The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, October 05, 1919, Section One, Page 6, Image 6

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    TIIE SUNDAY OREGOXIAX, PORTLAND, OCTOBER 5, 1919.
c
KING
OF BELGIANS
A
REPORTER
Example of Peter the Great
r of Russia Followed.
RIGORS OF WAR SHARED
;iTj- Place Is On the Firing Line,
Declared Albert, AVhcu Ccr
- inaajr Invaded His Country.
MIT TORK. Oct. 4. Albert L. kin
. ef the Belgians, the only nwppr
"reporter who ever became monarch.
Is 44 years old and 1 one of the most
picturesque figures of the rreat war.
Tke kins; took a post-s;raduate course
la "newspaper" training In 1J0S. when,
lumtshtt like Teter the Great, he
visited tie shipyards of France. Great
' Britain. Italy. Germany and Scandl
sjala. to learn everything possible
. iTtTrdlris; oca carrier with the ax
. pectation at some future time of pul
ing Belgium high In the class of marl
. time powers, several years previously.
It Is said, ween merely the aon of
the count of Flanders, a nephew of
Kins; Leopold, he came to the United
Elates and worked as a reporter on
' one or two newspapers In the north
. treat.
" Succeeding to the crown on Decern
' er S3. 1S09. Albert I endeared him
elf to the 7.500.000 pe-ople of hi
l:ttle kinirdora. The abuses of the
Congo, which bad brought upon the
bead of his aged uncle Leopold the
- condemnation of the civilized world,
were abo.i.-hed and the king and his
- beautiful consort faced the prosper
,t( i long and happy reign In a coun
- try where "tramps. Idlers and aoup
bouses are unknown."
Kima- Leada Ola Soldiers.
Then came the war. The king of
the Belgians might have yielded and
eacaped much of the hardship and
.". suffering that. was the lot of himself
- and his people for more than four
. years. Heeding not the specious prom
' Ises of tbe Germans to pay Belgium
huge sums for the prlrllere of cross
" leg her soil to attack France, the
gallant king railied his army of 350,
.Aoi men and placed himself at their
bead to fight the Invader. hen the
-German armies violated at Vise the
.'neutrality of the little nation they
were pledged to prolect, they met
with the most stubborn resistance
. Jrora the valiant but numerically in
ferior Belgians at tbe forts of Liege
and Nimur.
During the great conflict King Al
bert spared himself none of the rlg-
. era of the soldier. Q:ten he exposed
himself to shell fire and aviators
bombs burst about him. Once a Ger-
.' man ahe'.l tore off the wheel of the
- automobile in which be was riding.
At u'Khr time a chauffeur who bad
been promised 1200.000 to deliver the
' king to the enemy waa shot dead
' as he endeavored to drive the royal
' car Into the German linea Hardly
- 4ay passed that he wis not in Jeopardy
.. of hi life and futile efforts were
made by his ministers to Induce him
.-not to expose himself.
"My skin ts of no more value than
yours." he told his heartsick soldiers
.on their retreat from Antwerp. "My
place Is on the firing line.
Mother a Hoheaaollera.
Although his mother was a Hohen
-xollera princess and his wife a Bava
' rian princess, and although In his
outh be had been educated In Ger
. many, he maintained an Independence
of character that lrrlated the former
. emperor of Germany. The latter,
among honors before the war. con
ferred upon Albert I the title of hon-
.. orary colonel of the Mecklenburg reg-
- 1 me nt. an act which the Belgian press
construed as an effort of the German
ruler to gala an influence over the
. young king.
An indication of Albert's spirit came
when Belgium waa invaded. In taking
command of his troops on August 6.
1314. he said: "A neighbor, haughty
" In its strength, without the slight
est provocation, has torn up a treaty
bearing Ita signature and has violated
the territory of our fathers because
we refused to forfeit our honor. It
. has attacked us. Seeing Its independ
ence threatened, the nation trembled
- and Its children sprang to the fron-
tier, valiant soldiers In a sacred cause.
