The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, September 14, 1919, SECTION FIVE, Page 7, Image 79

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    THE. SUXDAY OBEGOXIAX, PORTLAND, SEPTEMBER 14, 19X9.
7
;M GOT THROUGH,
BUT WHAT 11 TOUR
And They Reached Tillamook
Instead of Portland.
WALTER KNEW THE ROADS
fist Ilereafter When lie Goes Tour
Ing, All Agree He'll Steer by
Map and the Tonr Book.
VuAdle. t., t.: T mix confusedly: to make
a mM of: a, t mudilla a Decollation, to
murtdi. onc'i task, .1c to muddltt a tour.
Webster's Dictionary.
BI L a GREGORY.
Any peraon who Is easily affected by
talea of wild adventure, who g-alps ex
citedly and wants to scream as the
hero jumps from the second story to
the roof, should pass up this story.
this road. His brother ventured a
feeble protest, asklns; If they didn't
have to ra throua-h Tillamook first.
"No. no, nothing like that," returned
Mr. Walter in serene confidence. "This
is the road to Portland. I know It.
Sou can't fool ma on directions."
Well, It was the road to Portland, or
rather. It was the ex-road to Fortiana.
The fact Is that Mr. Walter had
blithely pointed the Hupmobile up the
Wilson river road, which never was an
automobile highway, and was aban
doraed aaveral years ago even as a
road for horse vehicles. The Wilson
river road climbs right over the moan-
tains Instead of hunting: a pass through
them. A few small cars, mostly manned
by anglers, have made It to Tillamook
from Fnreat Grove over this Wilson
river road this year, but it is supposed
to be impassable on account of the
steep trrades, to automobiles from
Tillamook to Forest Grove.
Nevertheless, this Is the road that
Mr. Walter took. And now let us have
slow music please, for the climax is
approaching- for a few miles the road
was good and tlwn it began to climb,
climb, climb. More than that, after a
while there didn't seem to be any road
Just a cow path down the center, with
vines and bushes arrowing up from
this center in a kind of V formation.
They were now in the midst of gneat
forests, with huge trees on all sides. In
places they had to veer from the road.
such as it was. to pass fallen logs.
though luckily the way around had
been pioneered after a fashlnon by the
few cars that had crossed from the
other side.
"What's the matter with this road.
SHE SELLS, NOT SEA SHELLS, BUT REAL ESTATE.
If
3t
4
Sal
MRS. r. M. BtMMELU RECENT PURCHASER OF A MITCHELL. SIX FROM
THE MITCHELL. LEWIS A STAYER COMPANY.
The strain will be too great. It depicts
. the most classic touring example In
our midst of what the English call
"muddling through." It combines
thrills, bitter pathos, a mirthful touch
or two. Yet all leads to a happy end
ing.
The orchestra will kindly play Jass
music as the hero enters. The hero is
John A. Walter, the tire man. Mr.
Walter will please bow. and thin re
tire on his gallant steed, a 1916 Hup
mobile. to get his tour book, without
which he is nevermore to venture from
the family doorstep.
While he is hunting for the tour
book, enter Mrs. John A. Walter, his
wife; Clyde A. Walter, his brother, and
bis wife. Soft music and the aoughing
of the wind in the ta.ll firs as in pan
tonine they look weepingly for road
signs: basso profundo and sobs as the
gasoline runs out; but a sprightly tune,
there, orchestra leader, aa the emer
gency tank saves them and they fin
ally after long hours find themselves
again on familiar soil.
Let the plot proceed.
This story begins with a pleasing
domestic scene at the Walter home.
Mr Walter, comfortably sipping his
coffee. Is unscrambling the Sunday
Or g on lan In aearch of the automobile
section. He finda it. On the front
page of this particular aectlon is a
pictorial map of the loop tour from
Portland to Astoria and return, ove
the lower Columbia river and Inlan
highways, and an account of how to
make the trip. Mr. Waiter ponders this
map briefly.
Let's All G Along."
"Ah." says he. "here's just the thing.
Let's make this loop tour to Astoria
and back. It's a great trip. We'll take
along the tent and make it in two days.
If need be. Iaxn the expense, let
go!"
"Yes, let's go!" comes the triple
chorus.
The story will now revert from pres
ent to past tense. The gallant 1916
Hupmobile, rarin' to go, was trough
snorting to the door step. The tent,
blankets, a few kitchen things and an
Iron ration were taken aboard. Then
with full supplies of gasoline and oil.
away they went.
