The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, February 13, 1921, Section One, Page 21, Image 21

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    THE SUNDAY OREGOXIAX, TORTLAXD, FEBRUARY 13, 1921
1
PRUNES
EACH
KEEP DOCTOR AWAY
This Is Week All Oregon
Eat Home Product.
(Barde of this city, father of Jack
Karde. was able yesterday to tnrow
any light on the report that Jack
Barde. representing Barde Bros., of
N'ewr York, had presented the shipping
board with a check for Sl.O-O.u.O.
Whether the reported transaction
represented a payment in full for the
surplus materials on this coast, ap
praised at from $10,000,000 to $15,
000.000. or was merely a guarantee ac
companying a bid. remained as much
a matter of conjecture here as at the
national capital.
The last advices received from
Washington by Mr. Baird were to the
effect that new bids were to be asked
for the entire lot of property on this
coast.
CHINESE WILL BENEFIT
Growers Caught With 22,000,000
Pounds When Market Blows Up
Governor Behind Movement.
The Oregon prune is to be in. the
limelight tor the next seven days, for,
In response to a request from growers
and others interested in the disposal
of the 22,000.000 pounds of prunes
still unsold in the state, Governol Ol-
cott has set aside this week as prune
week for the state of Oregon.
As a consequence the patriotic citi
zens of the state are planning not
only to advertise but also eat Oregon
prunes and show to the world the
food value of tha Oregon product.
The succulent prune and the many
ways in which it may be prepared
into delicacies for consumption will
be presented to the public And it is
hoped that the basis for an increased
demand for Oregon prunes will be
laid which will mean that Oregon
growers will never again be embar
rassed with the inability of finding
a market for their product.
The Portland Ad club started the
ball rolling in Portland several weeks
ago when it suggested that a week
be set for advertising the Oregon
prune and this organization has taken
a lead in the plans for celebrating
the week in this city. In addition
various other Interests and growers
outside of the city are co-operating
In making the week a success all over
the state.
Grocers all over the state will put
on. attractive displays of prunes and
prune products, indicating to the
public the many ways in which this
fruit may be prepared for conslgmp
tion. Bakers are planning to make
prune bread and prune cake and vari
ous other prune delicacies. In addi
tion the various teachers of domestic
science throughout the state will give
Instructions in preparing various
dishes from prunes for the home
table.
The response from all over the
state to the campaign is declared to
have been gratifying by those who
have taken up the work of making
prune week a success.
Contributions of prunes to the com
mittees in charge of securing aid for
the starving Chinese and the needy of
European and other Asiatic countries
has also been suggested as a means
of assisting in disposing of the sur
plus prune crops.
William P. Strandborg, vice-president
of the Associated Advertising
clubs of the world, has suggested that
each member of the Portland Ad club
purchase a quantity of the prunes to
give to the Chinese relief.
This suggestion it is expected will
by other organizations and individ
uals and will mean the disposal of
prunes as well as the assisting of a
good cause.
The Rotary club of Salem. Or., has
offered to furnish prune bread to be
eaten at the luncheons of the various
rotary clubs in the state during prune
week and thereby advertise the food
value of that product. Prune bread
will also be served at the luncheons
of various other organizations and
prunes will be on the menus of res
taurants and hotels served In various
vi ays.
The moving picture houses will also
participate in the observance of the
week by calling attention to the
prune week with slides
Mrs. R. W. '"aygood, 1909 East
Davis street, suggested yesterday that
a campaign be put in the schools of
the city this week to have each child
purchase' a pound of prunes and do
nate for the starving Chinese. She
said that this would not mean any
considerable outlay for each child and
yet might do a great deal of good.
FREIGHT GOES TO SEATTLE
Steam Schooner Rainier Leaves
With Small Cargo.
The first shipment of freight to go
from Portland to Seattle by water
in seven years left last night on the
steam schooner Rainier, operated by
the Parr-McCormick company. The
schooner departed from Albers-dock
Xo. 3, where she picked up her north
bound freight after discharging at
the Couch street dock what she
brought here from San Francisco.
Because of the short notice given
shippers of the re-establishment of
the Portland-Puget sound service, the
freight offering from Portland for
TREND
MARKET
OF
DECLARED STABLE
Country Said to Be Passing
Through Rest Period.
COPPER COUP IMPORTANT
840,000,000 Xote Issne by Export
Association Called Permanent
Factor In Business.
BY STUART P. WEST.
(Copyright.. 1921. by The Or-Bonian.)
NEW YORK. Feb. 12. (Special.) All
that has happened this week tilled in With
the view that the country Is passing
through the familiar resting spell which
follows a violent upheaval like that of
for the banking position in this country,
ft is also bound to be a permnent factor
in domestic business recovery. The copper
transaction has lifted a vast surplus from
the market which has long been over
hanging, discouraging fresh buying be
cause of the threat of still lower price.
With the assurance that this surplus
is not to be pressed for sale, but will be
held over a period of from one to four
years, giving plenty of time for its sale
abroad, the whole outlook in the copper
trade Is changed, and so it will be in
every other industry which tries the same
experiment.
PUBLIC INTEREST IN STOCK LACKING
Few Changes of Importance Becorded in
Week.
'NEW YORK. Feb. 12. Trading in the
stock market this week dwindled to slen
der dimensions, the turnover for the five
full sessions being the lightest for any
corresponding period In almost half a year.