- I have confidence in your tenacious
" courage. I greet you in the name of
Belgium, a fellow citizen who is proud
- oX you!"
Fra lie Freaeata Sword.
One year after Belgium' heroic re
" sistance to the German f.ood. the
people of Paris. In gratitude to and af
r fectlon for King Albert, presented to
- him a gift sword of Sainte-Ktienne
steel, the design of which was wrought
by the sculptor. Fetu. L'pon the blade,
ornamented with panoplies of ateel
-- upon gold, waa a tribute written by
Jen r.ichepin.
"Z. So thoroughfare." Is the Inscrlp
1 Hon upon the guard at the foot of
- tha hilt In the form of a statuette, in
massive gold, representing a young
athlete upon tbe defensive, brandlah-
lng a club.
; On Friday. November 15. 191S. after
; years of bitter privations. King AI
; bert returned with his victorious
; troops to his devastated but beloved
- capital amid the loud acclaim of the
people.
Queen Kllxabeth. who was married
to King Albert In 1900. as the Duchess
Kllxabeth of Bavaria, was described
- at the time as "a strikingly handsome
woman." The marriage was quite
; generally supposed to have be.n a
genuine love match. Three children
have been born to them, the belr-ap
' parent. Prince Leopold, duke of Bra
. bant, born November 3, 1901; a second
son. Prince Charles Theodore, born in
1303. and a daughter, the Frinceaa
" iiarle Jose, born in 190S.
atea ltlahly Kaaratrd.
The queen Is highly educated and
' fond of music, liteurature and art.
. Music is said to be a passion with her
. and he is an accomplished violtuist.
he also plays the piano and mando
r lin with much ability. It is said that
; she has a marked preference for the
old repertoire, but confesses to a bora -'.
Inating Wagner. Some years ago she
developed talent as a dramatist and
.in 1904 wrote "Rosamond.' a play
which was produced In Brussels in
March of that year and caused a de
cided stir In the Belgian capital. She
la also a skilled horsewoman.
During the war the queen nursed
many wounded soldiers. A daughter
of Duke Charles Theodore of Bavaria,
'a renowned oculist, she began the
study of medicine herself at the age
.. of 1( and took her degree of M. D. at
Leipxlg Just before her marriage. Ex
ceedingly fond of horses and dogs, the
queen, before the war. frequently at
tended the weekly Inspection of the
royal stables at Laeken. when the
hundred or more animals were at-
tended by court veterinarians, and
.often gave the most experienced at
' tendants Instructions aa to proper
treatment. Havana griffons are her
.favorite dogs, and two of them usual
ly stand guard in the royal drawing
room.
Queen Elisabeth's charity is said
by the Belgians to be literally un
bounded. Many a poor, struggling
; artist at the Opera in Brussels is said
to have benefited from her generosity
without being aware or the fact, for
her gifts are usually made anony
mously. An instance of the queen's kind
heartedness Is related by the town
folk of Laeken. One cold, rainy morn
ing before the war, the queen was
driving along the Avenue de la Iteine,
when she raw a poor old woman,
scantily clad, walking along. The
queen got out of her car, stepped over
to the woman and asked her if she
was not cold. Receiving an affirma
tive reply. Kllxabeth took off her
own waterproof and placed it over
the old woman's back. Then, taking
out her purse, she gave her several
gold coins, and took her address so
that she might continue her benevo
lence. Many incidents of this type
have long since endeured the queen
to the people of Belgium.
Intensely practical. Queen Eliza
beth has sought to educate her peo
ple in domestic economy and other
useful arts. She founded a training
school for cooks in Brussels on the
lines of a university, with a three
years' course and an honor class. Lib
eral prizes were offered by the queen
to the students who Invented new
dishes. The students were from all
classes of society, working girls, so
cial butterflies and intellectuals.
4 area la F. Xpert Cook.
The queen Is an expert cook her
self, and frequently called at the
school to advise the teachers and
watch the progress of the students.
