The Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.) 1862-1899, February 28, 1879, Image 1

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    Cfe Corirallis (Sajettt
PUBLISHED
EVERY FRIDAY MORNING
BY
Editor and Proprietor.
TERMS:
(coin.)
Six Mcmhs, t j 50
Three MoMtlis, s 1 OO
INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.
SBbe
VOL. XVI.
CORVALLIS, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1879.
NO. 9.
Cc Coriidllis fgggg
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
If, In. 3 M. 611, I TH.
1 Inch 100 3 00 5 00 800 I 12 PC
2 " I 2 00 5 00 1 7 001 12 00 j 18 00
3 " i 3 00 I 6,00 10 00 16 00 I 22 00
4 " 4 00 700 18 Op "I 1B00 I 20 00
j Col. 6 00 9 00 I 1500 20 00 8500
j " I 7 50 12 00 j 18 00 S5 00 48 00
j " i 10 00 15 00 25 00 40 00 60 00
1 " 15 00 20 00 j 40 00 1 60 00 100 00
Notices in fiocal Column, 20 cents per line, each in
sertion.
Transient advertisements, per square of 12 lines
Nonpareil measure, 82 50 for first, and SI for each sub
sequent insertion in ADVANCE.'
Legal advertisements charged as transient, and
must be paid for upon expiration. Nocharge for pub
lisher s affidavit of publication.
Yearly advertisements on liberal terms. Profes
sional Cards, (1 square) 812 per annum. All notice
and advertisements in-tended for publication should be
handed in by noin on Wednesday,
F. A. CHENOWETH,
-A.ttorn.ey at Law,
CORVALLIS,
OREGON.
JVOFFICE Corner of Monroe and 2d St. 16:ltf
J. W. RAYBURN,
.Attorney at Law,
CORVALLIS, .... OREGON.
OFFICE On Monroe rtreet, bet. Second and Third.
1a.9peclal attention given to the Collection- of
Notw amd Accounts. I0:ltf.
JAMES A. YANTIS,
Att'y and Counselor at Law,
CORVALLIS, OREGON.
WILL PRACTICE IN ALL THE COURTS OF
the State. Special attention given to matters
in Probate. Collections will receive prompt and care
ful attention. Oifice in the Court House. 10:itf.
J. C. MORE LAND,
( CITY ATTORNEY,)
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
PORTLAND, OREGON.
FFICE Monastes' Brick
J bet. Morrison and Yamhill.
First street,
14:38tf
Grrain Storage!
A WORD TO FARMERS.
HAVING PURCHASED THE COMMODIOUS
Warehouse of Messrs. King & Bell, and thor
oughly overhauled the same, I am now ready to re
ceive grain on storage at the roduccd
Binto of J cent per ISushcI.
I am also prepared to keep EXTRA, WHITE
nrcfH&T omma from Mthnr lots, tlierebv enabling
me to SELL AT A PREMIUM. Also prepared to
pay tne
IligrhcKt Marlfet Ia-icc
for wheat, and would, most rescctfu!ly, solicit a
share of public patronage. THOS. J. BLAIR.
Corvalli. Aug. 1, 1S7S. 15:32tf. -
K
WOODCOCK & BALDWIN,
(Successors to J. R. Bayley & Co.,)
EEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND AT Till
olu stand, a large and complete stock of
DR. F. A. VINCENT,
DENTIST,
CORVALLIS, - - - OREGON.
OFFICE in Fisher.s New Brick over
Max. friendly New Mora. All the
I latest ? improvements. Everything
new and complete. All work warrant
ed. Please give mea call. 15:3tf.
Aua dbakh.
WILLIAM GRANT
DRAKE & GRANT.
MERCHANT TAILORS,
CORVALLIS, - - - OREGON.
SToisrisni2sTa
CUKES
Of Nervous liability, Lost Manhood,
Paralysis, Exhausted Vitality, Im
paired memory, Mental IMsciises,
Weakness of Reproductive
Organs, etc, etc.,
By the Great English Remedy,
SIR ASTLEY COOPER'S
VITAL RESTORATIVE
IT RESTORES HEARING AND STRENGTHENS
the Eyeght. It is not a yUACK NOSTRUM.
Its effects are permanent. It has no equal. It is
neither a STIMULANT NOR EXCITANT, but it wiil
do the work thoroughly and well.
DR. M1NTIE 4: CO S great success in the above
complaint is largely due to the use of this wonderful
Medicine,
Price S3 00 per bottle, or four times the quantity
for 10 sent secure from observation upon RECEIPT
OF PRICE.
