The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, June 02, 1918, Section One, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Bp
78 Pages
SixSectioiis
Section One
Pages lto22
VOL. XXXVII NO. 22.
PORTLAND, OREGON, SUNDAY MORNING, JUNE
o
1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GREAT 111 DRIVE
SUES 10 1ST
French Yield After Inflict
ing Heavy Losses.
750,000 GERMANS ENGAGED
Huns Seek to Crush Soissons
Salient and Gain Paris
Via Marne and Oise.
RHEIMS YET UNCAPTURED
American Troops Arrive in the
Battle Area, Ready to Go
In, if Necessary.
PARIS. June 1. Heavy attacks by
the Germans are reported in the War
Office announcement tonight. The
French troops offered strong resist
ance, inflicting heavy losses on the
enemy and gjving grround only where
they were opposed by overwhelming
numbers.
(By .the Associated Press.
With their left wing touching the
Marne and their right linking up with
the battle front at Noyon, the Ger
mans in their new offensive are ham
mering the allied line apparently with
the hope of crushing in the Soissons
ealient and opening up the way to
Paris by way of the Marne and the
Oise. They are reported to be using
nearly three-quarters of a million men
in this effort.
Although the enemy occupies the
northern bank of the Marne for a
stretch of a dozen miles east from the
vicinity of Chateau Thierry, he seems
to have made no serious attempt to
force a crossing, the only efforts in
this direction being made in small
forces. These were repulsed by the
French.
' Enemy Pushes Westward.
The main trend of the enemy effort
Is westward and with this purpose
seemingly fully developed, General
Foch is disposing his forces to resist
It. Already the French seem to be in
considerable strength in the path of
the Crown Prince's drive west of the
Soissons road to Chateau Thierry.
The Germans at last reports had
succeeded in penetrating from two and
one-half to nearly four miles at points
west of this road. They were stopped
for the time being, at least, at Chau
dun, three miles from the road, which
the French first lost and then retook
in desperate fighting, and likewise
before Chouy and Neuilly, to the
louth.
Just below Soissons the Crown
Prince's troops were forced back on
the Crise River, which runs on a north
and south line through that town. In
the engagements on this front several
hundred prisoners were taken by the
French and in the Soissons fighting
especially the Germans suffered ter
rific punishment.
Near the Marne in the vicinity of
Chateau Thierry, an important rail-
t I'ontlnuPtl on Page 4, Column 2.)
I :
. .
DECISION REACHED
IN TELEGRAPH CASE
AVAR LBOR BOARD TO AX
XOUXCE FIXDIXG TODAT.
William II. Taft . and Frank P.
Walsli Preside at Hearing of
Dispute at Xew York.
NEW YORK, June 1. After a dis
cussion lasting more than five hours
the National War Labor .Board reached
a decision here tonigrht in the dispute
between the Western Unton and Postal
Telegraph Companies and some of their
telegraphers over the right claimed by
the operators to Join . the Commercial
Telegraphers' Union, ' but withheld an
nouncement of the decision until to
morrow. Presided over by former President
William H. Taft and Frank P. Walsh
as Joint chairmen, the board. Including
in its membership five representatives
of employers and a like number of or
ganized labor, beard the complaint of
the telegraphers union that two com
panies have insisted -on the right to
discharge employes who Join the union,
while the Western Union actually has
dismissed some of its men.
A decisive vote was taken, of which
the chairmen declined to give any in
timation until they have reviewed the
record of the day's proceedings. They
promised to do this before leaving to
morrow afternoon for Scranton, where
they will attempt to settle a strike of
street railway workers.
WHITE IS WITH PERSHING
Former Adjutant-General Now at
Field Headquarters.
George A. "White, former Adjutant
General of Oregon, who resigned to
enter active field service as Major and
Adjutant-General of an 'American ar
tillery brigade In France, has been
transferred to General Pershing's head
quarters staff, at the general head
quarters of the American Army. .
Word of his transfer was received
in Portland yesterday. Major White
still has the rank and duties of an Adjutant-General.
As - Adjutant-General
of Oregon he made a remarkable rec
ord of efficiency that was responsible
for putting Oregon first in every call
of a military nature.'
MAJ. FLEET TRANSFERRED
Captain Weidenbatli Xamed Super
visor of Airplane Mail Service.
