The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, January 16, 1921, Section One, Page 5, Image 5

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    THE SUNDAY OKEGOXIAX, PORTLAND, JANUARY 16, 1921
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Three Exceptional
Winter Offers:
Heavy All-Wool
SUITS
With Two Pairs Trousers
Special $39.50
OVERCOATS
Special - v Special
$19.00 $29.00
Garments of Merit at Their Lowest Price
BEN SELLING
Leading Clothier
iATfiOL SilUS MILLIONS
WORTH OF FOREST' SERVICE
IS HELD FULLY PROVED.
BiUions of Fwt of Valuable West
ern Timber Protected Dur
ing Fire Sraon.
. BAN" FRANCISCO. Jan. 15. Avia
tors tf the United states forest serv
ice last season in California covered
3S8.8J0 miles, more thun 15 times
the circumference of the globe, ac
cording to records recently compiled.
In the flights the aviators pro
tected from fire 2t.Oilfl.nno acres of
wooded hinds growing 1 10.0UO, 000,000
feet of marketable, timber, conserv
atively estimated by the forest serv
ice as worth $220,000,0(10.
Twenty-six airplanes took part in
the forest flights and in spite of the
extreme hazards entailed by flying
over fires, there were but three fa
talities. The patrol was from the
Ninth Aero squadron of the army and
included a radio service effective in
locating fires.
The squadron ba.e, during the sea
son, was at Mather field, Sacramento,
and there were smaller bases at Hcd
illiiff. Fresno and March field.
Next season, according to 'present
plans, the airplane forest service will
be extended to Oregon. Washington,
Idaho and Montana.
The patrol lacked little or the ro
mance and glamour of war, allhooph
its mission was essentially a peaceful
one. Oftn there was sharp neces
sity for instant action and one par
ticular test of mobility was called for
wben 32 fires broke out in the Lassen
forest in a two-day period. There
were plenty of good fighters on hand
tut few experienced leaders. An S.
O. S. call was sent to Sonera. 200
miles away, and in a few hours two
forest officers from that place were
efficiently directing the fighting. A
few days later the Stanislaus forest
caueht fire, and the officers were
rushed back.
Through liaison officers the radio
was Riven a thorough and effective
test. Kvcn when the airplane failed to
make the fire disvovery the data the
observer furnished were important
to the protection organization The
vstem was particularly effective in
detecting fires caused by other than
human agencies.
Tests that probably reminded the
aviators of experiences on the west
ern front came when the airships w ere
used for reconnaissance work over
l;irce fires. Then there was the
same necessity for directing the
charge of the fire-fighters as there
was for directing the barrages of war
days. As the fires moved onward
the aviators, by wireless, told the
frghters below just where to attack.
I'ire lines were watched for new out
breaks just as enemy lines were
watched for new attacks.
The forest "front" extended 50
Tnllts from Oregon to the Mexico line
and the "battle" lasted from June
1. until rain. came late in the fall.
The "enemy," the fire, made 772 at
tacks, but the airplane-directed army
won, for the figures of fire destruc
tion fell far below those of former
years, sometimes the tires appeared
to win and oftert brought d"Wn sh'ps,
there being 38 forced landings re
ported during the season.
for the recovery of $6064 Is pending,
was filed in Cnited States district
court here Friday by the Jenks &
Muirs Manufacturing company of De
troit. In the bill of complaint the manu
facturing company states that about
150 other creditors hold claimii
against the Maxwell company. These
claims aggregate about $4,000,000. the
petition states, and that other indebt
edness in the form of loans bring:1
the company's total liability to $16,
000,000. The Maxwell company hatt
assets, the petition continues, aggre
gating more than $25,000,000, but
these could not be converted into cash
without great loss. The plaintiff con
tends the immediate realizable assets
of the Maxwell company are not suf
ficient to meet, claims of creditors.
In an answer filed by the Maxwell
Motor company, the petitions of the
plaintiffs for an injunction restrain
ing creditors and for establishment
of claims of creditors and assets are
concurred with.
