The Corvallis gazette. (Corvallis, Or.) 1862-1899, January 31, 1879, Image 1

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    Cite Corballis (Baicttt.
V
PUBLISHED
EVERY FRIDAY MORNING-
BY
Editok and Proprietor.
TERM S:
(COIN.)
Per Year, : s
Six Months, : :
Three Mouths, i
INVARIABLY IK ADVANCE.
RATES OP ADVERTISING.
I U, 3 M. ftu i lT,-
I Inch la 3 00 I 6 up j 8 00 I 12 oA
?U! ! 3 00 1 6UJ j 7 UP i 12 OJ ITUO
L-l ! s0 1 i ipoo i ,6oo i 99 an
1 " ! : Ljjgj jEjjjjj 'w '
V Col. I BOO ; 9M) ; loo -.0 cTTlTa
" ! 7:0 I gjjjj i law 35 00 i 4Bf,ft
i " i S 00 ! 25 00 j 40 00 60 CO
1 " 15 0Oig0O0j4O0O j COOP lOPCO
$3 SO
1 SO
i oo
VOL. XYI.
CORVALLIS, FRIDAY, JANUARY, 31, 1879.
NO. 5.
Notices in Lota! Column, 20 cents per line, each in
st-rtioii.
Transient advertisements, ncr sanare of 19 i;.
. Nonpareil measure, s2 r9 for first, and $1 for each sub
sequent insertion m ADVA as.
Lecral advertisements charged as transient, and
must be jiaid for upon expiration. Nocharge for pub
lisher s alhdavit of publication.
Yearly advertisements on liberal terms. Profes
sional Cards, (I 5quare) -12 per annum. All notices
and advertisements intended for publication should be
1 1. 1 1 3 1 t ay n I 1 .V : I l :s U.
F. A. CHENQWETH,
-A.ttorri.ey at Law,
C0RVALLI3, - -
OREGON.
OFFICE Comer of Monroa and 2d St. 16:ltf
J. W. RAYBlMT
.A.ttorney at Law,
CORVALLI3, .... OREGON.
OFFIC3 On HonroD street, bet. Second and Third.
R. H. WARREN,
HOUSE, S13N AND CARRIA3E PAINTERS,
WILL PROMPTLY ATTEND TO BUSINESS IN
ftufl line either at Corvallis or l'i;iiou:ath,
All work executed in the very latest and best htyle
umiuiu n . in i. a.iiut. uaK ana
Maple. Paper Hanging neatly dune. Give me a fair
trial, 15:3fctf.
WOODCOCK & BALDWIN,
K
ROBERT N. BAKER,
F
3l,Sp2'jial attention given to the Collection or
KOJ'ri AND A0CO4T5T& 10:ltf.
JA.IS A. YANTIS,
Att'j and Coun elor at Law,
CORVALLIS, OREGON.
JRMERLY OF ALBANY, WHERE HE HAS
triven his patrons perfect satisfaction, has deter
mined to locate in Corvallis, where he hopes to be fa
vo -ed wi'h a fair share of the public patronage. All
work warranted, when made under his supervision.
He lairing and cleaning-, promptly attended to,
Cor.allii. Nov. 23. Ifc73. Jf.:"43tf.
Grain Storage!
A WORD T0 FARMERS.
WILL PRACTICE IN ALL THE COURTS OF
thj State. S;i;.-ial attention given tj matters
In Probate. CV.lcjtions will receive pro:np; and care
ful attention. G.tice in the Court House. Khltf.
J. C. MORE L AND,
(city attorney,)
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
PORTLAND, GRECCK.
OFFICE Monastes' Brick. First street,
let. Morrison sad Yamhill. 14:3Sff
GTATVMSTNIEfi M. D.,
Graduate of Bellcvcc Hospital SIcdical Col
lege, R. Y. C.ty,
PHYSICIAN km SURGEON,
PHILOMATH, OREGON.
DT3ZASSS OF WOMIiN A SPECIALTY. RES1
de:i:j in WjjtU'.te.s Bui'ding, corner of First
and Lyoa strjetj. 13.32tj.
DR. F. A. VSNOrNT,
DENTIST
CORVALLIS,
9
OREGON.
OFFICE in Tisher.s New 3riek over
Max. Frieniiy's Maw Store. All the
,-latjst i!npro.'e.".ients, Kverything
new and complete. All work warrant
ed. Please give meacall. IS ML
AilSS DUAKL.
WILLIAM OtlSI
DilAKE & GRANT.
MERCHANT TAILORS,
CORVALLIS, - - - OREGON'.