None genuine without the signature of the propri
etor. A. E MINTIE. M. I).
Physicians say these troubles cannot he cured.
The VITAL RESTORATIVE and Dr. Kin tie & Co'
Special Treatment testify positively that they can.
VO'iiVL, fATIOM FItEE.
Thorough examination and advice, including analy
sis, :s5 00. Address
1)K. E. A. Ul.VraE, 31. I..
(Graduate of University of Pennsylvania, and late
Resident Surgeon, Orthanuadic Hospital, liiiladel
phia. Office Honrs M A. M. to 2 P. M. daily ; 6 to S ev
enings. Sundays, 11 A M, to IP. 31. only. lG:J2mo
'TH3 GREATEST
Kidney and Bladder Medicine!
E THE noiiLu:
ZOZO..
l
ALL WOKK IN OUR LINE NEATLY AND
promptly executed. Repairing and Cleaning a
specialty. Satisfaction guaranteed. Shop ojKoite
Uranam & Hamilton's. la.iTtf
0. R. FARRA, m. in
PHYSICIAN, SUR3EDN AND OBSTETRCIAN.
OFFICE OVER .GRAHAM & HAMILTON'S
Drug Store, Corvallis, Oregon. I4:26yl
NEW TIN SHOP,
J. K. WEBBER, Propr.,
JVIain. St., Corvallis.
STOVES AND TINWARE,
ALL KINDS.
All work warranted and at reduced rates.
12:13tf
H. E. HARRIS,
One Door South of Graham it Hamilton's.
COBVALLW - - - OREGON.
For Inflammation of the Kidneys or Bladder, Pain in
the Bade, Diabc-tse, liright's Disease, etc.
TRY IT ! One bottle will convince you of its Great
Merit. Ask your Druggist for it and take no other.
Everybody viio uses it recommends it.
Irice 81 S3 per IJottlc.
To be had of all Druggists, or of the Proprietor, at
11 ivearnv Street, San rrancisco, California.
33m. iva:i:Kr,3?2:E3 's
ENGLISH DANDELION PILLS!
THE ONLY two medicines which really act upon
the LIVER, one is Mercury or Blue Pill, and the other
DANDELION. .
THOUSANDS of Constitutions have been destroy
ed by Mercurv or Blue Pill, and Calomel. The only
SAFE Remedy is DR. MINTIE'S Dandelion Combina
tion, which is purely
VEGETABLE,
which acts gently upon the Liver and removes all ob
structions!. Price per box, 25 cents. To be had of
all Draggista.
All letters should be directed to, and special treat
ment given, at No. 11 Kearney St.
Sta Francisco, July II, lo76. 15 32m6.
Groceries, Provisions,
AND
DRY-GOODS.
Corvallis, Jan. 3, 1378. 10:lyl.
J. BLUMBERG,
Bet. Southers' Drug Store and Taylor's Market,)
CORVALLIS, OREGON.
GROCERIES and PROVISIONS, FURNISHING
Goods, Cigars and Tobacso, etc., etc.
raL Goods delivered free to any part of the city.
Produce taken, at highest market rates, in exchange
Am-goods.
March 7, 1878 15:10tf
CITY MAEKET
JOHN S. BAKER, Propr.
CORVALLIS, - - OREGON.
HAVING BOUGHT THE ABOVE MARKET
and fixtures, and permnncntly located in
Corrallis, I will keep constantly on hand the
choicest cuts of
BEEF. PORK. MUTTON, and VEAL.
Especial attention to making extra BO
LOGNA SAUSAGE.
Being a practical butcher, with large experi
enc in the business, I flatter mysf if that 1 can
give satisfaction to customers Please call and
give mea trial. JOHN S. BAKHK.
Dec. 6th, 1S78. 15:4tf
SETTLE UP.
ALL PERSONS KNO VINO THEMSELVES
indebted to the lute firm of B. T. Taylor A
Co., are hereby notified to come forward and
settle said indebtedness immediately and save
costs, as our business must bo closed up.
B. T. TAYLOR & CO.
Corvallis 13. 1S78. 15:4fitf.
W. C. CRAWFORD,
EALER IN
WATCHES,
CLOCKS!
TKWELRY, SPECTACLES, SIVER WARE, ETC
aim;
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, STRINGS, &C.
y Repairing done at the most reasonable rates'
fid all work warranted.
Corvallis Dec. 13. 1877. 14:.-otf
BOARD and LODGING.
