The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, October 31, 1915, SECTION TWO, Page 4, Image 22

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    THE StTSTDAT OREGONTAN, POTtTXAND, OCTOBER .CI, 19T5.
SIX SEALS CHOSEN
ON ALL-STAR TEAM
Harry B. Smith Picks Bates
; as Only Beaver Among
, Coast Luminaries.
FIVE ANGELS SELECTED
Flinging Starr Blade TTp of Williams.
Love, Baum, Steen, Fanning
and Ryan Bodle Not
. Placed in Outfield.
STARS OF COAST LEAGUE.
Pitcher.
C. (Lefty) William. Bait Lake.
Charles (Spider) Baum. San
Francisco.
Bill (Bis Six) Steen, San Fran
cisco. "Slim" Love, Los Angeles.
Charles (Skeeter) Fanning.
San Francisco.
John Ryan, Los Angeles.
, Catchers.
Walter Schmidt, San Francisco.
Rowdy Elliott, Oakland.
W. Lynn, Salt Lake.
Inlleldera.
First base Jack Ness, Oak
land. Second base Joe Gedeon, Salt
Lake.
Shortstop Roy Corhan, San
Francisco.
Third base Ray Bates, Port
land. Utility role McMullen, . Los
Angeles.
Outfielders.
Left field Jimmy Johnston.
Oakland.
Center- field Harl Maggart,
Los Angeles. .
Right field Harry Wolter.
Los Angeles.
Utility Biff Schaller, San
Francisco.
TWO FORMER COAST LEAGUE TWIRLERS WHO WILL VISIT HERE WITH TOURING ALL-STARS ON NOVEMBER 18.
BY HARRY B. SMITH.
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., Oct. 30.
(Special.) It is now the open season
for picking an all-star cast from an
abundance of Coast League material,
& pastime that is fully as exciting and
far less dangerous with the players
at least partially scattered for their
homes than when those baseball men
are on the ground to look you in the
eye and intimate by action, if not word
of mouth, that you don't know what
you're talking about.
At the best it is a thankless task,
since every fan has his own well
founded views on the subject that are
not to be overthrown, and you rarely
come into contact with the minority
that may possibly be inclined to agree
with you.
Here and there, where the records
speak for themselves, where players
stand out so prominently as to permit
of no argument, you will run into a
restful calm in making a selection. But
it is when the field narrows down to
two or three players, with one mor
or less balancing the others, that
trouble arises. Then you run counter
to the opinion of Mr. Fan on this side
of the street and Mr 3. Fan on the other.
Figures ot Kverj-thiagi.
Nothing venture, nothing have, goes
the old lines, and, bearing in mind that
such selections represent of them
selves but the opinion of the writer,
and that said choices are not held up
to your consideration in any arbitrary
sense, the plunge is being taken.
Various of the fans, it must be re
membered, will have different ways of
getting at the information. Some will
incline to the younger players who are
coming up as being the most valuable
to a club. Others will hew closely to
the figures. Figures don't lie, so they
tell us, but occasionally they are mis
leading, and you will frequently have
a better line on the various men in
mind from seeing them work than by
basing an opinion purely on what they
have done in fielding and with the big
stick.
To the writer's way of thinking,
there should be a happy combination.
Youth must be given consideration, but
service during the season Just come to
a close cannot but be given credit.
The pitchers come close to picking
themselves. At least, that is the case
with the first four. Lefty Williams
otands out in front by himself, not
alone as & southpaw but as the top
notcher in the league, and there is no
one closely to approach his record.
Lore Easy Choice.
As for the other sldewheeler and
surely there should be two of that type
on such a team the palm must be
given Slim Love of the Angels. Some
critic recently remarked of the An
gels: "Dillon was forced to go through
the closing weeks of the season with
a team and one pitcher." It was not
necessary to call Love by name.
There remain four other pitchers to
be selected. Big Six Steen, a recent
acquisition, to be sure, but a valuable
one. for all that, Charles Spider Baum
and Skeeter Fanning, stalwarts from
the Seals, appear to be men entitled
to the doubtful honor of the choice.
To round out such a staff of hurllngs.
J would go to Jack Ryan, of the An
gels, who is not alone a good hurlsmith
but ever dangerous at the bat. Co
veleskie, remembering that he has been
handicapped with a losing club, an ag
grepation that lost heart long ago, is
a more valuable man than appears on
the surface, and may demonstrate this
fact before another season has been
concluded.
At least two catchers, and possibly
three, would be needed by a manager.
Walter Schmidt, of the San Francisco
club, is naturally suggested over and
beyond the others. His batting average
doesn't indicate his full strength, since
he is a particularly dangerous man in
the pinches. Also he is faster than
the average man on the bases.
Stcomd Catcher la Problem.