WASHINGTON, ' June 1. Captain C
A. Weidenbatb, .of the Signal Corps,
United States Army, who has seen
three months', service as a flier with
the . American forces in Francei has
been appointed by the War Department
as supervisor of the airplane mail serv
ice between Washington and New York,
it was announced.
He will succeed Major Reuben H.
Fleet, of Aberdeen, Wash., who has
been transferred to a California flying
school.
GERMANY'S NAVY . ACTIVE
Unusual Assemblage in Heligoland
Bight Reported.
COPENHAGEN, June 1. Fishermen
returning from the North Sea, accord
ing to the Stifts-Tidende, report an un
usual assemblage of German war craft
in Heligoland Bights.,
The fishermen also say there is un
usual reconnoissance activity by Ger
man vessels well up the Jutland coast.
CONCRETE SHIP RATED A1
First Voyage of Faith, Tested by
Storms, Highly Satisfactory.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 1. An A-l
rating as to seaworthiness was given
to the concrete steamship Faith In the
report, filed here today with under
writers, of a marine surveyor who not
ed the conduct of the vessel on its first
voyage, which included considerable
storms.
PICTORIAL SIDELIGHTS BY CARTOONIST
SOLDIERS' DRILL IS
KIND THAT COUNTS
Faculties Quickened by
Strenuous Work.
RACIAL SPIRIT SHINES OUT
Americans Reveal Patriotism
Without Alloy.
BOYS TOILING TO PURPOSE
Twenty Miles of Pounding Gravel Is
Daily Feature of Training Ore
gon Men Are Getting at
Finishing School.
BY WILL G. MacRAE.
(Staff Correspondent of The Oregonlan
with the American Forces in France.)
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY IN
FRANCE, May 3. There is something
very human a numan as war itself
about the attitude of men preparing
and training as soldiers. It strikes
one that In nothing are we so much
the creatures of our sourroundings as
in war.
This Is that period : when one gets,
full blast, the meaning cf that famous
phrase, "The spirit that quickens." One
sees it on the faces of the men as they
march to and from the drill field; one
sees It in the faces of the men as they
entrain for other fields, -for their eyes
gleam and they seem to say: "At last.
it is soon to be our turn." The qual
ity of this appeal causes a tightening
of the vocal cords, for in one's heart
one knows it Is that of the thorough
bred racial and National spirit of a
people wfthout alloy that Inbred pa
triotism which, though young in cen
turies, has created a distinctive civilization.-
-
These then are the breed of soldiers
men who put in nine strenuous hours
of drill a day, walk six miles twice a
day to and from the drill ground be
fore the retreat bugle is sounded. It
is this kind of drilling that the Ore
gon troops a- getting at this "finish
ing" school. That 20 miles of pound
ing the gravel sounds fierce, doesn't
it? It perhaps would be If the, great
objective were obscured, as it was In
tho mess, fumbling and muddle of 1916.
I know it sounds ominous, and it would
be, perhaps, but the company com
manders and the squad leaders make
It their special business to see that
It isn't all work and no play.
Drilling; la Real KJn.
During: the drill hours, while there
are no periods of absolute rest, there
are work-play periods. To be sure,
there is no time for "rolling your own,"
or for a quiet sprawling rest on the
grass. There is something doing every
moment. " Either the men are hurry
ing through a short period of close
order drill. Just enough to remind them
that . there are . such . commands as
"Squads Right" and "Squads Left." or
there is a bayonet drill.
The bayonet drill these soldiers had
at the different training camps at
home was a milk-and-honey drill com
pared to the bayonet drill of today.
It Isn't all parry and lunge. It is too
thrillingly real for that. While the
big N. C. O., Just back from the train
ing school, is urging the men to put
"pep" in their drill, the captain and his
lieutenants, their eyes quick to detect
any pair putting too much realism In
the work, are moving up and -down the
line of lunging, plunging, perspiring
men, uttering low-spoken words of
caution.
Yesterday, while drilling. Private
MacMahon. In private life an office boy
on The Oregonian. forgot that across
from him at bayonet drill was his
(Concluded on Page 12. Column 1.)
INDEX OF TODAY'S NEWS
The Weather.
YESTERDAY'S Maximum temperature. 60
degree; minimum. 48 degrees.
TODAY'S Fair; moderate westerly winds.
... War.
Allies oppose Hun advance westward. See-
tlon 1. pace 1.