Seat Rooms and Splendid Table.
OUR CORRESPONDENT ON YESTERDAY WAS
shown the Neatly Furnished Rooms
or
MRS JOSEPH POLLY.
At their residence, just opposite the residence of
Judge F: A. Chenoweth prepared and now in readiness
(or such boarders as may choose to give her a call,
either by the single meal or by the week.
Mrs. Polly has a reputation as a cook, and sets as
good affable asn be found in the State.
Solicits a share of patronage. 15:46tf.
FRUIT TREES AND SEEDS!
The Coast Hills Nursery
OFFER A FINE AND CAREFULLY GROWN
stock of
FRUIT AND NUT TREES
to suit the times. Also' an assortment of Garden
Seeds. All our seeds ate carefully tested. Seeds
in packets sept by mail, post-paid, on receipt of price,
10 cents. A few varieties choice Flower Seeds at the
same price.
Vegetable Plants and Flowers
ft sale in the Spring. Orders by mail will receive
prompt attention. Address
ED. C PHELPS, manager,
Newport, Benton County, Oregon.
Dec. , 1878. 15:71m4.
Farm for Sale.
THE UNDERSIGNED OFFERS FOR
Sale his SDlenclill Tain :in,l anlr farm
four miles north of west of Corvallis, on
Oak creek containing -1200 acres over one
i i i i , , . .
nunureu ajrea in cultivation two tine beir
ing orchards, and well calculated for divid
ing into two or more snug farms Terms
easy ana title rierlect. h or particulars in
quire of E. Holgate, W. B. Carter, or
aLA.Hr LH,
on the premises.
Corvallis, Jan. 1, 1878. 16:ltf.
FITS EPILEPSY,
OR
FALLING SICKNESS.
TiERMANENTLY CURED NO TTTTlvT.
XT bug by one month's usage of Dr. Gou
lard's celebrated Infallible Fit Powders. To
convince sufferers that these powders will do
all we claim for them we will send them by
mail, post paid, a free Trial Box. Aa T)r
Goulard is the only physian that has ever
made this disease a special study, and as to
our knowledge thousands have been perma
nently cured by the use of these Powders
we will guarantee a permanent cure in eve.
ry case, or refund you all money exuendpH
All sufferers should give these Powders an
early trial, and be canvinced of their cura
tive powers.
Price, for large Tox, $3.00, or four boxes
for $10.00, sent by mail to any part of the
United States or Canada, on receipt of price,
or by express C. O. D. Address,
ASH & BOBBINS,
360 Fulton Street, Brooklyn NT Y
15:8yl. '
Heavy and Shelf Hardware,
IRON, STEEL, TOOLS, STOVES,
EANGES,
Manufactured and Horns Made
TIN AND COPPER WAUL
Pumps, 3ripe, etc.
A GOOD TINNER constantly on hund.anc
all Job Work neatly and quickly done.
Also Agents for Knapp, Burrell it Co., fo
the sale of the best aud latest improved
FARM MACHINERY,
of all kinds, together with a full assortment
AURIC ULTUKAL IMPLEMENTS.
Sole Agents for the celebrated
ST. LOUIS CHARTER OAK STOVES
the BEST IN THE WORLD. Also the Nor
man Range, and many other patterns, in all
sixes anil styles.
Particular attention paid to Farmers'
wants, and the supplying extras for Farm Ma
chinery, and all information as to such articles,
furni.-hed cheerfully, on application.
No pains will be spared to furnish our cus
tomers with the best goods in market, in oui
line, and at lowest prices.
Our motto shall be, prompt nnd fair deal in r.
with all. Call and examine our stock, befoK
going elsewhere. Satisfaction guaranteed.
WOODCOCK & BALDWIN.
Corvallis, Jan. 26, IS . 14:4tf
JF'jcosija. Goods
AT THE
a FASHIG
CORVALLIS, - - OREGON.
MRS. E. A. KNIOH1
HAS JUST RECEIVED FROM SAH
FfMOIMpIfiCO, and PKT.
fL.Aft'I, the Largest and Best Stock of
aiiiiiiirnu nnnnn
DRESS TR8MMINGS, ETC.
Ever brought to Corvallis, which she will
sell at prices that
Defy Competition.
Ladies are respectfully invited to call grid
examine her goods and prices before pur
chasing elsewhere.
AOKNCV FOR
Mme. DEMOREST'S
RELIABLE PATTERNS.
