The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, June 08, 1919, Section One, Page 5, Image 5

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SOLD AT AUCTION
THE SUNDAY OREGOXIAX, PORTLAND, JUNE 8, 1019.
RAREMAWUSCRIPTS
Famous Yates Thompson Col-
lection Again Scattered.
MANY SUBJECTS BIBLICAL
Interesting Sketches and Illumina
tions Throw jLlght on Thought
of the Dark Ages.
LONDON, June 7. A sale by auction
Of 100 illuminated manuscripts collect
ed by Yates Thompson, formerly owner
of the Pall Mall Ua.ette, was held at
Sotheby's this week. The collection was
offered in three lots, and a richly illus
trated catalogue of the first volumes j
offered was issued.
Mr. Thompson himself prepared the
catalogue for the auctioneers and en
riched it with many personal touches.
He says that some might prefer that
the collection be permanently kept to
gether, but in the case of a compara
tively small group of books in which
each individual is so important as to
be well qualified to stand by itself he
prefers that the volumes should be in
private hands rather than merged in
any public collection.
"These precious manuscripts which
have been to me of such absorbing in
terest," is how he describes his treas
ures. Eight of them came from the famous
library of Lord Ashburnham and five
from that of M. Firmin-Didot, the
Paris publisher, whose collection of il
luminated manuscripts occupied a sim
ilar position in France to the Ash
burnham collection in England.
Quaint Humor Is Shown.
One relic is a psalter which belonged
to a nun in the Augustinian convent
of Preray, near Cambrai, in the region
recently occupied by the German
troops. On the leather cover there is a
stamped representation of John .the
Baptist preaching. One of the decora
lions reproduced in the catalogue rep
resents David slinging his stone at
Goliath in the 13 th century chain
armor, helmet and shield.
The quaint taste which induced our.
pious ancestors to place caricatures or
living men as gargoyles on churches is
reillustrated in the breviary of Mar
guerite de Bar, who wts abbess of the
Convent of Saint Maur, near Verdun, in
the 13th century. She was a great lady,
of a noble family, with a brother who
was bishop of Metz, and the pages of
her breviary which she .used at mass
have on their borders grotesque fig
ures and designs of a distinctly secular
character. One, for example, repre
sents a cock In harness drawing a
country cart up a tree branch, the cart
being occupied by two monkeys, one
blowing a trumpet.
Another reproduction in this cata
logue from a 16th century French life
of Christ, represents the Egyptians in
the Red sea.
The sea is very red, and is full of
horses and men in gold armor. The
waters have reached to the spearmen's
chins, and they still stand in solid
ranks with marvelous discipline.
Jn the center is Pharaoh in his crown
and ermine tippet, with his hands ex
tended in that peculiarly wooden pos
ture which the illuminations of the
middle ages regarded as that of grief
or entreaty.
A Treasure In the Dark.
On the banks of the Red sea Moses
and Aaron, clad like 16th century
burghers, are improving the occasion
with a very fine stolidity.
Yates Thompson cannot conceal the
triumphs of a collector in his notes.
For instance, there is a loth century
book of Petrarch's Sonnets of which
lie says:
"This charming little volume of cer
tain Florentine origin was thrown ii
na a makeweight when I was bargain
ing with an Italian nobleman for
splendid example of an early English
Apocalypse of the 13th century in i
famous city on the coast of the Adri
atic."
Again he rejoices' in the 12th cen
tury martyrology from the Benedictine
convent of Monte Cassino in southern
Italy:
"When I bought this book in Frank
furt, 26 years ago. I little knew what
a treasure I had hit upon: still less did
Mr. Baer of Frankfurt, who sold it to
me."
It is the only Monte Cassino book in
England or America, with the excep
tion of the Bodleian Library.
One of his oldest treasures is a vol
ume produced in 894 A. D. in a Spanish
monastery at the command of an abbot
named Victor. Victor's artist pro
duced, among other startling color ef
fects, a huge green tree full of birds,
red, brown, yellow and pink, with nests
of young birds. Beneath is a yellow
ox and Nebudchadnezzar eating a plant,
which may be a banana, or a parsnip,
according to the school of interpreta
tion favored by the student.
The illumination of this old Spanish
missal shows distinct traces of Sara
cenic influences, which may be attrib
uted to the Moorish invasion of the
south.
The Book Magnificent.
Of another, a Byzantine manuscript,
Mr. Thompson remarks that the designs
have sucli an Asiatic look that he
thinks the artists must have had in
mind the coloring of oriental rugs.
