The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, October 27, 1918, Section One, Page 10, Image 10

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    THE SUNDAY OREGOXIAX, PORTLAND, OCTOBER
1918.
JILL PORTLAND ACTS
RELENTLESS WAR AGAINST SPANISH INFLUENZA NOW IS BEING WAGED IX PORTLAND BY PEOPLE!
IN ALL WALKS OF LIFE.
ANOTHER BARGAIN WEEK AT
. TO
SHANAHAN'S
t tun t -V
This week by extraordinary inducements in every department we will make it to your interest financially
Slight Improvement Is Shown
and otherwise to come here and trade. We sell for cash; have light overhead expenses and no bad bills.
This tremendous saving we give to our customers in lower prices on standard merchandise than you.
in Health Reports.
can secure elsewhere.
10
in
INFLUENZA
199 NEW CASES REPORTED
Officials, Business Men, Industrial
Concerns and Police Co-operate
in Enforcing Regulations.
( Despite a slight apparent letting; up
. In the Spanish influenza epidemic in
. Portland. precautions against the
: spread of the disease are being redou
bled by city officials, business meq. in
dustrial concerns and the police ' bu
reau. Deaths directly chargeable to influ
enza are given bv the city health bu
- reau as 115. with several others on the
doubtful list. Total cases to date are
1977, which, with allowance for deaths
and recoveries, make the actual num
ber of cases well below that figure. -Testerday
199 new cases were record
ed. Thirteen deaths were reported. In
the state, outside of Portland, the State
Board of Health estimates the number
of cases at 5000. with 7S deaths.
Senas Dcaaida laereaae.
Applications for the serum that is
said to be a preventive for the dis
ease have far outstripped the supply.
Yesterday the City Health Bureau's
supply ran out before noon and de
mands for the serum continued to pour
in all afternoon. This morning be
tween 10 and 12 o'clock about fOOO
first doses of the vaccine will be avail
able. More will be ready Monday.
Advertising of special sales has been
. cut down greatly. The public is becom
ing aware that the health officials
mean business when they ask that non
essential traveling be abandoned.
Screetcars cannot be overloaded and
all windows are to be kept wide open.
Crowds are being dispersed wherever
they gather.
Cosctwlos Granted Library,
, Special dispensation for the restricted
opening of the circulation room of the
library was given yesterday by Mayor
Baker upon the advice of state and city
health officers. No chairs will be al
lowed in the room and no loafing Is to
be permitted. Those getting books
must stand five feet apart in line.
General wearing of masks still Is
under consideration. Dr. Parrish op
poses the wearing of masks in the
street, saying the fresh air is better
than any mask.
Masks are on sale at the Red Cross
shop. 106 Fifth street.
The school day will be lengthened 40
minutes a day, when school again takes
up, as a means of making up time lost
during the epidemic. Superintendent
Grout announced yesterday.
Stndeats Are Iaoewlated.
Placing of a pan of water near the
radiator, fireplace, register or other
heating apparatus as a means of
creasing the humidity in the inside
air has been suggested as a cold pre
ventive by William F. Woodward,
Portland druggist.
The National Hospital Association
announces that it will administer anti
influenza vaccine to its members, free
of charge, from 7 to 9 P. M. daily in
the Mohawk building.
Ferdinand K. Reed, real estate man Influenza
ana noeriy loan worKer. leu a victim
to the influenza yesterday afternoon.
His condition is considered serious.
Postmaxf er Mvera whn waa III -ih
disease, is back a't work. Two of his There are approximately 3000 cases of
boys also were sick with influenza. Spanish Influenza in Idaho today. The
Boarding students at Hill Military records of the state board of health
Academy yesterday were in-culated show the epidemic is particularly bad
against the disease. Day students are in Power and Lewis counties. Dr.
not admitted to the school. Biwer. secretary of the board, has re-
Of 132 deaths reported to the city iii,h Hrki in laro stores- plpvitor
irttiiii iiuiruu IUC UH?t WeCK, 04 Were I nnvrntnrm Hontiut, nnH hnrhom to wear
from influenza, according to a reoort I n.ciB n .iivtii that lai-ira s'nrrs
1 1 me triiouB uurcuu 1L BSmnKlOn I ,lni, Kotnrriav nights hocniiKA Clf thP
. . . . u . u .-
possibility of spreading the epidemic
. v- y,' Z- i rr.' - - I
;;-A T-.-A cc ' -1 j i .. f ? I
f V' 'V flfC MlMsgStwM
-an ' ! r w-irTi ?T-??V- !
i viK ik-y tnJsfl t A i
: i?ni 5feMW"S ft-- '
'. m I fvifs 4 . ...v: v -4 II
P'7 b ... . fc - . m i in
Your Logical Store for Women's, Misses' and Children's
READY-TO-WEAR APPAREL
Offering choice of tremendous assortments of the season's most stylish merchandise at
,these low prices that have made this sale headquarters for economical women.
