The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, November 01, 1914, SECTION FOUR, Page 2, Image 52

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    TIIE SUNDAY OREGOXIAX, PORTLAND, NOVEMBER 1, 1914.
ACTOR, WHO SCORED AS JAPANESE, NOW IS MOST
REALISTIC CHINESE IN NEW YORK SUCCESS
Walker WMtesid.es, Star of "Typhoon," Now Shines in "Mr. Wn," an Oriental Drama That Shows His Great Artistry Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion"
Likely to Prove Most Popular Vehicle Playwright Has Sent to America "My Lady's Dress" Is Unusual.
STEERS & COMAN
PRESENT
-s. I r-f AtT'C Am BEGINIMIIMCi
HLlLKil i tommy ous today
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f y--' h 111 "N: u
EVAN
WILLIAM
America's Greatest Concert Tenor
Heilig Theater
Sunday Afternoon
3 o'clock
November 8
Seat Sale Friday
Nov. 6.
Send mail orders NOW.
Steers - & Ooman, Columbia
Bldg. IncloBe self-addressed
stamped envelope with check
Popular Prices
Lower floor, $1.50, $1.
Balcony, $1, 75c, 50c.
Gallery Reserved, 50c.
Gallery Admission, 25c.
of Mortimer and Classen. Who had been
arretted as pickpocket, suspects.
Kendall told of a conversation with
Harry Powers, a detective sergeant, to
whom he said he had been introduced
by Foley. Powers told him. he said, he
rould have obtained the release of his
friend for 125 Instead of the $200 Ken
dall said he paid Foley.
"He told me If we ever grot arrested
aura In to call him up and he would Bet
us out In fifteen minutes." Kendall tes
tified.
Barney Hertscne. ward politician.
with two policemen and two bystand
ers, who was shot during stret re
volver battle on Wednesday is ex
pected to testify, either before the
crime commission or to the State's At
torney, as soon as he Is out Of the hos
pital. N
The State's Attorney is conaueting? an
investigation into the shooting; on the
theorv that it Waa the result of a, plot
to kill Bertsohe, who had threatened
to expose police relations with the un-J
aerworia.
The State's Attorney, in explaining
his refusal to appoint an assistant to
conduct the Council Investigation, said
he had been conducting a. parallel In
vestlsratlon for several months. "There
never was a publlo investigation yet.
he said, "that didn't hamper a criminal
inquiry. Why not place the evidence
directly before a grand JuryT"
Albany CatTl, Report Made.
AT.-nAW. Cir. Oct. 81." (Snectal.V
Albany mallcarrlers walk an average
of miles a day and deliver almost
1800 letters and postcards dally. A rec
ord kept for the week ending' October
24 discloses that the carrier delivered
during the week 441 purcel post pack-
BY LLOYD LONERGAN.
NEW YORK. Nov. 1. (Special.)
Walker Whiteside eeems deter
miiJ make a name for himself
as a man of other countries. He scored
heavily in "The Melting Pot," later in
"Typhoon" as a Japanese, and he now
appeals for our iavor in "Mr. Wu," a
Chinese melodrama at the Maxine
Elliott Theater. I
Mr. Whiteside, as "Mr. Wu." the lead-'
Ing character, is a Chinese commercial
magnate of indefinite kind with all the
profound reticence and discretion of his
race and all the resources of such a
great man in an Oriental country. He
had all this plus the veneer of an Ox
ford education. This is Mr. Wu. . His
characteristics were displayed in his
manner of avenging himself on the
family of the young man. son of his
rival in business in the East, who de
ceived the daughter of the mandarin.
It was the familiar Eastern romance of
Pierre Lotl in "Mile. Chrysantheme."
The girl happened in this case to be
the daughter of a mandarin and not a
geisha. So there . were consequences
when the boy was to Btart back to
England, leaving behind him the girl
he had wronged.
H. M. Vernon and Harold Owen are
the authors of this play, which trans
lates into the terms of melodrama the
elements of the Oriental nature which
New York rejected in "The Yellow
Jacket" and received more cordially In
"tm uypnoon. it is more conventional
of course, than "The Yellow Jacket'
and treats the Oriental in its fiction
with even less novelty than Lengyel's
play did.