Mr. Walter beaded er west by north
down the lower Columbia river high
way. The day was fine, the road was
good and In due time, at about two
bells of the first dog watch, they were
In Astoria.
"Fine town, this." remarked Mr. Wal
ter approvingly, aa they motored down
the main street- But let's keep going.
W e can eat along the road.
Mr. Walter being the' skipper, what
he said went, of course. From Astoria
they crossed Young's river and Just
beyond it came to the Junction of three
roads. One turned to the left, one to
the right, and the third went straight
ahead. The one to the left was the way
to Portland. The one to the right waa
plainly marked. "Seaside." Without an
instant's hesitation. Mr. Walter righted
the helm and turned down the Seaside
road.
"Here, hold on there, wait a moment.
stop, will you!" ejaculated Mr. Walter's
brother. "This Is the road to Seaside.
1 believe we're making the wrong turn.
J-.et a take a look at that map."
He Needs No Map, Not He!
Mr. Walter did not stop. "What's
the matter?" he snorted. "Of course
it's the way to Seaside. Say, I know
this country like a book. You have to
go to Seaside to reach Portland by the
inland route. Anybody knows that.
You don't have to look at the map to
una mat out.
Thus crushed. Mr. Walter's brother
eaid no more. Presently tney reached
Seaside, and Mr. Walter decided they
might as well eat and camp for the
night. They did, and next morning
bright and early were ready to con
tinue.
"I've been all through this country,"
said Mr. Walter. "To reach Portland,
you go right ahead. I could travel all
through this section without ever look
ing at a map.
On they went. The road took them
through forests and then through a
more open country, with fertile mead
ows and a pleasant stream winding
through them. Mr. Walter took the
view that this was the Kehalem river,
as Indeed it was. though the iower
Nehalem Instead of the upper. He very
properly remarked that the Inland
highway followed the Nehalem for a
good many miles, and opined that they
were getting pretty close to Portland.
In the course of events, a town ap
peared ahead of them. The town waa
Tillamook. This fact presently dawned
on Mr. Walter. Did it fease htm? It
did not.
"Well. well, this Is Tillamook." said
he. "How we ever got here is more
than I know. But I'm glad we're here.
I know Just exactly where we are now,
and how to get out. This is a beauti
ful country, isn't it? Don't worry. I
know this section like a book, and I'll
oon have you home."
Sere. It West Portlaad.
Just before entering Tillamook, the
Hupmobile came to a road branching
to the east off the main road. Mr.
Walter promptly turned the car up
anyhow?" snapped Mr. Walter. "It
never acted like this before."
But he kept on. which wss about the
only thing he could do- By and by,
after miles of climbing, the Hupmobile
rame to the famous Zig-Zag hill. This
Is a very long hill and a very steep
hill. The alleged road is full of slip
pery places made so by springs oozing
out of the rock. It would be a bad
hill on any road. On this ex-road, it
is a terror.
Somewhere on this hill the Hup
mobile came to a bridge. One side of
the long unrepaired structure had sunk
and teetered over so that the bed of it
tilted at an angle. A car spilled over
the edge would have stopped some
where short of China, but not very
much so. To make it worse, the road
at the other side turned in a very
sharp hairpin up a very steep grade.
Cautiously crossing this bridge and
trying to make the curve, one wheel
of the car somehow got caught in
hole. Stepping on 'er to get out caused
the rear wheels to skid and slip down
the slanting planks toward the edge
Might there Mrs. Walter, who had
trustingly and uncomplainingly fol
lowed her spouse in his meanderings
to find the way to Portland, declared
a revolt.
"I am going to get out of this car,1
said she firmly. And she did get out.
To get out of this hole without slid
ing over the side of the bridge. Mr.
Walter and his brother had to Jack up
the wheel and literally pry the car
out. It waa getting along in the even
ing now, too, and it began to look aa it
they might have to camp out there
over night among the bobcats and
bears. If, Indeed, they ever got out at
all. But the worst was still to come.
Right in one of the slipperiest and
steepest parts of Zlg-Zag hill, with the
car working hard in low, there was a
choke and a gasp and the engine
stopped. Out of gas! The fact was
that there was still some, gas In the
tank, though not much, but the car
was tilted at such a steep angle that
the carburetor was higher than the
gas tank, which in the 1916 Hupmobile
is In the cowl But this Hupmobile
also has a one-gallon emregency tank.
and Mr. Walter never thanked his stars
more that this is so than at that
critical moment.
Quick, Brother, the Emergency.'