ALL WORK IN OUR LINE NEATLY AND
promptly executed. U-.ma.rmg and Cleaning a
specialty, riatisattion guai-luteed. Siiop op,Oiite
Oraha ii i Hamilton's. 13 ,27tf
G. R. FAHHA, iVl. D.,
PHYSICIAN, SiRSEONAND OBSTETRCIA.i
o
FFICE OVER .GRAHAM & HAMILTON'S
Dru Store, Conu.lid, Oregon. I4:2"yl
NEW TIN SHOP,
J. K. WEBBER, Propr.,
M!ain St., Corvallis-.
STOVZ3 AND TINWARE,
ALL KINDS.
15TA11 work warranted and at reduced rates.
12:I3tf
H. E. HARRIS,
One Door South of Oraham & Hamilton's.
C03VA2.I.3S - - - OXEGOIV
Groceries, Provisions,
AND
DRY-GOODS.
CorVallU, Jan. S, 187S. 13:lyl.
J. BLUMBERCx.
(Bzt. Southers' Drug Store and Taylor's Market,)
CBRYALLIS, - OREGON.
GROCERIES and PROVISIONS, FURNISHING
Gaols, Cigars and Tobacco, etc., etc.
VS. Good d-rlivered free to any part of the city.
Produce taken, at highest ...arket rates, in exchange
for goo Is.
March 7, 1S7S 15:10tf
W. C. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN ....
WATCHES,
OXi OCK S!
JEWELRY, SPECTACLES, SIVER VARE, ETC
Also,
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, STRINGS, &C.
K?F Repairing done at the most reasonable rates,
and all work warranted.
Corvallis, Dec. 13. 1877. 14-5Ctf
HA VINO PURCHASED THE COMMODIOUS
Warehouse of Ues&rs, King & Bell, and thor
ou ily overhauled the same, 1 am now ready to re
ceive grtt in on storage at the roJuced
Rate oJ -4 cents per 5u:Eael.
I am aLo prepared to keep EXTRA, WHITE
WHEAT, separate from other lots, thereby enabling
me to 8ILL AT A PREMIUM. Also prepared to
pay the
f-r wheat, and would, most respectfully, solicit a
share of public patronage. THOS. J. BLAIR.
Corvallis. Au;'. 1, 187d. 15:a2tf.
. 0 ARB and LODGING.
Neat Rooms ;nul Splendid Table.
OUR CORRESPONDENT ON' YESTERDAY WAS
shown the Keaily Furiilaiictl Ilooins
OF
.MRS JOSEPH POLLY.
At tbeir residence, iue;t opnosite the raidence of
Jnxnre V. A. Cnenoweth prepared and now in readiness
tar ancn. X oardera as may choose to give her a call,
cither by the eimrle meal or by the week.
Mr.. FoHy has a reputation as a cok, and sots as
good a!tatle as can bo found in the State.
bolieru a scare or oatronav-e. lo:4Qtt.
(Successors to J. R. Baylcy fc Co.,)
EEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND AT Tilt
old stand, a largo and complete stock of
ft
B
EMPIRE MARKE
JOHN S. BAKER, Propr.
CORVALLIS, - - - OREGON.
HAVING UOUGIIT THE ABOVE MARKET
and fixture, und perm incntly located in
Curraltie, I will keep constantly ou hand the
choiceKt cutz! of
IlEE. PORK. MUTTON, and VEAL.
Especial attention to making extra BO
LOGNA SAUSAGE.
Being a practical butcher, with l irge experi
ence in the business", I (l itter uiysMf that 1 can
trivc satiftnethtn to customers Please call and
give men trial. JOHNS BAKKK.
Dec. 8th, IS7S. 15:iytf
Heavy and Shelf Hardware,
(RQNj STEEL, TOOLS, ST0ES,
RANGES,
Manufactured aiul Iloms Made
TIN AND COPPER WAJRM,
IPvimps, IPipe, etc.
A GOOD TINNER constantly on hand, and
all Job Work neatly and quickly done.
Also Agents for Knapp, Btirrtll fc Ce., fo
the sale of the best and latest improved
FARM MACHINERY,
of all kinds, together with a full afsortmen
AG IC OL J UK A L I ii I'LEM LN T S .
Sole Agents for the celebrated
ST. LQ'JIS CHARTER OAK STOVES
the BEST IN THE WORLD. Also the Nor
man Range, and manv other patterns, in all
sizes and styles.
3Wr Particular attention paid to Farmers'
wants, and the suppliti;r extras for Farm Ma
chinery, and all information as to Siich articles,
furni.-hed. cheerfully, on application.
No pains will be spared to furni.-h our cus
t"mcrs with the host goods in market, in ouj
line, and at lowest prices.
Our motto shall be. prompt and fair dcalirf
with all. Call and examine our st ek , hcfori
going elsewhere Satisfaction guaranteed.
WOODCOCK t BALDWIN.