CURB ON PACKERS URGED
REAOLCTIOX ADOPTED BY A
TIOXAL LIVESTOCK BODY.
I EVEREST TO BE SCALED
PERMISSION- GIVEN" BRITISH
EXPLORERS TO TRY ASCENT
Senator Komi rick Re-elected Prcs
idem and Colorado Springs Is
Cliosren for Next Convention.
EL, PASO. Tex., Jan. 14. The Amcr
lean National Livestock association in
convention Friday adopted a reso
lution recommending enactment by
congress of constructive federal legis
lation regulating the packers, com
Nmission men and traders.
Neither the Gronra bill, now pend
ing in the l mted States senate, nor
the Anderson bill, now pending in the
house, was indorsed by name, al
though debate on the convention floor
on the report of the resolutions com
mittee centered about the Cironna bill.
During this debate Fred H. Blxby
of Long Beach. Cal., one of the prin
cipal advocates of an indorsement of
the (ironna bill, explained that he bad
consented in the resolutions commit
tee to have the words "as set forth
in the (Irotina brll" eliminated from
the indorsing resolution "for the sake
of harmony and unity."
L'nited .States Senator Kcndrick of
Wyoming, president of the associa
tion, was re-elected.
Colorado Springs was unanimously
selected for the next annual conven
tion. The only part of the ' resolutions
committee's report that was con
tested was the section dealing with
packer legislation, which was adopted
as reported by. the resolutions committee.
Dalai Lama at Lhasa Sanctions Ex
pedition to Invade Tibet to Con
quer Loftiest Peak.
(Copyright by the Nw York World. Pub
lished by Arrangement.)
LONDON, Jan. 15. Lhasa, the "For.
bidden City" of Tibet, has at last
granted permission for a party of
British mountaineers to climb Mount
Everest.
This announcement was made by
Sir Francis Youpgnusband to an en
thusiastic meeting of the Royal
Geographical society.
Political obstacles having now teen
overcome, the physical obstacles
which bear comparison with those
surrounding the conquest of the north
pole itself, will have to be overcome
The problem is being tackled with
out delay and the grand assault upon
the mountain almost certainly will
be made next year.
Mount Everest, in the Himalayas,
the highest mountain on earth, rises
slightly more than 29.000 feet above
the tea, a height at which aviators
risk death without the aid of art!
flcial respiration. - Until 3 903. when
Sir Francis Younghusband entered
Tibet, the peak had never been seen
by white men, except from India,
where mountains at its base obscured
a complete sight of it.
Mount Everest is on the frontier line
of Nepal and Tibet, about 150 miles
from the British border. From the
Tibet side, the "Lord of the Snows,"
as the natives call it, can be seen
to rise thousands of feet above any
others.
Th ascent of Mount Everest pre
sents tremendous difficulties. The
intervening peaks are difficult, and
the climate is unfavorable.
Capital Punishment Defeated.
I'IKKIIK. S. D.. Jan. 15. A senate
bill providing , restoration of capital
punishment in South Dakota, was de
feated in the state senate Fridav, 25
to 17.
OCCUPATION PLAN STAYS
No Order Received at Coblcni on
Troops' Return Here.
COBLENZ, Jan. 15. (By the Asso
ciated Press.) No instructions have
been received here thus far with ref
erence to an immediate reduction in
the American occupational force.
The policy, as outlined by the war
department before Christmas, is to
send the American soldiers home for
discharge or reassignment as time
may necessitate. Nothing was said
about moving any of the organiza
tions home. Lnder this policy 400
men would return to the United States
for discharge during the year and,
unless the old plans are changed, it
would take two years to reduce the
American force in the Rhineland to
8000 men.
Best grades coal. Prompt delivery.
Diamond Coat Co, Pdwy. 3037. Adv.
TAHITI WOMEN . CLOTHED
Beauty I'nadorned ! Not Chief
Feature of Landscape.
rATEKTH, Tahitil. Dec. 15. (Cor
respondence of the Associated Press.)