Play la Picturesque.
There Is, of course, no particular
reason why all that happens in "Mr.
Wu" should take place in and near
Hongkong. The Chinese color is pic
turesque, and it may be that the
hypothesis that a crime committed by
a son should be avenged in kind on the
mother, would be too improbable in
any but a mysterious and Eastern at
mosphere. But Mr. Wu is a citizen- of
the stage who might be at home and
frequently has been in any country of
the world.
Even in Its Oriental surroundings,
which were most elaborately main
tained, there was little illusion of life
about the first two acts of "Mr. Wu."
. All that preceded the final act was in
deed but a preparation for the long
continued scene of the woman's tor
ture in the palace of the mandarin.
Here the melodramatic blood is thick.
The scene with its careful building of
the wall about the English woman until
It seemed-. as if there were no escape
for her, vis adrott enough in its me
chanics to hold the spectators in Its'
grip' in spite of the discounting and
commonplace language which had been
put into the woman's mouth.. Her help
lessness was intensified by. the aid of
lights and music, clanking chains and
every aid to. the force of such a scene
which time has added to this tra
ditional episode.
AVhitenlde Shows True Type.
', Walker Whiteside gave a careful
study of the implacable, self-contained,
relentless Oriental, wno was always
able to outwit his European antag
onists. It was quite as deliberate as his
portrayal of & similar character in
The Typhoon. It was impossible not
to feel at times that a little more spon
taneity would have been interesting
even had it not been so true to the
type. There were passion and fervor
in his last scene, however, and he
maintained the horror of the death
with intensity, but no less of lmpres-
siveness. Antoinette Walker, who was
a plump young Japanese, to be so easily
deceived, acted with pathos.
Bernard Shaw's latest play, "Pyg
malion," which caused comment be
cause it was first presented in German,
has been brought to America by the
Llebler Company, with Mrs. Patrick
Campbell as the star. Some of th
actors and actresses who were with
her -in the London- production are Btill
in the cast here-at the Park Theater.
The "romance in five acts" is not
altogether unknown here. It was acted
first in Vienna and then in Berlin. In
both cities it was highly appreciated In
the expert translation used there, and
later in the performance given at tne
Irving Place Theater in this city.
Flower Girl la Heroine.
Connoisseurs in matters theatrical
may recall the outline of the play from
Its performances at the German thea
tar. They may remember that itd hero
ine is- a flower girl out of the London
gutters, who attracts a professor of
phonetics by the appalling character
of her speech. He declares that he
could make her talk like a duchess
and she overhears his boast. She seeks
out his rooms to have her way of talk
ing sufficiently refined for her to ob
tain a place as salesgirl in a florist's
shop. She becomes his pupil. He takes
her into society to a mild extent later.
and her occasional outbreaks alone
show that she may not yet be a
duchess at heart, however her speech
may have come to resemble talk in
that rank of life.
Shaw's comedy is quite as fantastic
as the story of the earlier Pygmalion,
who created an affinity out of stone,
but it is humorous enough after the
middle of the second act to afford the
finest sort of entertainment to any
audience. It is all the wit of the
author, although there is much humor
In., the character of the heroine's un-
regenerate father, who is so poud of
being one of the undeserving poor and
who is the medium of most of the
smartest talk of the familiar Shaw
kind.
There will be less to weary specta
tors in the long stretches of the second
act once the actors are more familiar
with their tasks, as there was an un
comfortable slowless of tempo in sev
eral scenes. There is some uncommon
ly fine acting "on the part of several
members of the cast.
Mm. Campbell Striking.
Mrs. Campbell, while too mature for
the" part of the flower girl in the last
scene as well as the first, makes a
striking Impersonation of the role. It
was her - revelation of the vulgar but
fine-spirited creature under the Veneer
imparted by her professors that kept
her always true to the spirit of the
play. Then her realization of Its comic
possibilities was complete.
Pygmalion deserves to be one of
the most popular of the Shaw plays
seen here.
Those who know Edward Knoblauch
Only as the author of "Kismet" and
the co-author of "Milestones" may find
it rather hard to recognize that skill
ful playwright as the inventor of "My
Lady's Dress," the current attraction
at the Playhouse.