Price movements were of a piece with
these stagnant conditions, only a few spec
ulative favorites recording more than
nominal changes, investment rails were
almost entirely neglected, but developed
moderate heaviness later on the refusal
of the United States railway labor board
to reduce wages.
Similar conditions prevailed In the bond
market, many old time or pre-war Issues
cancelling much, if not all. of their recent
gains, while most of the new underwrit
ing felt below their subscription prices.
Surface-wise, the money market was
easier, but rates for time money remained
firm.
Foreign exchange was again subjected to
the bewildering cross-currents resulting
I S Hi
checked The decline at this end and in ! 1 1 f I r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I tl
some quarters the opinion prevails that -
m lliKET
Only Moderate Trading
. Calfskins at Low Prices.
in
VALUES ARE AT BEDROCK
Slump In Export Leather Business
Largely Responsible for De
pression In Hide Industry.
OREGON PRUNES AND ONE OF PRETTY SHOP GIRLS "WHO WILL EXPEDITE THEIR SALE
THIS WEEK.
PORT OF TACOMA GROWS
i
HEAVY IMPORTS BOOST SHOW
1XG FOR THIS YEAR.
- hi W iJVM
1 '
MISS SYLVIA WARD AND ATTKACT1 VE EXHIBIT SUCH AS DEPARTMENT AND GROCERY STORES HAVE
ARR.UVED FOR PRLAU WKEli.
the sound on this trip of the Rainier
was pitifully small, but better results
are expected b- the operators as soon
as the service becomes known.
Tne steam schooner Northland, which
Is to follow the Rainier in this route,
has been undergoing' repairs at San
Francisco and is scheduled to leave
that port for Portland and Seattle
within a few days. Whether the
Rainier will return here from Puget
sound or go direct lom there to San
Francisco will not be determined un
til the arrival of the steamer at
Seattle.
REXT REDUCTION" IS REFUSED
Tonnage for 1920 Total 1,770,468,
.Making Gain of 34, 430 Over
That of Preceding Year.
TACOMA. TV-ash., Feb. 11. (Spe
cial.) Although many other Pacific
ccast ports showed a decrease in car
goes handled during 1920, Tacoma
showed a marked Increase, due to the
heavy imports, over the hiph mark
of 1919. The tonnage of 1920 was
3 . 7 7". 4 US, making an increase of 31,
4U over the preceding year.
A marked increase was ehown in
the number and size of cargo vessels
entering this port, also, there having
been 13.341 vessels with a registered
tennape of 1.,77. In all the car
goes that came here. 184 different
oommoditie are registered, ranging
from feathers to firecrackers and
clocks to catgut.
Ore holds first place with a ton
riace of 303.370 at a valuation of
t3l.K4.D57 of a possible J109.241.911,
the total value of 1920 cargo handled.
Tennis raoiuets proved to be the
mnallpst Import. its total brine
tut $75.
Silk goods ran up a total of $10.
14 1.557 and logs brought to Tacoma
mills were worth $6,941,614. Taper
umbrellas found but little favor in
Tacoma, their valuation being only
l-0.
EL SEGCXDO TO POIXT HELLS
Tank Steamer Waits Four Days
O a side Month of Columbia.
After waiting outside the mouth of
the .::mbia river for four days for
weatnc- clear enough to enable her
to cross in. the tank steamer Kl Se
frundo, of the Standard Oil fleet, yes
terday received orders to proceed to
Point 'W'eUs. according to the radio
operator of one of the steamers in
purt. who was listening in and heard
the E. Segundo receive her new in
structions. Brineing- a cargo of oils from San
FraucisYo, the El Segundo arrived off
the mouth of the river and hove to
.:ast Tuesday. From that t'me until
she was told to go on to Point Wells
ne patently waited for the weather
to clear while other craft, ranging;
from fishing launches to the 12,000
ton steamer Moerdyk, passed in and
out.
Tacoma City Council Denies Plea of
Dock Lessees.
TACOMA, Wash., ' Feb. 12. (Spe
cial.) A plea from the Pugt Sound
Navigation company, which uperaies
steamship service between 'lacoma
and Seattle, for a reductjon in rent of
the municipal dock received no sym
pathy by the city council, "The com
pany based its plea on the fact that
the early morning and late-night
boats had been taken off. The com
missioners, however, responded read
ily by telling the company that the.
city's expenses were not reduced be
cause of this.
Commissioner Harrison In his
speech before the other members of
the council said that It mattered but
little if the company did remove from
the dock, with the kind of service it
was givrng at the present time. If
thev did remove, he said, that it
would leave an opening for a com
pany that would give real service.
The fast Hteamer Tacoma that has
formeriv been on the run has been
taken off, and it" Is said that it will
be put on the Columbia river on the
run between Portland and Astoria.
However, officers of -the navigation
company deny any knowledge of this
fact. .
Movements of Vessels.
PORTfXn. Feb. 12. Arrived at 10:30
r vi steamer Montairue. from Hongkong
.nil wav poru. Sailed at 4:1!V P. AI.
Steanr Rainier. f-r San Francisco.
ASTORIA. Feb. 12. Arrived at 9 A. M.
and' left up at noon Steamer Montague,
from Hontrkona; and way ports. Hailed at
A M. steamer Celilo, for San Fran
cisco: sailed at 10:30 A. M. Steamer
Swiftarrow, for San Francisco.