If yon want the utmost style, value and service. Investigate these phenomenal offers. Despite the Increase
In everything; thjvt enters Into the manufacture of women apparel, our tremendous buylns; power enahles n
to supply our customers' needs with atylisa apparel of unquestioned quality and workmanship at MO.EI.
SAVING PRICES.
Values Extraordinary in Juniors and Women's High Grade Fall Coats
PLAIN AND FUR-TRIMMED STYLES ARE BEING SHOWN AT
$12.50, $19.50, $22.SO, $27.50
Veloor, Broadcloth, Salts. Plushes, Zlbellnes, Corduroy In fashionable Fall colors Rnsslnn green, tobacco
brown, plum, taupe, navy blue and black are featured In Motor, Street, I'tllity and Dreas oats. Many band
some new models designed with large cape, convertible and muffler collars, empire effects and belted styles
to choose from. Women who anticipate replenishing their wardrobes will surely find something here to their
advantage, for these beautiful Coats are rarely offered at such a low figure.
OTHER EXCLUSIVE COATS $32.00 TO $60.00 EACH
HOSIERY AND UNDERWEAR
Women's Woolen Hose
Special at 65c Pair
Women's Fine Wool Hose, with elastic ribbed top,
gray color with whUe wool heels and toe's, or black
cashmere with hem top and seamless foot; fashioned
leg:; all sizes at 85c
Women's Cotton Hose
Special at 35c 3 for $1.00
Women's Fine Cotton Seamless Hose, hem top, most
all the leading colors wanted; all sizes. Special 3 pairs
for Sl.oo.
Children's Extra Fine Hose
Three Pairs 85c
Children's Extra Fine Ribbed Black Cotton Hose,
slightly imperfect, double heels and toes; very elastic;
all sizes 5 to 9 at 3 pairs S5c
Women's Union Suits
Special at $1.00 Each
Women's Fleeced Union Suits, medium weight; high
neck, long sleeves; Dutch neck, elbow sleeves or low
neck, no sleeves; ankle length. Sizes 34 to 38 at 1.00.
Sizes 40 to 44 at l.-.
Children's Union Suits
Special at $1.00 Each
Children's Fine Ribbed White Cotton Union Suits,
fleece lined, full taped with buttons, drop seat; all
sizes 4 to 12 years at 1.0.
We Will Continue the Great Sale of
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS
Another Week In Order to Give Every One an Oppor
tunity to Share In the Grand Bargain Event
A Wonderful Sale of Plaid Suiting
Marvelously Underpriced, Yard 49c
These DO VBLE-WIDTH Plaid Suitings will create wild
enthusiasm among the economical shoppers. Shown in
broken plaids and checks in delightful combinations
of dark colors. Excellent qiratity. Just the proper
weight for children's school dresses, also for women's
street wear and business suits.
36 to 42-inch Storm Serges
In a Wonderful Disposal, Yard 95c
This standard line of serviceable dress materials is
always desirable for .Fall and Winter suitings, and
we are well prepared to meet your wants in the staple
shades as green, brown, wine, navy, tan and black
and now offer them at the extraordinarily low price
of only, yard, 95C;
"High Grade" Black Dress Taffeta Silks
Amazingly Underpriced, Yard $1.49
36-INCH. Dressmakers and those who do their own
sewing will do well to attend this sale, for such splen
did silks are rarely offered at so low a price. Beauti
ful deep, rich, lustrous finish and just the right weight
for costumes, suits, coats, skirts, waists and petticoats.
Unequaled for their durability, both for eervice and
color.
$1.25 to $1.50 Dress Corduroy
Special at Only, Yard 95c
31-inch Silk-Finish Dress Corduroys, excellent wear
ing quality; colors maize, navy, taupe, ruby, American
Beauty, gold, hunter's green and the ever-wanted
black. Fine fabric for outdoor uses, sport suits, coats,
skirts, etc
Store
Open
9 A.M. to
6 P.M.
ANAHAN'S
Saturday
From
9 A.M. to
8 P. M.
Since then there has been a rapid daily
n I drop to 33 admissions Friday.