'My Lady's Dress" has been described
as a dream play. And it is partly
dream. But partly it is real most real.
indeed, when it is not a dream. It is
an unusual play. Spun out of a most
improbable material, yet plausible. Mr,
Knoblauch had a new and bright idea
wnen it occurred to him to conceive an
entertainment combining tragedy with
comedy out of a woman's gown. Not in
a literal sense, ot course. The gown
Is only the germ, the stuff out of
which "My Lady's Drees" is fashioned,
It is, as It were, the leitmotif, the
theme on which it is built. The play Is
divided into three long parts or acts.
each one of them divided into three epl
sodes. The first and last of these deal
with reality: the rest are dreams.
SLEUTHS POSE AS THIEVES
1 1 1 "
Chicago Detectives Try to Get Data
Against Policemen.
CHICAGO, Oct. 27 Maclay Hoyne.
State's Attorney, recently refused an
appeal from Charles E. Merrlam. chair
man of the Council Crime Commission
to appoint Fletcher Dobyns, of counsel
for the committee, an Assistant State's
Attorney to prosecute members of the
police force who have been implicated
in deals with pickpockets, according to
testimony before the commission.
Mr. Hoyne s refusal, he said, was
based on belief that such investigations
should be conducted by the grand Jury
and not by a CouneiA commission.
Further testimony was given by Ben
jamin Kendall, John O. Mortimer and
Leroy Classen, all Investigators of the
commission. The investigators, accord
ing to their testimony, posed as pick
pockets, lived In the underworld, and
established intimate relations with nu
merous thieves and some policemen.
They lived, they said, under the pro
tection of Dennis Foley, a saloonkeep
er, who obtained the release from jail
Pictures
25Vo off
Positively no restrictions. Your
choice of our entire stock of
Sheet or Framed Pictures.
Copy
LYRIC
Fourth and Stark Sts.
Portland's only musical " comedy
playhouse' catering especially to
ladies and children.
Week commencing matinee today.
The
Lyric Musical Comedy C.
Presents
My Wife's
' Husband
A Biot of Laughter A Galaxy
of Beauty.
Full of novelties, showing a reg
ular rehearsal of the company
on a bare stage.
Matinee every day at 2:30, 15
Evenings, continuous, 13S 25
EXTRAS
Monday Night Isch-Ga-Bihhle.
Tuesday Night Amateurs.
Wednesday Country Store.
Friday Night Chorus Girls'
Contest.
N. B. On Tuesday night elec
tion returns will he read from the
stage as fast as they are received.
STANDARD PIANO SOLOS
Beautiful Blue Danube.., Htrauas
Bohemian tilrl Bait
lotermcazo. Cv. Hustlcaaa Mascasnt
tonvent Bella Bplndler
Iylng Poet Gottschailc
Fatut Transcription Cramer
Fifth Nocturne Leybach
l'lower Bong Lang
11 Trovatore Trans Dorn
Love's Dreamland Walts Boeder
Old Black Joe, var Drumheller
La Paloina, var Yradter
l'oet and Feacant Overt , . . . Euppe
Wm. Tell Overture " Rossini
Barcarolle Tales, Hoffman Offenbach
Humoreaque Dvorak
Sweet Bre and Bye, var Drumheller
The Storm Weber
Hprtng- Song Mendelssohn
Sextette from Lucia Bohm
By mall add lc per copy for postage.
When It'a Music or Pictures, "Uo
Where the Crowds Go."
fferosM St, einlek ft Oo, rropxlstors,
322 .Washington Street
Between Sixth and Broadway."
Fourth Season
PORTLAND
8'
rMPHDNY
n
utI7.aMOST MOTION PICTURES
THE
P OILER
S
William Farnum
Aa "CleuUter"
Kathlyn Williams
Aa "tkerty Malotte"
Bargain Price Afternoons From 1 to 6 P. M.
Entire Lower Flor 1B K.sttre Balcony lOr
POPULAR PRICE EVENINGS 6 TO 11P.M.
