The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, June 30, 1918, Section One, Image 1

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    76 Pages
Six Sections
Section One
Pages 1 to20
PORTLAND, OREGON, SUNDAY MORNING, JUNE 30, 1918.
VOI,. XXXVII NO.
JG.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
v u rm v m . c m v. m 1 1 sv 11 . i v ri i in . t. a : ri a .in
ji Kp & isr rv 1
IS
TAKEN BY POLICE
Alvin Adams Tells of
Slaying Chauffeur.
BODY HIDDEN BESIDE ROAD
Milton Raymer Shot Down by
Youth in Cold Blood.
AUTO DRIVEN TO PORTLAND
Young Man Tells Police That De
Ire to Return to His Parents at
Grandview,. Mo., Prompted
Him to Commit Deed.
Alvin Adams, 19-year-old youth, who
shot anil killed Milton Raymer. a Se
attle chauffeur, near Redmond. Wash.,
Thursday afternoon. In cold blood, was
arrested at 4 o'clock yesterday by In
spectors Goltz and Howell a few min
utes after he arrived at the Oakland
service station on Burnside street, near
Broadway, in the car of the murdered
man.
Despite the long automobile ride over
a strange road, loss of sleep and the
knowledge that he was a fugitive from
Justice as well as a deserter from the
Army, Adams maintained an air of cool
ness and indifference when he told the
story of his crime that is seldom noted
in the characteristics of veteran crim
inals. Youth Talks of Mnrdtr.
In his confession to Deputy District
Attorney Bernard and the inspectors
Adams frankly talked of the crime and
gave all the details of his movements
leading up to the murder and the plans
he had adopted to return to his home
at Grandview, Mo., a small town a few
miles from Kansas City.
Adams had arrived at Fort Casey,
near Seattle, in April where he was as
signed to the coast artillery service. A
few days ago he failed to pass the re
quired examination and though still
subject to call for duty In some other
division of the military service he be
came homesick and had decided to go
back to' bis home.
Body Hidden Beside Road.
"I don't know what impelled me to
kill the Jitney driver," hs said. "I was
penniless and homesick and had hired
the driver to take me to Redmond
where I expected to board a train and
beat my way back home. When we
arrived in Redmond I asked the driver
to take me a few miles further.
"As we approached a wooded place
along the road, I drew out my revolver
and fired one shot at the driver. It
killed him instantly. 1 crawled over
the seat and stopped the car. Then I
dragged him from the machine and
hid the body in some thick bushes.
Previous Trouble Admitted.
"Then I drove the car back to Seat
tle, where I remained until Friday
morning. I made up my mind to come
to Portland and, knowing the officers
were hunting for me, I got the car and
started for this city. I had intended
to come here and hire out aa a chauf
four until I could earn enough money
to return home.
"When I hired the driver in Seattle
I had no intention of murdering him.
I simply wanted to get back home, some
way. I can't yet realize that I com
mitted the crime. I am sorry for It, but
that doesn't do any good."
Adams admitted that he had been in
trouble before and had been before the
Juvenile Court at his home. He would
not discuss the .nature of the offense,
His parents. Mr. and Mrs. Adams, and a
younger brother live in Grandview.
Adams waived extradition and said
he was willing to return to Seattle and
(Concluded on Page 3, Column 3.)
BO
MURDERER
L j fry y., ; : L xog :
j ; : ; - : ; - : - ' :
U , , , , f . .....x. i r ...... , , , , t t
1 i
HUNS IN TOWN BUT
DOING NO DAMAGE
"WHY NOT DRIVES OUT?"
MAJOR INQUIRES.
'Burying Party Not Yet Arrived,"
Is Response of American
Soldier in Charge.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY IN
FRANCE, June 13. (Correspondence
of the Associated Press.) Durinsr the
ttack made by the Germans on
Bouresches. which the American troops
were holding-, a report was received
that the town had been occupied by
the Oermana. A Major was sent to
ascertain the facts. He fell in with
the officer who had been entrusted
with the defense of the village.
Are the Boches In Bouresches?" he
inquired hastily.
"Yes. sir," was the reply.
There was a lurid interlude and the
staff officer was then understood to
say:
'Was it not the order that no Ger
mans were to be allowed to remain in
Bouresches?"
"Yes, sir."
"Then why the hell have you left
them there?" was demanded. '
"Burying: party not yet arrived, sir,"
was the quiet answer.
WHEAT VOTE AGREED UPON
Minimum Guaranleed Price of
$2.50 a Bushel to Be Decided.