United States destroyer sinks two U-boats
within half hour. Section 1. page 1.
General Bridges says United States most
turn tide In battle. Section 1. pace a. .
Huns abandon attempts to retake Cantlg-
ney. Section 1, page 4.
Creating-seaport In France for American
Army gigantic task. Section 1. page 7.
Lincoln transport casualties believed few.
Section 1, page 4.
Fore Ism.
Drill ef finishing school In France kind
that makes soldiers. . Section 1. page 1.
Revolt or Ukraine peasants In full swing.
Section 1, page 1.
No army ever cared for as Uncle Sam cares
for his. says Carl U. Doner. Section 1.
page 21.
National.
Rail rate to be cut for tourists. Section 1.
Page .
Censor Creel, denies that he la. a Socialist.
Section 1, page 8. -.- .
Crowder calls for 14,674 draft registrants for
special training. . Section 1, page 6.
Domestic. .
Rose Pastor Stokes sentenced to 10 years
In prison for sedition. Section 1. page 3.
April earnings of American railroads reflect
Increase. Section 1, page 2.
S3.000.000 loss In warehouse fire at St. Louis
arsenal. Section 1, page 1.
Derision In telegraphers case to be an
nounced today. Section 1. page 1.
Sports.
Coast League hit by rate Increase. Section
2. page 1. .
New Pacirio Coast International I-eague
schedule out. Section 2, page 1.
Municipal golf course opens Juno 16. Section
2. page 2. . .
Tie race possible In Intcracholaatle League.
Section 2, page 2.
Roscoe Fawcett in flying school In England.
Section 2. page 2.
Portland Golf Club closes campaign. Section
2. page 2.
Washington High's tennis team best. Section
2. Page 8.
Shipbuilders teams 'fight, hard for pennant.
Section 2, page 8.
Juvenile tennis -play starts Wednesday. Sec
tion 2, page 8.
Cornell wins big track meet. Section 2,
page. 4. . -
Seattle hopes for 10-round bouts. Section 3,
page 4.
Cudgel, son of Broomstick, wins great Ken
tucky handicap. Section 2. page 4.
Salem fair purses total 15, 850. SecUon 2.
page e.
O. A. C. schedule arranged for 1018 season.
Section it, page 3.
Pacific Northwest.
Clackamas County Fair dates set. Section
1. page 7. ,
Pests alarm cranberry growers. Section 1.
page a.
Scientists ready for June eclipse. Section
1. page 0.
Double tragedy- near White Salmon clearly
case of premeditated murder. Section 1.
Page 10.
Oregon Jewelers to meet at Salem. ' Section
1. page-11.
187 Oregon Aggies to graduate. Section 1,
page 11.
Nearly 100 college boys leave Corvallis for
Presidio training camp. Section JL
page 15. "
Coos discusses recall of Commissioner. Sec
tion 1. page 1X
O. P. Hoff thanks friends. Section 1, page S.
Chautauqua session at Gladstone Park this
year will be notable one. Section 1,
Page 6. .
Portland and .Vicinity.
Shrine ceremonial to be held in Portland
next Saturday. ' Sectl'n 1, page 21.
City must speed up' bdltetruetlon of homes!
saya city Building Inspector. Section 1.
page 12.
Dentists aid National cause. Section 1,
page 13.
Home-made syrup within easy reach of
every housewife. Section 1, page 18.
Oregon Legislature strong-for dry amend
ment. Section 1, page 14.
Women alien enemies specifically defined.
Section 1. page 14.
Joyous farewell planned for Portland boys
leaving for camp tonight. Section 1,
page 15.
T. M. C. A establishes circuit of entertain
ers for soldier-loggers. Section 1. page 18.
Lieutenant Roy Terry returns to United
States. Section 1, page 8.
Reed College graduates 37. Section 1,
page 18.
A. Bland Calder writes of political upheave)
In Russia. Section 1, page 19.
School teachers to help in harvest. Section
1. page 20.
Bishop Sumner urges clubwomen of . Port
land . to help in war-stamp campaign.
Sectlot 1, page 21.
Oaks Park to be filmed.' Section 1, page 21.
Drug store still seized in raid. Section 1,
page 20.
Will of Mrs. Anna "ilary Mann filed for pro
bate. Section 1. page 20.-
Senator Pierce optimiatle over chances of
election In Fall. Section 1. page 20.