The selection of a running mate or
mates for Schmidt is by no means as
easy a task. There are several who
ran); along well in second place, and it
is by no big margin that Rowdy El
liott, of the Oaks, is ranked as No. 2
This proviso would have to be made,
however, take Rowdy away' from the
handling of a club, if he is to be con
sidered a strong asset in the backstop
ping division.
Clarence Boles of the Angels, would
100K well with such a club of "great
men." but Lynn, the Salt Laker, will
have to be given the palm and placed
in tnis select company.
The infield, save in spots, is not s
easy to name, and there will likely be
a world of dissenting votes. There
nave been three first basemen well up
to the front Heilmann. of San Fran
cisco: Jack Ness, of Oakland, and Bun
ny Brief, of Salt Lake. Truth to tell.
tnere is comparatively little to choosx
oetween mem. Brier has been on a
rar with Heilmann at the bat. but the
San Franciscan has been out of the
harness for so long a time there is no
telling what he might have accom
plished.
As a fielder. I would much prefer
'
A - ; i i - rf i; uV
pVui; ' W-J$ k ? HsCJ rd
' '
3-25
6-
15-19
9-13
23-23
S) 13-17
IX-
IS-33
-15
22-1S
13-
bUS-ll
17-13
11- 7
13-
7- 3
15-1
t-13
i-:4
13- 9
34-18
-13
3-
13-17
5- 9
c)17-:j
53-2 7
B. wla
13-17
6- 9
17-22
CS-27
B. wla
15. 19. 2J. 26. 27. 2S. 30. 31. king S. White
to move and win.
Solution to problem 93. Black ::. IS.
kings 10. 15. White 5, kings 1. o. 11.' Black
u move inu win.
25-23
13- 9
33-1S
9-13
13-15
13- 9
Variation (A.)
15-19 9-13 11- 7
9- 6 24-26 13- 9
18- 15 13- 9 7-3
6- 9 15-11 9-13
19- 34 9-13 2- C
B 13-9. 2i-2S. 9-13. lS-ll. 13-9. 1S-IS,
9-6. 19-24, -9. Same as variation (A).
Black win.
C 17-13. 10-15. 11-6. 15-10. 6-15. 23-37.
Black win.
a snort route e-u. i-s.
29-2S (d 13-17. 15-19 17-13, 25-21. 13-9
19.24, 9-13. 34-2S. 13-9. 9-13. 1S-14.
13-9. 53-32. Black win?
D 13-9 prevents 15-19. 19-24, etc. Aaron
Bart, Jaclc. Ctoorze Bluichird.
boluuoa to problem 94 HlacK 3. 6. s, lo,
11. 12. 17. 22. Wblte IS. 19. 2. 23. 27. 29.
Ju. 31. White to p:y and win. 13-13, 11-18.
23-7. 3-10. 19-la. 10-19. 21-35. 23-29. 27-23,
lD-L'S. 3-6. I-l, 6-1. K-14. 1-0. 14-lS. 6-10.
is. .3. lo-ia. 33-37. 13-11. wane Wla. Aaron
Hart. Jack. Georc Blanchard.
Solution to problem 95 Black 3. 4. 11. 13.
IS. 19. 27. Whits 10, 20. 28. 30, kings . 17,
25. Black to play and win. 11-1&. 30-11. 4-3,
11-4, 3-8, 4-J1. lt-32. 11-18. 19-24. 23-19.
27-31. 1S-27. 21-39. Black win.
Criticisms, play and remarks from cor
respondents: The published solution to prob
lem 90 is rank. At sixtn move insteaa oi
18-23 brlnr man on 14 around and capture
piece on 2o. See no win for white. Jack.
Problem 88 et 31st move instead of 3-19
play 15-10. White back up then 28-29. 9-14.
29-25, 23-18. Black Kin. Wblte have a much
stronger defense at 2nd move. Instead of
23-25 play 22-2S. 24-23. 2S-23. 28-32. 23-2S,
32 28. 2-23. 28-32, 22-2S. 32-27 ta)26-23,
27-18 17-14. lo-ll. 14-S. 13-14. S-1S-10. 1-5,
11-7, 13-9, 10-15. 9-, 7-2, 4-1. 15-19. Black
A 14-17. 9-18, 26-23. 18-23. 23-32. 15-18,
82-37. 10-14, etc. Black win. Jack. Our
correspondent does not chants results but
develops a strong line of play for white,
which adds greatly to the value ot the prob
lem. To Yates ''single corner here la an end
ing similar: Black 2. 3. 5. 7, f, 9. 10. 12,
15. IS. White 14. 17, 20. 23. 24. 25.' 26.
27. 31. 32. White to move and win. 24-19,
15-24, 20-16. 12-19. 27:0. 18-27, 31-6, 9-18.
17-13. 2-9. 13-S. 5-. 32-27. 7-10. 6-2. 10-15.
26-23, 9-14, 2-6. 8-12, 6-10. White win. The
airterence is that in &. game man on
must be sacrlticed while this man on 9
Drotectl man on 6.