The camp still is quarantined and
wlU continue so until conditions im
prove in adjacent territory and cities.
All indoor congregating places also re
main closed.
IDAHO RECORDS 3000 CASES
Epidemic Serious in
Power and Lewis Counties.
BOISE, Idaho, Oct. 26. (Special.)
I E. F. Pernot, City Daetcrloloelnt, Inoculating a City Employe With Antl
Sponlsh Influenza Serum While Hia Assistants Are Making; Cultures of)
Influenza tierma. S Bnalnesw Same aa Usual." 3 Employes of the Gaa
Stations Take Precautionary Measures, Which Are Enjoying; a Vogue In the
IVelghborhood.
yesterday,
Eighty-Three Death Reported.
State health bureau yesterday re
corded three deaths from Marlon
County, two from Jackson and one
from Linn.
Deaths reported yesterday follow:
October "- Ray Finnerty. 24. soda
. fountain dispenser. Hotel Navarre-
October 33 Olive M. Lee, 23. 371
r.ast r-leventh street.
October 24 Andrew J. Dunn. 33. cook,
1114 First street: Henry L, Mann. 33,
salesman. 331 Third street: George
Bock. :s. motorman. Burley. Idaho.
October 26 Carmela Ragnone. 34. 174
Sheridan street: Beatrice C. CanueL
TSS North Sixth street; John Class.
31. dishwasher. Park- Hotel: William
W. Donaldson. 32. 310 Fremont street;
Kllzabeth Tolson.. 22. 635 Yamhill street;
waiter Howard Coole. 37. express busi
ness 40S Braiee street.
October 26 Hattie Etta Meyer. 2. 425
Twenty-seventh street Northeast: Ella
Henbree, ,
INFLCEXZA CASES ARE FEWER
Crest of Epidemic Is Past, Accord
ins to Health Report.
CAMP LEWIS. Tacoma. Wash., Oct.
- 'The cre.t of the influenza epi
demic Is past." says the weekly camp
health report Issued today. During
the week 927 rases of Influenza devel
oped here against 1034 cases .cported
the previous week, a decrease of 127
cases.
There were 39 cases of pneumonia
and 65 deaths, all but two due to pneu
monia, during the week, both record
high marks for this camp. The high
mark for pneumonia was reached Octo
ber 21, when there were 85 admissions
to the ha:e hnp11il from Tbut disease.
FREE TO
ASTHMA SUFFERERS
A ew Home Tare That Aaroae Caa l ae
W It Boat Dlaeemfart r Losa ( Time.
W have a Nw' Method that cum
Asthma, and me want you to try It at our
expense. No matter mhether your rtM ta
or icnr-aianainir or recent development,
mhtner It Is present as occasional or ihran-
ic Asthma, you should send for a free trial
ef our method. No matter In hil climate
you live, no matter what jour aa-e or occu
patmn. If you are troubled with asthma, our
m.iniM tnonin relieve you promptly.
We especially want to send it to those
apparently hopel-n cases, where all forms
of tnhalerv. loo-h-'s. opium preparations,
fam, m. "patent emotes. etc.. have failed.
We want to show everyone at our own ex
pense, that this new method Is designed to
end ail difficult rrtruhinr. all wheeiinc. and
9 I thnee t?m3i paroxysma at once and for
all time.
. This free offer Is too Important to neglect
a slnsle day. Write now and then beein
the method at once. Send no money. Simply
mail couDoa below. Io It Today.
by the crowds.
A summary of new cases reported by
cities in the past 24 hours to the state
board of health follows: Boise. IT,
Lewlston, 6; Nampa. 4; Twin Falls, 6,
making a total of 65 for that city and
nine deaths: Moscow, 3; allace. Zo
Coeur d'Alene, 4. In the cotmtry sum
mary Canyon County reports 4 and
Twin Falls County proper 25.
KLAMATH FALLS TAKES ACTIOX
Incoming and Outgoing Trains to Be
Watched for Possible Cases.
KLAMATH FALLS. Or.. Oct. 2.
(Special.) With not only the Spanish
influenza but several other contagious
diseases spreading with alarming ra
pidity over this district, measures more
strenuous than those heretofore rec
ommended, chief among which will be
the wearing of cloth masks by every
one, are to be adopted here on the in
structions of the city officials and the
Red Cross leaders, who are co-operat
ing In a mighty effort to check the
epidemic-
Incoming and outgoing tra.ns are to
be inspected and those found coming
in with the symptoms of contagious
disease are to be cared for immediately.