Eatlr Lower Kloor 25 Entire Balcony 15t
7 S SUNDAY, NOV. 8
SPECIAL PRICE MATINEE SATLRTJAV
BARGAIN PRICES MAT. WEDJIBtD.V
KLAW &
ERLANGER
Present
THE
BEItJMNO
SUCCESS OF
ENGLAND) AND
AMERICA
Eve. Lower Floor, 11 rows.
2; 7 at 1.S0.
Balcony, Jl, 7So, 50c Gallery, 50c
Wed. Mat tl, 7 Be, 80c
Sat. Mat. U.60. $1. 7K 50c.
MAIL
BOX OFFICE SALE OPENS THl'H, N'wV. , ORDERS NOW
BAKER
THEATER
Pnoneot Main Z, A S
Broadway nasi Herrlssa
GEO. L. B Alt Kit. Ma-.
Permanent Homo of the Incomparable Baker Theater Players
Week Commencing TODAY, Sunday Matinee, Not. 1, 1914
A Beautiful production of Orttt Geore' greatest succVss
1
A WOMAN'S
1 -
Klornc Roberta
w
AY
By arrannement with Wm. A. Brady. Pull
ktrenxth of th entire Baker Players. A com
edy ot domestic troubles In hlsrh life. A vain
able hint to thousands of married women ot to
4 day. Superbly staged. (Jorftcouslr owned.
Splendidly enst. Staice tinder direction of
Thomas Coffin Cooke.
Tuesday Night, Election Returns Between Acts
Evenings g&c SScv Knc, TRc Box seats SI.
Sunday and Saturday Matinees 2c, one. Box T5c.
The two popular bargain performances
wA'tati All Seats 25c e b.
NEXT WEEK MAGGIE PEPPER
aires. 10,3 letter and card and 5271
newspapers and magazines. This is
only the mail handled on the delivery
routes within the city limits and does
not include that sent out on the rural
deliveries or called for at the post-office.
It doesn't do a rabbit much Rood to
have a mean disposition.
a m . m
MghTT llc BROADWAY AT YAMHILL
Week Beginning Monday Afternoon, Nov. 2
ORCHESTRA
First Concert
This Afternoon
At I o'clock.
HEILIG THEATER
Schubert's Seventh
Symphony Feature
HAROLD BA1LEV, Conductor
POPULAR PRICES 11. 75C.
60a and 25o.
Seat Sale Friday. Oct. 30. at
10 A. M.
THE GREAT IRISH CHARACTER ACTOR
si RY AN-RICHFIELD
IN "MAG HAGGERTY'S FATHER"
Tho Oldtinto Favorite
HARRY
THOMSON
"THE MAYOR OP THE
BOWERY"
CONTINUOUS
Afternoons 1:30 to 5:30
Nights . . 6:30 to 11:00
Second Show . . . 9:00
Sundays . 1:00 to 11:00
"JUST TWO GIRLS
Lucy and Ethel Baker
In Sona-a and Original Dances
Skill and Comedy on Wheels
The Cycling McNutts
'Pinnacle of Picturesque Pednlry"
Clever Girl Ventriloquist
GRACE DE
W1NTRES
With Her Impersonate
Dummy, In Mew Musts
THE SO.NG-WRITIXQ COMEDIANS
'Rags' Leighton & Robinson
la Orla-lnal Slnrlna: Comedy.
"KDDKASIltN'
FIVE REELS PIHST-RIV
5-PH0T0 PLAYS-5
Unequalled Vaudeville Broadway at Alder
Continuous Performance Today
From liSO P. M. to 11 130 P. M.
Week Commencing Monday Matinee, Nov. 2
11 Colonial' Minstrel Maids11
Vaudeville's Colossal Musical Organization
HUGO LUTGENS
The Swedish Raconteur
ELWOOD & SNOW
Masters ot the Double Voice
LEON & ADELINE SISTERS
Cyclonic Comic Jugglers
VAN AUD ENH AEYE
The Belgian Nightingale I
Special Added Attraction
Isabelle Fletcher, Chas. Ayers & Company
In Wtllard Mack's D " A Tale
Dramatic Success . x-"i"v- cannula
f A Tale ot the
n Woods
THE MUTUAL WEEKLY The World's War News lit Motion Pictures.
Boxes and 1st Row Balcony eats Reserved hy Phone. Main 43. A Z23G