Rooms at residence, two blocksnortb
of Gazktte office. .gj
Corvallis. May 2, 1S78. 14:lt6f
E. HOLGATE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
WILL PRACTICE IN ALL THE COURTS
in the State.
Having had four years experience as Count
Judge, and given cio.-e attention to Probutt
matters, I em well prepared to attend to all
business in that line : also contested Road
Matters. I will give strict und prompt atten
tion to collections, and as heretofore will do a
BEAL ESTATE,
and General Business Agency.
Local Ayrent of
Home Mutual Insurance Co.
33TOffico up-stairs in Fisher's new brick
middle room, with Judge Burnett. Entrance
at rear end of building on Monroe Street.
vl5ii28tf.
THE STAR BAKERY,
MAIN STJtEET, CORVALLIS,
HENRY WARRIOR, PROPRIETOR.
FAMILY SIIPPLY STORE!
G ROOBRIES,
DREAD. CAKES, PIES, CANDIES, TOYS,
Etc., Always on Hand.
Corvallis, Jan. 1 1877. 14:2t
"Q "PI Cj rn business you can engage in. $5
Jj JLjio X 20 Per day ma(ie by any
-.ihf.r c.-. v rirrhr. in their own lo
calities. Particulars and samples worth .?5
. , . ;
free. Improve your spare time at mis uusi
ness. Address Stinson & Co., Portland,
Maine. 15:12yl
SETTLE UP.
ALL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE UNDER
signed, either for board or meat account, will
please come forward and settle immediately as I
need the money to enable me to meet mv obligations,
and must have it. 'A word to the wise is sufficient.''
H. W. VINCENT.
Corrallis, Dec. 24, 1878. - 16f.
AUGUST KNIGHT,
CABINET MAKER.
AMD
UNDERTAKER,
Cor. Second nnd Monroe Sts.,
CORVALLIS, OREGON.
KEETS CONSTANTLY ON" HAND ALL
kinds of
Work done to order on short notice, at rea
sonable rates.
J. A; KNIGHT.
Corrallis Jan. 1,18 7. 14:ltf
Eastern Oresfon vs. Western Or-egon.
Editor Gazette : In the experience of
our people, since this country was first set
tied, the advantages and disadvantages of
each section of our State have been duly
jonsidered. Each one has its own peculiar
climate and seasons. Webfoot has its
mists, and the eastern section or our
State is subject at times to very deep snows
and cold weather. In every such case,
thousands of cattle, horses and sheep perish
fiom cold and starvation. This bankrupts
men whose capital is solely invested in stock.
No one can tell when these deep snows will
fall there. At present the whole eastern
section of Oregon, W. T. and Idaho is cov
ered with snow, and of course the weather
must be very cold. Perhaps there is not
enough prepared feed there now to keep the
stock six days. Should the snow and cold
continue for only twenty days, grer.t de
struction of stock must ensue there. That
country is isolated, and wheat and wool sell
at ruinously low prices. But that country
is healthy, well watered, has a brge surface
for wheat, has abundance of minerals, and
it must, in the future, have railroad connec
tion with the outside world. Its proximity
to hostile bands of Indians casts a damper
over the prospects of the people there. If
the murderous savages are turned over to
the military department as they should be,
their raids would be less frequent and de
structive, and their lives and ponies would
pay for their depredations upon our people.
When the winters in Eastern Oregon are O.
K., the profits on stock are fair. But so
ciety, schools, churches, markets, and good
roads must of course be on the back ground
for some time to come.
Ivow in Web-foot we have "mists," but
no failure of crops ; we have all the benefits
of an old settled country. And lands are
low in price ; good and productive. Our
markets are sure and fair, and there are nu
merous ways and means here for men to
make good livings. Jso man need be idle
or lack for means of a support, if he be sober
and industrious. There are thousands of
vacant quarter sections of congress lands on
the slopes of the Cascade and Coast Ilange
of mountains, that are healthy, weil water
ed and not hard to clear, that are rondy for
homestead claimants. And there are large
bodies of good railroad lands to be had at
very low rates on long lime, besides quan
tities of State, school, college and seminary
lands to be had cheap and ou good terni3.
The regular markets opened up to us at
Portland, to all the ports of the world, and
our fisheries, lumber, mines, and farm prod
ucts, insure us large compensation. Ali
this winter the ground has been naked, grain
growing, plows running, and now spring
seems to be upon us. Truly, Webfoot is not
so bad a country. David Newsome.
Corvallis, Feb. 19, 1879.