Corvallis. Jan. 2fi. 18 . 14:ltf
AT THE
AST 0 1ST E S EC I NG
CU RES
Of Xorvcus Debility, Iwt Munhnod,
Farnlysis, ExhfiUKtcd Vitality, Im
paired memory, Mental ifiscascs,
WcaknesK of Kepreduetlto
Org-aiiis, etc., etc..
By the Great English Remedy,
SIR A3TLEY COOPER'S
VITAL RESTORATIVE
IT ssstjass n:-:.vaiSG and strengthens
the Eyj;i;;it. It not a QUACK NOSTRUM.
Itf efegi j are nr nanent. It has no equal. It is
neither a STIMULANT NOB KXC1TANT, but it wiil
d,o the work t$omaettj went
DIE. WlWfiiA & CO'U jfrjat success in the above
cottuaint U largely due to the uo of tiiis wonderful
Medicine,
Pries 8 00 per bottle, or fonr times the quantity
for $10 sent secure from observation uton ItKCKH'T
OK K&ICK.
MfSC genuine without the signature of the propri
etor, A. E. Ml.N'TIE, M. 1.
Piivsieiana say these troubles cannot bo cured.
.The VITAL RSTO&ATlV and Dr. Mintie & Co's
Special Treat neat teitify joiit:vely that they can.
Thorough examination and advice, including analy
sis, so 00. Address
It. 1. A . WlifTIJB, ITI. !..
(Gradnase of Uuivcrjity of Pcnn-ylvan'.a, and late
Raatdent dnrg joii, urthapxdic Hospital, 1'niladel
phia. 0;3ce Honrj 10 A. M. to 2 P. M. daily ; G to 8 ev
enings. Sundays, 11 A M. to 1 P. M. only. 15;32mG.
TEL ;0 GREATEST
Kidney and Bladder Medicine!
mmm nipiiiwii
For Inflammation of the Kidneys or Bladder, Pain in
the Hack, i.abjte, brignt's. Disease, etc.
THY IT ! One bottle will convince you of its Great
Merit. Ask your Drnggst for it and take no other.
Everybody wno uses it recommends it.
flri'e 5jtl SS per Bottle.
Tobs had of all Druggists, or of the Proprietor, at
11 Kearny Street, San Francisco, California.
ENGLISH DANDELION PILLS!
THE ONLY two medicines which really act upon
the LdVfclt, one is Mercury or Blue Pill, and theolner
DANUHtlON.
THOUSANDS of Conititutions hive been destroy
ed by Mercury or lilue Pill, and Calomel. The only
SAF Uemedy is DA, MINTXe.'S Dandelion Co.ubina
tion, which is purely - .
VEGETABLE,
wliich acts gently upon the laver and removes all ob
structions. Pr;ce per box, 25 cents. To be had of
all Druggists.
All letters should he directed to, and special treat
ment given, at No. 11 Kearney St.
San Francisco, July H, 1S7S. . 15 32m6.
FRUIT TREES AND SEEDS!
READ, AND PROFIT THEREBY!
WARREN N. DAVIS,
Physician and Surgeon,
(Graduate of the University of Pennsylvania)
OFFERS HIS SERVICES TO THE PEO
pie of Corvallis and Vicinity.
Specialties:
Surgery. Obstetric, and Dieaees of Women
and Children.
Will practice In Citv of Country. Rooms at
Mew .England Hotel, for the present.
Corvallis, Nov. 15, 1878. 15:46tf.
The Coast HillsHursery
rFFER A FINE AND CAREFULLY GROWN
J stock of
FRUIT AND NUT TREES
to suit the times. .Also an assortment of Gnrtleii
Seeds. All our seeds aie carefully tested. Seeds
in packets sent by mail, post-jiaid. on receipt of price,
10 cents. A few varfeties choice Flcvcr Seeds at the
same price.
V sTtnblf Plants and Flowers
for sale in the Sprinjr- Orders by mail will receive
prompt attention. Aaaress
ED. C. PHELPS, Manager,
Newport, Benton County, ' 'regjon.
Dec. 20, 1978. 15:7tn4.
SETTLE UP.
ALL PERSONS KNO "UNO THEMSELVES
indebted to the late firm or B. T. Taylor A
Co., are hereby notified to come forward and
settle said indebtedness immediately and save
costs, asonr business mast be closed up.
B. T. TAYLOR A CO.
Corvallis 13, 1878. 15:46tf.
Oil
GORVALLtS,
- GREG6??.
MRS. E. A. KNIGHT
HAS JUST RECEIVED FROM IS AM
FBAAi'lMV, and fi'Olfe'i'-
I. A H 1, the La ryes t and Best Stock of
ftULUNERY GOODS,
DRESS TRcMMtNSSj ETC.,
Ever brought t. Corvallis, which she will
sell at prices that
Defy Competition.
Ladies are respectfully invited to call and
fxnniine her goods and prices before pur
chasing elsewhere.
AOKNCV FOR
Mme. DEMOB EST'S
RELIABLE PATTERNS.
