The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, June 15, 1913, SECTION FOUR, Page 7, Image 53

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    THE STTJTDAY OKEUOMA, FOKTLAAD, JU.VB 15, 1913.
PORTLAND DOCTOR AND WIFE CLIMB PYRAMID OF
CHEOPS AND EXPLORE AMONG OLD-WORLD SHRINES
Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Morrison Say Sight From Top of Great Egyptian Wonder Is Greatest of All Manger, Purported to Be Birthplace of Christ, Is Viewed.
Jerusalem, Dirty, Unsanitary and Barren, Is Big Disappointment Italian Soil Cultivation Causes Amazement.
AUTO POLO
and
AUTO RACES
i2 ' .
iin.-ni I-.- ,,
LEFT TO RIGHT 1)1. J. W. MURUUW, MRS. G. E. AVATTS, MRS. MO It ROW.
The Arabs leading the camels were graduates of a college in Egypt and make It a business to explain to tourists not only the structure of the
places they visit, but all the history and religious significance of the tombs and pyramids.
PULLED, yanked, boosted and
shoved, with two sturdy Arabs
above and one stout dragoman be
low, and scrambling for all one is worth
to keep the footing on the steep rock
this must one experience in order to
stand atop the great Pyramid of
Cheops, as did Dr. J. W. and Mrs. Mor
row, of Portland. They climbed, and
yaw such a vista of farm and river and
distant city as they never before be
held. The doctor and his party have Just
returned from a visit to Africa, Asia,
Europe and several Islands of the sea.
Mrs. G. E. "Watts accompanied them in
all parts of the journey save the pyra
mid climb. After viewing the dizzy
height, following a somewhat racking
camel ride, she preferred mother
earth.
The party sailed from New York City
February 15, and touched land first on
the island of Madeira, where they found
flowers blooming out of doors and the
-whole countryside in full vigor of pro
duction. After visiting the Spanish
sugar factories and driving through the
beautiful streets, they set sail for Cadiz,
that romantic Spanish city of cathe
drals. Thence to Seville, where they
visited the Winter palace of King Al
fonso and Inspected the great shrines.
"Main street In Seville Is so narrow
that they don't allow wagons In it at
all," said Dr. Morrow. "The paving
extends to the walls of the buildings
on each side and there are no side
walks. Out in the country they still
plow with oxen and the same crooked
Ftlck their ancestors used ten centuries
ago.
l it Furnishes Great Sights.
In Ugypt the party saw the greatest
Ights of all. On top of the pyramid
they had an unobstructed view as far
as the curvature of the earth would
allow.
"IT the world had been absolutely
flat, there is no limit to what we might
have looked at," said Dr. Morrow. "The
Nile Valley lay close under us, and
beyond that were more farms and more
groves and more cities. Regulation of
the overflow of the Nile has revolu
tionized the whole of Egypt. We saw
tho finest cotton the world produces
right under us, and now there are no
destructive floods, followed by equally
destructive droughts. The big dam has
demonstrated the value of storage of
surplus waters that this country might
well copy after.
Jerusalem was the one great dis
appointment of the whole trip. Dirty,
unsanitary, barren, the people mostly
paupers, and nothing but sacred tra
ditions to keep the city on its feet, the
proipe.'t was anything but pleasing.
"It was so chilly that we ordered
fire for our rooms," said Dr. Morrow.
"We had to pay 0 cents for a few
handfuls of sticks maybe roots cut
from dead trees. That's the only fuel
there is. and there Is little of that.
The only living trees we saw were
olive trees, and they are guarded most
carefully.
Birthplace- of Christ Seen.
"On our visit to Bethlehem, birth
place of Christ, we were shown what
purported to be the manger In which
he was born, and on the floor Is a
star guarded by a soldier which they
told us was the same Star of Beth
lehem that guided the Magi. We vis
ited the Garden of Gethsemane. and
saw a group of olive trees which they
told us were In the garden when
I'hrtst prayed there that the cup of
death might pass from him. The leaves
of these trees are gathered and
pressed, blessed by a priest and sold
to pilgrims for large sums."
When the party landed at Athens,
they ran right Into the great jubilee
o'.cbration of victory over the Turks,
accomplished only the day before. The
-ity was decorated, though the war
was still at its height, the citizens
were dressed in their best and made
tuerry.