WASHINGTON, June 29. After an
unsuccessful effort by Senator Martin
of Virginia, Democratic leader, to have
the Senate abandon its proposals to in
crease the Government minimum guar
anteed wheat price to 12.50, an agree
ment was reached tonight to take a
vote on the question Monday.
Senators Gore of Oklahoma, Gronna
and McCumber of North Dakota, Borah
of Idaho and others from wheat-producing
states, vigorously objected to
Senator Martin's proposal. They urged
the Senate to stand by its price in
crease "until the snow flies," despite
the prospect of a deadlock with the
House causing failure of the important
agricultural appropriation bill to which
the increase provision is attached as a
rider.
MAIL TUBES ABANDONED
Vetoed Postal Bill Repasesd With
Objectionable Provision Cut Out.
WASHINGTON, June 29. Further
Government use of pneumatic mail tube
systems in six large cities was blocked
today by a Presidential veto of the
postofflce appropriation bill with
provision directing that the Postofflce
Department retain the tubes until next
March, pending an Investigation by the
Interstate Commerce Commission to de
termine the advisability of their pur
chase by the Government.
When an attempt to pass the bill
over the veto falied in the House, both
the House ' and Senate repassed the
measure with the provision objected to
eliminated.
DATELESS LETTERS TO GO
Soldiers In France May Tell Home
Folk Where They Are Located.
PARIS, June 17. (Correspondence of
the Associated Press.) American sol
diers and officers stationed at posts
behind the front may reveal the secret
of their whereabouts to friends and
relatives at home, according to a new
ruling of the Army authorities.
It is still forbidden, however, to send
any picture postcards of the places
where the troops are stationed.
BIG DEFENSE BILL PASSES
Senate Votes $5,408,000,000 for
Fortifications.
WASHINGTON, June 29. Without
rollcall or dissenting vote and with
but 20 minutes' discussion, the Senate
late today passed and sent to confer
ence the $5,408,000,000 fortifications bill,
which provides for enormous increase
in ordnance manufacture.
CARTOONIST REYNOLDS INTERPRETS
AMERICAN AGE OF
ACES TELLS STORY
Lufbery's Tale Is One
of Thrills.
CALCUTTA SCENE OF DEBUT
Hero Is at First Beset With
Difficulties.
'ERSISTENCE IS REWARDED
Man Who, With 18 Hun Machines
to His CrSit, Falls 2 000 Feet
to His Death, Leaves Mar
velous Tale Unfinished.
(Copyright. 1918. by The McClure News
paper Syndicate. Published by arrange
ment.) As a human document, surrounded by
dramatic circumstances, the story of the
career of Raoul l.ufbery. the American ace
of aces, told br himself and herewith given
to the public la one of the most remarkable
and thrilling ever penned.
Major Lufberr had begun the series and '
was making slow progress, because the air
fighting was so severe and Intense, and it
could hardly be . expected that with the
destruction of IS German machines to his
credit he would lose any chance to do bat
tle with the enemy. While writing the
fourth article In what was Intended to be
series of 10. the call came to go up.
Paper and pencil were left on the table In
his tent. And up he went, to descend half
an hour later by Jumping 2000 feet to bis
death from a flaming machine.
BY RAOUL LUFBBRT.
It was on the race course at Calcutta,
transformed temporarily into a flying
field, that I made my debut in aviation.
if so odd a beginning may be called a
debut. One hot August day, in the year
1912. while I was strolling along the
banks of the Ganges River, my atten
tion was attracted by a great -crowd of
natives who were talking and waving
their arms in the
wildest excitement.
Near by there was
a little group of
Europeans who
were perhaps
equally excited, but,
after our Western
custom, more re
strained in their
manner of showing
It. I Joined this
gathering, curious
as to the meaning
of it. "The French
2.J?eoizZufey: ing," someone told
me. Then otners.
eager to give Information to a. new
comer, pointed out a, boat-which was
comlntr in to the shore. On the deck
were two large yellow cases.
"Do you see them? These are crates
containing their machines. They are
Bleriot monoplanes."
Shortly afterward the boat came to
anchor and two young fellows. Marc
Pourpe and Joseph Verminck, the avia
tors, disembarked and were received
by their compatriots.
The natives waited patiently while
the enormous boxes were being carried
ashore. Most of them had heard of
aeroplanes, but they had never , seen
them, and their curiosity was aroused
to the highest pitch. A crowd of
dozen or more coolie women, standing
near me, were discussing this new
event. I understood enough of their
language to be interested and amused
at their remarks. People the world
around are a good deal alike, and the
skeptic in America who used to say,
"No, sir! You can't tell me that them
pesky things will ever fly!" had his
counterpart in the crowd of Indians
on the banks of the Ganges. Finally
one of them, a woman, more daring
than the others, stepped forward and
cautiously touched the tip of a fore
finger to one of the boxes.