A number of Indians on the Klamath
Reservation are reported to be victims
of the epidemic several having died
from Its effects.
GRAIN ELEVATORS BANNED -
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE PLEA
IS DEXIED AT CAPITAL.
KB EE ASTHM A COUPON
FRONTIER ASTHMA CO.. Room 1248T.
Niagara and Hudson Sts, Buffalo. N. T.
Send free trial of your method to:
Yakima to Wear Masks.
YAKIMA. Wash.. Oct. 26. City offi
cials this morning issued orders that.
beginning at o clock tonight, all
clerks in stores, banks or public offices
should wear gauze masks and also for
bade the streetcars carrying more pas
sengers than can be seated. Open-air
meetings scheduled for Sunday night
will be permitted. There are now 150
rases in the city. There have been six
deaths.
Baker Soldier Is Buried.
BAKER, Or., Oct. 26. (Special.)
The body of Lieutenant Roy L. Shaw,
who died at Camp Lee, a.. October 29,
of pneumonia, arrived here this morn
ing, accompanied by Lieutenant Thomas
Bundle. The funeral took place this
afternoon, with Masonic services at the
grave, after which military honors
were paid by Company A. Baker Home
Guards.
Government Survey Indicates Pres
ent Structures Are Sufficient lo
Meet Wartime Xeeds.
Housing authorities at Washington
have made the astonishing discovery
that the Northwest is dotted with an
ample number of 'xrain elevators and
will not countenance the erection of
others.
This Informative news came last
night to Jesse A. Currey, building per
mit commissioner of the State Council
of Defense, in a telegram from the Na
tional capital. It was in answer to a
query emanating from the Oregon Ag
ricultural College, whose instructors.
together with Government agricultural
agents, have started a crusade for
country elevators as a means of hand
ling grain more expeditiously and
without the cost of sacks and sacking.
The Washington dispatch, answering
the plea of the agricultural agents.
stated that inasmuch as a survey has
shown that the Northwest is amply
provided with grain elevators, permits
for the construction of additional ones
will be turned down. The message said,
also, that the agricultural agents and
agricultural college leaders will be in
structed to drop their campaign for
more elevators.
War conditions have greatly stimu
lated the demand for bulk handling of
grain. That Oregon and other North
western states sorely lack the facilities
for this is pointed out as patent to
everyone familiar with the situation.
Mr. Currey stated that he has no idea
where the officials at Washington ac
quired the misinformation on which
they base their decision.
table was killed instantly, according
to the letter.
Lieutenant Boyd spent several davs
in the hospital after the battle in which
Noble lost his life. Concussion of the
big guns laid him out temporarily.
Lieutenant Noble was a graduate of
the Centralia High School and captain
of the University of Washington foot
ball team in 1917. He married Miss
Doris Smith, a Portland girl and also
a Washington student, last Winter.
NEW LOCATION, Dekum Building, Third and Washington Streets
THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY. "THE BIG CASH STORE"
ENTRANCES 266 WASHINGTON ST. AND 125 THIRD ST.
OATLT METEOROLOGICAL, REPORT.
PORTLAND. Oct. 26. Maximum tempera
ture, 56 degrees; minimum, 42 degrees.
River reading. S A. JI., X.9 feet: change in
last 24 hours. 0.2 foot fall. Total rain
fall (5 P. M. to 5 P. M.) none. Total raln-
lall ilnce eptemtler 1, 4.57 inches;
normal, 4.84 Inches; deficiency, 0.27 inch.
Sunrise, 7:43 A. M.: sunset. 6:07 P. M.
Total sunshine. 1 hour 40 minutes: possible.
10 hours 24 minutes. Moonrise. 12:40 A. M. ;
moonset, 2:20 P. M. Barometer (reduced
to sealevel) 5 P. M.. 29.il.' inches. Relative
humidity at noon, 75 per cent.
THE WEATHER.
High School. Two cases of influenza
have been reported in Monmouth, and
all public gatherings are under ban.
The Normal continues its sessions as
usual, however, and there have been
no cases reported among the students.
ELECTRIC BURNS FATAL
Ben OHtt, Employed at Columbia
Substation, Dies From Injuries.