No. 114. "Old Fourteenth." second reel, or
(A) at sixth move instead or 36-33.
what result? It the first one analysed for a
loss. This also should be carried out tor it
looks to me much stronger: 27 has 23 to
move to and exchange two ways, but if 26-23
hemmed in and restricted. J, sanrleld.
Centralis. Wash.
Here is a Waterloo game ending something
11KO ll.'t 11-1. Zo-lS. B-ll. -io,
24-19, 15-24, 22-8. 4-11. 27-20. 5-9. 21-17,
l.u 'll-ir, "s-4. 7-11- 26-23. 15-18.
32-27. 3-7." 24-19 (a) 11-15. 30-26.. 15-24,
20-16, 12-19. 27-20. White wins. A For a
draw continue 18-22. 20-16. 19-15, etc X
Sanfleld. . , ,,
Knriinr ahiv is arrived at hv "Switcher"
fiiii i.i7 i.ia s.ii. 17-14. 10-17.
21-14! 6-10". 22-17. 13-22. 26-17. 15-18
(a)29-25. 1-6. 34-20. 11-15, 28-24, 4-8. 30-26,
6-9. See .ending above.
A 29-35 weak; good against non-book
players as they seldom reply 18-22. X. San
field. , .
A correction The game from which ed
itor arranged problem 93 was played between
J. L. Poets and W. L. Bryant, of Salem, in
stead of Mr. Oivens.
Solution to 115. ending "single corner"
-6 2-9 24-19. 13-24. 20-16. 13-19, 27-20.
18-27. 31-6. 14-17. 21-14. White win. Aaron
HThe San Diego. Cal., club has accepted the
challenge from the club at Saa Quentin.
Cal., to play a match of 12 games or
checkers by correspondence, play to com
mence November 1. H. Baker.
In the fourth game of the match between
R. Jordan and the late James Wyllle they
arrived at tra following position:
"MAID OF THE MIL.U"
Dl.v T.,i1.n 9 3 K. B 7. 11. 17. IS.
BEES PLEASE FANS
Loyal Salt Lakers Sure Team
Was Best at Finish.
CITY IS BASEBALL CRAZY
Ness to the other two, and since such
a club will naturally have a power of
hitting strength, the shade will be
given to Ness, despite his batting per
formance of .339, as against .366 for
Brief, who was the league leader, or
.365 for Heilmann, close up.
Gedeon. Werthy of Choice.
Joe Gedeon, of the Bees, looks to
have the edge on his second base rivals,
with McMullen and Jerry Downs run
ning well up and entitled to considera
tion. Gedeon, if you will glanca over
the records, stands sixth among the
run-getters in the league and that is
something that must be counted.
There will likely be no opposition ot
arfy worth to rating Roy Corhan as
the best shortstop in the Coast League.
He has been hitting .22. this season
and is No. 7 as a base-stealer, which
in an organization ot sprinters is not
to be disregarded. Not only does ne
hold over Terry as a hitter, but Cor
han s ability to cover a world of gr'und
is one of his strong points. If Cor
han has a fault it is the tempera tent
that causes him to have a bad day when
affairs start the wrong way. but he
more than makes up for his errors by
his repeatedly sensational fielding.
Third base doesn . seem to suck out
this season, or, to put it more concisely.
there is no thiru baseman who has been
featured. That is often the case, but
in the present instance It is posstDiy
because Ray Bates, who is voted into
office herewith, isn't the sort of player
who can grandstand. I mean by this
that 3ates goes .about his work so
quietly that attention has not been
drawn to him. All the same, he would
not disgrace himself in such a gather
ing of talent.
Outfield Slaterlal Good.
And last, but not least! The outfield.
On the whole, the Coasters have been
better equipped from outfield stand
point than in any other department of
the game. All around the circuit you
can find good men and true. It makes
the task a hard one, nut. wnat must oe
must be.
There may be surprise in the elimina
tion of Ping Bodie. but when no more
than four can be selected, the cut must
be made. Without questir-j, could five
outfielders be retained, Bodle would
qualify, but a club with five in the
outer garden would be somewhat top
heavy. '
Hcrl Maggert. of the Angels, is not to
be denied. Neither is Jimmy Johnston,
of the Oaks. Harry Wolter, oZ Los An
geles, is unquestionably a strong man
with any club, not alone because of his
natural qualifications, but because he
is a smart ballplayer, and that covers
a world of territory.
That narrows the field to one men.
and the laurel is handed to Biff Schal
ler. Schaller in the year just closed
uasn't batted up to Bodie's strength,
but he has been second among the base
stealers and second as a run-getter. His
record is one that simply forced tne
man into notice.
Wolverton Chosen Manager.