TBS SIBJEXZ, Afti!.4I-.
Ed. Gazette : The communication from
Rev. Dr. Boswell, published in your last is
sue, appears considerably moderated in tone
and spirit.
Had the Doctor thought of those early
impressions taught him by his father, he
never would have written such extravagant
accounts of the Siletz reservation.
The Doctor, having taken upon himself
the defense of the agency and its manage
ment, became a proper subject for criticism,
otherwise hi3 name would not have been
mentioned. If there was real worth in its
management, the reservation would need no
long and glowing accounts of its prosperity,
when the fact3 will not bear them out.
But if the reservation was really prosperous
and under successful management, then it
would be its own defender agaiust all oppo
sition. Those letters that have appeared in the
press, from time to time, describing the
wonderful progress of things at Siletz, were
written by parties holding positions at the
agency, or their friends and relatives who
know about as much about the real condi
tion of the reservation as a hog does about
latin. Persons visiting the agency and re
ceiving the hospitalities of the Agent would
not have the cheek to go away and write
against him.
But it would be quite different for an offi
cial to go there, whose duty it would be to
investigate and report the true condition
cf things. Such a report would not only
show that the reservation, with all its fine
facilities, had signally failed to produce a
subsistence for the Indians that make their
home upon the reservation, but would also
show the whole thing to be a farce, and a
grand imposition upon the people and ought
to be abolished.
The Doctor has always professed to be a
friend of mine, but from the tone of his let
ter it was only false and put on. The res
ervation has been a success under former
agents and has produced, in a single year, as
much as 40,000 or 50,000 bushels of grain
and potatoes, and an endless quantity of
vegetables, whereas now they don't raise
their seed. These are facts that can be
fully substantiated by every one that
knows anything about the reservation.
The Doctor says my removal was caused
by reasons satisfactory to Mr. Bagley.
Now if that gentlemen will explain those
reasons and also state that I tendered my
resignation the first of July and that I did
not leave the agency until the middle of the
month, then, perhaps, the public will be in
terested to know the truth of the whole
matter.
Now we will pass on to things more inter
esting to the general public. The reserva
tion contains 225,280 acres, anil about
30,000 or 40,000 acres of it is good farming
land, capable of producing immense quanti
ties of firrain and vegetables. Millions of
tine timber for lumbering purposes grow up
ou the reservation and fine water power, all
wasting to be utilized only when occupied by
a thrifty white population. The Indians
will never be able to develop the great re
sources of the reservation, and it will re
main, as now, a heavy tax on government
until opened up to white settlement.
The Indians are rapidly fading out and a
few years will find the most of them beneath
the clods of the valley, and the building of
boarding houses and agricultural schools is
the height of folly. A manual labor school
was tried a few years ago and proved a per
fect failure. These Indians have been
trained to work for more than twonty year?
and they know how to use the plow and
hoe, but their will is opposed to manual la
bor, and no amount of instruction an 1 labor
will change their nature. Some of the lead
ing Indians desire to throw o.T their tribal
relations, take lands and become citizens,
while the majority of them prefer to follow
their old habit3 and live by fishing and
hunting. This cla3s of Indians would do as
well removed, to some other reservation or
turned loose to take care of themselves.
They would scatter along the coast and
through the mountains and would neither
be missed nor in the way, and much better.!
off than now. Tiiis would make room for
at least two hundred families and do more
to develop the country and build our rail
road (for which the Gazette has labored so
long), than all other means combined.
It is the policy of the government aow to
consolidate these little reservations, and
this should be done before any more public
improvements are made.
If all the Indians that belong to the reser
vation were counted they would not exceed
500, and a groat proportion of these take no
interest whatever in civilized pursuits. A
dozen Indian families live on the bay and
never pretend to make the reservation their
home ; and this is so with a great many
others that are scattered along the coast
and through the country, making a living in
their own way. Very rcspectiully,
F. M. Carter.
Newton, Feb. IS, 1ST9.
From the Daily Salem Salesman.
nfltI.SWOdtt AN2 OOIVKIX.
Portland, Feb, 14, 1879.
The Dowell-Griswold case was up again
yesterday before the U. S. Commissioner
and from present appearances the case may
be summed up as follows :
A bill will be filed in behalf of the United
States and B. F. Dowell to-day in the Unit
ed States Circuit Court to declare W. C.