"Funny bird!" she said, turning to
(Concluded on Page 10, Column 1.)
y '
1J1 WW vw
TO COLONELS, LlEl'TESAXT
COLOVELS AND CAPTAINS,
THIRD LIBERTY LOAN.
You and each of you are now
members of the Flying Squadron
of the war savings stamp cam
paign, and, having pledged our
assistance in this work, we ask
that you lay aside all other ap
pointments for Monday morning.
July 1, at 11 o'clock, and meet at
that hour with the undersigned.
General Guy W. Talbot, at his of
fice, 407 Gasco building, this city.
This meeting Is for the purpose
of a conference and will take up
only a few minutes. The work to
be outlined at the meeting In con
nection with the W. S. a drive
will require but a few hours of
your time during the remainder
of the campaign, which probably
will take only a few days longer.
The support already given by
the Flying Squadron has been
felt by the war savings stamp or
ganization. It has been admit
tedly a great assistance. We
must continue to help.
We urge you and appeal to you
on behalf of the Government at
this time for this supreme cause.
Let no one fail to be present at
the meeting as requested above.
The roll will be called promptly
at 11 o'clock.
GUY W. TALBOT,
General.
JAS. A. CRANSTON.
Lieutenant-GeneraL
JULIUS L. MEIER.
Lieutenant-GeneraL
INDEX OF TODAY'S NEWS
The Weather.
YESTERDAY'S Maximum temperature.
81
degrees; minimum 53 degrees.
TODAY'S Fair; gentle westerly winds.
War.
First United States military force lands In
Italy. Section 1. page 4.
Hungarian Premier admits Austrian losses
heavy. Section 1. page 3.
British down 23 airplanes. Section 1,
page 4.
Hun guns pound new allied positions. Sec
tion 1, page 4.
British and Hun destroyers clash. Section 1,
page 5.
Official casualty list. Section 1. page 5.
Foreign.
Von Seydler and Von Kuehlmann to remain
at their posts. Section 1, page .
National.
Federal funds available for building impor
tant roads in Oregon. Section 1. page 2.
lomestie.
Federal Trade Commission bares vast prof
iteering. Section 1, page 1.
Many die In Sioux City fire. Section 1.
page 1.
Raoul Lufbery, American ace of aces, tells
story of his career. Section 1. page 1.
Pacific Northwest.
Mount Angel graduates 23. Section 1,
pass 7.
Russian situation watched by Hood River
Finns. Section 1. page 7.
Portland Shriners get enthusiastic welcome
at Bend. Section 1, page 8.
Camp Lewis soldiers to stage military tour
nament. Section 1, page 9.
Sports.
Portland beats Vancouver, 7-0. Section 2,
Page 1.
Waverley Club to hold holiday tourney. Sec
tlon 2. page 2.
Shipbuilders play five games today. 6ectlon
2. page 2.
Motor Boat Club changes plans for Fourth of
July cruise. Section 2. page 6.
Bob McAllister to live here. Section 2,
page 2.
Motorcycle meet set for July 1-4. Section 2,
page 2.
Vancouver to hold athletic carnival July 4.
Section 2, page 3.
Purse of $15,000 hung up to attract world-
famous drivers at Tacoma. Section
pago 3.
Anglers to compete today at Oaks. Section
2. page 2.
Training camp athletic schedule varied. Sec
tion 2, page 4.
Portland and Vicinity.
Milk price to go up July L Section 1,
page 18.
Boy murderer confesses to slaying Seattle
chauffeur. Section 1, page 1.
Milling division fixes tentative flour prices.
Section 1, page 11.
Women have chance to enter Army School
of Nursing. Section 1, page IS.
City officials proud of last year's record.
Section 1. page 16.
New delivery system goes Into effect July
IB. Section 1, page 12.
June marriage licenses less than last year.
Section 1, page IS.
Little ladles give open-air function for ben
eflt of Belgian babes. Section 1, page 12.
Grocers of Oregon receive detailed Instruc
tions as to sale of sugar. Section 1,
page 14.
Portland asked to cheer up soldiers. Section
1, page 14.
All America In grasp of war prosperity.
Section 1. page la.
Weather report, data and forecast. Sec
tion 2, page S.
Lumber output large. Section 1. page 13.