SAV FRANCISCO, Feb. 12. Arrived
last niKht Steamer Arixonnn, from New
York, (or Portland via way porta.
NORFOLK. Feb.
City, from Portland,
12. Arrived,
Or.
Orient
BARDE CHECK STILL MYSTERY
Transaction May Involve Ship
Boartl Material on Coas-t.
Neither T. G. Baird. district director
of the supply and sales division of the
rmerge.icy fleet corporation, nor M.
PAN VedRO. Cai., Feb. 12. (Ppectal.)
Arrived, Frank D. Stout, from Tacoma.
7 A. M.; Governor, from San Francisco,
11 A. M. : Ialsy Oadsby. from San DieKo,
7 A. M. Sailed, Wolverine State, for San
Francisco. 5 P. M. ; George Washington,
for San Francisco, 8 P. M.
COOS BAT. Feb. 12. Arrived at 11 A.
M. S;eamer Curacao, from Portland, for
San Francico and Eureka.
BAl.BOA. Feb. 11. Arrived Steamer
Moaella, from Portland, for Emden.
CRISTOBAL, Feb. 10. Sailed Steamer
Eastern Ocean, for United Kingdom via
way porta.
SAN FRANCISCO. Feb. 12 Arrived
Steamer Steelmaker, from New York;
steamer Depere. from Seattle.
SEATTLE. Wash.. Feb. 12. Arrived
Edward Luckenbach. from Baltimore via
Cristobal and San Pedro; Spokane, from
southeastern Alaska. Departed Presi
dent, for San Pedro via San Francisco.
TACOMA. Wash., Feb. 12. Arrived
Motorship Theodore Roosevelt, from Ant
werp via Honolulu: steamer Fulton, from
Powell River. B. C-: ateamer San Diego,
from San Pedro: steamer Prince John,
from Prince Rupert. Departed Steamer
Fulton, for Powell River via porta.
CALT.AO. Feb.
from Tacoma.
1 1. Arrived Jeptha,
MARSH FIELD, Or.. Feb. 12. (Special.)
Arrived Curacao, from Portland 10 A.
Read The OregeaUii classified ads.
last autumn. Business conditions are
variable; In some lines, like woolen and
cotton goods, a decided recovery is under
way. In other lines, notably Iron and
steel, prices still are falling, and pro
duction, along with new orders. Is on
the decline.
This unevenness. however, is quite nor
mal under circumstances like the present,
and has been forecast very generally ever
since the first of the year. The earliest
date which has been set for a new lor
ward movement to set in is sometime in
the spring. Meantime. readjustment,
while it has been completed In most quar
ters, has not been finished in all.
Street in Waiting Mood.
The Wall street market, reflecting the
trade position outside, is also In a waiting
mood. Trading has aunk to a minimum
and prices have been swinging back and
forth in an extremely narrow range. It
Is precisely the sort of market which was
witnessed in the early part of lt4, fol
lowing the so-called "rich men's panic,"
and the more or less acute trade depres
sion of the preceding year. Likewise it
is very much like the market which we
had for a few months following the crisis
of 1UU7.
It is a market which is not responsive
to developments either favorable or ad
verse. Still it is of more consequence that
bad news has ceased to count than that
ood news has nut yet begun to count.
The performance of the oil shares in the
face of the cutting of crude on prices an
the way from 25 to -O per cent, has
certainly been remarkable. At no time
during this price-cutting campaign have
these been weak, and they even had, dur
tng the recent trading, their .momenta of
very decided strength.
Steel War Opened.
The same Is true of the steels. Open
war has been declared between the intle'
pendents and the steel corporation. Some
of the former companies have reuueed
prices sharply in an effort to stimulate
business. It is certain that they can make
nu money and will probably lose at these
price levels, let the steel stocks gained
on tne weeK.
Keuewal of the recovery in the foreign
exchanges may be set down first of all to
tne improvement In international trade
from the standpoint of most of these
countries, following the estimates ot
fl.uou.OOU.OO- credit lor Great Britain last
year taking the invisible as well as the
visible items into account, the January
figures showed Britisn exports and im
nuru even closer together than lor any
month oi 1U. In part, too, the fresh
upward turn in exchange rates is a re
flection of confidence in the settlement of
the (Jcrman reparation question, and still
again it is Influenced by the prospect of
easier money on this side.
Foreigo xchange Stronger.
But there is undoubtedly an increasing
connection between the recovery in ster
ling, francs and lire, and the plans under
way lor financing the American export
trade. The $4u,oux.ouU note issue by the
Copper export association Is the lirat great
step along this line. There is no doubt
of the success of this operation. The 8
per cent rate is attractively high, and the
security ot -OO.tjuo.OUO pounds of copper
metal valued at 10 cents a pound is un
questionably adequate, simply because no
commodity can for long stay below cost of
production, aud 10 cents for copper Is way
below cost.
When this copper financing Is out of the
way. a similar scheme will be worked out
for coffee, where there is also a trouble
some surplus waiting to be taken care
of, and it would not be surprising if
other commodities such as cotton, tobacco
and, perhaps sugar, were taken in hand
in the same way.
Interest to Be Awakened.
Ait this will lead up to and awaken a
more general public interest in the great
$ 100,KK),Oou foreign finance corporation
with Its charter providing for a debenture
bond issue of tl.OOO.UOO.OOO to be used
for long-term credits to buyers of Amer
ican goods. The banks and investing pub
lic have responded well to the copper note
offering, which, in a way, is a unique ex
periment in American finance. They should
be equally responsive to the offer of se
curities by the new foreign trade financing
company because the loane of this con
cern will be secured by collateral that
must receive the approval of the federal
reserve board and will, therefore, be of
the highest investment rank.