Water rates go up. Section 2, page IS.
After-war marine problems discussed. Sec
tion 2. page 16.
Traffic to shipyards Is solved. Section 2,
page 16.
Paulist choristers mng. Section 1. page 8.,
City and county officials to confer on war
problems. Section 1, page 19.
Benson to train 300 Oregon boys. Section 1.
page 5.
Charles Green chairman of wool valuation
committee. Section l.'pags 6.
Closing exercises for university " extension
classes announced. Section 1. page 12,
Weather report, data and forecast. Section
2. page 15.
REYNOLDS ON SOME
1
E AFLAME
WILD REVOLT
Rising of Peasants in
Full Swing.
INSURGENTS DESTROY CROPS
Germans Turn Artillery on
Rioting Populace.
ATTEMPT MADE TO DISARM
Peace Terras Presented to Delegates
of Soviet In Negotiations at
Kiev Are Rejected and
Conference Adjourns.
WASHINGTON, June 1. (Special.)
A Swedish press report from the Petro
grad Telegram agency saying that In
the Ukraine a revolt of the peasants
is in full swing, was made public by
the State Department today.
The peasants are setting the woods
on fire, destroying crops and refusing
to surrender their agricultural imple
ments. German soldiers are attempting to
disarm the peasants. In some cases us
ing their artillery on the Insurgents.
Pear Destsali Presented.
The State Department was also ad
vised through Stockholm that the
Ukrainian delegation in conference
with the Soviet republic's delegates,
meeting to negotiate peace, has pre
sented at Kiev the following demands:
Withdrawal of all troops of the Sp
vlet republic from the territory or the
Ukrainla and that military operations
cease.
Repatriation of all Ukrainian citi
zens and the restoration of their prop
erty which has been seized by Russian
authorities.
Restitution to Be Made.
Return to tho Ukraine of all railway
material which the Soviet government
had seized.
Appointment of an Ukrainian to su
eprvlse the eexcutlon of the foregoing
terms.
The Soviet delegates acepted" the
Ukrainian delegates' conditions In prln
Ciple and proposed that hostilities
should cease before the official conclu
sion of the armistice. The Ukrainian
delegates refused this condition and
the conference adjourned.
Destruction of Fleet Presese.
Another report from Kiev via Vien
na, received by the department asserts
that the sailors' congress, which repre
sents the Black Sea fleet at Novo Ros
sisk, decided to destroy the fleet a
which there are two battleships of large
type, nine torpedo boats and 10 other
war craft before German forces could
arrive. It was decided not to destroy
the merchant vessels.
Fate of Ships tskuira.
The department has not been ad
vised whether the Russian warships
in the Black Sea actually have been
destroyed.
BERNE. June 1. As the result of a
conflict for the possession of the lega
tion premises here between the former
diplomatic representatives of Russia
and a Soviet delegation that recently
was admitted to Switzerland, the Swiss
authorities have sealed up the legation
quarters, excluding both parties of con
testants. Ship Employes Get Rise.
WASHINGTON. June 1. Flat In
creases of 120 a month to all chief
stewards and chief cooks and $15 a
month to all other members of the
steward's department on Atlantic and
Gulf vessels were announced today by
the shipping board.
OKRAIfl
EVENTS IN THE PAST "WEEK'S NEWS.
TWO U-BOATS SUNK
WITHIN HALF HOUR
V. S. DESTROYER DOES effi
cext work single-handed.
Two Enemy Submarines Destroyed
Almost AVlthin Sight of the
French Coast.
AN ATLANTIC TORT, June 1 De
struction of two submarines within
half an hour by an American destroyer
off the coast of France was reported
today by an American ship arriving
here from the war zone.
The U-boats were sent .down almost
within sight of the French coast, it was
said.
The destroyer wa one of a number
convoying American troops. The first
submarine was sighted some distance
off, members of the ship's crew said,
and the destroyers gave chase, drop
ping depth charges near where the
U-boat had submerged. There were evi
dences of a hit. it was said.
As the destroyer was returning to
her position in the convoy, another sub
marine came up near a transport, the
account said. '
The troop ship opened Are while the
destroyer dashed in. The submarine
quickly submerged, but the destroyer
let go another depth charge, which re
sulted in evidence that the U-boat had
been hit.
CLEW TO CONVICT FOUND
Slate Police Think Raldwin Mas
Seen at Sweet Home.