"There we saw true patriotism the
k tnd vc seldom encounter here." said
tae doctor. "Thousands of Greeks In
America left their business and paid
tncir uwn expenses back to their moth
er country to fight her battle. They
responded to the call of patriotism, but
cuuld not forget the land of their
adoption. So, when they saw our
party .they ran up to us and hailed us
as "half brothers. It really was touch
ing, because most of them expected to
come back to America and take up
their business where they left off. The
same spirit of Thermopylae seemed to
permeate th much-maligned modern
3reek."
Constantinople Dirty City.
At Constantinople they found a big
but dirty city, with almost as much
gloom as there was Joy at Athens.
They did not linger long, but went on
In the Black Sea to Jaffa. With a sea
so rough that landing was perilous in
the extreme, the party lingered but a
few hours, not trusting the sea to sub
side for a safer re-embarkation, but
preferring to go back to ship through
the breakers. Twelve hours away was
Joppa, the gateway to Jerusalem,
whence they made their invasion of
the Holy Land.
Of great interest to the Portlanders
in Egypt was the celebrated tomb of
the sacred bulls, which consists of a
great underground tunnel, cut through
solid rock. Opening off of this tunnel
are chambers wherein are the sarco
phagi in which the bones of these ani
mals are still preserved. These vaults
are carved of solid granite and the
heaviest weighs 65 tons. There is no
native granite within 650 miles and
how that great weight was transported
to the tomb is one of the world's mys
teries. Crossing the Mediterranean, the
party visltad Naples and saw Mount
Vesuvius, still smoking with the vigor
of inner tires. They went into the ex
cavations of the uncovered city of
Pompeii, where they saw meat mar
kets, candy stores, baths, hotels, art
galleries, cobblestone pavement, side
walks, the remnants of a. remarkable
water system and other marvels.
Ancient City Wonderful.
"The people of that ancient city cer
tainly had the idea of metropolitan life
in all its phases," said the doctor.
"They didn't have any street cars that
we saw, nor any electric lights, but
otherwise they were pretty well
equipped to live in our modern style
To Rome, to Switzerland, down the
Rhine, to Paris, across to Dover and
to London, the party rapidly passed
from the ancient to the modern world.
The trio reached Portland last Sunday
without any mishap whatever not one
experiencing even a touch of seasick
ness.
"As I survey the trip now that it is
over," said Dr. Morrow, "believe the
thing that impresses me most Is the
way they cultivate the soil In Italy. It
is absolutely all cultivated even the
mountains and the work is all done
with Bpade and hoe. There are no
waste acres and the soil Is made to do
its full duty according to its varying
adaptabilities. One can draw lessons
there, too but in our great land with
Its millions of unused acres, perhaps
the lesson is not now applicable."
LOS ANGELES DISTRICT ATTORNEY
FINDS NO CRIME IN PIER DISASTER
Officers Hunt for Forger While His Daughter Is in Ruins at Long Beach Angel City Stirred by Charge That
New Mayor Was Supported by Votes of Underworld.
LOS ANGELES, June 14. (Special.)
After careful consideration of
the evidence in the Long Beach
auditorium disaster, District Attorney
Fredericks has asserted that he has
concluded that there is nothing crim
inal in connection with the disaster,
despite the failure of the inspectors
to discover the weakness in the build
ing. If the grand Jury takes up the
Investigation, as suggested. It will be
upon Its own volition.
"For my part," said Fredericks, "I
shall let the matter rest. At this time
I do not know of any reason why the
grand jury should be asked to probe
the disaster."
In reviewing the findings. Captain
Fredericks places the responsibility on
the inspector, but asserts that in his
opinion the inspector is not legally or
morally responsible, because of other
conditions which enter Into the case.
The inspector is J. C. Twombly.
W. H. Taft is awaiting trial on a
charge of Issuing a fictitious check.
His real name is said to be v aiden
Herbert. He is alleged to have cashed
a check for ?350 on the Chesire Na
tional Bank, of Keene, N. H.
While his 12-year-old daughter, Mar
garet Reed, a victim of the Long Beach
disaster, was being buried, officers of
the law were searching for Isaac Bol
ton, charged with forgery. It was
thought that he might come to the fun
eral in hope of one last look at his
daughter before she was placed in the
earth, but the officers were unable to
locate him if he was present. 1-ittie
Margaret, crushed when the audi
torium caved in, never knew that her
father was charged with the crime.
Officers have not been able to find her
father, and it is thought that he must
have escaped to Arizona, where he Is
thoroughly acquainted with the coun
try, having prospected there.
Los Angeles has been In a turmoil
since the election of Judge H. H. Rose
to the office of Mayor over an editorial
by E. T. Earl, declaring that Rose was
elected by the underworld.