The first aspect of these undertakings
Is. ot course, the stimulus they will give
the export trade. . The second aspect is
the relief they will afford the credit sit
uation at home. The sale, for Instance,
of the 4O,O0.OO0 copper notes means Just
so much of a load taken oft the banks
and passed on to the investment commu
nity. It means the change of so much
credit from a temporary form, where it
helps along inflation, to a more perman
ent form where it ceases to be a strain
upon bank resources
Copper Coup Important,
While this copper and other similar fi
nancing that may follow this is of the
first Importance for foreign commerce, and
from latest aspects of the German Indem
nity agreement.
Railroad returns and the tonnage and
final statements of companies engaged in
important lines of manufacture testify
that business and ind-ustry are reviving
slowly and unevenly. These conditions
were exemplified in the smaller earnings
of transportation systems and reduced
bookings of the United States Steel cor
poration. ,
Seattle Feed and Hay.
SEATTLE, Feb. 12. City delivery:
Feed Scratch feed, $57 ton; baby scratch
feed, $71; feed wheat, $02; all grain chop,
$47; oats. $46; rolled oats, $48; sprouting
oats. $51; roiied barley, $47; clipped
barley, $52; milled feed, $30; bran, $37;
whole corn. $4U; cracked corn, $42.
Hay Alfalfa, $27 ton; double com
pressed alfalfa, $33; double compressed
timothy, 94b; eastern Washington mixed,
$34; straw, $20; Puget sound, $31.
I.ondon Financial Market.
LONDON, Feb. 12. Bar silver. SV4d
per ounce. Money, per cent; discount
rates, short bills, 0 per cent; three
months bills, 11-16 per cent.
There has been no material change in
the bide situation during the v past week.
The only sales recorded were on calf skins
In Chicago. These sold at 13 cents for
Chicago city skins, the lowest price re
corded In 20 years. Country hides are a
drug on the market and packer hides are
only salable at very low prices. Hide
prices in general are today about 50 to
75 per cent under those ruling in 1III2
or 10 years ago. Winter hides are not
worth as much for leather as for glue
purposes. Commenting on the situation,
George M. Sullivan, of the Sullivan Hide
& Wool company, said yesterday:
"The present condition of the hide mar
ket is easily accounted for. Last De
cember we exported 1.078,5."9 pounds of
so-le leather against 3.149,702 pounds In
December, 1910. Exports for 12 months
ended December, 1IW0, were 22,429,639
pounds against 122,660,993 in the same
period of 1919.
"Exports of calf and kip leather were
18,02.1.910 square feet for 1920 against
49.417.005 square feet In 1919.
"Exports of goat and kid leather for
1!)20 were 54.911.163 square feet against
104,377.890 square feet for 1919. We have
lost about three-fourths of our foreign
trade as far as leafher Is concerned.
"The government report for January,
1921. showed aboutlO.000,000 fewer farm
animals in the United States than on that
date a year ago. Hogs decreased 7.1 per
cent, sheep 4.3 per cent, cows 1.5 per cent
and other cattle 4.2 per cent. There were
602,000 less horses and 42.000 less mules
In the country than on January 1, 1920.
"It has been practically settled that no
duty will be put on imported hides, either
now or later, when permanent tariff
changes are made. Tanners, shoe manu
facturers, dealers In hides and others con
nected with the hide and leather trade
are not in favor of a tariff on hides. It
is generally admitted that a duty on hides
would benefit nobody In the long run.
"There is at present a surplus of hides
and skins In the United States, but not
a world's surplus, as Is the case with
wool. When our foreign trade opens up
again, or In other words when exchange Is
stabilised, and when our people get to
work again and their buying power is thus
Increased, and when the shoe retailers get
their prices down to where they belong
along with other necessities, then the sur
plus of hides here will fast disappear and
prices will advance and not until then.
Hides could sdvance 100 per cent and
shoes and leather could decline 50 per
cent at the same time and still leave a
decent profit for everyone and a fair price
to the farmer and stock man who pro
duces the hide."
prices will go no lower this season.
The demand for poultry was more ac- I
tlve than In the preceding week and as
receipts were not heavy, hens of all sixes I
sold at firm prices. Country dressed veal
was also firm at the close of the week, i
but pork dragged.
BANANA PRICES AT LAST DECLINE i
First Drop Announced In Several Years;
Large Oranges Higher. I
The first decline that has occurred In
banana prices since before the war was i
announced by Front street fruit Jobbers i
yesterday. The drop, which follows lower
markets at the gulf ports, amounts to
lhi cents a pound. The new quotations
are 11 cents loose and 12 cents crated.
Oranges are firm, particularly the large
sizes, 80s to 150s, which are 50 cents a
box higher. Small sizes are still available
at $34.50 a box, according to grade...
Grain Trading Ceases.
The Merchants' Exchange, with other
grain boards throughout the country, was
closed yesterday. It being Lincoln's birth
day. No reports of business were received
from country points. Terminal receipts,
in cars, were:'
Whest.BarIey.Flour.Oat3.Hay.