Indignation is expressed by Tahiti
residents beoaus magazines, moving
pictures and Sunday supplement pages
of the mainland have long pictured
native Tahiti women as wearing few
clothes, when, as a matter of fact, the
avi'iaL-e woman's dress is a Mother
lulib:ii-d which begins brhind the
ears and flares voluminously to the
grass tops.
"The impression has got abroad
that beauty unadorned is one of the
chief features of our landscape." one
Tahiti resident said recently. "As
matter of fact, we see that ort of
thing about as frequently as New-
Yorkers see a band of Choctaws strid
ing down Broadway in full war paint.
"Such shocking pictures as have
appeared in mainland prints and mo
vies are merely photographers' tricks.
".Missionaries chanced the st le of
native dress lung before any of the
present generation were born and
designed the Mother Hubbard for the
female of the species here."
MAXWELL MOTORS SUED
Petition .Ak Court to Establish
Creditors' Claims, and Assets.
DETROIT. Mich.. Jan. 15. A peti
tion asking that claims of creditors
and assets of the Maxwell Motors
company ie esiaonsnea ana mat
eeks a.n iniunction restralninr other
creditors from interfering while, suit
on knox and stetson hats
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off
HERE'S A GOLDEN ROMANCE OF THE DAYS OF
"NELLIE GRAY" LAID ON THE VAST SIERRA
SLOPES AMONG THE GIANT REDWOODS. MADE
of the BIGGEST, TENDEREST THINGS in HUMAN LIFE.
KT 1 ,.. au.,., f ... . -J
MX An Elaborate Western ifelMWff? " iK ' . 1
VLf Atmospheric Sett,S fifl '"WjfWV W WEEK h
It- " - wtfitifiiisif si
- MAsETT YY ''k T5 T1
'l Liberty World - 1 . Jf H w h
Events in Motion tW tf A mdmm &JduL Xi25 mmt; Mk lk
-T-n 1' Ctmmmountgiclure - JSM
KEATES' MUSIC TEST
AND CONCERT
On Our Mighty Voiced $50,000 Organ
CONCERT
1. "Before the Mast", Nautical Medley March..L. Laurendeau
2. Selections from "FAUST" .Gounod
3. Prologue The Liberty presents a Western Atmos
pheric Setting to the famous "The Testing Block."
Music test demonstrating Keates' perfect pitch.
Bring in your old bottles, pieces of pipe, or any form
of musical instrument, or anything that svill
produce a tone, and we will show you some
thing you haven't seen before in Portland
Favorite Melodies -
Arranged by Henri A. Keates ...
TODAY
AT
12:30
3
... s
on every dollar's worth of
merchandise in
the store
42 off on overcoats
50 of f on shirts
collars and handkerchiefs
by the half dozen or dozen
inn Sichel
exclusive but not expensive
men's furnisher and hatter
331 Washington st.
near broadway
Save From 20 to 35fo
on the Purchase of
DIAMONDS
Superior and unusual buying facilities
enjoyed by us save you money on the
diamonds you buy here. See our dia
monds learn their prices! You'll be
astonished.
Buy a Diamond !
ARONSON'S
- Jewelers Silversmiths
Washington Street at Broadway
3
Made to be lovely
and made to last;
that describes the
Oriental rug
rJTHE weaver worked jor
value, not volume, fie
Was less concerned about
time than quality. Even with
a pattern to Work from, he
gets originality into his prod
uct.
Oriental rugs arc hand
woven from .virgin wool,
fine linen and pure cotton.
That's why they are so
lustrous and wear so long.
The touch of lime adds to
their beauty and value.
We have a Wonderful col
lection to choose from.
CARTOZIAN BROS.
Importers Oriental Rugs
Established 1906 ? .
Pittock Block. Portland "
With each day comes an
added determination to
better our service. Thus,
when the day's ditties arc
over we can enjoy that feel
ing of satisfaction in know
in: we have done our best.
Edward Holavanamd Son
FVneral. Directors
TWO-TWENTY THIRD STREET.
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