
in our line, and at the lowest prices.
Our motto shall be, prompt and fair
dealing with ail. Call and examine our
stock, before going elsewhere. Satisfac
tion guaranteed.
VVOOKCOCK A BALDWIN.
Corvallis, May. 12, 1879. 14:4lf
CLASS
AND
POTTY.
PURE WINES AND L QUORS
FOR M EDICTNAL USE.
And also the tho very best assortment of
Lamps and Wall Fapf r
ever brought to this place.
LANDS ! FARMS! HOMES!
I HAVE FARMS, (Improved and unim
proved,) STORES and MILL PROPERTY,
very desirable,
FOR SALE.
These lands are cheap.
Also claims in unsurveyed tracts for sale.
Soldiers of the late rebellion who have, under
he Soldiers' Homestead Act, located and made
final proof on less than 160 acres, can dispose of
the balance to me.
Write (with stamps to prepay postage).
R. A. BENSELL,
Newport, Benton countv, Oregon.
16:2tf
ALLE1 & WOODWARD,
Druggists
and
Apothecaries,
P. 0. BUILDING. CORVALLIS, OREGON.
Have a complete stock of
DRUGS, MEDICINES, PAINT?, Oil,
61 ASS, IT?., ITS.
School I'ooks tat.ooeny, feo.
inrva Lodge So 14. C 4k A. If.
Holds stated. Communications on Wednesday on
or preceding each full moon. Brethren in good
standing cordially invited to attend. By order
W. M.
Bar anna Lodge Ho. 7, I. O. O. V.
Meets on Tuesday evening of each week, in
their hall, in Fisher's brick, second story. Mem
bers of the order in good standing invited to at
tend. By order of JT. G.
J. R. BRY80N,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
All business will receive prompt
attention.
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY.
Corvallis, July 14, 187. 16:29tf
ROBERT IM.BAK.eR.
Fashionable Tailor,
TpORMERLY OF ALB NY, WHERE HE
bas given his patrons perfect satisfaction,
has determined to locate in Corvallis, where he
hopes to be favored with a share of the public
pa-ronage. All work warranted, when made
under his supervision. Repairing and cleaning
promptly attended to.
Corvallis, Jan. 1,1880. 15:48ft.
Grain Storage !
A WordJo Frmers.
XTAVING PURCHASED THE COMMODI
ous warehouse of Messrs. King and Bell,
and thoroughly overhauled the same, I am now
ready to receive grain for storage at the reduced
Bate of - A ci. per Bushel
1 am also prepared to Keep Extra, White
Wheat, separate from other lots, thereby enabling
me to SELL AT A PREMIUM. Also prepared
to pay the
Hifphest Miti-lcet Price.
for wheat, and would most respectfully solicit a
share of public patronage. T. J. BLAIR.
Corvallis, Aug. 1, 1878. 15:32tf
FftAHKLW CAUTNORIf.M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Corvallitt, Oregon.
Special attention given to surgery and diseases
of the Eye. Can be found at his office, in rear of
Graham, Hamilton it Co.'s Drug Store, up stairs,
day or night.
June 3, 1879. lft-23tf
H T2. HARRIS,
One door South of Graham A Hamilton's,
(ORTil.llN, OBBG0M.
GROCERIES
PRO
AND
ISIONS,
Goods.
Corvallis, Jan. 3, 1878.
l:lvl
DRAKE & GRANT,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
. . URKUUS,
We buy for Cash, and have choice of the
FRESHEST and PUREST Drugs and Me.! ic nes
the market affords.
fgg- Prescriptions accurately prepared at. ualfT
the usual rates. zMayit:ioii:
AGENTS FOR TUB
AVERIU IHCKICU PMflT,
SbTERIOR TO ANY OTHER
FRESH GOOD
AT THE
BAZAR orfASHIONS
Has jut
Mil
jTE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A LARGE
and well selected su.ek id ('loth, viz:
We' of ' ' ulaud Ifiond
4 lot Iih. rench Mwlm-ri,
cotch '1'weetis. mid
American wlitua;
Which vc will make uptoior3er in the most
approved and ta.sh ouaUle style. -No puins will
be s: are i n (eiKluein good ruins garments.