Harl Maggert has stolen more runs
than any other player and is third
among the baae-stealers. Johnston has
hit well up with a percentage of .345,
has stolen 84 bases and ranked fourth
as a scorer of the all-powerful tally.
In these departments the name of
Harry Wolter does not appear, but it
is safe to say that in any list of all
star outfielders bis name would ap
pear. Anl. just a moment, folks!
We need a manager & man who can
welc together such material and pro
duce the results without which an ag
gregation of specialists would not
count.
Harry Wolverton is the chap, and
that, too. with all due deference to the
skill of Cliff Blankenship. who has
brought something out of nothing, a
contending club out of chaos.
I
Junction City Beats Cottage Grove.
JUNCTION CITT, Or., Oct. 30. (Spe
cial.) Although outweighed and hav
ing been defeated this year by Cottage
Grove, 19 to 0. the high school football
team outclassed them today on the
local gridiron and won. 13 to 0. The
game was one of forward passes and
line plunges; two passes were recov
ered by E. Hays, who made two 20-yard
runs for touchdowns. The next game
has been scheduled with Springfield
for Isovember 6, to be played, here.
WILL AMS WINS
32
Bees' Pitcher Nearly Breaks 2
Mar4ks Hung Up in 1910.
LEAD HELD IN RUNS, TOO
Lore, of Angels, Is Cla6S of Twlrlcrs
and Responsible for Only 1.92
Tallies to Nine Innings Baum
Is Sit Most Often.
Lefty Williams, of Salt Lake, came
close to breaking two league records
nung up by Cack Henley when, in 1910.
he was pitching for San Francisco.
With his 32 wins for the season, Will
iams fell only two shy of the Henley
record of 34 wins, which has stood as
the modern league record if one does
not care to go back to the early days
of the Coast League, when, in 1904,
Pitcher Newton, of Los Angeles, fig
ured in 39 wins for the season.
But Williams came closer to Hen
ley's record of the largest number of
innings pitched, lor, in 1910, Henley
worked a total of 430 innings for the
season, and this year Williams, with
431 2-3 innings of work, came closer
to equaling this record than any Coast
League pitcher has ever come.
Second to Williams as the hardest
women pttcner in tne league was
Dutch Klawitter, of Oakland, who was
the only other pitcher to pass the 400-
inning mark. Klawitter worked a total
of 402 innings. Ryan, of Los Angeles,
was third on the list with 37S inningst
then came Frough, of Oakland. 358 1-3
innings, and Love, of Los Angeles, with
355 innings.
More runs were scored against Will
iams than against any other pitcher,
opponents crossing the rubber 167
times while he was pitching. Klawit
ter was a close second, with opponents
piling up 166 runs, and Prough was
third with 163 runs scored against
him.
But when it came to averaging up
the runs for which each pitcher was
responsible in each nine innings. Love,
of Los Angeles, was the class of the
pitchers who might be termed "regu
lars" for the season. Love was re
sponsible for an, average of only 1.92
runs to nine innings. Second among
the regulars came Piercey, of Vernon,
responsible for an average of 2.18 runs
in nine innings.
Baum. responsible for 2.55 runs to
nine innings, was the best bet of trie
pennant-winning Seals, closely fol
lowed by Fanning at 2.56. Lush at 2.68
and Coveleskie at 2.64 were Portland's
best bets. Lefty Williams, responsible
for an average of 2.70 runs to nine
innings, was Salt Lake's most effective
pitcher.
Burns, the Los Angeles discard,
headed the Oakland pitchers with a
nlne-lneing run responsibility of 2.85.
with Pruiett close on his heels at 2.87.
Coveleskie was the only Portland
pitcher who was responsible for an
average of less than three runs to nine
innings, his record showing him re
sponsible for 2.64 runs to nine innings.
More bits were made against Spider
Baum, of San Francisco, than against
any other pitcher, opponents piling up
a total of 397 hits. Williams, of Salt
Lake, was next with 393 hits; Klawit
ter was the next in line with 382 hits
for opponents, and then came Prough
with 37L
As in run responsibility, so also In
keeping opponents to low batting
averages. Love, of Los Angeles, was
the class of the league, the aggregate
batting average of all opponents who
faced him during the season being
only .220. Fanning was the best San
Francisco pitcher in holding opponents
to low batting averages, his record
showing an average of .240. Lush, of
Portland, held opponents to .245. Lefty
Williams headed the Salt Lake pitchers,
holding opponents to a .254- batting
clip, and Klawitter held opponents to
.261 for the best showing for an Oak
land pitcher.
Following records show total Innings
pitched, total runs scored by opponents, to
tal runs for which pitcher was responsible,
and the average per nine innings for which
each pitcher was responsible:
Av.Ttrf.
In. Pit. Runs. Brf. In.
, . 1 0 0 0.00
..8 11
..123 SS SI
,. SS 13 7
. .S35 114 76
..137 1-3 44 30
..ir.4 1-3 S3 37
..291 2-3 101 71
S5
STARS CUT GAMES
Big Leaguers Will Play Only 1
Game Here, November 18.