Ben Olitt, 31, of 841 Brooklyn street,
died early yesterday from burns sus
tained from electricity in the Columbia
sub-station of the Portland Railway,
Light & Power Company, at Vancouver
avenue and Columbia boulevard. He is
survived by his widow.
H. D. Bowman, another electrician at
the Columbia plant, who sustained se
vere burns while trying to drag Mr.
Olitt out of contact with a live wire,
is still at the Good Samaritan Hospital
with a fair chance of recovery. Mr.
Olitt was burned by the short-circuiting
of a transformer on which he was
working.
a 2 "B Wind
I i sa a
1 3 i"E i-
5 3 5 2. S
STATIONS. ." Z 1
S3:::
c -
5 a ; ; ;
Brother and Infant Son Die.
PENDLETON. Or., Oct. !. (Spe
cial.) To lose his brother and his in
fant son by illness within a few hours
of each other was the experience of
Eble J. Ankeny. of Rieth. The brother.
J. A. Ankeny, an employe of the O.-W.
R. & N. Company, was a victim of Span
ish influcnsa. He was 22 years old.
Hood River Men Go to War.
HOOD RIVER, Or.. Oct. 16. (Spe
cial.) The following men were in
ducted into the service by the local
board this week, entraining for serv
ice at coast fortifications: Robert
Binns. Joseph H. Lausmann and Oscar
Krussow. Mr. Binns was sent to Fort
Stevens, while the other two men were
assigned to Fort McArthur at ' San
Pedro, CaL
POLICE AID HEALTH WORK
Crowds Not Permitted; Public
Rooms Must Be Ventilated.
Chief of Police Johnson issued orders
to the police department yesterday to
give particular attention and devote
the principal part of their time to eu
forcing the regulations to prevent a
spread of Spanish influenza.
The police are instruc-1 to see that
no crowds are permitted to congregate
at any place. This order applies to all
business houses, hotel lobbies, cigar
stores, poolrooms and billiard halls. In
case of willful violations arrests will
follow, say the police.
All hotel owners are instructed to see
that the hotel lobbies -e properly
veniiiatea.
The police will also supervise crowds
at railway stations.
Baker I 2! S4 0.00 12 SE Icioudv
-MOIHC 34I on.u.uni. .IE Cloudy
Boston I 54i 72i0.00i..SW Cloudy
Chicago 54! 56.0. 00(12. NE ICloudy
Calgary 241 RS 0.0. . NW'Pt. cloudy
uenver 1 3n 42;u.O" . . IrJ fUlouay
Oes-. Moines ...I 38! 420.SSI12iN
Eureka . . J 441 56 0. OOj . . IE
Galveston
Helena
Kansas City..
Los Angeles..
Marshfleld ...
Medford
Minenapolls . .
New Orleans. .
New York ...
North Head...
North Yakima
Phoenix
Pocatello .
Roseburg
Portland
Sacramento . .
St. Louis ....
Salt Lake
San Diego. . . .
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane .....
Tacoma
8010.30 IBiNW
I 34 50 0.001IIISW
50 0!I.10I18!N
78. 0.001
6410.04
56!0.O0i
36'0.3S
SW
N
80 0.02 ..18
7o!o.ooiio:s
-..i n anUHlKv:
580.01!.. INE
NW
SW
NW
SE
SE
740.00i..
50 0.001..
62 0.001. .
56 0.00 ..
7410.00!. .
70iO.OO:10!E
50!fl.00. .NW
7f'O.OOI14!NW
72 0.00 18 W
50 0.04.10 SE
52 0.00. .IE
.010.061. . SE
SHELL IS CAUSE OF DEATH
Confirmation of Killing of Lieuten
ant Noble Received.
Confirmation of the report that Lieu
tenant Elmer Cy" Noble, of the 364th
Infantry, had been killed In action has
been received here. Lieutenant Noble
was killed by a shell on the Argonne
Meuse front, according to a letter Rev.
John H. Boyd, pastor of the First Pres
byterian Church, received yesterday
from his son. Lieutenant Thomas Henry
Boyd, also with the 364th Infantry.
Tatoosh Island! 46! 521.14 20 S
TValdez "28 .. ....
Walla Walla. 42' 64 0.00.. N
Washington .. 60 7S0.O2..S
Winnipeg 36i0.00..s
IKain
uiouay
Rain
Pt. cloudy
Rain
Pt. cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Rain
Rain
'Cloudy
Kain
Clear
Clear
Clear
Cloudy
Cloudy
Clear
ICloudy
(.near
Clear
Pt. cloudy
Rain
Cloudy
Ram
Rain
"Tell Me How
To Be Beautiful"
Get Rid of All Pimples, ackheads
and Skin Eruptions Purify
the Blood With Stuart's
Calcium Wafers.