Parties wisliilig to puiehase cloths and have
them cut out, will Co well to cnll and examine
our stock. DRAKE & GRANT.
Corvallis, April 17 1879. I:ltftf
Boarding and Lodging.
Pkilomatb Be-tluu Co . rr(e.
GEORGE KiSOR,
RESPECTFULLY INFORMS THE TRAV
cling public that he is now prepared and in
readiness to keep such boarders as may choose. to
give him a cull, either by the .
SINC E MfeL. DAY. OR WEEK.
Is also PtejiBieu to fa n sh horse feed. Liberal
share ot laibl'c jiatiotmge isolicited. Oive cs a
call. GEORGE KISOR.
Philomath, April 28, 1S79. Iu:18tr
Al.BEIlTPYOAl.Ii. WlMiIAMllWIN.
PYGAIjTj & IRWIN,
City Truck& Drays,
YTAVING PURCH 8E1 THE DRAYS AND
Trucks lately owm.l by James Egflo, we
are prepared to do uli kin.it of
Iiy IJttU li. i -liv rl if of
Wood. 1- t?.. K
in the city or country, at reasonable rates. Pat
ronage ai.ficiteil, and jatij-faction guaranteed iu all
tsef. A LI1KRT I'YGXLL,
WILLIAM HtWIN.
Corvallis. Dee, 9), 1878. ''$j3W4iSW
J C. WOU ELAND,
(llVV ATTOBSKV.)
ATT01tEV AT LAW,
OFFICE Monastes' Brick. First street.
between Morrison and Yamhill. 14:38tf'
THK STAB BAHEBY,
MU Street. orvalli.
HENRY WARRIOR, PR0PRikT0&
REPAID.
BY MAY KESTLEP. DALLAS.
"No Elson, I don't thl you are act
ing quite the gentleman in regard to An
nie Gray. She is but a child, and as in
nocent as a baby in the art of flirting. If
you wish to try your powers in that line,
why don't you take up arms against some
of the gay heartless coquettes with which
this place is swarmed. There's Kate Les
lie, Maud Fulton, Mary Dubois, and a
number of others, all willing to have a
lark with the rich and handsome artist."
Now, Dick, old boy, don't be too hard
on a fellow. Those gay butterflies tire
me. I want something new. Annie is
such a pretty little thing and her sim
plicity amuses me. She is only my sis
ter's servant, and of course she don't ex
pect that I mean anything serious. She
is pleased with my attentions, and just
like all the women always ready to fall
in love with every nice looking chap
they chance to meet. I should not be
surprised if she would meet me to-night
with a frown and a cold how do you do?
And to-morrow smile lovingly on you."
"Frank Elson, you have no more heart
than a mummy. Can't you see that the
child is passionately in love with you?
One look into her eyes will tell the story.
Poor child, she might as well have
thrown her affection away on a marble
image as to bestow it on one like yon. At
least be man enough to undeceive her be
fore the knowledge that you are only tri
fling with her gives her too much pain."
"Good Lord! man, to hear you talk
one would suppose that I had been guilty
of some dreadful crime, the greatest vil
lain in the States, just because I've been
amusing myself with a servant girl.
There was a ring of scorn in his tones
which aroused the blood in Bichard
Sword's veins, and he replied hotly:
"And so you are a villain, if you play
with the affections of that innocent
child."
There was an angry flush on his face,
which boded no good, and Frank Elson,
not wishing to provoke the anger and
thereby lose the friendship of the young
lawyer said laughingly while he knocked
the ashes off the end of his cigar:
"Well, Dick, since you take this matter
so much to heart, I will let Miss Annie
understand, in the most delicate manner
possible, that our friendship must end.
Do you know Dick, although I treated
the subject so lightly that I do really
care for the child; and if it was not for
my family, I almost think I would be
tempted to marry her. No woman ever
inspired me with the same feeling she
does. What a great pity it is that she is
nothing more than a servant."
"She is a thousand times better than
any of the painted dolls we have here,
and a more perfect lady than any of them.
I am much mistaken, or Annie Grey has
been reared to be waited upon, rather
than to be the servant of others. Did
you notice how" very small and white her
hands are?"