Grjswold insolvent according to section
3466 of the revised statutes of the United
States, which statute gives the United States
priority in all cases of insolvency. It also
charges fraud between Griswokl and his
wife in the matter of the Griowold block in
your city, and seeks to subject the property
to the payment of the judgement of the
United States. It was the opinion of many
that the United States would get beat on
the execution but Mr. Dowell went to your
city la3t week and searched the records and
produced the above statute which put3 a
new phase in these matters. It is now al
most certain that the United States will get
the greater part of his property and those
who have been diligent in encumbering Mr.
Griswold's property will have to take back
seats aud look for their payment of their
claims after the United States judgments
arc satisfied.
It appears from the bill .and from Mr.
GriswoIdV deposition, which was taken yes
terday before the United States Commis
sioner, that Mr. Griswokl filed a petition in
bankruptcy in New York in 1878, and that
he neglected to put his property in your city
in his schedule of bankruptcy and large
amounts of Oregon war scrip amounting to
over 4,000. By these means Mr. Criswold
induced his creditors to compromise with
him for less .than 50 cents on the dollar
without knowing or mistrusting that Mr.
Griswold was the owner of a fine, brick block
in Salein, and without knowing Mr. Gris
wold bad upwards of $20,000 of Oregon In
dian war scrip unpaid. This, the attorneys
for the United States say, will make the
brick block liable to the United States for
their judgment, and for all his old New
York debts which were compromised at in
adequate prices by the concealment of prop
erty in this city and the Oregon Indian war
debts weich he attempted to cover.
"Visitor."
A1LAS24A.
Washington, Feb. 5. The report on Alas
ka, just made by Major William Gouverneur
Morris, special agent of the treasury depart
ment, was received in the senate from the
secretary of the treasury to-day, and ordered
to be printed. It is a lengthy document,
comprising at least a thousand pages of man
uscript, aud is copiously illustrated wiih
maps and sketche3 of the country. The re
port is very comprehensive, and presents a
great number of details regarding the re
sources of the territory, tending to show
that it is very far from a worthless country.
Major Morris reports that there is ample ev
idence of the existence of rich mines of gold,
slver and copper in Alaska, although their
precise location is not given. He furnishes
an extended description of valuable fisher
ies and timber resources of the territory.
Considerable space is devoted to the subject
of the disputed boundary line between Alas
ka and British Columbia, and after report
ing a mass of information on the subject the
suggestion is made that congress should take
necessary steps to settle the dispute with
Great Britain by means of a joint commis
sion. The present chaotic condition of af
fairs in Alaska is fully set forth, and the
establishment o? some sort of civil govern
ment for the territory is earnestly advoca
ted. Figures are presented to sho y that the U.
S. government now receives annually, from
the Alaska Commercial Company an amount
equal to more than 4 per cent, upon the
original cost of the territory, which was $7,
200,000. The conduct of affairs by this
company is in general terms commended,
and in the absence of specific proof it is ac
quitted of any organized attempt to retard
the settlement and development of the ter
ritory. The cost maintaining custom ser
vice in Alaska since it was first established
is shown to have been only fifty per cent,
more than the receipts, and as the customs
district was created for purposes of general
protection, and not for local revenue, the
proposition for its discontinuance is pro
nounced unwise. Major Morris ures the
construction of a new vessel for the revenue
marine service on the Pacific coast, there
being at present not one which is adapted
for extended cruises in Alaskan waters.
Many interesting facts are given concerning
the Indian tribes of the coast aud interior.
As regards the former, an opinion is ex
pressed that they should be kept under con
trol, not by the military, but by means of
big gunboats, of which they stand in great
dread. In conclusion, Morris warmly
eulogizes the efforts of the Board of Presby
terian Home Missons to introduce schools,
and teachers in the territory, and congress
is urged to aid in this laudable and Chris
tian enterprise.
secretary Sherman's orixioN.
Secretary Sherman, in his letter transmit
ting to the senate a copy of M;vj. Morris' re
port on Alaska, remarks that portions of it
indicate the necessity for the adoption of
some legislation for fMe better protection of
the inhabitants of the territory and preser
vation of law aud order, as well as the neces
sity for some system of land record by which
titles of real estate in Alaska may be per
fected. Maj. Morris throughout his report
assumes ttie position oi a cnampion oi Alas
ka aud asserts that many important facts
concerning that country have been hitherto
unknown, or it known have been utterly
misrepresented to the general public. He
takes direct issue with Special Agent Henry
W. Elliott, and charges that Elliott misrep
resented a large portion of Alaska which lie.
Elliott, never visited, and of which he was
profoundly ignorant. There is likely to lie
a large demand for this report when pub-
lisnea.