The women's clubs have risen In arms
Tcainst the charee. declaring It false.
and that thousands of the best people
voted for Rose.
Earl, however, still asserts that It Is
true, and that the majority of the
people who voted for Rose were or
that element.
c
Much surprise was occasioned in the
Juvenile Court this week when Chris
tine Neal, aged 16, who has been an
Important witness in the white slave
investigation, and who has unhesitat
ingly testified against other men, flatly
refused to answer Important questions
In the preliminary hearing of J. P. Har
rigan. who is charged with contribut
ing to her delinquency. After twice
refusing to testify the girl was ad
judged in contempt of court, and fin
ally sentenced to the reform school at
Whittier until she Is 21 years of age
Harrlgan. however, will be held to
answer to the charge.
Carl "VCarr, the "human bomb" who
attempted to wreck the Los Angeles
central police station, and was con
vie ted. has taken an appeal to the Dis
trict Court of Appeal, and through his
attorneys will again make a fight for
freedom. The date of argument on the
appeal of the prisoner, who is serving
a long sentence, was set for the July
session of the Appellate Court. The
appeal is based on general technical
grounds, and on alleged errors in the
record of the trial of Warr.
mm
Tuesday was a gala, day at Fala Mis
sion, near Oceanside. With elaborate
ceremonies the water was turned Into
the new Government irrigation project
installed by the United States Indian
irrigation service for the benefit of
the Fala Indians. In constructing the
new Fala project the Government made
use of a century-old canal, constructed
by the padres when the mission was
established more than 100 years ago.
The canal was found still to be in ex
cellent condition. Fala Indians and
residents of the section for miles
around attended the ceremony. Monks
from the old Franciscaiu mission of
San Luis Rey blessed the water and
opened the ceremony with an outdoor
mass in front of the Fala mission on
the Plaza de San Francisco. A pro
cession of monks and Indians followed.
Then came a series of Indian dances
and sports and games.
Ex-Representative Bell has advocated
a rejection by the people of the antl-
alien land law and an enactment by
Congress of a law that will bar all
Asiatic labor from the United States.
He asserts that he is not circulating
a petition for the submission of the
bill to a vote of the people because he
has been Informed the An ti -Asiatic
League of San Francisco will bring the
question to vote. He will devote his
time to speaking in favor of a rejec
tion and the enactment of a National
law.
Back in 1892 in Chicago, Earl Henry
Davenport says he was hit on the head
by a baseball pitched by one of th
stars of the major league diamond, who
has since passed into oblivion. In
Judge Willis' court he asserted that this
accident caused a form of recurrent
insanity, which prompted him to forge
fictitious checks. Davenport says he
was once a "major leaguer." He asked
Judge Willis that he be examined, and
Judge Williams committed him to the
County Hospital. Davenport is charged
witn passing two spurious checks.
Fifteen years ago two sweethearts in
Los Angeles, engaged to be married
quarreled and parted. Less than a year
later they married persons they had
known only a short time and after
wards came the divorce courts. Last
Tuesday the same pair met again, and
in less than 24 hours were wed.
This is the story that was revealed
when Frank Gregory, local manager
for the Claybourgh Slid Company, ar
rived here from San Antonio, Tex.,
bringing his bride with him. She was
formerly Mrs. Bertha Miller Cole,
daughter of a wealthy Indiana farmer.
Their romance began in Peru, Ind.
when Gregory was manager of a small
dry goods store. For 15 years after
their separation they did not hear from
each other.
A short time ago after the recent
YOUNG DEER, EXHAUSTED BY SWIM, CAPTURED NEAR CITY.
PHOTOGRAPH MADE JUST BEFORE ANIMAL WAS RELEASED.
A young deer, probably driven from an island in the Columbia
River by the high water, was roped as it reached the river bank ex
hausted by its swim last Sunday about 15 miles below Portland.
John C. Jenkins, of 532 East Sixteenth street North, who was mak
ing a trip to St. Helens in an automobile, was one of the party to
capture the deer, and took, a photograph. After the deer had rested
for a while It was turned'loose and went Into the woods.
Ten of the most skillful, daring drivers will introduce AUTO POLO
to Portland next
Friday and Saturday, June 20-21
Coupled with this thrilling sport will be a card of star racing pilots,
including the famous
Speed King "Bob" Burman
The PORTLAND AUTOMOBILE CLUB has arranged to have a
string of the fastest motor cars in the country here to enter the open
competition against Burman. "Wild Bob" will drive
The Famous Blitzen Benz
Reputed to be the fastest racing craft ever built. This is the car in
which Burman has lowered hundreds of track records.