Among ner numerous charities, not
tbe least ts the Albert-Elizabeth dis
pensary In Brussels, which the king
and queen established and have sup
ported for years.
The king and queen are enthusias
tic about aviation and both have tak
en a number of flights, two of whtcn
included trips across the English
channel from Paris to London. On
March IS, 1917. Albert made a long
reconnalsance In a biplane over the
Yser front under a heavy anti-aircraft
fire by the Germans. At other
times the daring monarch "visited"
ostend. Bruges, Dunkirk and other
Belgian cities in machines that car
ried him high above the guns.
iiraieiui xor me aia wnicn ine i
United States and the allies bestowed I
upon Belgium in her hours of trial,
the king's visit is said to be partly
to express this appreciation on behalf
of his country to the American people.
One of the gifts which Albert and
Elizabeth are bringing to this coun
try is a complete table set of Brussels
porcelain for President and Mrs. Wil
son, whose guests tbey will be at the
White House for a part of their stay,
l'pon leaving the United States the
royal couple are to visit King Alfonso
and Queen Victoria of Spain, for both
of whom they have a warm attach
ment.
HUNTER, 19, IS KILLED
Effort to Relieve Exhausted Com
panion Fatal to G. L. Sliuliz.
CENTRALLY, Wash.. Oct. 4. (Spe
cial.) George Leon Shultz, 19-year-old
son of Mr. and Mrs. George Shultz
of Tenino. was Instantly killed yes
terday while hunting with three com
panions In tbe upper Skookumchuck
valley.
The party was on Its way home
when one of the young hunters was
overcome with exhaustion. Schultz
offered to carry his shotgun and
reached for the weapon, pulling it
toward him. muzzle first. The gun
was discharged, the load tearing
through Schultz' stomach. '
The body waa brought to the city
last sight.
-Pi-?!1?
What
Makes
the
Wheels
of
Industry
(fir
Around? IPr!
iff
iis
-Wis
.e Of rice kquipme
From here radiates the whole business of any concern. Should this
equipment be inferior, out-of-date, ponderous and cumbersome it will so
lower the efficiency of any business that any keen competitor modernly
equipped would soon have the field to himself. A poorly equipped office
will lower the morale of any business.
See what is new in office equipment. '
Visit our Office Furniture Department on our third floor.
Tables Chairs
. Globe-Wernicke Sectional Bookcases and Filing; Cabinets, Filing Equip
ment of all kinds, Labor-saving Devices.
Agents for the best office furniture manufacturers of the country.
LL
The J. K. Gill Co.
Booksellers Stationers Office Outfitters
Third and Alder Sts.
JAPAN ACCEPTS HEW EM
PREMIER. II Alt A SAYS END OF
MACHIAVELLIAN DIPLOMACY.
ARBITRATIONPLEA MADE
Spokane Job Printers Vote to Strike
as Alternative.
SPOKANE. Wash.. Oct 4. Job
printers of Spokane today endeavored
to win their employers to arbitration
over the question of a wage demand
recently presented to the printers
They stated that as an alternative to
refusal of arbitration they would go
on strike, a vote favoring such action
having been taken by their local last
night, it was announced.
Arbitration of the demand of 17 for
a seven-hour day was refused by the
employers, who proposed arbitration
of their offer of Hi for a 48-hour
week.
MONARCHY IS CALLED FOR
Budapest Placarded With Large
Posters Advocating- Old Regime.
BUDAPEST. Friday. Oct S. The
city has suddenly become placarded
with large posters summoning the
people, regardless of race or creed,
to rally to the monarchy and deraand-
ng an Immediate meeting of the na-
lonal assembly for the purpose of
bringing about a monarchy.
The government has just made pub-
Us figures showing that the soviet
rule in Hungary cost the country
3. 675. 000.000 crowns.
Considerable Interest Aroused In
i
View of Straggle Going On Be
tween Jlilitarists and Liberals.