"Yds, Dick; and my sister also re
marked it. By George, I wouldn't be
surprised if she had run away from
home. My sister knows nothing about
her. She employed her two weeks ago,
through the recommendation of one of
her lady friends. When I come to
think of it, no poor girl could have ob
tained the education she possesses. My
suspicions have been aroused, and I am
determined to find out something about
her. When I first saw this young girl,
she was reading a letter written in
French, for one of the servants. I
promised Captain Justian that we would
ride with him this evening. Will youf-
come r :?
"Yes; I want .to see the Captain about
the Trescot estate." -
The young men rose and entered the
hotel parlor, just as a slender, white
robed, girlish figure glided swiftly out
of one of he Summer house, and sink
ing into one of the low seats, she drew a
long, shuddering breath.
She was apparently about sixteen. The
round, sweet face was very white, and
the scarlet lips were tightly compressed.
There was a dangerous gleam in the
blue eyes, as she muttered under her
breath:
"Only a servant! The contemptible
flatterer; I will repay him for this or die
in the attempt."
A few minutes after she passed out,
and met Frank Elson and Bichard
Sword on their way to Captain Justian's.
Annie met the young artist with
bright laughing eyes and sweet smiles.
She returned Dick's deep bow with a
slight inclination of the head,' but the
lawyer saw a look in her eyes that puz
zled him for a long time after.
She tripped along towards the house;
and the young men continued (heir walk
in the direction of the Captain's cottage.
When Frank Elson returned to the hotel
late that evening, his sister flew to him
with the intelligence that Annie Gray,
her children's nurse, had left that even-
ng. -i-' i i
"Oh! Frank, what shall 1 do ? Annije
was a perfect treasure. I'll never got
anotherone like her." )
"Probably she might be incVaced to reh
turn. Did THje leave ner addess 1"
Frank askeSssthe question quietly,
but there was a3her feeling at ,his
heart V. t
"No; sue iidn't teP me she ywas
going. I sven offered "er higher waes,
bnt nothine wonl induce her to T re
man."
Mrs. HoffmftM ran onz 10 meet ner us
band, and Frflik was alone. His &weet
little wild rise had flown. He could
miss her; lc& the feeling at his hetlrt told
him that ie loved her.
Mr Ph-icu.i' f.e.ertptli
tally luuipuuudeU.
nn ulkdv wanHuiv BDiiyirikTiiH jm mm. b
VALI.IN, I "" T Kfeh
received (M Tfa.iiiilar ttiiTknlaflfl W
jm am m
ty. You can judge for yourself this eve-
in, replied the lawver.
The town clock had just pealed forth
tne hour of eight, as our two friends were
shown into the brilliantly-lighted parlor
of the Trescot Mansion, while their cards
were conveyed to Miss Trescot.
The artist was as handsome as ever,
but his gay, careless manner was gone.
He had searched everywhere for Annie
Gray but his efforts were In vain. He
found no trace cf her. It grieved him
much, for he discovered that he loved
her fondly, and would marry her at any
cost. His proud family and her position
in life were forgotten. Her pure love
was all he longed for.
There was the rustle of silken robes as
as the door opened to admit Miss Tres
cot. Both young men rose instantly, but as
their glanoa rested upon the young lady
they stood still. Frank came forward
with outstretched hand, saying eagerly,
while his eyes lit up with wild joy :
" Anne Gray ! Is it possible I At last
I've found you."
The color deepened in her cheeks, but
she answered haughtily with a proud in
clination of her head :
" Not Annie Gray Miss Trescot, if
you please."
His outstretched hand fell listlessly to
his side as he stood looking at the fair
girl in blank amazement.
Miss Trescot advanced towards the as
tonished lawyer. She held out her hand
saying sweetly :
" I am pleased to meet you again, Mr.
Sword, and thank you for your noble
defense of a servant."
His hand closed over hers, and the elo
quent look he bent upon her expressed
his pleasure more fullv than simple
words could have done.
" Miss Trescot, by some means you
have learned the conversation that passed
between Mr. Sword and myself, the day
you left my sister's employ. But believe
me when I say that I've bitterly "repented
of the words I used. I searched every
where for you to ask you to marry me,
but found no trace of you till this even
iug. Won't you forgive me ? I ask noth
ing more, for I know you hate me, and I
deserve it. But ere we part " his voice
choked, and 'he walked hastily to the
window ashamed of his emotion.