Portland Sat.. 44
Year ago .... 29
This week . .. 2S7
Year ago 132
Season to date.H.2.'13
Year ago .... 5,957
Tacoma Fri... 11
Year ago .... 11
Season to date. 8.SS9
Year ago 4,993
1
'io
192
169
47
63
14
17
70
R49
2824
1
4
659
1903
13
3
872
400
93
145
6
9
6!)
40
1617
1294
872
650
Increase in Butter Holdings.
Storage holdings of creamery butter In
the United States are about 3.34S.00O
pounds larger than a year ago. The pre
liminary futures Just Issued by the bureau
of markets make the following com
parison : '
Pounds.
41.707.000
38,359.248
February
February
1921.
1920.
Naval Stores.
SAVANNAH. Ga., Feb. 12. Turpentine
Quiet, 92Hc; no sales. Receipts, 21
barrels; shipments. 184 barrels; stock.
15.109 barrels. '
Rosin Quiet; no sales. Receipts, 395
barrels; shipments, 526 barrels; stock.
81,29 barrels, uuote: it, L, E, F, G, H,
, K., M, N, WG, WW, $11.00.
Chicago Dairy Produce.
CHICAGO, Feb. 12. Butter Higher
creamery extras, 44c; standards, 43 4c
Kggs Higher. Receipts, 10.447 cases
firsts, 37ij37c; ordinary firsts. 33l34c;
U4ILY METEOHOLOGICAL REPORT.
PORTLAND. Feb. 12. Maximum temper
ature, k degrees; minimum, 40 degrees.
R'ver reading, 8 A. M., 12 8 feet: change In
Inst 24 hours. 1.2 feet rise. Total rainfall
S P. M. to 5 P. M ). 0.87 inch; total rain
fall since September 1, 1920, 34. 08 inches
normal rainfall since September 1, 28.40
inches; excess of rainfall since September
i. l-0, . is incnes. sunrise. 7:19 A. M.
sunset, 5:32 P. M. Total sunshine Feoru-
aT. 12, nore: possible sunshine. 10 hours
la minutes. Moonnse Sunday. 9:42 A. l
moonset Sunday, 11:40 P. M. .Barometer
.'reduced to sea level) at 5 P. M.. 30.n
Incnes. Relative humidity at 5 A. M . 95
r-er sent: at noon, 90 per cent: at 5 P. M.
93 per cent.
the 'Weather.
STATIONS.
Wind
Weather.
B-ker ....
Boise ......
Boston ....
Calgary
Chicago ...
Denver
D" Moines.
Eureka ....
(,iveston ..
Helena .....
J'ineaut . . .
Kansas City.
Los Angeles.
Murshfleld .
Medford ...
Minneapolis
New Orleans
New York...
North Head.
Phoenix ....
Pr.catello ..
Portland ...
Ttuseburg . .
Sacramento
St. Louis...
Salt Lake. .
San Diego..
S. Francisco.
Seattle
Sltkat
Srokane ...
1 acoma ...
Tatoosh Isd.
Walla Wall;
Washington
Winnipeg .
Takima
321 4410.001. 'NE (Cloudy
28 51 0.001. .W Cloudy
28 SS 0.1412'NWIClear
: t u.ooi. .i.N ISnow
32 3O.0Otl2;SW
3 0.001. .JE
sol o,o.ooi..!s
4til a'0.0O..SW
50! OtS'O.OOi. .SB
n-' O.OO . . E
24u32 0.24!. .I.WV
32i 62 0.00,10'SW
no; 72 0.0O. .W
4 4s;o.si. .ISW
38: 52 0.00). .INK
52' bs:o.oo'!'Inw
2S' 38 0.O2H2 NW
381 42 0.441. .INE
441 84 0.001. .SW
381 52 0. 00112 SE
401 50 0.87L .IN
4! 60.0.001. .IW
50! 64 0. 00!. .1
34! 54!0.0lil2 S
38! 6OO.OO IO1S
4 60!fl.00l. .18
4Sl 64'A.OO!. .W
3S 40 0.4l. .ISE
24i3-'0.1ol. .1
44! 46 0.04:. .'SW
401 42 0.5SI. .IE
401 4IJI0.O0;. .INW
48 54 0.001. JXW
Cloudy
Cloudy
cloudy
Cloudy
(Clear
Pt. cloudy
Cloudy
IClear
It'lear
Rain
Pt. cloudy
(Clear
IClear
IClear
ICIoudy
Clear
Pt. cloudy
Rain
Cloudy
Pt. cloudy
IPC cloudy
IClear .
Cloudy .
krioudy
icioudy
ICIoudy
Cloudy
ICIoudy
ICIoudy
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32 42 0.00;12'NWICloudy
18 3t? 0.no:. .S JPL cloudy
I 48 0.001. jNwlRaln
DECLINE IN POTATOES HALTED.
Markets Are Steadier In East, Bnt Still
Weak in West.
The .persistent price decline of the po
tato markets throughout the east during
January appears to have received at least
a temporary check. Sacked round white
stock held 8390c per 100 lbs. at northern"
f. o. b. shipping points and the carlot
market in Chicago recovered 10 cents from
the season's low point, closing $1.101.20.
Other middle-western cities showed a
wider and weaker range at $11.45 for
large lots. Colorado No. 1 rurals declined
5c per 100 lbs. f. o. b. cash to growers,
closing 6065c. Sacked rurals held at
55 60c wagon loads cash to growers, but
russets advanced 10 cents at Idaho ship
ping stations, closing around S5c. Round
whites held at $11.10 at western New
York shipping points. The New York
market held at $1.50lg1.65 bulk. Maine
Green Mountains were steady around 85c
bulk f. 0. b. Boston closed slightly lower
at $1.00 1.65.