TO HIS OWN LIKING SOME EVENTS IN THE PAST
TRADE PROBE RARES
VAST PROFITEERING
Meat Packers Stand
Foremost in Greed.
FLOUR MILLERS IN SAME CLASS
Federal Commission Makes Its
Report to Senate.
BAREFACED FRAUD SET OUT
Five Big Meat Concerns Charged
WltH Monopolistic Control and
Declared to Be Reaching for
Like Domination In Others.
WASHINGTON. June 29. Profiteer
ing on a tremendous scale in practi
cally all the basic commodities of life
was reported to the Senate today by
the Federal trad commission as the
result of aa exhaustive investigation
"Inordinate greed and barefaced
fraud." as well as "war pressure for
heavy production." the commission re
ported as the causes. Re-appraisements
of properties .were made by
great concerns when It became evident
that the Government wan about to fix
prices on a basis of return on invest
ment, the report said, and salaries, al
lowances and expenses were in many
instances padded to snow increased
costs of conducting business.
Tbe outstanding feature of Its in
vestlgation. the commislon reported.
was the evidence of a tendency to in
ciease and maintain prices against the
forces of competition.
Packers and Millers Went Offenders.
Of all the big profits disclosed by the
Investigation, the report said. the
profits of the meat packers and those
allied with them and by the flour mil
lers, stand foremost, despite the fixing
of prices by the Government.
Manipulations of the market by the
five great packers Armour, Swift,
Morris, Wilson and Cudahy the com
mission asserts, "embrace, every device
that is useful to them without regard
tr. law."
The report charges that the five con
cems have monopolized control of the
meat Industry and "are reaching for
like domination in other products."
During: 1916, 1916 and 1917. the re
port said, these companies "pocketed'
,140,000.000.
Fixed Price Hurts Comsamer.
"The experience with steel, flour
and coal," says the report, referring to
price fixing, shows that a high stimu
lating fixed price, while stabilizing an
ascending market, produces an eco
nomic situation which Is fraught with
hardship to the consuming public and
with- ultimate peril to the high cost
companies through increasing power of
their low cost competitors."
Where the Government has fixed
prices on the basis of fair return on
net Investment, the report hints at
padded depreciations, increased salar
ies of officials, new construction
charged off as repairs, fictitious values
en raw materials and manipulated In
ventories.
Bis Bosun Paid.
Illustrating . high remunerations
charged off to expense accounts, the
report cites the following payments
shown to officials of the American
Metal Company, of New York, which
deals chiefly in sine:
B. Hochschlld, chairman of the board,
$179,603.
C M. Loeb. president. $304,826.
Otto Sussman. vice-president. 9221.506.
J. Loeb. vice-president. $147,930.
Sol Roos, manager, St. Louis, $148,530.
M. Schott, manager. Denver. $136,538.
In the steel Industry, the report says,
profits Increased from 4.7 per cent in
Concluded on Pace 2, Column 1.)
DR. MARIE D. EQUl
ARRESTED BY U.S.
PORTLAND WOMAN CHARGED
WITH SEDITIOUS SPEECH.
Secret Indictment Accuses Defend
ant With Violating Espionage Act
in Talk at I. W. W. Hall.
Dr. Marie D. Equl was arrested yes
terday by Deputy United States Mar
:l
shal Berry, within an hour after the
federal grand jury returned a secret
indictment charging violation of the
spionage act.
The offense for which the woman
was arrested is alleged to have been
ommitted Wednesday or Thursday
night, when she made a speech at the
. W. W. Hall, in the course of which
It is alleged she made seditious ut
terances. Dr. Equl has been repeatedly warned
to desist from seditious expressions.
but It is alleged she has been one of
the persistent offenders who has been
under constant surveillance of the au
thorities. In custody of the deputy
marshal she sought to obtain bail.
FEAR OF AMERICANS FELT
German Prisoners Vlrtualy Unani
mous In Confirming Report.
PARIS, June 29. (By Havas
Agency.) German prisoners are vir
tually unanimous in confirming the
fear felt of the Americans by the Ger
man high command. According to the
declarations of officers, this Is the
principal reason for the determination
of Germany to seek at all costs to
Impose peace on the allies before next
Winter.
The prisoners make no secret of
their astonishment at the spirit and
versatility of the American soldiers.
NEGRO CONVICT IS HANGED
Lougols McGill Said to Have
At-
tacked Farmer's Wife.
MADILJU Ok la., June 29. Lougols
McGill. a negro convict, said to have
been identified as the man who at
tempted to attack the wife of a farmer
living near here and who later Is said
to have stabbed the woman, inflicting
probable fatal injuries, waa lynched
early today by a mob of 600 persona.