Room at residence, two blocksnorth
o( Gazkttk offire.gjj
Corvallis, May 2. 1878. 14:llCf
E . H OLCATE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
W'lLL PRACTICE IN ALL THE COURTS
in the Ptste.
Having hinl f.ur yenra experience hp County
fitilge ami girca clo-e ntttntion lc Pfobt
tatter, I i in well prepared to attend to ull
hwnwil in tint line ; also contested Ko4
Maitcrt. I will f(We strict un'd jirtnnpt attn
(iuu tu cullcetions, and as herctolore wili du a
HEAL ESTATE,
and General Business Agency.
Local A trent of
Home Mutual Insurance Co.
3S0flicc up-stairs in Fisher's new brick,
miilille ro"in, with .luilte Burnett. Entrance
at rear end ol buiMing on Monroe Street.
loii28tf.
THE STAR BAKERY,
MAIN 6TKEET, COKVAIX18
HENRY WARRIOR, PROPRIETOR.
F.H1ILV SljTm STORE!
Gr ROOERI3ES,
DREAD. CARES, PIES, CANCIES, TOYS,
Etc., Always on Hand.
Corvallis, Jan. 1 1877. 14:2t
T) T? CJTt hnsincs3 you can engage in. $5
15 LiJ X S20 per day made by any
worker of either sex, right in their own lo
calities. Particulars and samples worth ?5
free. Improve your spare time at this busi
ness. Address Stinsos & Co., Portland,
Maine.. 15:12yl
AUGUST KNIGHT,
CABINET MAKER.
UNDERTAKER ,
Cor. Second and Jlonroe Si..,
CORVALLIS, OREGON.
KEErS CONSTANTLY ON HAND ALL
kinds of
Work done to order on short notice, at rea
sonable rates.
J. A- KNIGHT.
Corrallis Jan. 1, 18 7. 14:ltf
Work anil Win.
Up ! awaken from slumber !
There is work for you to do ;
Would you plod along life's pathway
With no belter aim in view
Than your silly, saltish pleasures ?
If another's way is dark,
Shed some sunlight o'er his pathway
Lend a hand to steer his bark.
Each one has his work appointed
Has some field to labor in.
While ambition points us upward
To the motto, " Work and win."
Do not think yourself tiegiaded
We Lave our respective spheres ;
All can not be doctors, lawyers,
Merchants, ministers, or peers.
Every person has his station
Has some duty bo perform,
Which, if nobly done, is worthy
(Jf the liigest honors worn ;
Let us live, then truly, nobly,
And in life's incessant din
Have some aim for which to labor,
With the motto, " Work and win."
There are thorny paths before us
. Paths that other fdfet have trod,
Until, wearied with life's burden,
They are laid beneath the sod.
We must ail toil up the hillside
Up w here bravest Bori's have beetle
Never faltering, always striving,
With the will to work and win.
I mil THIS.
A Tale of Everyday Life.
THE THIRD.
There was to be a juvenile ball at 25,
Da by Crescent a Twelfth Night ball and
the tiny king of the festival was to be tiie
l al yson of Maurice CapeL He had mar
ried the woman of his mother's choice soon
Otter lietta was driven rom the house, and
it was in honor of the birth of another
A.'aurice Capel that his grandsire proposed
to threw open his doors to the youthful
members of his lady's large circle of ac
quaintances. The Misses Capel had ordered new dress
es of ther own fancying from a fashionable
modiste, and it was their whim that their
skirts should be -trimmed with scarlet flow
ers of a most expensive description. Ma
At me declared that she should Lave to send
expressly to Paris, but-this was false, her
best flowers being made by a young girl
whose taste in grouping them and blending
the colors was exquidie. Strict injunctions
were given to the florist to have the garni
tures reaily 1 y a ceitain hour, : nd to expe
dite her progress, she was told why they'
were wanted end by whom they would be
worn.
More than once a ter .fell upon them .as
she sat in the poorly-furnished sitting roofii
of her faithful friend for Hetta Capel slill
1 ived the cousins who had discarded her.
Did they ever think ot her now ? What
would thev sav if thev hew that ifc was she
who had devised the wreaths and bouquets
with which they would adorn themselves ?
" Have ye nearly done, Miss lieta, darl
ing?" asked old Nanny, who was sitting
with her bonnet and shawl on readv to take
home the word as soon as it was completed.
' That's we'd ; but its a shame that you
should have made them for somebody else
instead of y ur own pretty self ; you don't
have a single pleasure in life you that once
had so many ! Dear heart ! when I think of
the Christinas and New Year's presents that
used to be sent to you but that minds me,
Miss Hetta, dear, that you're sot quite for
gotten. rlhe old apple woman Biddy, came
to the door this morning and popped this
parcel into my hrn ls. You'll open it before
you go out, won't yon ? "
Hetta smiled, hesitated, and then cut the
string (if the parcel. Ah, the doctor knew
precisely what she most needed at this in
clement season. A set of furs, not very
costly, but well chosen, and a soft, warm
crimson scarf, to wrap around her slender
throat ; how it cheered her to find that one
friend thought kindly of her still !