Pitcher, club
Schaller, San Fran.
Ktsberg. Vernon .
Steen. iSan Fran ..
Noycs. Portland .
Love. Los Angeles
Johnson. Vernon .
Kromme. Vernon
Piercey. Vernon
Decanniere, Vernon . .221 19-3
Bodie, Kan Fran ..... s
Carberry. Oakland ... 7 l-3
Baum. Ban Fran 360 2-3
Fanning. San Fran ...3612-3
Lush, Portland ......265
Coveleskie, Portland .289
C. Williams, Salt Lake 431 2-3
Jtyan. Los Angeles ..37C
Hitt. Vernon 52 l-S
Henley. Vemor. ......273
Cou :h. San Fran 7
Brown, San Fran. ...174 1-3
Burns, Onkland-L. A. 275 l-S
Pruiett. Oakland 287 2-S
Fittery, Salt Lake . . .310 2-3
Scogpir.s. Lob Angeles 246 13
Klawitter, Oakland ..402 1-3
Mlddleton. Oakland
Smith, San Fran .. .
Mitchell. Vernon ..
Chech, Ver.-L. A. ..
Prough. Oakland ..
Kahler. Portland
Hlgglnbotham, Port.
Evani. Portland .. .
Beer. Oakland
Brant. Ioe Angeles
White. Vernon
Klllllay. 8. 1 3. T.
Kra'jse. Portland . .
Hall. Salt Lake 308 2-3
Horstman. L. A. 47 13
Peterson. S. L. 34 l-S
J. Williams. L.A-S.L. 206 2-3
Munsell, Salt Lake ... 64 2-S
West. L-A.-S.L-Ver. .102 2-3
Cavet. San Fran.
Fairbanks. Vernon
Gardner. Oakland
Hosp. Oakland ...
Gregory, Salt Lake
Gllliran, Salt Lake
Reuther, Salt Lake
3
.221
I ISO 2-3
.231
.35$ 1-3
.210 2-3
.323 1-3
.241
.129 2-3
. 73 21
. 46 l-S
.187 2-8
264 2-3
92
. 26
4
. 2
.200 2-3
. 45
. S3 1-3
1
35
13
114
44
S3
101
87
4
8
156
13.1
107
118
17
138
03
122
36
73
115
129
144
119
166
1
89
80
SS
163
95
145
137
60
38
23
100
131
158
32
19
100
40
59
s
15
9
1
123
32
30
105
103
76
85
l-O
113
76
84
30
53
1.1
1.53
l.6
1.02
1.B7
2.16
2.18
2.23
2.25
2.83
2-55
2.56
2.58
2.64
2.70
2.70
2.71
2.77
2.78
2.S4
87- 2.83
2.S
102
82
134
1
74
61
78
122
74
115
65
46
26
17
72
102
128
19
14
88
28
45
44
13
3
1
101
29
26
2.93
2.90
3.00
3.00
3.01
3.03
3.04
3.07
3.15
3.18
3.18
3. IS
3.31
3.33
8.45
3.46
3.55
3.64
8.70
3.82
3.87
3.93
4.30
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.r,2
5.8(1
7.0S
Occidental Defeats Whittlei.
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 30. Occidental
College won from Whittier College here
today, 13 to 6, in a well-played and
closely contested game. Considerable
punting and open plays featured the
contest.
HOW VARIOUS LEAGUE PENNANT WINNERS FINISHED THE
1915 BASEBALL SEASON.
League and club
American, Boston
National. Philadelphia
Federal. Chicaa-o
International, Buffalo
American Association. Minneapolis. .
Southern Association. Xew Orleans. . ................
Western, Te Moines -
Central. Fvansville ............
Three I (first). Davenport
Three I (second-!. Moline ............ .............
New England. Portland ........... .
New York State. Blnghamton
Northwestern. Seattle
Texas, Waco
Canadian, Ottawa
Northern. Fargo
Pacific Coast, fan Francieco ........ ..... ............ .
Virginia (first). Rocky Mount .. ...................
Virginia (second). Portsmouth ........................
Colonial. Hartford
Blue Kidge. Frederick ,
Central Association. Burlington
Xorth Carolina. Ashville
Western Association. Oenlson
Won. Lost. Pet.
. 101 50 , .9
. SO 62 .591
. 8 ( ,S
. . S 60 .632
. 2 61 .597
0f 63 .58
. 7 53 .S21
. 7i 50 .600
. 44 22 .7
. 19 .67
77 42 .447
. ' 44 .M2
it KS ,5M
. ss ; .:.