Shipments Increased moderately from
the most important late shipping states.
Total shipments were 3020 cars compared
with 2851 the preceding week and with
2691 during the corresponding week a
year ago. The increase was largely from
Maine with 667 cars shipped compared
with 491 the previous week.
APPLES DRAG) IN LOCAL MARKET.
Few Sale at Country PointsOregon Fruit
at New York Auction.
There was only a small movement in
the local apple market during the week
and It was confined mostly to. the cheaper
grades.
Business was slack In the country dis
tricts. Yakima reported a few sales of ex
tra fancy medium to large Wtnesaps at
$2.102.15, and extra fancy medium to
large Newtowns at $2. The Wenatchee
market was inactive. In other districts
Romes sold at $1.751.90 for medium to
large extra fancy.
At the New York auction 1510 boxes of
Oregon Newtowns were sold at the fol
lowing prices: Extra fancy large $3.05
-.00; medium $2.32.60; . fancy large
Jj.4; medium $2.22.60; small $
choice large $2.35; small to medium $2.
The shipping movement of both barreled
and boxed stock was slightly more active
with the heaviest grain in shipments from
the boxed shipping states. Total barreled
apple shipments were 1072 cars compared
with 1044 the previous week and with 407
during the corresponding week last year.
The boxed apple movement was 476 cars
compared with 363 the week before and
with 5S4 during the corresponding week
year ago.
PORTLAND MARKET QUOTATIONS
Grain. Floor. Feed. Etc
No session Merchants' Exchange.
FLOUR Family patents. $9.80; bakers'
hard wheat. $9.50; bakers' nuestem pat
ents, $9; valley patents, $7.90; whole
wheat. $8 20; graham, $8.05.
M1I.LFEED Prices f. o. b. mill. Mill
run. $35 per ton; rolled barley. $4143:
rolled oats. $42: scratch feed. $58 per ton.
CORN Whole. $39i cracked. $42 per
ton. -
HAY Buying prices, f. -o. b. Portland:
alfalfa. $19 per ton; cheat. $23023 per
ton; clover, $18: valley timothy. $2728;
eastern Oregon timothy. $30.
Dairy and Country Produce.
BUTTER Cubes, extras. 40c per pound;
prints, parchment wrapped, in box lots.
50c; cartons 51c. Butterfat, buying price,
43c; A grade, 48c; B grade, 46c; Portland
delivery
EGGS Buying prices.' case count, 23c
delivered; Jobbing price to retailers, can
dled ranch, 30c; selects, 82c.
CHEESE Tillamook triplets price to
Jobbers f. o. b. Tillamook, 33c; Young
Americas, 34c lb.
POUTRY Hens. 2428c: ducks, 40(9
4.r,c; geese, nominal; turkeys, live, nom
inal:, do. dressed, nominal.
PORK Fancy, 13c per pound .
VEAL Fancy. 19c per oou.nd
Fruits and Yegetables.-
FRIIITS Navel oranges. J3(8'5.2.'S: lem
ons. $4. 25S.4. 75: grapefruit. $5fi9 per box
bananas, 11&12. per pound; apples, .$1.50
m3 per box.
VEGETABLES Cabbage. l02a per
pound; lettuce, $3.503.7- per crate: car
rots, $1.50 per sack; garlic 20 25c pound
beets, $1.50 per sack; cauliflower, $2.25
per crate: celery, $4.50l3 per crate; green
peppers. 25 w 40c per pound: sprouts. 2'ic
pound; rhubarb. oc pound; spinacn, 11.1:
per box; turnips, $23)2.50 per sack; to.
matoes. $5.50 per lug.
POTATOES Oregon. $1.35.50 per 100
pounds; Yakima, $1.50$)2; sweet potatoes,
8c per pound. $4 per hamper.
ONIONS Oregon, $1.8519 1.50 per sack.
Net Earnings Over 2xz Times
Interest Requirements
Portland Gas & Coke
Company
FIRST LIEN AND GENERAL MORTGAGE 7 GOLD BONDS
Dated January 1, 1921 Due January 1, 1940
Redeemable at premiums up to 107 according to maturity.
1 PRICE 95 AND INTEREST
I Yielding 7H.
S For details, call, phone or write.
I Clark, Kendall & Co., Inc.
FIFTH AND STARK STS.
PORTLAND, OREGON
ailllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
OKI
8
to
8.30
New Syndicate Issue
We offer the unsold portion of
our allotment of:
8
8.30
Copper Export Association, Inc.
) Secured Gold Notes
tA M. today,
day.
P. M. report of preceding
FORECASTS. '
Fortland and vicinity Rain; northeast
erly winds.
Oregon and Washington Rain west por
tion, cloudy east portion;, moderate north
easterly winds
Report From Mouth of Columbia,
NORTH HEAD, Feb. 12 Condition of
tne sea at 5 P. M.. moderate; wind, north
tuiU four miles. '.
BITTER WILL ADVANCE MONDAY
S-Cent Rise Due to Lighter Outnut In
Northwest.
There will be a 3-cent advance in the
local butter market Slonday morninK.
which will put prints at 50 cents in parch
ment wrappers and 61 cents In cartons.