1 d dearly like to know who sends these i
jarccls, Miss Hetta," said Nanny. "I used j
to think it must be Mr. Maurice, till we i
heard that lie was married. But Biddy's as
close as wax ; n 't a word will she say, coax i
her as much as I will."
" There's warmer, truer hearts, thank
heaven, than Maurice Capel's," sighed Het
ta ; " and if I were rich, Nanny, I would
soon devise some way of proving my grati
tude to the one generoas friend who never
forgets me ; but, alas ! work Lard as I win,
we can barely live."
" Th; t's because I've got such an unfortu
nate appetite ! " lamented Nanny. " If I
could but do without eating I Now, don't
ye laugh, Miss Hetta, just as I'm so misera
ble, and there's fiotstep3 coming up tiie
stairs. It's never the landlord for the rent
and we not ready for him '. "
Silently, Hetta. dipped her hand into the
woman's and they stood together, listening,
till the steps paused at their door. It
openend. Mr. and Mrs. Capel appeared,
and, with a joyous cry, their niece bounded
towards thm. Had they discovered her in
nocence, and hastened thither to express
their regret? But, no; they waved her
aside to make room for a gray-haired stran
ger. 'Vomterot wonders , it was uie la
ther she hn.d so long mourned as dead ! He
had been saved by an Indian Begum, who
hail not only nursed him back to health,
but had given him a high post in her own
court, reluctantly consenting at last to his
returning to his native land, where he had
just arrived, enriched by her costly pres
ents. " My child," he said, mournfully, as Het
ta flew to him, " my joy at beholding you
once more is marred by the tidinus that you
have disgraced yourself. Can this be true ? "
Hetta wrung her hands and looked from
one to the other. To tell all now would
sound as if she sought to avenge herself on
those who had so hastily condemned her ; to
remain silent would be to lose her father's
affection forever.
But while she hesitated, Mrs. Capel in
terposed.
" It is evident that . Hetta is obstinately
determined not to confess, but you shall
have proofs of her guilt. The fellow for
whom she forfeited our esteem is frequently
seen lurking about the neighborhood. A
message purporting to come from this unwor
thy girl, has been conveyed to him, and he
will be here directly."
" Ah ! madam, what have you done?"
gaspea netta.
" My duty ! " was the exultiag reply, for
Mrs. Capel, in her anxiety to prove that he
had acted rightly, was pitiless. " We will
bring you face to face with your secret lover
and nis nrst words when you meet will,
doubtless, connrm all I nave averred.
There was a tap at the door, and Leonard
now tall, robust, all traces of his early
trials ell'aeed ; a man, in fact, whom they
might ignore, but could not despise came
in. The sight of Hetta's relations surprised,
but did not abash him, and when Mrs.
Capel tauntingly told hiin why he had been
lured there, his eyes hashed as proudly as
her own.
" Sweet cousin," he said, respectfully,
taking the hand of Hetta, " I can be silent
no longer. While I was ignorant of your
reasons for leaving your uncle's house. I
kept my promise ; but, now, those who
have dared to denb. you, must know all."
" Dared ! " echoed Mr. Capel angrily.
" Dared, did you say and to tue ? "
"Yes, sir?" answered Len, confronting
him, undauntedly. " Your looks ask who
I am. Let me tell you what you would
have learned long since, but for the entreat
ies of your niece j I am the lawfully born
son of your elder brother ! "
"Impossible!" murmured Mr. Capel,
growing very pale, however ; and Hetta's
lather repeated the word.
Leonard smiled ; and that smile of con
scious power carried conviction to his kins
men. .
" An angel pleaded with me when I
would have claimed my inheritance and,
for her sake, I vowed to let you and yours
retain it. But I little thought that you
would requite her as you have done ! " he
added indignantly, " and, if she bids me re
venge her, I am ready."
"No," said Hetta, softly. "I prefer to
forget everything but the days when my
uncle ami aunt treated me as if I were their
own child.'
" I thought this would be your decision,"
Leonard exclaimed ; " but, if you are so
generous to those who have persecuted you,
will you not be equally so to me, whose re
spect, whose affection have never wavered ?
Hetta, i is true I have hovered uer.r your
dwelling, for I have not been able to deny
myself the pleasure of watching over your
safety, and supplying you witli such few
comforts as my own scanty, means enabled
me to procure. I dared not come . to you
and say, ' Let me shield and defend you al
ways,' for I was too poor ; but. now, t hat
the good doctor who has treated me as a sen,
has promised me a lucrative situation in
Australia, ' Hetta, best and dearest, will
you be mine ? will you let me teach you in
another land to forget the sorrows you have
endured here ' "
" Ah, papa, how ara I to answer him ? "
faltered Hetta, biding her face on the shoul
der of her father.