She looked after him ; pity taking the
place of scorn in her eyes.
Miss Trescot glided to the young art
ist's side, and laying her hand on his
arm, said softly :
" I do not hate you, Mr. Elson, and
I'm truly glad to meet you as a friend."
Frank grasped the white jeweled hand,
and a bright, eager look crept into his
eyes a he spoke ; but, as the word friend
fell upon his ear, the light died out, and
a hopeless expression settled over his
face.
"I freely forgive you, but all the affec
tion I ever felt for yon died a sudden and
violent death, when I accidently over
heard you and Mr. Sword conversing
about Annie Gray. No doubt you think
it very strange," she continued, "why
ore who had been reared to a life of ease
and luxury, should seek employment as
a common servant: I will tell you what
prompted me to take such a step. My
grandfather sent for me one day, and in
formed me that he had chosen a husband
for me, and if I did not consent to marry
him - would never receive a penny from
him. I became very angry, and told him
very plainly that i would rather starve
than marry a man I hated. I determined
to leave my home, and accordingly ac
quainted a lady friend of my intention,
receiving her solemn promise to keep my
secret. She gave me a letter to your
sister, who employed me at once. I met
you and thought you were true and per
fect. There I also met the man my grand
father willed I should marry. I found
him a gentleman in the true sense of the
word. Becoming disgusted with my life
as a servant, I returned to my home; my
dear grandfather freely forgiving my lit
tle adventure."
As she ceased speaking the young law
yer drew near. Bowing low before the
heiress, he said quickly, while a flush
swept over his face
"Miss Trescot, your grandfather surely
informed you that the person whom he
had done the great honor to choo.se for
the husband of his grand-daughter had
declined to accept the honor until he had
formed the acquaintance of the young
lady, and had won her heart and her free
consent to become his wife."
"Yes, Mr. Sword," Annie replied, a
vivid blush lying on her cheeks. "Dear
grandpa told me how nobly you had
acted, even refusing to be mentioned in
the will."
"I was only just, Miss Trescot; the
money was rightfully yours, and I would
have been a villian to act otherwise. If
you will lend me a few minutes I will
give you an account of your estate."
. The lawyer drew out a package of pa
pers, as he spoke, and taking a seat on
the sofa beside Annie, he began to ex
plain the different meanings to her.
Frank Elson, after bidding Annie Tres
cot good-bye, bowed to Dick, and took
his departure, a wiser if not a happier
man.
When he had gone an awkward silence
.fell between the two, the color coming
and going in (he. young girl's cheeks,
and Dick's heart-beating at a rapid rate.
At last Annie - 'buried her face in her
hands and burst into tears.
Dick drew one of her hands gently
away from her face and said softly:
. "Whatrieves you, Annie?"
She did not answer but continued to
weep.
"I must tell you now or never, Anfie,
I love you. Is there any affection for a
eat rough feUow like me in your pure
a passionate feeling in his
caused her to dry her tears
up to him with bright, loving
jL '' . :
IrHio like you."
Colonel Jack Hays' Men.
The Indiana Register, in February,
1848, published a series of letters from
Lieutenant Colonel Ebenezer Dumont,
Fourth Indiana Volunteers. One of
them we find in a copy of the New Or
leans Delta, of February 13, 1848, in our
possession, containing the following ex
ceedingly graphic and interesting de
scription of the entrance of Col. Jack
Hays' Texas Bangers into the city of
Mexico:
"Well, yes, I was about telling you
how the Bangers came to town. They
rode some sideways, some standing up
right, some by the reverse flank, some
faced to the rear, some on horses, some
on asses, some on mustangs, and some
on mules. Here they came, rag-tag and
bob-tail, pell-mell, helter-skelter. The
head of one covered with a slouched hat,
that of another with a towering cocked
hat, and a third bare-headed, whilst
twenty others had caps made of the skins
of every variety of wild and tame beasts.