The butter fat buying price will also be
raised cents to 4. cents for A grade and
4- cents for B grade. At Seattle there
will be a 2-cent advance in prints which
will put the Portland and Seattle markets
again on a parity. 0
The butter market has been firm at all
points on the' coast for some time past.
In the northwest the strength was oc
casioned chiefly by the reopening of the
milk condenseries, which materially re
duced the output of butter. Northern
cities drew on California for-butter sup
plies and this, with shipments of Cali
fornia butter east, led to several advances
on the San Francisco market.
There has been a good volume of cube
butter buying on the local market during
the past two days, and at the close of the
week stocks were closely cleaned' up.
DECLINE IN EGG MARKET CHECKED
Active Buying for Eastern Shipment at
bteady Prices. .
The egg market was very steady at the
close of the week. Buyers offered 25 cents
to country shippers and on the street
there were sales . at 252Qi cents case
count. There has been no let-up in the
movement of eggs to the east, and but
for this fact prices here would have been
demoralised. The reaction late In the
week In the ea-tera markets effectively
titaple Groceries.
Local lobbing quotations:
SUGAR (t-ack basis) Cane granulated, 8c
per pound; beet, 7.00c per pound.
N uts walnuts. i'a4c; -frazil nuts,
34c; filberts. 15-rflKc; almonds. 2830c;
peanuts, uu12c per pound; cocoanuts, 12
per do-en; pecans, 23c; chestnuts, 300 per
pound.
HONEY Comb, $7.758.25 per case.
RlCl--B!ue Rose, 9 Vic per pound; Ja
pan style, 7c per pound.
BEANS Small white, Uc; large white.
6c; pink, Ihic: lima, 10c; bayou, 12ftc;
red. 7c per pound.
COFFEE Roasted, bulk, drums. 14 36c
per pound.
SALT Granulated, bale. 53.50(4.25; half
ground ton, 50s, llu.73; lOUs, (18.25; lump
rock. 120.50.
Provisions.
HAMS All sizes. 30fo3c; skinned. 269
32c; picnics. 21c.
BACON Fancy. 4049c; choice, 300
34c; Htandard, 26 28c.
.ARi Pure, tierces, 19c pound; com
pound, tierces, 13VjC
DKY SALT Backs, 2124c; plates, 18c
Wool, Hops, Etc.
WOOL Local market based on eastern
scoured values as follows; Eastern Ore
gon No. 1 .staple, 80(&00c; eastern Oregon
clothi.ig. 6570c; Valley, No. 1, tioiOc
per pound.
HIDES AND PELTS Nominal.
TALLOW No. 1, oc; No. 2. 4c pound.
CASC4RA BARK 1920 peel, 8c pound.
HOPS 1020 crop, choice, 20e pound.
MOHAIR Nominal.
Oils.
LINSEED OIL Raw. in barrels, 99c;
5-gallon cans, $1.14. Boiled, In barrels,
11.01; 5-gallon cans, $1.16.
TURPENTINE In tanks. $1.24; cases,
$1.30. 0
COAL OIL Tank wagons and Iron
barrels, 17 tsCl cases, 8037c.
FUEL OIL Bulk. $2.35 per barrel.
GASOLINE Tank wagons and Iron
barrels, 20c; cases. 41 c.
HUG MARKET TONE IM
JLOWKR PRICES
FOR MONDAY'S
INDICATED
OPENING.
Two Loads Sell at Yards at $10.85
Bulk of Shipments Come
Direct.
Business was small at the stockyards
yesterday, as usual on the closing day ot
the week. The run consisted of 174 head
of hogs, but of the lt loads received. 3tJ
were a direct shipment to packers. Two
loads were sold on the open market in the
ore noon a $10S5. While they approached
the heavy c!a?s, the price realized wo aid
Indicate a lower trend of the market lor
the opening of the coming week. Price in
othr linos were nominal.
The following prices are current at the
local yards:
Cattle
Choice steers
Medium to pood steers
Fair to medium trteers
Common to good .steers
Choice cows and heifers
Medium to good cows, neirers.
Fair to medium cows, heifers
Common to fair cow a, heifers .
Canners
H 1 year at
a 2 " "
H S a4T V h a V k r N.
9 p
100 yield
99 "
8.15
3 year at
4
99U yield 8.30
99
8.30
Wire orders "collect" call or phone for details.
Freeman, Smith & Camp Co.
PORTLAND
am raANCiac
HOUND PIOOB
LUMBKRMKNS BUILDINA
rim AND STARK
WAY 740
J.T510: bulk 200 pounds up, S 00
D.2.t; pitss, steady.
Slirep Receipts. .1000; for week, fat
Iambs generally $1 lower; yearlltiRS T."c
lower: wethers, 25c lower; ewes, 500
lower; feeding lambs. 7c lower.
ttte
Kani-BH City Livesturk Market.
KANSAS CITt. Mn Feb. 12. Cl
Receipts. 123: for week: Ileef steers 10c to
jtc hisher; the stock steady: canners
steady to 2."c 'over: bulls. 25c lower; calve,
i;eady to OOl h.pher: stockers and feeders
strong to 2.V higher; stock calves and
."tuck cows and heifers steady.
DAILY CITY STATISTICS
.Marriage Llrennes.
BOUTTV-MARTVN Chester Boutty. le.
cal, 1110 First street, and Mildred A. .Vlar-
tyn. leffal. -40S1, Park street.