" Give me your hand, Leonard, he ex-
: the image or your ta
it you may possess all
I his mistakes ? If my
s you, I will not oppose
:r.U3t not carry her off
lot your romance be
' oroth-1iauiice
Capel, ttte justice relumed to the cleaa
must be done to their son. Leonard must
take his rightful place in the house of Capel.
1 am wealthy enough to promise that nei
ther you nor yours shad suffer by this con
cession.
So Len no longer the outcast, but flat
tered, honored, looked up to now for the
third time ascended those steps on which he
claimed. '"Y
ther ; Cod grant
his virtues, and a
child thinks she I
your suit, only y
to Australia, lit
stronger than yot-.r common-sense.
or ! ' he added, addressing Mr.
had once sat shivering
ascended them with
his bride upon his arm for the wedding
breakfast was given in sumptuous style at
I'o. 25 Dal by Crescent ; anil everyone look
ed satisfied Lnt Maurice CapeL His rich
wife had turned out a shrew, whose for
tune, after all, was smaller than he would
have had with Hetta, the little cousin, who.
as she leaned on the arm of her smiling
bridegroom, was pronounced, b- all, the
fairest, even as she was th happiest, bride
of the season. Soah's Sunday Tims.
Conc'uded.
Wlay lie CJsivc Xliviu Up.
Little folks generally like to run and
meet father at night when he returns from
his day's work, either at the oiriee,. store or
shop, don't they ? Thy father likes to have
them as well.
Roger Craigh did, any way, and when his
little " Po ly (as he called her), ran out to
tiie gate he would catch her up and give her
a kiss, and then toss her up in the air and
then run into the house with her on Ins
back, And oh, what a good time they had
after tea she on his lap, prattling in child
ish fashion, ahd he listening or telling his
famous stories. .
One night she met him as usual, but
when te i was over she did not climb up on
his lap, but ran off after her mother into the
krtiheu.
" Where's my Polly? "he cried. "Pol
ly, I've a nice new fatory to-night." But no
Polly came.
"Co to your fatUer, child," sr.id the
mother.
" No, I don't want to," said the little
one, and buist out crying, for the new story
was a temptation.
"lint why?" urged the mother. I
thought you liked papa's lap so well ? "
" Yes," said the child ; "but to-night his
breH" don't smell good."
" Did yon near that, Roger?" said the
wife, whose glance at his flushed face told
her the true cause of Polly's dislike.
" Yes, Mary," said he, " and it shall nev
er be said agun. I only stopped a moment
with John Moore, who begged me to have; a
glass of something for old time's sake, and
then a cigar afterwards. I'll give them all
up forever rather than lose roily s kisses.
If she shuns me now what wiil she do in the
years to cine ? No, no 1 I want her love
and respect more than all the liquor3 and ci
gars in creation.
That father's love was worth something.
He was not afraid to give his reasons, ei
ther, for declining to drink when urged by
others, by replying: "No, no ! I've ot a
little girl at home who would kno ,v it ; and:
mites, I don t think it s good for us, any
way. I say a clean mouth and a pure
breath for kis3es for wife and baby. " I am
glad to say he won some over to his way of
thinking. "0L M., in Youth's Temperance
Banucr.
A gentleman is a rarer thing than some
of us think for. Which of us can point out
many sucti in ins circle men whose aims
are generous, whose truth is constant and
elevated, who can look the world honestly
m tne iace witn an equal, manly sympathy
for the great and the small? We all know a
nunareu wnose coats are .well made, and a
score who have excellent manners, but. of
gentlemen, how many? Let us take a little
scrap of paper, and each make his list.
Thackary.
. -c-
The English language is wonerful for its
aptness of expression. When a number of
men and women get tozether and look at each
other from the opposite sides of a room
that's called a sociable. When a hungry
crowd call upon a poor minister and eat him
out of house and home that's called a do
nation party.
Ol R AI.AnE.l LETTEIC.
Editor Gazette: Perhaps a few lines
from this part of tiie world may not be un
acceptable to you and some of our readers.
First, let me congratulate the Gazktte on
its becoming a full grown newspaper, and
let me contribute my mite towards its fu
ture success in the way of another year's
subscription, which I herewith enclose.
Secondly, let me say a word about my self.
At prese it I am under a cloud, and there
appears to be a fatality attending mo. I
was preparing for a voyage to the South
Paeific in search of Pearls and Pearl Shells,
when I met with an accident in the way of
a fracture of the knee joint. However,
timsrand good attendance brought me out; i not ju3t possib!y be true) a
after ten weeks 1 was ready again to renew sfcveuth d a(lve!ltist claim that we i
an alarmist, but it would really seem as
t'.ongh we were on the eve of great events.