The dog, the cat, the 'bar,' the coon, and
the wild-cat, had for this purpose all
fallen a sacrifice, a willing sacrifice, on
trre express condition that not one hair
of their tails should be touched; that is
to say, I suppose it must have been on
this condition, for each cap had a tail
hanging to it, and the very tail, too, I
am keen to.swear, that belonged to the
original owner of the hide. I fancy even
now that I hear the last request of that
same old coon, which was, 'Oh, spare
that tail!' This dying injunction has not
been forgotteu. His tail is still where
nature placed it, and will there re
main. But I am wandering. Tim sub
ject upon which I started was the Texas
Bangers, and find that I am on the sub
ject of coons. To return. A nobler set
of fellows than these same Texan tatter
demalions never unsheathed a sword in
their country's cause, or offered up their
lives on their country's altar. Young
and vigorous, kind, generous, and brave,
they have purposely dressed themselves
in such a garb, as to jjrove to the world
at a glance that they are neither regulars
nor volunteers common, but Texas Ban
gers as free and unrestrained as the air
they breathe, or the deer in their own
native wild wood.
"Many condemned them on sight, for
the world is prone to judge a man by his
coat. But by correct deportment and
marked propriety, during their stay at
this place, they won rapidly upon the es
teem of those who had condemned them
in advance.
"Before they left, they accompanied
General Lane to Matamoros, and fought
that battle, and as usual came off first
best, with the loss of but one man. I
have described the entrance of Hays' reg
iment into this town, and Aill now tell a
little of what took place on their arrival
at the city of Mexico.
"Hays' men entered the City of the
Aztecs and approached the Halls of the
Montezumas, as at this city, the subjects
of universal curiosity. The sides of the
streets were lined with spectators of every
hue and grade, from a Major General of
the North American Army to a Mexican
beggar. Quietly they moved along. Not
a word was spoken. They seemed uncon
scious that they were the observed
of all observers. The trees in
their own native forests would
have attracted as much of their
attention as they seemed to bestow upon
anything around them. They seemed to
say, 'We have seen men, and been in
cities before.' The difference between
their entry into the city and that which
I now describe was a mere freak of their
own. It is said that a real gentleman is
as much at home in one place as another
in the bear-dance and the hoe-down, as
well as in the King's palace. Jn each
place, they acted their part well. In this,
it was to play the part of a bull at a fair
to show more courage than conduct.
There, as the sequel proves, it was- to
show both courage and conduct. This,
with them, was to be the bear-dance, and
the other the King's palace.
"After entering the city, they had pro
ceeded some distance without being mo
lested; but the temptation at length be
came too great for a Mexican to with
stand, and one standing upon the side
walk threw a stone at the head of one of
the Bangers. As nsual with the Mexi
cans, he overshot the mark, and took off
the cap instead of the head of his in
tended victim. Never was a guilty act
more instantly punished. It was the last
stone he ever threw for, quicker than
thought, a flash was seen, a report wa3
heard, and the offender fell dead. A flash
of lightning from the Eternal Throne
could not have more speedily called him
to account. The Banger quietly replaced
the pistol in his belt, reclaimed his cap.
and rode on. Ere long, another stone
was thrown and another greaser launched
into eternity. Dtiring all this time no
noise was heard, no disturbance was per
ceivable, the column never halted, and
the ranks were not broken.
"Information soon reached Scott that
two Mexicans were killed as Hays en
tered the city. Having exerted himself
to suppress all disorder and prevent all
outrages, the commanding general was
extremely wrothy, and despatched an or
der for Colonel Hays to appear instantly
before him. In five minutes a tall, gen
tlemanly young man stood before the
commander-in-chief of the American
army, and accompanying the word with
the proper salute, thus addressed him:
1, sir, am Colonel Hays, commander
of the Texan Bangers, and report
myself to you in accordance with an or
der just received.' General Scott re
plied : 'I have been informed, sir, that
since the arrival of your command in
this city two Mexicans have been killed.
I hold you, sir, responsible for tie acts
of your men. I will not be disBraced,
nor shall the army of my country e, by
such outrages. 1 require you, sir,wb say
r my information is correct, and
der me a satisfactory
ationpeplied
Coi-viiilis Gazette.
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publication sbould be banded in by noon on
Wednesday-
which this was said, and the whole bear
mg and deportment of Colonel Hays was
so sincere, frank and manly, that none
could have doubted his own belief that
his men had done right. The General's
wrath began to abate, and desiring the
Colonel to be seated, he requested a full
statement of the facts. They were de
tailed to him." Washington Vedette.