DAHLyL.IaT-l.AM H AUT William M.
Dahluui.t. lepal. Gresham. Or., and Emmy
Blatichart. leg.i;. IU7fe Williams avenue.
VUt)VK H-l,USI.S Jonn ukovicii,
leeal. 751 Amhurst street and Vinka
Zlosels. leunl. 751 Amhurst street.
CGHN-SHKMAXSKV Abraham conn.
legal. 702 Loveloy utree. and Alma L,eia
Shemftnwkv. lenal. 711 Irvlnir street.
C A It AM EI. T, A - GARDELI.A Lorenxo
Caramella. SO. Portlitnd. and Maria Ur
delia. 23. fittO Knjt Thirteenth street.
1'I.L.M a - - I TZl'A thick w muni r .
riumb legal. Portland, and Lillian Fits
Patrick, legal, 290 W est Terry street
Vancouver Marriage Licenses.
SANDERS-CARSON Herbert P. San
ders, S3, of Vancouver, and Mrs. Mary Car
son. 23. of Vancouver.
FITZGBRA LL-C I. E V B N U E K E. II.
Fitsgcrald. 19, of Portland, and Miss Jua
nlta Olevenger. IS. nf Albany, Or.
WHITE-HARRINGTON l.elnd vt'nite.
27, of Portland, and Blanche -iarrlntfton.
of Portland.
Prices
.. .$ 7 0OW e.25
... .75W 7.50
. .. SOU 6 75
. .. ."..(Kilo1 6.00
. .. 6.00& 6 73
.50$r 6.00
5.5UAI 600
4 00(B) 5.00
2.00 4.00
5.00& 00
12.00b. l.'I.OO
7.50( 10.00
fl.OOW 7 50
60019 6.50
5.00O 6.00
Eui:s
Choice dairy calves
Prime light calves
Heavy calves
Best feeders
Fair to good feeders
Hogs
Prime light 11.00011.50
Smooth heavy iu.iwihw
Rugh heavy 7.oo 0.50
Fat nigs lOOOfell 50
Fteder pigs 10.00& 11.50
ShMQ
Kast-of-mountaln-Iambs 8.50(9 H.00
'.alley lambs 'i..o s.ju
Heavy lamus, uu ids. an- up.. o..,utn' i.uu
Feeder lambs 6 00 i 00
Cuil lambs 5.00 BOO
L'ght yearlings s
Heavy yearlings 6 50 7.25
Wethers 6...0". 7.00
Ewes 1.00 5.00
Chicago Livestock Market.
CHICAGO. Feb 12. Cattle Receipts,
5t0; compared with week ago, better grade
eef steers and feeder stock 25c to 50c
higher, plainer grades steady, top steers
;.0.2o; canners and cutters and bulls 25c
lower; calves and stockers and feeders
25c tc 50- higher.
Hogs Receipts, 7000; light and light
light 10c to 25c higher: butchers strong
to 10c higher than yesterday's average;
tup, f 10.10; bulk 200 pounds and down.
Sale of
NAVY CONDEMNED
STORES
By Sealed Bid, Opening on
Thursday, February 24, at
2 o'clock.
Including:
METALS . SILVERWARE
BLANKETS TABLE LINEN
HARDWARE FURNITURE
BOATS BARBER CHAIRS
BOAT ENGINES, SCREWS, Etc.
Catalog of sale and further infor
mation may be obtained from the
BOARD OF SURVEY, AP
PRAISAL AND SALE
NAVY YARD, PUGET SOUND,
WASHINGTON
or from the Sales Office,
305 Lowman Bldg-. Seattle, Wash.
BUY IT FROM THE NAVY
Low-Priced
Listed Stocks
Of Speculative
Merit
We have compiled data on
a number of low-priced
itocks, possessed of un
doubted merit that hare
dropped in price consider
ably within the past year.
The present position of
these stocks appears highly-
attractive.
lTon application to Dept.
pa-40 we shall be i;lad to
forward complete liter
ature gratis.
&RRLE5RDiIRKS0Nfi&
66 BROADWAY NEWYORK
TELEPHONES: RECTOR 4663-4
BROKERS
Stock Salesmen
Stronic Eastern Financial Insti
tution dealinK only in securities
of recognised merit listed on
leading- Stock. Exchanges and
vr York Curb desires local
firm or representative a.l corre
spondent. State fully record
and bank references. Address
BROKERS," care of
Matos Advertising Co.
Bulletin Bldg.,
Philadelphia, Pa.
0VERBECK &
COOKE CO.
Brokers, Ptnrks, Bonds, Cotton.
Orufn. fctc
1 16-21 7 BOARD OP TRADE BLUU.
Vail Walla, Um.Ii, ,
I'nrtliiml, Or.
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MEMBERS CllirAGO BOARD OF
TKADK.
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MKMBKHS
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BoHtoo Stork Exrhanjce.
hlt aro Board of 1 rai.
Sew l ork Cotton Eirlinnre,
Nw Or lea Of Cotton Kkittanva,
w York 1 rod tit ICxc hat-go.
Winning Grain ExcbanKr.
Liverpool Cotton AmmjcuiUoh.
4 WEEKS' FREE TRIAL
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HERRIN & RHODES, INC.-
Hallway Bxchanss Rids. JdalD 2H4
Established 189S.
Seattle, fort-and. T acorn.
Fast private duplex wire eoast to
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