This particular work was in Ham
ilton Palace library, and was sold to
the German government in 1882. In
1S89 it was resold in London, it being
understood that this was a protest by
Prince Bismarck against what he con
sidered the extravagance of the pur
chase, which had been advised by the
then crown prince, the kaiser's father.
Two very fascinating lots are atlases
or "fortulani" by the Genoese cartogra
pher, Baptista Agnese, made about
1550. They show quaint drawings of
America.
"The most magnificent book in the
world," is Mr. Thompson's description
of an edition of Aristotle, printed In
Venice in 1483. It consists of two im
mense volumes, printed in the blackest
of ink on the choicest and whitest vel
lum. It weighs 33 pounds, and it is
illustrated with wonderful pen work
and paintings.
One. representing Aristotle instruct
ing the Arabian philosopher Averroes,
which is reproduced in this sumptuous
catalogue, is a really wonderful speci
men of Italian art of the period.
Cordial
ff Welcome
ssl does this historic old
P N hotel offer to the thoHi-. '
.' sands of guests who
will be in Portland this
week.
The city is' indeed
honored to have within
its gates the out-of-town
people who will ,
attend the Ad Men's
Convention, the E.ose
Festival, and the Con-
fectioners' Convention. -
The Keys of Jsjfsf
the City are i?fcji
youra-
Hofef RrtfandW? I
for the. Americans" as "America for
North Americans."
Mr. Ross told his hearers that British
neglect of advertising in South Amer
ica. had an important effect upon their
trade; that it was important that cata
logues should be published in the lan
guage of the people and that prices
should be quoted in the currency of the
country.
NEW LABOR PUN TRIED
EXPERIMENT IX INDUSTRIAL.
, DEMOCRACY WATCHED.
' -
im! '
if i ih.h
'
My label protects you. Its plain and only meaning Is: m
lour satisfaction made certain or your money back, gladly.
BEN SELLING'S A PERMANENT INSTITUTION
PRESENTING CLOTHES of PERMANENT CHARACTER
qNOT EVERY CLOTHIER CAN JUSTIFIABLY , TELL YOU THAT
THE SUIT YOU PURCHASE TODAY WILL HAVE ITS CHARACTER
AND IMPRESSIVENESS A YEAR FROM TODAY. T. CAN. MY FAB
RICS AND STYLES ARE SUBSTANTIAL AND STANDARD.
qNOT 'THAT YOU'LL WANT TO WEAR NEXT YEAR THE SUIT
YOU SELECT HERE TOMORROW, BUT, FOR THE SAKE OF ARGU
MENT, I CLAIM YOU CAN WEAR IT. TO KNOW THIS STORE IS TO
KNOW STYLE TO KNOW SATISFACTION.
q THERE ARE THOSE TO WHOM THIS STORE AND ITS STYLES
REPRESENT ACCOMPLISHMENT AND AMBITION. ARE YOU ONE
OF SUCH? BE 'ONE. IT'S EASY, PRACTICAL, ECONOMICAL AND
ENJOYABLE.
- GOOD CLOTHES READY-TO-PUT'ON
Twenty-Five Dollars
to Sixty
eit
Morrison Street at Fourth:
System Based on Constitution and
Government of the United States
Said to Be a Success.
NEW YORK, June 7. Manufacturers
and union labor leaders all over the
United States are said to be watching
with interest and sympathy the ex
periment in industrial democracy
which is now being conducted in five
cities Ft. Wayne, Ind., Shelton. Conn.,
Cleveland, O., Paterson, N. J., and
Brooklyn, N. Y., and which, it is be
lieved by some of them, will scotch if
it does not prevent Bolshevism in in
dustrial centers where it is put into
effect.
The originator of the plan, John
Leitch, an efficiency engineer, started
it among 300 employes of a Fort
Wayne piano factory. Its basis was
the constitution of the United States.
The factory was administered by a
senate, a house of representatives "and
a cabinet corresponding to the aids and
advisors of the president. Its success
is said to have been immediate and
permanent. Yale University, the
National Council of defence and the
National Association of manufacturers
are said to be a few of the bodies that
are investigating the merits of the
plan.
H. Edmund Iavid, head of a silk
manufacturing corporation in Paterson,
N. J., who was instrumental in intro
ducing the system in his factory in
that city about a year ago, expressed
today the keenest satisfaction at the
results attained and said he hoped,
ultimately, to establish similar work
ing conditions m four other of his
mills in York, Reading, Scranton and
Beaverton, Pa. The Paterson manu
facturer, however, said the new system
should not be considered a "panacea"
or adaptable to all kinds and sizes of
industrial establishments.