A ILozuIora School Io:trd.
An English writer has been sharply criti
cising the management of the London pub
lic schools, known as the " Board Schools,"
and produces the following as specimens of
the written examination of some of the
scholars :
" Where is Turkey V"
" Turkey is the capital of Norfolk."
" Where is Turin ':"
" Turin is the cappital of Chiner, the pe
pul there lives in burds nests and has long
tails."
"Where is Gibralta ? "
''Gibbi'raltcr is the principal town of
Rooshia."
" What do you know of the patriarch Ab
raham ?"
" He was the father of Lot, and ad tew
wives wun was called H ishmalc and t'other
Haygtir. He kept wun at home, and he
turn'd the t'other into the desert, where she
became a pillow of salt in the daytime and a
pillow of fire at nite. " .
" What do you know of Joseph ?"
" Hee wore a koat of many garments.
Hee were chief butler to Faro and told his
dreams. Hee married Potiffers dorter, and
he led the Gypsuns out of bondage to Kana.
in Galilee, and then fell on his sword and
died in site of the premiss landl"
" Give me the names of the books of the
Old Testament."
" Denvonshire, Exter, Liltlecus, Num
bers, Stronomy; Jupiter, Judgement, Rath,
etc. "
"What is a miracle ?"
"Don't know."
" If you saw the sun shining overhead at
midnight, what would you call it f
" The moon."
" But if you were told it was the sun 1 "
" I should say it was a lie."
Another boy, giving his impressions in re
gard to Moses, wrote as follows :
He was an Itgypsnun. He lived in a
hark maid of bull-rushers, mid he kept a
golden calf, and worship brazen snakes, and
he het nothing but kwales and manner for
forty years. He was kort by the air of his
ed while riding under the bow of a tree,
and he was killed bv his son Abslon, as he
was a-hanging from the bow. His end was
pease !
BATARD 'a'AYEAE2.
Interview with John Bay in Cleveland Leader.
His reputation for performing remarkable
literary achievements has often been re
marked upon. And the remarks are true.
He could do more. I think, in a short space
of time than'ony other man I ever knew.
He would, if required, write a whole page
of the Tribune in a single day. His review
of Dr. Schliemaun a first book, written Irom
advance sheets, was remarkably full, and
ijave such a good idea of the work that it
was almost unnccessanMb read the book
itself. He hail the peonlmr rift at condens
ing matter and still retaining every point
which the author made. Perhaps his great
est feat in this line was achieved upon Vic
tor Hugo's poems. They arrived in New
York on a certain morning, and the next
morning he published nearly a page review
of the work, with several columns of metri
cal translation, done so finely that all tho
original vigor and spirit was retained. In
the "Echo Club" papers, which were pub
lished a few years ago in the Atlantic Month
ly, the best idea of his powers as an author
is seen. In these he produced with remark
able fidelity imitations of the poems of the
leading authors of the country, which were
so closely to the original that, without the
least thing to indicate who was being imitat
ed, any one intimate with literature could
not fail to recognize them. These were not
parodies ; they were imitations, written on
entirely different subjects, but on such sub
jects as the different authors would be likely
to choose. Besides the element of nmta
tion there was a slight vein of caricature
runnina th-ough them. The review of the
Inn Album, by B,obert Browning, was writ
ten in the same style as the Echo Club, to a
certain extent. . Taylor gave it a long re
view in blank verse, in Browning's own styie.
It was supremely ridiculous, to be sure, and
everybody laughed. The secret of Brown
ing's style had been discovered.
Upon the reporter remarking upon tne
beautiful handwriting in the note, Colc-ne.
Hay said : "Yes, he always wrote just like
that. The compositors on the Atlantic used
to say that his was the best wn ting they
ever had to handle. He usually prepared
his copy for the press on narrow slips of pa
per, and it could always be read with the
distinctness of print "
A suddenly rich couple not a thousand
miles from New York gave an upholsterer
t furnish their new house from top
to bottom, and make it as magnificent as
possible. A few days later ne tow tnem oi
one of Church's famous pictures which could
ii t 9fM nnO nnrl advised its our-
ua uuuswv w. , - -, ' 1"
chase. They consulted, and the next day
informed him tnat tney liKea ine painting
but agreed that the price was too high for a
" second hand " picture.
The Destruction oi Forests.