An Infallible Remedy .
If there is one thing more than another
that annoys a good wife,who is nervously
sensitive to all that is gross and ill-timed,
it is the habit some husbands have of
using profane language in their homef.
In many cases it is mere thoughtless;
ness on the part of the good man, who
never gives a thought to the better
half; even should she mildy remon
strate, he pays no attention to the re
buke. A lady whose husband was addicted
the bad practiceto we have alluded to,
came to her family physician, laid her
grievances before him, and said.
"Now, Dr. N .won't you remon
strate with him, and try to break him
of his habit? I know he will listen to
you."
"Why, madam," said the doctor he
would pay no attention to any thing I
could say to him, although somewhat
out of my line, I will recommend a
prescription to be administered by you
that will certainly cure him. It is an
infallible remedy."
"Oh, what is it, doctor?"
"Well, when Jones comes home
again and swears, do you swear back
at him, Of Course, I don't want to
take the name of the Lord in vain,
but, d n things a little for his bene
fit." s
And she did.
The next day John came in and in
quired whether dinner was ready and
was told it was not.
"Well, why in the devil isn't it?" he
asked.
"Because," she replied, "the wood
was so d d wet the fire wouldn't
burn."
"Why, Mary, what is the matter with
Are you crazy or have you been
drinking.
"Neither," she said, and quietly pro
ceed to put on the dinner.
B'..;' Mdn't melt like butter between
his teeth1 it rather resisted all efforts
at iua.:tt':.' - on, like so much India
rubber, iiud finally John blurted out:
"What o&i&s this d d beef so in
fernal toug! .'?"'
Mary looked up archly and re
plied: "Well, John, I suppose you went
dowu to the butcher'.;, and without
knowing the difference, picked out a
pieee of some d d old stag that hadn't
been fed for a month."
John jumped up, looked at his wife
in dismay, and wanted to know what
such language from her lips meant.
"It means just this, John: you are
the head of the family, and just as
long as you think it manly to swear in
my presence, I intend to do the same.
If yon don't like to hear it, you know
how to prevent it,"
The cure was radical, and to this
date Mary has never been compelled to
administer another dose of Dr. N 's
prescription. -
Need For Coal or Wood.
j
A correspondent has sent us a start
ling letter from MM. Betam-Edwards,
from which we give an extract: "I send
you the following particulars of a recent
scientific invention, just patented, and
destined without doubt to play a very
important part in our economic history.
I think it may be regarded as a solution
for once and for all of the great coal
question, not only among ourselves but
abroad. M. Bourbennel, of Dijon, the
celebrated lion and panther slayer,
lighted upon the following discovery by
hazard, and after six years' persistent in
vestigation brought it to entire workable
perfection. He discovered by means of
two natural substances, inexhaustible in
natur.-, the means of lighting and main
taining fire without wood or coal; a fire
instantaneously lighted and extin-"
guished ; a fire causing no dust, smoke
or trouble; a fire costing one-tenth at
least of ordinary fuel, and what is more
wonderful still, a fire tSo portion of
which answering to our fuel is everlast
ing that is to say would last a lifetimesr
M. Bourbennel's invention. The fires
could be on the minutest scale or on the
largest. They would be used for heat
ing a baby's food or for roasting an ox.
Being lighted instantaneously, there will
be a great economy of time. M. Bour
bennfel at once patented his invention
and j4 body of engineers and savant'
from Paris visited him, and pronounced
his discovery one of the most remarkafcle
of his agW I have seen these'
fires and stover-. There is no mistake
a'hnnf tWo matter is as clear as i: Js-
tiiat tva have nNuerpetual and
APnnnmiii sonri of fuel. T(tohundretl
vears aaro the discoverer would
been bntied as a wizard."
Heredity in Crime. An account was
recently -published of a Jukes family.
New York State, which, beginning wi
vagrant wotnan nearly ooenunarej
ago, has supplied a vast nuinuei
nals oi every negree 01 gum. wj
: a : kna i tt ul ci itn abH
liv in nunc i juov
New iJeilloro. mass. ju
young man ofeis
i i : . v. .-. H;!nfl
of-nurglar
Malboflej
prison, t
r or
t!