When we consider what has taken placa
within the past year or two and is yet
taking place, we can hardly treat the sub
ject lightly. Earthquake.?, and Tidal waves
in South America; great tidal waves and
famine in India ; famine in China; violent
hurricanes through the Eastern States, to
gether with the great heat of last summer,
which killed hundreds of people ; yellow fe
ver in the South, now followed by extreme
cold such as was never known before ; the
plague in Russia, all seems to indicate that
Old Mother Earth's system is terribly out of
order, and may indicate her speedy demise,
i ana cause a person to wonder at tiine.3 it is
as the
i sc-vuiita day adventi.-;t claim mat we are in
my eiTort, and began making arrangements the ,Mt daya( hl ft very near the end.
for voyage. But on my very first attempt j , (: T lt - , , ;t tW it
high time 1 was to the end of my letter.
to do anything in that direition 1 was vis
ited with a second fracture, and thus again
prevented from going. And. now J am half
inclined tob2liee this was all necessary,
and I am almost converted to the doctrine
of Fatalism, for it seems that plan and ar
range as we may we are yet all actors in tlio
great drama of life, and it would seem that
our parts are all prepared for us and at the
proper time we wili be in the proper place
to perform our part ; and the question is can
we help it ? But while I am performing
the character of invalid, I have plenty of
time to glance around me and think.
First, then the common topic upon which
all express an opinion" the weather."
We ; re passing through a season such as
California has never known, and it is to be
hoped may never know another. I think
it may be fairly expressed a California'
glory and Calif or na s ruin. Here we
within a day or two of midwinter and only
three inches of rain. One continuous and
monotonous succession of clear sunshiny
days. The finest day that you ever sa w in
Oregon in mid-summer could not surpass
this day while I am writing. But it brings
anything but sunshine to the people gener
ally. First, it brings sickness and death to
many a home ; next it ' brings the promise
of a failure of crops, which means poverty
and want $o many more homes ; and to sum
it all up, and admit the truth, California is
not prosperous. You people in Oregon may
be thankful that among your misfortunes
you have not zo enumerate the one curse of
too much fine weather. I have siid before,
reluctantly, what I am willing to say now
freely and candidly, that Oregon is far the
best and safest country for poor men to set
tle in.
The next gloomy cloud that comes up for
California is one that unfortunately threat
ens Oregon, also. Like the little cloud that
appears in the horizon, and grows darker
and rise3 higher until it obscures the s:tn,
and foretells 'unmistakably of the coining
storm ; so this cloud, " Chinese emigration,"
is looming up, and the person must be blind
indeed who cannot read "the hand writing!
on the wall." Must be deaf indeed, who
can not hear the muttering of the mighty
hidden forces that are soon to break loose.
The press of the State is only beginning to
give utterance to public opinion, and already
its tones are ominous, not merely hinting at
a resort to arms, but openly declaring the
fact. Now will it come to this ? For my
self I will say that I have always been op
posed to mob-violence and brute-force in
every way. But I can not shut my eyes
to plain facts, and I candidly believe that
this Chinese question will end in blood. It
is a cancer that has taken root so firmly and
deeply thai the knife is the only remedy
that will bring about a cure. I do not say
that I favor this as being the best plan, but
to me it seems inevitable. My reasons for
thinking so are, that congress will not take
hold of the matter until some terrible out
break occurs. The people of the older
States (the Eastern particularly) are educat
ed in the great doctrine of the "Universal
brotherhood of man.'" The great idea that
America is the asylum for the poor and op
pressed of all nations. And you cannot un
educate them, or eradicate this idea very
readily. Perhaps not until they arc brought
face to face with the fact that the people of
the Pacific States have risen with arms in
their hands resolved to throttle the monster
that threatens their very existence. Then
perhaps the cars may come across the conti
nent freighted with soldiers to crush down
these people, and California and Oregon may
feel the power of Federal bayonets ; may bo
literally tramped under foot. But I hava a
hope and belief that such will not be the
case. For by that time it is possible that
our Eastern brethern may have learned the
true nature of the contest. They may dis
cover that it is a struggle on the part of the
people of this coast for their very existence.
They may discover more than thatr may dis
cover that California and Oregon are but
great breakwaters trying to roll back the
monster wave of heathen emigration that
threatens to overflow all our fair land, and
when they see the question narrowed down
to a bloody contest between American civ
ilization and Asiatic barbarism, they will
not be long in deciding which side to take.
We have a Constitutional Convention in
session which has taken very decided
aronnds on this important question. But
it is thought by many that the new Consti
tution will be loaded down with so many
objectionable features that it will be defeat
ed by the people. A result, no doubt, de
sired by many of the members.: However,
all our minor dangers and troubles may bi
nvershadowed and absorbed in the great
coming combustion predicted by Professor
Rnapp, which I believe he says is to take
place about 1880. The Professor, may be
-
J. J. WlNANl
Alameda, CaLj Jan. 10, 1S70.