TOKIO. Sept. 27. (By the Asso
ciated Press.) "The day of Machia
vellian diplomacy is past and a new
era of open diplomacy is arrived, with
International affairs managed by co
operation of the powers whether old-
school diplomats of Japan like it or
not." declared Premier Hara today at
a 'luncheon given in honor of Baron
Makino. forme minister of foreign
affairs.-and one of Japan's delegates
to the peace conference. In view of
fhe jitruczle coins: on between the
militarists and liberals of Japan, con
siderable interest has been aroused
K ir th nrpmier'fl words.
M. Hara praised Baron Makino and
his colleagues for obtaining approval
of all Japanese contentions except
that relative to equality of races.
adding:
"The fact that some misunderstand
ings eaisted in foreign countries con
cerning the real Intention of Japan
made the task of the Japanese dele
gates more severe."
The nremier said the new poet-war
era means that "militarism has been
absolutely discarded and that the
powers will work conjointly for world
peace.
M. Hara expressed the belief that
the treaty of peace with Germany
would be ratified by the powers at no
distant date, although he thought it
probable the operation of the treaty
would bring up new problems which
would require the exercise of care and
consideration.
In replying. Baron Makino said Ja
pan must "fall In with the new order
of things if she wished to maintain
her position aa one of the five great
powere."
an entertainment in its lodge rooms.
An oyster supper was a feature of the
evening's programme. Short addresses,
in which they related their war
experiences, were made by the veterans.
have either disappeared from view or
kept no intelligible record.
WOMEN WORKERS FEWER
Number Employed by Railroads
During War Being Rednced.
WASHINGTON, Oct 4. The num
ber of women employed by railroads
In heavy work while the war was
on Is being reduced steadily, Director
General Hines .announced. Women
employed July 1 were 4.9 per cent
fewer than on April 1, but those
working in roundhouses had -been re
duced 23.6 per cent and in shop work
18 per cent- , .
The total number of women work
ing on railroads July 1, was 2,284,
most in clerical positions.
Central! Veterans Entertained.
CENTRALIA. Wash.. Oct 4. (Spe
cial.) In honor of Its members who
served overseas, Centralia lodge No.
54, Knights of rythias. last night held
TIFFANY
FAVRILE GLASS
i TIFFANY FAVRILE
1 1
GLASS IS THE ARISTO
CRAT OF GLASSES. IT IS NO MORE TO
BE CLASSED WITH ORDINARY GLASSES
THAN AN EXQUISITE VOICE IS TO BE COM
PARED WITH ONE OF MEDIOCRE QUALITY.
FOR WEDDING GIFTS OR FOR ORNAMENTAL
PURPOSES THERE IS NOTHING DAINTIER,
OR MORE TO BE TREASURED BY THE POSSESSOR.
NEW SHIPMENT OF ODD
COLORS HAS BEEN RECEIVED,
A
SPECTION IS INVITED,
DESIGNS AND
YOUR LN-
We Are
Exclusive Agents
A. & C. Feldenheimer
Jewelers Silversmiths Opticians
Washington St. at Park. Established 1868.
NINETY MILLIONS SPENT
Revolutionary Financing In Berlin
Will Be Exposed.
BERLIN, Sept 17. (Correspondence
of the Associated Press.) Revolu
tionary financing as practiced by Ger
man soldiers, sailors and working
men's councils will be exposed in a
forthcoming- memorial from, the min
istry of finance.
According to trustworthy estimates,
the sums disposed of by local revo
lutionary tribunals amounted to 90,
000,000 marks, but the bulk of it is
unaccounted fori as the men who col
lected the money and disbursed it 140
The raising of stags for their horns
is one of the curious industries In
China, the horns being cut while soft
each year, and used Jn the manufac
ture of medicine.