ALBANY, Or., June 1. (Special.)
Members of the State Military Police
telephoned to Sheriff Bodine today that
after talking to people at Sweet Home
who had seen the man supposed to be
Jeff Baldwin they are positive they
are on the trail of the much-wanted
convict. This man turned off the trans-
mountain wagon road at Foster and
took a trail through the big bottom
country. This leads over the divide
between the two branches of the
Santlam and Gates-.
NEW RATES ALARM GROWER
Orchardlsts and Shippers Meet at
'Seattle to Prepare Protest,
i
SEATTLE. Wash.. June J. (Special.)
Washington apple orchardists will be
driven practically out of business if the
new. freight rates announced under the
schedule of Director-General McAdoo
are not modified, according to repre
sentative growers, distributors and
shippers from Wenatchee and Yakima,
who met here today to enter an Im
mediate protest with request for euis
pension of the rates to the Interstate
Commerce Commission.
HUN PLANES BOMB PARIS
Several Explosive Charge Dropped
and Few Persons Are Hurt.
PARIS. June 2. Enemy airplanes at
tacked Paris this morning. Several
bombs were dropped and a few persons
were wounded. The alarm was sounded
at 12:0S A. M. and the enemy machines
were vigorously bombarded.
The all-clear signal was given at 2:06
A. 51.
AUTOMOBILES FOR SOLDIERS
WANTED TODAY.
A request through the National
League for Woman's Sen-Ice has
been made for automobiles and
drivers to take soldiers and sail
ors In Portland today over the
highway and on other scenic
roads around the city. Those who
have machines and who will do
nate their cars and time to give
the men a holiday are urged to
report as early as possible after
10 o'clock this morning at the
Soldiers' and Sailors' Club in the
Royal building. Morrison street
near Broadway.
$3,000,000
LOSS
L FIRE
Two Warehouses at
St. Louis Burned.
ENEMY ALIEN IS IN CUSTODY
Austrian Captured Within
Stockade of Plant.
EXPLOSION STORY CURRENT
Fifteen Million Yards of Khaki Cloth
and 15,000 Sen ice Hats
Reported Destroyed
In Flames.
ST. LOUIS, June 2. Warehouses Nos.
23 and 24 at the United States Arsenal
here were destroyed by fire shortly be
fore midnight with a loss of Anmy
equipment stored there estimated by
the police at more than J3.000.000.
Numerous other warehouses were
threatened by the fire, which early this
morning were under control, every
available fire fighting facility in the
city being railed out to combat the
flames, which threatened more than 16.
000.000 worth of Army supplies within
the large depot.
Oae Arrest Made.
A report was current that Jlie origin
of the fire was incendiary and cub
stance was given to this belief by tho
taking into custody by the police of an
Austrian enemy alien, who was cap
tured within the stockade shortly after
an explosion was heard, which is be
lieved to have started the fire.
An explosion is said to have par
tially wrecked one of the warehouses.
Details of the conflagration's extent
or cause are meager, as military au
thorities immediately took charge and,
throwing a heavy guard of toldiera
around the enclosure, refused to admit
only the fire fighting units.
Khaki Clotk Destroyed.
Officers of the quartermaster's de
partment said early today that more
than 15.000,900 yard a of khaki-cloth for
Army uniforms, valued at more than
$3,000,000 was destroyed.
Fifteen thousand soldiers' servit-e
hats were also lost.
WASHINGTON QUOTA, 103
Grammar School Graduates to Train
at Spokane and Pullman.
SEATTLE. Wash.. June 1. Calls fvr
102 registrants In the state of Wash
ington to take mechanical Instruction
at Spokane under military direction,
and 209 registrants for the same pur
pose at Washington State College, Pull
man, were received by local draft
boards from the War Department.
Both contingents must be made up
of grammar school graduates who have
mechanical experience and aptitude.
Those reporting at Spokane will bo
given a modern automobile school
course In mechanics, while those going
to Pullman will be trained In black
sraithlng, auto mechanics, truck driv
ing, carpentry and radio work.
GIRLS WILL SELL CIGARS
Retail Stores at San Francisco Put
Skirted Clerks to Work.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 1. Girl cigar
clerks made their appearance here to
day in downtown cigar stores, from a
reserve detachment of 100 or more
young women trained by two of the
large tobacco retail firms to take the
place of men called Into service.
AB E A