Or. Carter 2xlans.
Editor Gazkxte: I read an article in
your paper recently, copied from the States
man, written by Mr. Bagley, in which my
name occurs and to which I desire to make
a simple statement La 'personal vindication.
It is the duty of the agency physician to
report every case treated by him under the
head of the disease the patient was suffering
at thd time though that be a cold, itch, or
a simple absccts.
When wo remember that nearly all the In
dians are affected with cousfit utional forms
of disease, as well as subject to all the acute
farms of rliajjtfiAS and that von will TinrhanH
' Sf tftapt one Indian eight or ten times during
rc t ' .. . . ... ... a , . t
rsoayear, ii is n it strange mai uie iiumuer
i.nv W.-.L 1 fam ni. 1 Win urifhtn 4 link timn
ami .not be many Indians either.
All my reports, for about three years,
were examined by Mr Bagley before being
sent to the department, and if they were not
right, it was the duty ot the agent to have
called my attention to the matter, which he
never did.
I don't remember of a single report being
returned for correction, though there was
one made out for every month in the year.
It was no interest to me, and I had .no
disposition whatever to misrepresent the
number of Indians, I know it was one con
tinual round of practice from year to year.
I am not surprised that the number of In
dians treated have decreased since Dr. Bos
well took charge. The Dr. was ou the
agency some years ago and so many of the
Indians died under his treatment that they
are fearful of his medicine and will not call
on him, and they never will until he has
gained their confidence.
If these things are to go before the public
at all, I want them to go in their true light.
Very respectfully, F. M. CaETEK.
Newton, Jan. 19, 1879. '
The
EMi VuixIiiiK'Hiezi2
I-?: :i I. -..
ot the
The effective poiut urged by Mr. Blaine
in Ms address supporting his resolution of in
quiry as to whether the constitutional rights
of American citizens were violated in the
late election, may bethus stated : The South
claims a representation in Congress appor
tioned to the total population, including ne
groes as well as whites, but the practical
disfranchisement of the blacks permits the
white voters of the South to elect, nearly
twice as many Representatives as they would
be entitled to if the blacks were excluded in
the apportionment as well as in voting.
This proposition enlarges the scope of the
discussion, for it is not only a question
whether the blacks shall be protected in the
rights guaranteed them by the constitutional
amendments, but a question whether one
Southern white's vote shall equal the
votes of two Northern whites. The ques
tion is, whether the negro population or the
South shall be used for the political aggran
dizement of "the very class that fraudulently
and viobjutly deprive the blacks of their po
litical rights ancbthus unable their oppressors
to prevail overths,white at the North who
would eth iwise protect them in their polit
ical r grits.
Mr. Blaine's, Statement' ef the case is nor. e
too broad, as nis comparative statistics show.
The three States of South Carolina, Missis
sippi, and Lottisiahna have seventeen Rep
resentatives, apportioned on the basis of
1,035,000 white votes and 1, 225,000 colored
votes ; nine of the Representatives given to
thc.-ie three States were apportioned by rea
son of the colored population, which' was-5
not permited to elect one of them. The re
sult is that 1,035,000 white voters have as
manv Representatives in Congress, and as
large a voice in the affairs of the nation, as
the 2,247,00 white voters of Iowa end Wis
consin, which likewise have seventetrt Rep
resentatives. In other words, as Mr. blftino
puts it, "o0,C00 white people? in those South
ern States have precisely the same political
power as 1 112,000 white people have in Iowa
and Wisconsin." This r-tate of things gives
the South even more advantage over the
North than it eujoyel in the days of slavery
Then the whites elected Representatives to
Congress for three-fifths of 'heir slave pop
ulation in addition to their own apportion
ment; now the Southern apportionment in
cludes the entire colored population, which,
as a matter of fact, has no more voice m
choosing the Representative than it had
while in a condition of slavery.
This argument Is based, or course, upon
the assumption that the colored voters are
practically disfranchised, which is the sub
ject of inquiry. But that the assumption
is strong enough to warrant the inquiry is
evi.lent from the fact, while thirty-riye of
the representatives from.tjhe Southern States
were assigned, by neason of the colored pop
ulation, not more than four of the members
of Congress from thoSouth belong to the
political party with which the blacks vote
almost solidly. .Moreover, the assumption
is not weakened, but rather strengthened,
by the fact that the Demociats Who benefit
by the disproportionate representation are
brincini such imn as Thurrnan and Lamar
pto the front to oppose the inquiry into its
accuracy. Commercial S. f .) Adeocait.
An eminent actress f-peak.of stage
winking as a stuttering of the eyelids.