. 72 r. .4
74 49 .02
. llg S .570
35 23 .KOZ
. 41 25 .621
. 23 IS ..".SI
s :s .s7
. 81 - 3S .681
. 74 46 .617
. 76 S3 .5S
COAST FAVORITES RETURN
Bill James and Ed Kiepfer Again
Will. Be Seen In Action Stay
Reduced That San Francisco
Contest Might lie Arranged.
Portland has only one date scheduled
on the revised schedule of the tonr
ing National and American Leagues.
Two big league squads will be seen
in action on the Portland ball lot
Thursday, November 18.
Originally, Portland was to see two
contest, but the switch was made to
enable the big league nines to get
into San Francisco for a. Saturday
afternoon battle.
Among the former Coast League lav
orites will be Bill James, who went
up to fct. Louis from the Beavers and
was last season sold to Detroit. An
other twirler who formerly worked in
Venice livery will also be seen with
the American team in the person of
Ed Klepfler. He went to the Chicago
Cubs from the Coast and figured in
a trade by which he was sent to Cleve
land.
A list of the players making up the
two squads xollows:
Nationals Alexander. Coombs,
Vaughn, pitchers: Snyder, Killifer,
catchers; Miller. Daubert, first base;
Jack Miller, shortstop; Johnny Evers,
second base; Groh, third base; Wade
Killifer, left field; Cozy Dolan, center-
field; ueorge Burns, rigntfield.
Americans Kiepfer, Mitchell, James,
&cott, pitcners; ienry, cady, catchers
Gaynor, first base; Barry, second base;
Schang. third base; Chapman, short
stop; Strunk, left field; Jackson, cen
ter field; Lewis, rignt field.
Checkers
Headquarters Portland Chess and Checker
Club, 101 Washington building annex. Fourth
and Washington streets. A welcome for alL
uommunications and contributions solicited.
send to 143 .ast rnirty-iirta street. Port
land. Information and instruction free.
B. H. BRYANT. EDITOR.
Phone Tabor '6213.
PROBLEM 96.
Contributed by Harry Baker.
Block kings 3, 11.
fsa. .y- - --teT
gs,-, m te
K'
j"" -ip
White men 19. 20, 24. White to play and
draw.
PROBLEM 97.
End game between A. O. Walton and
George Bianchard at clubrooms. October 21.
Black 3. S. 7. 11. 12. 13. 17. 21. White 16.
18. 13. 20, 23. 26, 30, 32. Wblte to move
and draw.
PROBLEM 98.
Published some years ago In Derry News
No. 91 . also book of portraits No. IS. It
is a "beaut." tt.mcn 4. it. Kings s. 13.
White 25. 26. 32. king 24. White to move
and black to win.
Problem 99. By Editor.
Black 3. 6. 1. 10. 11. li. 14. io. Ji. White
White. IS,
to move.
16-13
11-1S
25-21
S-10
11-14
10-17
20-16
17-21
26-23
It.
13- 16 23-13
23- 14 37-31
7-10 26-23
14- 7 31-26
2-20 22-17
31-26 26-22
19-24 18-14
27-23 21-25
24- 27 14-10
25-30
10- 6
30-25
- 2
30-34
2- 6
24-27
6-10
27-31
10-15
31-24
15-10
25-21
17-14
21-17
10- 7
17-14
Jordan
won.
Thk five earlv traDS for the amateur and
expert to avoid are given below. The first
"known as the Steel Shot, originated by
him at Kllblrnie. Scotland Mr. UenMr has
worked up four, and one is credited to
A. Head. a
Black. 1. 2. a. o. o. 1. j-. v. 7.:.
White. 14. 15. 19. 23. 24. 25. 2U. 27. .
32 Black to move and win. Original y
from -Laird and Lady." Classed second to
th. "Rnnu Walk." Many call It - farmer.
Laird asfl jmay. "U1JU'1'
Argyie Lassie.
"Denny."
'Kelso.'
11-15
23-19
8-11
22-17
9-1 3
17-14
10-17
21-14
13-18
19-15
4- 8
24-19
13-17
2S-24
11-1
26-2S
16-20
31-26
and
10-14 10-15 IJ-15
22-ls 21-17
7-1U 0-13 o-l)
25-22 17-14 23-i6
11-16 15-18 12-10
24-20 22-15 22-18
ii-ia 11-1K 10-14
23-16 24-19 IS-15
12-19 8-11 7-10
1S-1S 1B-13 25-z:
14-lS 4- 8 14--S
28-25 23-19 22-17
9-14 11-18 U-14
20-16 26-23. 17-13
5- 9 16-20 5-
10-12 28-24 2-2f
2-7 13-17 2- 7
31-20
the above problem. 12-10.
, f , 10 -is 7.1(1 14-7. 3-28. 12-J.
2-7. S-10. 6-31." 27-24. 20-2Vr, black wins.