Radio-Active Pad
Restores Health
or Money Back
Th United State government report!
show that a large percentage of all diseases
treated with Radium wera either cured or
greatly benefited. Tou may now say to
yourself How could one thing cure all
these different diseases? Very simple! This
Is what our Radio-Actlve Pad will do for
you or me. It gives forth energy rays that
penetrate your body, causing a vibration
that exercises the tissue, the blood cells,
veins, arteries, etc. This causes the circu
lation to attain its normal flow. That's
all our Pad does. It restores youx circula
tion to normal. But that's all it'need do.
Medical science has proven that 95 of all
diseases are caused by sluggish circulation.
That being true, jf we can bring back your
circulation to normal, we have cured you.
And that is just what our Pad should do
for you. Bring back your blood circulation
to normal, bo sure are we that the Pad
will benefit you that we give you a "money
back." absolute guarantee, ten-day trial,
you to be the only judge as to whether you
have been benefited or not. Why suffer
longer when you can try our Pad at our ex
pense? No matter what your ailment. 01
how long standing, we would be pleased to
ave you
Try It at Our Risk
"Write for full information.
K A T1V M ' A PPLIAXCE CO..
Bradbury Bid?., Los Angeles, Calif.
I Cj3 IK. Jh 1" 9 S
PROFIT SHARING
Cash Selling Policy
III Means money saved which is money made to the customer who buys
! HI here. That's our statement, let us verify it to you.
MAKE COMPARISON OF VALUES
i I Compare Grays Compare Grays Compare Gray's j
Suits and Overcoats Suits and Overcoats Suits and Overcoats
with those sold by the with those sold by the with those sold by the
III other stores for other stores for other stores for I
1 $35 and $40. $45 and $50 $55 and $60
7 DISCOUNT
HI on men's furnishings and hats when purchase amounts to $4 or more;
! contract goods excepted.
1 O llr (PD A V 366 WASHINGTON
; K. 1V1. UKA I ST. AT WEST PARK
1 Sunday Dinner i
ifil
The
CREMONA
the PHONOGRAPH
with the human TONE
mmmmmvtiisaieSt
I lib I U'. '
fj! JIM1 JiwJtihr
CJ While beautiful in
appearance the
charm of the Cremona's unequalled tone is
the big satisfying feature.
CjfTwo distinctive inventions make the Cre
mona stand out clearly above other makes.
First, the resonator is a spruce sound cham
ber where the vibrations resound like those of
a violin. The second exclusive feature is the '
Cremona tone arm which is an adjustable
pressure regulator giving to the various rec
ords the pressure needed. These new im
provements add greatly in the production of
Cremona's superior tone.
JThe Cremona plays all records without
rasping notes, nasal tones or surface
noises the only phonograph built on the
principles of a piano or violin. Come in and .
near it play.
Wakefield Music Go.
427 Washington St, Portland, Oregon.
is always the most enjoyable hour of the day when you
spend it at
The Hazelwood
where one is sure of being served with the latest of
the season's delicacies.
Vegetable Dinner 45c Plate Dinner 75c
Table d'Hote $1
- Hazelwood
Pastry
If you wish something different for breakfast, for after
noon tea or dessert select some dainty from our
pastry shop. Baked fresh daily.
388
Washington
127
Broadway
F- L I in T'i im n i m iiniiiiliiii Win n nt'i "-'-iniiiiiifiiiniiiiiihtni - , .jj
"BAGGAGE A worthless thing; an incum
brance; rubbish. " (Webster)
And no wonder, when you view the effect of even a short trip on the aver
age bag or suitcase.
has changed all this. The name spells perfection in
quality skill in workmanship beauty in design and
finish.
"The
Roadman"
is a special which should be in the grip hand
of everyone who travels.
A Genuine Cowhide Bag for
$13.75
Eighteen-inch, smooth grain, black or tan; five-piece construction; heavy steel,
leather-covered frame; lift catches; English concealed lock; large corners sewed on;
double stitched; leather lined throughout; three pockets.
One of the famous "LIKLY" f ayorltes will wear and look well for years. Order by mail
WOODARD, CLARKE & CO.
Wood-Lark Bldg. Alder at West Park