"Turn on that emergency tank," he
cried, at the same tlnrva throwing on all
brakes to hold the car on the steep
grade. His brother leaped out and
prudently put a rock behind one of the
back wheels before he turned the cock
to the emergency tank. The engine re
sponded to the starter with a Joyful
hum. Nobody in that party ever had
heard a more gladsome sound.
The orchestra may now swing into
more pleasing strains, though the note I
of anxiety still predominates. The
worst has been told. Zig-Zag hill was
at length surmounted, the supposedly
impossible accomplished, and a car had
reached the summit from tike Tilla
mook side. There still remained a
good many miles to Gales creek, the
first gasoline station, and some pretty
bad roads, but mostly down hill. At
every down stretch. Mr. Walter turned
off the Ignition and let her coast. At
every up stretch, all nervously waited
City
Gary
of
Portland
Time
for
Fire
oreau
& - r;- . JSbv yv ,
The passing of the horse proves the economy of operating by trucks. Twelve horses to be disposed of by city for Twentieth
Century fire equipment Fire-fighting apparatus to be installed at Municipal Shop of City of Portland.
The City of Portland held competitive tests for trucks that would be best suitable for strength and hill climbing under loaded
conditions and speed on level, in which the Gary won over all competitors in open competitions, in which the city invited all
dealers to compete. The Gary, "The Ten Point Test" Truck is composed of standard units The Buda Motor, Brown Lipe
Transmission Tuthill Titanic Branded Springs, Parrish and Bingham Cold Pressed Steel Frame.
Factory One Full Year Guarantee
These Trucks Are Equipped With Brunswick Pneumatic Tires
71 Broadway
Ty
Coast
emcy
Distributors
Phone Broadway 2162
for the tell-tale cough that meant no
.nore gasoline. But at length, wel
after dark, they reached Gales creek
and gas.
From that point it was pretty near- I
iTJm.SBA OPERA TI OX S MAKE DE-
ing the Hup halted before the Walter
mansion. Now, orchestra leader, your
gayest tune. The happy ending is
achieved. And the sturdy Falls tires
and Evergreen tubes with which the
car is equipped have come through
without a puncture. Ruffle the drums.
clash the cymbals, call out the guard.
They're home!
Well." said Mr. Walter, genially.
I knew we'd get here. I know that
road. I know that country like a "
John!" said Mrs. Walter. "John!
Next time we go touring, you will
kindly drive by map and tour book!"
By map and tour book! chorused
all hands.
! SISKIYOU STRETCH IS SAD
TOUR NECESSARY.
Ten Miles an Hour About All Cars
Can Make Now on Mountain Sec
tion of the Highway.
ASHLAND, Or., Sept. 13. -(Special.)
The. Siskyou mountain grade on the
Pacific highway is in the worst shape
since the new grade waa established
several years ago. Paving operations
are on in full swing and one detour of
a mile around where crews are laying
hot stuff is rlvina- southbound tourists
The dash pressure or sight feed a little trouble.
gauge seldom gives any trouble and I Rock has been piled along the road
will warn you If the oil Is retting low. 'from the end of the present pavement
on the Oregon aide to the California
line. The heavy auto-trucks have
spread this rock and ground out chuck
holes until it is impossible to make
more than ten miles an hour anywhere
on this stretch. The detour is steep,
but has stalled only one or two cars
so far. Autoists are advised to tin
their radiators at a place provided at
the foot of the detour.
Between Ashland and the foot of the
mountain the road is torn up a little
on account of work preliminary to
paving, but Is not in bad shape.
From the California line through
Yreka to Gazelle the California state
highway is in excellent shape. Thirty
miles an hour Is possible for long
stretches. From Gazelle to Weed the
road is "wavy" but not bad. The de
tour south of Dunsmuir is still giving
autoists trouble.
The Ashland-Klamath Falls road is
In poor condition. With ordinarily
careful driving it takes seven hours
to make the 64 miles although the
auto-stages, with drivers who make
the trip daily, are doing it In five hours.
Excellent progress Is being made on
the new Greenspring
math Falls.
grade to Kla-
A Stitch In Time,
rion't fall to examine electrical con
nections, gasoline and oil lines and
bolts and nuts occasionally, and sea
that everything la Intact.
Learn to Judge distances and speed
at which a car travels. Ability to es-..
timate speed mav prevent accidents.
ACTUAL PROOF OF VALUE IN
HE'S
DISTRIBUTOR FOR
ARROW HERE.
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