"7-24 9-13 24-20
10-19 29-25 7-1 1
24-15 8-12 26-22
10-1H 31-27 11-1S
23-10 3- 7 22-15
12-111 7-24 1-
--17 18-23 20-ltt
34-18 2)14- 5-14
17-14 4- 8 1-11
we
12-18
22- 17
16- 20
23- 10
11-13
26-23
8- 11
31-26
9- 13
17- 14
10-17
21-14
15-1S
19-15
4- 8
24- 19
13-17
25- 24
have
9-14
22-18
5- a
11-16
1S-15
10-19
24-15
1) 7-10
12-16
11- 4
23-27
32-23
l-i
30-2n
14-17
21-14
O-10
Drawn.
At the the point where variations 2. 3 and
S branch off we believe 14-10. -14. 15-11
gives white the best game. fcdltor.
23-26
25-22
2-31
29-25
.-11-27
-2-17
Aie-i
23-16
12-19
7- 10
27-24
2- 7
32-27
8- 12
30-23
! 4- 8
Z7-ZJ
12-16
24-20
7-11
17-13
11-27
31-1".
10-1K
20- 4
14-18
4)26-22
16-2 3
22-1 S
17- 14
B23-26
14-3
18- 14
V v- .Trnnv as 7-10
B 25-22. 23-26, 14-10. etc.
14- 9
-10
0-
tO-14
13-
1- 10
5- 1
10-15
1- 6
14-13
6-10
18-22
10-14
.J-26
14-10
2rt-3t
31-27
- 2
27-24
2- 7
24-20
Drawn.
White
wins.
3)24-20
19-24
6)26-19
24-27
32-23
6-10
VARIATION
1.-.- 6 2S-24
-7 "i -
19-13 24-19
4- S .".2-27
".-,-22 22-18
1- A 7-11
3-7.
30-2"
24-27
21-17
27-23
4-8,
17- 14
-3-16
14- 9
18- 19
Black
wins.
81-26. 7-11.
11. 27-i4.
Variation 3 19-
, ..- 11 i c oo.i
11-18.' 19-15' 10-19. 24-13. White wins
v.r,itlrn 4 23-22. 18-25. 29-22, 9-14.
oo-17 14-18. 1 1 - H. J - . io-w, v-, - -
ISVa7l.t?orn 25-22. 6-10. 15-6. 2-25,. 34-15.
25-9 26-19. 29-25. Black wins.
5-5-11 "-27 25-22 31-27
Itll 19 15 27-31 30-26
32 "3 4- 8 28-l 27-24
6-"ir 26-2.; 7-11 17-14
15- 6 ' 1- 6 21-17 12-16
14- 9
24-19
9- 2
1U-10
black
wins.
SARA QUINTET NAMES CAPTAIN
Basketball Schedule With Outside
Teams Is Being Arranged.
P.tDGEFIELD. Wash.. Oct. 30. (Spe
cial Sara will enter a team In the
basketball field this year. A meeting
of aspirants to the team was held and
Prank Tower was elected captain.
Charles Hellingson was elected man
ager and John Deako, treasurer. Prac
tice is being held' on Monday and
Wednesday nights of each week at the
Tower Hall at Sara.
The members of the team are: Frank
Tower and John Deako. forwards;
Charles Hellingson and Glenn Thur
man, guards; Clarence Connaway. cen
ter; Louis Osmer. substitute, and Fred
Hall, referee. Games are now being
arranged with outside teams and a
schedule is being fixed so that every
thing will be in readiness when the
season opens. Last season the Sara
basketball team won nearly every game
played.
SEALS IjOSE TO VITT'S STARS
Victory by 9-2 Score Slakes Series at
. San' Francisco Eleven, One Each.
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 30. The All
Stars, composed mostly of major league
players, had things their own way to
day, taking the long end of a 9-to-2
score from San Francisco, and inci
dentally tying up the post-season series
at one all. One game was tied. Spider
Baum, the Seals' star slabster. was
driven from the mound in the third
frame- Score:
R. H. E. R. H. E.
All-Stars 9,12 0 San Fran. .2 6 S
Batteries Prough and Stanage;
Baum, Couch, and Sepulveda,
All Are Sure "UtUe Brother"
Take Pennant Next Year Club
Has Good Profit for Sea- '
son and Fine Support.
BY WILL 3. MACRAE.
SALT LAKE, Oct. 30. (Special)
Not satisfied with having shoved Pop
Dillon's crew to the second round of
the ladder, the Bees took the wind-up
game of the season Sunday, thereby
adding insult to injury. It was a
rather frost-laden farewell, both from
the 000 fans and the atmosphere,' that
sent Los Angeles back Into Winter re
tirement. All week Los Angeles played to an
early season crowd, and I am quite
sure that if Cliff Blankenship' s wreck
ing crew had not landed second place
there would have been an alarming
increase in the suicide statistics last
week and this. What I mean is, that
Salt Lake is just plumb baseball crazy.