AUTO POLO
is the latest and most spectacular sport devised. It provides a thrill
every second. Regular polo played with autos instead of horses, with
trained experts at the wheels and mallets, will be seen here for the
first time Friday and Saturday, June 20-21, at the
Country Club Track
Under Auspices of the Portland Automobile Club
wrote to Miss Miller's mother asking
u . J ., A tViat hln
now tney .
a wc (( V.ar hrflthpr in SLTl
C. v a.o t,i. -1 ' ' -
Antonio. Business soon took him there.
and the day lonowins ms arnvoi uv
married his lormer sweeun:ai i.
J Hnwlfitm KPion Of a
l iiuuina ' . , '
wealthy and prominent Manchester,
, , o A von fn mr soldier of
nmsuuM, iauui: , . - . -
fortune, traveler and student, must
spend part 01 nis reraaiiuub mo-jo
the Patton Insane Asylum. The com
mitment was read today in Judge El
lis' court, where a tew weeks ago
Hawkins pleaded guilty to the charge
of passing fictitious checks.
Hawkins Is a physical giant mo a
a . ri-fnrA - OTn Vl nvci he
1 ,iHU.l If " " VA.w. " " -
was a leader In athletics and a social
lion. When arrested several weeks ago
he told how he had been tortured In
Mexican prisons. For three days and
nights, he said, he had been strung up
by his thumbs and had had nothing to
eat.
Hawkins when arraigned asked to be
examined by an alienist. The lunacy
commlsion found him insane.
"The Hawk," as he is known, is es
sentially a gentleman, and disclaims
that he has been a forger before. Pii-
erton aeietuves atxj
dare that because of this same gentle
manly mien the Hawk was not only
able to defraud hotels all over the
country, fro,m .New xorK to an irran-
A n olnn. Vm TMf1r. COURT
UlSUU ttiivi. ail ' 1 1 " ' " '
but also passed had checks on many
taxicaos.
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Graves, of Port
land, have been staying In town this
week. Mr. Graves, who is a banker
and interested in real estate in Port
land, Is In this city on business and
pleasure.
m m
Romona Borden, the "poor little rich
girl," who ranaway from the sanitari
um where she had been placed by her
father in New Jersey, Is no longer sad,
but by her own admission Is the happi
est girl In the world. At her home In
Ocean Park, her mother has surround
ed her with everything that will make
her happy and comfortable.
Miss Borden has changed greatly
since her arrival in Southern California
ix weeks ago. No longer is she the
pale, hollow-eyed little girl that had
run away from her father, but is
tanned and her skin is clear. She has
seven freckles on her nose.
All day she seekB pleasure, swim
ming, fishing and horseback riding. She
says she had been so occupied having
a "good old time" that she has not
had time to go to many parties or en
tertainments, "but mother is planning
a dandy party," she confided.
m
Reports circulated in railroad circles
here and at San Diego aTe that a direct
line from Los Angeles to Imperial Val
ley with a branch of the same line
extending to San Diego, is planned by
the Santa Fe line. Surveyors are now
running a line through San Felipe Pass
and It is said that the Santa. Fe plans
an extension of the Ferris branch from
Tomecula by way of the San Luis Rey
River Valley and Warner's Hot Springs
through the San Felipe Valley to El
Centro.
Burnside bridge draw, the bridge closed
too soon and carried away part of his
rigging, then, upon reaching the ocean
he met a dense fog which delayed him
many hours on his run to Yaquina Bay.
A leading feature of the two-day
celebration at Newport, July 4 and
6, is an exhibition of the United States
lifesavers in command of Captain Stu
art rescuing persons from an anchored
ship by the lifeline, which is shot out
by a cannon. Quite naturally Captain
Morse has offered the Ahwaneda for
that purpose.
NORTH IDAHO CROPS GOOD
Favorable Growing Weather Makes
Up for Lnto Start of Season.
LEWTSTON, Idaho, June 14. (Spe
cial.) That the prospects for a bumper
grain crop in North-Central Idaho and
Eastern Washington have never been
more favorable, and that the farmers
are more optimistic than last year, Is
the statement of M. B. Mlckkleson,
representative of the Vollmer-Clear-water
Company, of Lewiston, one of the
biggest grain concerns in the North
west, who says:
"In spite of the belated season the
coming of showers at times when most
needed, followed by warm and favor
able sprouting weather, the season In
July will be scarcely behind the aver
age. The early reports that the hail
storms on the uplands did great damage
to the young grain are not contradicted
by grain men and the farmers. The
season has been ideal for the Fall grain.