"Its outstanding feature" said Mr.
David, "is the ungrudging recognition,
on the part of the. employer, of the
worker's right to a voice in the deter
mination of matters which are of vital
interest to him which lends the addi
tional . dignity to his position whic!'
self-government invariably Carrie
with it."
Industrial democracy or, constit
tionalism in industry." he said, "w
first explained to the workers.
broad and fundamental set of rule
adopted wnicn was to guide manage
ment and workers. The four corner
stones of this business edifice wer
justice. co-operation, economy
energy. Its capstone was service. Thi
policy, as the supreme -law- of the es
tablishment. has never failed to Bug
gest a solution when troublesome
questions arise."
In proof of the system's practicabil
ity Mr. David pointed out that last
winter, when almost every other silk
mill fti Paterson was closed as the re
sult of a strike, the David mill was
not affected, but maintained" full pro
duction and was. kept in continuous
operation as by members of one con
tented and harmonious family.
Explaining the operation of the plan
Mr. David said the cabinet consists of
the executive officers of the company
chosen by directors of the corporation.
It has the power of veto and may ini
tiate "legislation" as well as make
suggestions to the senate ami., house. .
Neither the seoate or house are ob
ligated to adopt the cabinet's recom
mendations and when they do they
have the power to amend .them. The
cabinet, therefore. Instead of issuing
orders, is merely a part of the demo
cratic control of the whole plant.
"The Senate," explained Mr. David,
"is composed of the foreman and de
partment heads. It may initiate legis
lation which, before going to the cabi
net for approval, must be accepted by
the house.
"The house is elected by a secret
vote of all the workers in the mill, one
representative for every twenty work
ers. The house meets weekly on com
pany time. Much of the legislative
work is done by committees appointed
by the presidents of the senate and
house. . .-
"There is a review board -to which a
discharged worker my appeal his case,
and a board, of appeals giving each
worker an opportunity for the redress
of grievances, real or fancied, at the
hands of a department head."
" Every- two weeks ft "dividend" is
paid to each worker who has scored
a certain number of points in effi
ciency, economy, punctuality and regu
larity of work.
FIVE CENTS PER MILE DUE
Soldiers
Are
Upon Demobilization
Entitled to Transportation.
SAN FRANCISCO. June 7. Soldiers
upon demobilization are . entitled to
transportation at 6 cents per mile either
to their bona fide home town or to the
point of enlistment, according to new
orders now in effect at the demobiliza
tion camp here, it was announced by
Captain Roger II. Waite. Heretofore
transportation was granted only oV
point of enlistment
the new arrangement, regardless of
where the soldier entered service, he is
entitled to transportation upon dis
charge to his real home.
Demobilization officers are empow
ered to transfer men to other camps
nearer the home- town or give trans
portation direct to the home town,
whichever is most desirable.
Many soldiers previously discharged
from the army and granted S4 cents
mileage are entitled under the ruling
to the additional amount to make up
the 5 cents per mile. To obtain these
discharged soldiers should present
themselves to the nearest army remitt
ing office or commun
nearest recruiting"
oruiting stating
discharge
a check for the amount due to the dis
charged soldier.
Eccentric people often conceal sums
of money in the family Bible. A Pari
sian left his son, in a will, nothing ex
cept the family Bible. In it were found
securities worlh jifi.ooo.
EURALGIA
or Headache
Rub the forehead
and temples with
Ss
They're Here in Person!
(Not appear
ing in any
SOUTH JEALOUS OF NORTH
American Influence 1'oarcd by Some
in Argentine Republic.
LONDON", "May 7. (By Mail.) Belief
that tJreat Britain can have the trade
of South America for the asking de
spite the competition which the United
States has built up there during the
war, was expressed by Gordon Ross,
formerly financial editor of the Buenos
Aires Standard, in an address he de
livered here recently. Mr. Ross is
quoted as saying that there is in some
South American republics a jealous fear
of the extension of the influence of th
United States and he repeated the
statement that it had been cynically
said in South America that the Monroe
doctrine cieara not eo much. "America
Established 1906.
WE are glad to give you expert
personal counsel and sugges-j
tion W-hen you come to make
a choice from our rare collection off
OrientalK
Rugs
Never again, perhaps, will prices
be so reasonable as now. You will
profit by making early selections.
Wash-Cleaning, Repairing
. Summer Storage
Cartozian Bros.
Incorporated
Washington at Tenth
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