The gallant fight the Bees have been
making all season hss made all other
events and stirring world topics take
second place. Even the municipal pri
maries and church affairs have played
second place in the minds of the peo
ple. Fans Are Satisfied.
Here one can go over the town and
rake it with & fine-toothed comb and
you can't find anyone, man. woman or
child, that is not saying:
"Well, the little brother of the Coast
League finished second this season.
Pretty good, eh! We'll win the pen
nant next season, sure."
By the same token, it's best to agree
unless you are a good two-handed.
rough-and-tumble fighter. Just to tell
a truth in passing, I am going to
agree with Doc White San Francisco
and Harry Wolverton are lucky to win
the pennant. Wolverton, when he read
Doc White's comment on the Salt Lake
team, looked wise and sneered. Deep
down, if the Seal manager did not
know and realise that Salt Lake Had
the best ball club, he knows it now.
even if he won't admit it.
Ask any keen baseball manager and
he will tell you there are only about
12 cardinal rules to follow In baseball.
And the same source of information
will tell you that any time a club
manager has on his team half a dozen
players that will put to use these 13
rules while they are in uniform, that
manager will be lucky and turn out a
pennant-winning ball club. Ask your
own Walter It McCredie. He will back
up this statement.
Beea Rated Above Seals.
Here is the difference between the
1915 pennant-winners and the Bees.
San Francisco has got about six of
these 12-rule boys on the team, and
the Bees, since the team was strength
ened, have a full crew of the 12-rule
boys on the payroll. That is why tho
Bees came from last place to second,
and if the league season end were a
month off nothing short of an enrth
quake could prevent them from kick
ing San Francisco from first place.
Wolverton came here last week as
cocky as a boy with his first pair of
copper-toed boots. In a dozen places
in each game during the series, the
Bees played rings around the Paciflo
Coast League pennant-winners. Every
Coast League magnate will admit, if
he is disposed to tell the truth, that
the Salt Lake Bees had the best team
In the league and that the best team
in the league did not bring home the
bacon. Another thing they'll admit
if they don't, ask them to show their
financial statements for each series
that Salt Lake City gave each team
more money 'than any town in the
league.
Bees Make Good Profit.
There is no way at this time to show
Just how much money the Salt Lake
team has made for the stockholders,
but I'll take for my share all over 320.
000. This in spite of the fact that
the 360.000 stock subscription dwindled
down to 335.000 cash paid. This stock
is nicely divided, for about every busi
ness man in town, large and small, is
down for a piece of this stock. When
the people here decided to put a team
in the Coast League, they went into
the game for advertising purposes and
agreed to pay each year the amount
opposite their names, for a baseball
team first, and for advertising Salt
Lake second. With that spirit behind
them, it is no wonder the town is base
ball crazy and the thousands of fans
loyal.
Just as sure as there is going to be
a directors' and stockholders' meeting
there is going to be a Juicy dividend
declared. From what I hear, none of
the stockholders are going south .with
this money, for the prevailing senti
ment 'favors retaining a stiff cash re
serve in the treasury for possible back
sets and a bceak in weather conditions.
These Salt Lakers know they are tak
ing a gamble with the weather.
ABERDEEN BOXER AT FRONT
Nick Randitch Writes of Hardships
Experienced in Trenches.
ABERDEEN, Wash., Oct. 30. (Spe
cial.) Nick Randitch, two years ago
an Aberdeen boxer, but now an Aus
trian soldier, is still alive or was some
six weeks ago according to a letter
and picture of himself just received
here. Nick writes that he is not en
joying the war much and that life in
the trenches is hard. His letter con
tains little about conditions or the
war. probably due to warnings from
censors.
Young Randieh was on a visit to the
old country when the war broke out
and was unable to return to America
with his bride of a few weeks. He had
lived in this country since boyhood,
but had never become naturalized.
Aberdeen Guard to Give Smoker.
ABERDEEN, Wash., Oct. 30. (Spe
cial.) Company G. National Guard of
this city, has" completed platis for a
large free smoker to be held here on
November 5, which wjll feature several
boxing bouts, a fencing match and a
number of military events. The fencing
bout will be between Gaston Mock, of
Montesano, and Captain H. A. Comeau.
of this city, formerly fencing champion
of Connecticut.
Young Turkey to Meet Tex A'ernon.
CENT RALIA, Wash.. Oct. 30. (Spev
Iclal.) Young Turkey, of t,entraiia.
will box 'lex vernon in audi
the night of November 8 for the feath
erweight championship of the North
west, according to an accounceroent by
Turkey's manager, Leo Cohen. .Turkey
is in training for the bout- The local
boxer is confident he can take' Vernon's
measure.
McCIeary Mlllman Loses Fingers.
ELMA. Wash., Oct. 30. (Special.)
E. Haney, an employe of the Chehalis
Fir Door factory at McCIeary, lost all
of the fingers on his left hand Thurs
day while engaged around one of the
panel sanders,