News of the lynching waa received
here tonight.
SUFFRAGE AWAITS AUGUST
Resolution on Which Vote Was Pre
vented Will Go Over Recess.
WASHINGTON. June 29. The woman
suffrage resolution, on which a vote
was prevented last Thursday by an op
position filibuster. Chairman Jones, of
the Senate suffrage committee, an
nounced today, probably will not be
brought up again until next August,
after the proposed recess of Congress.
AVIATORS SAVE SICK FOLK
Sixty Bedridden Patients Rescued
From Burning Sanitarium.
BERKELEY. Cal., Jun: 29. Sixty
five bed-ridden patients were rescued
from the El Reposo Sanitarium by stu
dent aviators in training near by
when the building caught fire today.
When the alarm sounded the soldiers
quickly gathered and began carrying
out the inmates.
URUGUAY ADOPTS JULY 4
South
American Repnbllo Honors
United States.
MONTEVIDEO. Uruguay, June 28.
Uruguay has made July 4 a peruianert
national holiday in honor of the United
States.
A bill to that effect was passed by
both the Chamber of Representatives
and the Senate, and President Viera
signed the act immediately.
WEEK'S NEWS.
SIOUX CITY FIRE
COSTS MANY LIVES
Building Falls and In
mates Are Trapped.
DEATH TOLL FROM 10 TO 20
Landmark's Collapse Crushes
Two Adjoining Structures.
IMPRISONED MAN 'PHONES
Frank Harp, Caught in Ofricc, Rings
Up Another Store and Asks Tor
Aid, but Rescuers Unable to
Reach Him in Time.
SIOUX CITY. Ia.. June 29. The toll
of dead In the Ruff building, a three
story brick structure, which collapsed
here today, was estimated tonight at
from 10 to 20. with a score or more
injured. Most of the injured are not
seriously hurt. The financial loss i3
placed at $100,000. The Ruff building
was being remodeled and the collapse
Is believed to have been due to re
moval of old supports.
The structure was erected nearly 50
years ago.
The known dead are: Louis Soiseth.
Sioux City; Walter Nelson. Sioux City;
Roy Ostranger. Sioux City; Louis
Schuler. Lemars. Ia.; Charles Kugel.
Sioux City, and one unidentified.
Otis Boruff. critically hurt, was dug
out at 10 o'clock tonight.
The missing: Alfred Hanson, one of
the owners of the Ruff Drug Company.
Five tailors employed on the third
f,oor ot the Ruff building, believed to
De Durled in the basement. They are:
Hereman Feddern. Olof Roisura. John
Stuts. John Louma and Olof Running.
Two other tailors. Louis Fretheim
and Nels Vindine. escaped. They fell
clear of the ruins, which then toppled
over.
Buildings Are Crashed.
When the Ruff building collapsed the
east wall fell on the Chain grocery
and Beaumont & Braunger meat mar
kets, two stories, crushing both as If
they were eggshells. A number of per
sons are believed to be burled in the
ruins of these buildings. Fire, which,
broke out in the ruins of the Ruff
building, added to the perils of those
imprisoned. All the fire departments
In the city, assisted by hundreds of
volunteers, aided In fighting the flamea
and searching the ruins.
Oscar Ruff, one of the proprietors of
the store, had a narrow escape from
death. After being imprisoned under
tons of debris for eight hours, he waa
finally dug out by rescuers tonight,
practically unhurt. Fire, water and
burning chemicals added to the perim
of the tons of debris which threatened
for hours to crush out Ruff's Ufa.
R. F. Kugel. an employe of the Ruff
Drug Company, who was in the build
ing when It collapsed, was able to
reach safety. His father, Charles Ku
gel. and brother. Merle Kugel, were
caught in the ruins. Charles Kugel.
vho was a carpenter, was taken out
dead. Merle Kugel. who was a cleric
in the store, is still in tho ruins. Hana
Asper. a bookkeeper, was rescued aftee
being pinned in the ruins for hours.
He was not seriously hurt.
Trapped M Telephone for Aid.
Frank Harp, one of the owners of tha
Beaumont & Braunger market, is be
lieved to have been burned to death in
the office of the market. Soon after
the accident occurred the telephone In.
another Beaumont At Braunger store at
Sixth street rang.
"For God's sake come and help ma
get out," a voice shouted distinctly
cer the wire.
F. Ricketer, an employe of the mar-
Conciuded on Page 3. Column 2.