TRIAL PACKAGE! MAILED FREE.
Cloudy
Cloudy
ICloudy
A. M. today. tP. M. report of preceding day.
southerly
FORECASTS.
Portland and vicinity Rain;
winds.
Oregon and Washington Rain; moderate
southerly, winds.
Idaho Rain and warmer.
EDWARD L. WELLS
Meteorologist.
Colonel Young Goes to Willamette.
Colonel George S. Young, recently re
lieved of recruiting duty in Portland
and ordered to proceed to Pacific Col
lege, Forest Grove, Or., to command the
Student Army Training Corps school
there, yesterday received o-ders to re
port for duty as S. A. T. C. comr ndant
at Willamette University. Salem, Or.
When ordered to Forest Grove he re
ported to the Government that the
school there was not prepared to re
ceive students, and as a result his new
orders came jesterday.
If f jry
. Monmouth School Closed.
MONMOUTH, Or., Oct. 26. (Special.)
The training schools of the Oregon
Normal in Independence and Monnouth
have been closed this week because
of influenza, as has alsq the Monmouth
Stnart'a Calcium Wafera Surely Do Give
m Lovely Complexion.
The reason why Stuart's Calcium
Wafers beautify the skin is their nat
ural tendency to seek the surface.
The wonderful calcium sulfide is one
of the natural constituents of the
human body. You must have It to be
healthy. It enriches the blood, invig
orates skin health, dries up the pimples
and boils, eczema and blotches, enables
new skin of fine texture to form and
become clear.' pinkish, smooth as vel
vet and refined to the point of loveli
ness and beauty. This is "how to be
beautiful." Stop using creams, lotions,
powders and bleaches which merely
hide for the moment. Get a 50-cent
box of Stuart's Calcium Wafers at any
drug store today.
And if you wish to give them a trial
send the coupon below. ,
1 a&S. T?l'
III
DR. E. G. AUSPLUSfD, Mgr.
My Practice la Limited to
High-Class Dentistry Only.
arare
Is the Same
The World Over
Free Trial Coupon
F. A. Stuart Co, 676 Stuart Bldg,
Marshall, Mich. Send me at once, by
return mail, a free trial package of
Stuart's Calcium Wafers.
Name
Street .'.
City State
I There is a strange perversity about human nature (and we are all
much alike in this respect) that the things that COME EASY are
not valued nearly so much as those which COME HARD or ARE
UNATTAINABLE. I have been asked times without number why
I continually advertise when my practice is now unquestionably the
largest in the state, and my offices always busy.
I have had it insinuated that I was selfish even avaricious
when I still made efforts to secure more patients.
For the benefit of my legion of friends and patients who ask
this question in a spirit of friendship and equally for my critics
who sneeringly inquire why I find it necessary to continue my
advertising I wish to say: ,
I have my share of adversity I am intensely human I, like
others, want to acquire that which requires effort, pluck, ingenuity
honesty, skill and "stick-to-it-iveness"; namely, the good will of
PEOPLE WHO WONT BELIEVE IN ME AND PEOPLE WHO
DON'T BELIEVE IN ME.
You recall the joy which reigned when the Prodigal Son re
turned you remember the welcome extended the new convert? It
was not the importance of the prodigal or the convert but the fact
that THERE WAS A PRINCIPLE INVOLVED that made the
victory sweet, and that principle is involved in my advertising.
Through this medium I am telling you again and again, and will
for years to come
JUST THIS: '
That the Dental work done in my office will compare favorably
with any Dental work done in this state, regardless of price charged.
That unnecessary pain in Dental operations is entirely eliminated
by my system of local anesthesia.
That this office is a, model of sanitation and my operators
need not suffer by comparison with any like number of Dentists
anywhere.
In other words, they would discover that I am giving the peo
ple ALL that the High-Priced Dentists can give them and doing
it for less money.
MY WORK IS GUARANTEED 15 YEARS
Open Nights
Electro Painless Dentists
IN THE TWO-STORY BUILDING
Corner Sixth and Washington StsM Portland, Or,
i You Can!t Come Down Town
Phone Your Want Ads to
THE OREGONIAN
Main 7070 A 6095