Physical laws cannot be outraged
with impunity. It is time, says an
eloquent writer in the December num
ber of the North American Review,
to recognize the fact that there aie,'
some sins agains.t which not one of
the Scriptural codes of the EaRt con
tains a won! of warning. The de
struction of forests is such a sin, and
its significance is preached by every
desolate country on the surface of the'
globe. Three million square mifes of
the best lands which ever united the
conditions at human happiness have
perished in ihe sands and drifts of ar
tificial desrtn, and are now more irre
trievably lost to mankind than the'
islands ingulfed by the waves of
Zuyder Zee. Some of these countries,,
like Egypt and Palestine, were over-,
taken bv thoii fate long as;o, while,
the ruin ot others has been compassed
within comparatively recent periods.
Since the beginning of the 16th cen
tury the population of lour Mediter
ranean peninsulas has decreased more,
j than fifty live millions, and the valuo
oi tneir agricultural products oy at
least sixty per cent, (even without
making allowance tor the increase in
prices); and lie rate of the decline
Irom year to year bears an exact pro
portion to the decrease of the forest
area of every district.
To the striking facts cited by Mr,.
Oswald in illustration of this state
ment, so far as concerns the Turkish
provinces in Europe ami Asia Minor,
Afghanistan, Persia, Mcssopotamia,
Syria, Greece, Macedonia, the south
ern islands of the Mediterranean, and
the whole of Northern Africa, from
Cairo to the western extremity of Mo
rocco, it may be added that trie pro
portion of land now covered with
forests throughout Europe is' 29 per
cent., Russia and Sweden furnishing
the greater part. In Russia it is es
timated that 40 per cent, of territory
is covered with woods, and of this'
some 200,000,000 acres are covered
with pines and other cone-bearing
trees. Sweden and Norway have 34
per cent., chiefly birch, maple, pine,
fir, ami willow. Austria has 29 per
cent., Germany 26, and Prance 17.
Far below these comes Spain, with
its cork woods and evergreen oak for
ests, covering 7 per cent, of the land,
and Holland and Belgium with the
same proportion. In all countries
the percentage is decreasing rapidly
every year. As far back as 1838
it was calculated that in Great Brit
ain and Ireland alone limber to the
value of .2,000,000 or 10,000,000,
was yearly cut (town.
It appears that since the year 1835,
(the date of the first reliable South'
American statistics) the forest area of
the Western Hemisphere has decreas
ed at the average yearly rate of 7,
600,000 acres, or about 1 1',400 square
miles; and that in the United States
alone this rate has advanced from.
1,000 square miles iu 1835 to 7,000
in 1855, and 8,400 in 1876. , Be
tween 1750 and 1835 the total aggre
gate of forest felled in South and
Central America (especially in South
eastern Mexico), and in the Eastern,
Southeastern and Southwestern States
of our republic, may be estimated at
from 45,000,000 to 50,000,000 acres..
In other woids, as Mr. Oswald figures
it out, we have been wasting the
moisture, supply of the American soil
at the average ratio of seven percent.
for each quarter of a century during
the' last one hundred and twenty-live
years, and are now fast approaching
the limit beyond which any further
decrease will affect the climatic phe
nomena of the entire continent. The
inhabitants of the alluvial bottom
lands of which, replenished by inex
haustible rivers, we own about 40,000
square miles at the mouth of the
Mississippi and its southern tributa-
ries.and in the swamps of the Gult
coast, mav. like t hi-inhabitants of the
lower Amazon Valley, violate every
law of agricultural economy to their
hearts' content ; "they will never ex
haust the cornucopia of the river god,
who will continue to lavish hisabund
aiiee on them, as he has lavished it on.
Egypt, in spite of all they can do to
aluise his bounty though these ex
ceptional privileges may be offset by
the unhealthiness of their luxuriant
marshes" But' the vast majority of
our tmpulation, the dwellers of the
Western plains ami me nut countries
of the East ami North, enjoy their,
prosperity on which, however easy to
the strict observer, and seemipgly
pliant to altered conditions, are in re-
ahty as inexorable as the laws of
health. The necessity of adopting,
in the United States something equiv-.
alent to the system jot forest laws
which Europe has Deen forced to rec
ognize as indispensable, is yearly
growing more urgent. And the prac
tical methods recommended by Mr,
Oswald for the preservation ot for.,
ests merit serious and prompt considr ,
eralions on the part of our people
and their legislators.
The latest fan in Paris is really a
sort of toilet set. It has a nob handle
which holds powder and puft Under
one of the side staves is concealed a
mirror and under the other a scent
tube and pocket comb.