The acreage will be greater In most
every locality.
"In the Palouse belt, the reports that
the late snows had laid Ions on the
ground and hindered growth were more
exaggerated than the conditions actual
ly warranted. The Eastern Washing
ton grain will be fully up to the stan
dard with no falling off In acreage.
MORE PARADE PRIZESG1VEN
Miss Lianra Schnlze and Elijah Cor
bett Take First Honors.
Additional prize-winners In the
horse and vehicle parade held Thurs
day were announced by the Festival
management yesterday. The following,
which were at first identified by num
ber only, were added to the list pub
lished yesterday:
Saddle pony, girl rider Miss Laura
Schulze, of Milwaukee, Or., first. Miss
Gladys Avery, of Lents, second.
Saddle pony, boy rider Elijah Cor
bett, first; Harry A. Young, second.
Two-horse team Honeyman Hard
ware Company; Wells-Fargo & Com
pany express; Log Cabin Baking Com
pany; Oregon Humane Society, W. M.
Johnson; Weinhard Brewery.
CAPTAIN MORSE MOROSE
Tale of Woe Told by Schooner
Ahvraneda's Commander.
NEWPORT. Or.. June 14. (Special.)
The gasoline schooner Ahwaneda in
command of her owner, Captain Morse,
arrived from Portland this week with
a tale of woe and 100 tons of freight.
If Captain Morse's experiences did not
turn out financially as well as Sinbad
the Sailor's, they were as varied, and
Sea-lion Charlie, lord of the Newport's
Admiralty, is In danger of losing the
palm.
Captain Morse said that he lost a
propeller which had struck a sub
merged object In the Columbia River
and snapped a crank shaft. At Portland
the water was so high that he had to
move from dock to dock while taking
on cargo, as he passed through th
You Can Have It Repaired
At a Very Moderate Price
The Oregonian's Repair Directory gives all principal places where an arti
cle can be repaired and should be preserved in every home as a ready guide.
1
atOSLEUSAFECO.
108 Second St.
Main 7076.
LARGE
ASSORTMENT
SECOND - HAND
SAFES
LOW PRICES.
Safes Repaired.
Combinations
Chanced.
340 Morrlwon St.
SEWING
MACHINES
REPAIRED
All Work
Guaranteed.
We Have on Hand
a Number of
Slightly -Used
Machines. The
W h 1 1 e Aarency,
Main 1H4.i. A 1K1S.
FANS,
IRONS, MOTORS
REPAIRED
AND RENTED.
Moderate Prices.
WESTERN ELECTRIC
WORKS,
213 Sixth Street.
Marshall 096, A 35SS.
ARMISRAW
BROS. A CARR
HIGH-GRADE
SHOE
REPAIRING.
SHOES MADE
TO ORDER.
Work Called for and Delivered.
367 Stark Street.
Phone Main 7358, A 3312
HARRIS
TRL'NK HFC.
CO.,
130 Sixth,
Trunks, Bags,
Suit Cases
Repaired.
Phone us.
ree delivery.
Main 6278
PORTLAND
CYOLERY CO,
EXPERT
BICYCLE AND
MOTORCYCLE
REPAIRING.
Large Assortment of Used Bicycles
for Sale.
130 Thirteenth Street. Main 4613.
PIPE REPAIRING.
MOST COMPLETE SHOP
IN THE NORTHWEST.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT
ATTENTION.
W, H, D ED MAN, JR.,
167 Third Street.
FIXTURES AND WIRING.
Fixtures
finished
and Extensions Done
by experienced Men.
Repaired and Ro-
w iring irtepalrs
BARRETT'S,
412 Morrlwon St.
Main 122.
BOWERS Jk PARSONS,
Formerly With Tull & Gibbs
UPHOLSTERY AND
MATTRESS MAKING.
FLRXITI'HE RE FINISH
ING, REPAIRING.
CANE WORK, PACKING.
SHOP 1Wi FRONT STREET.
CORNER OP STARK.
Main 7443.
No More Bald Heads!
WIGS, TOUPEES
FOR LADIES AND
GENTLEMEN.
$10 Switches for J6.B0
Beat Hair Drrmln
in the City.
PARIS HAIR STORE.
147 Broadway,
Main 546. Since 1S88
mm
OPTI
CAL RE.
PAIR-
. ENG.
Any
broken
lense duplicated correctly. No mat
ter how difficult, we can fix it.
DR. GEO. B. PRATT. 173 Third,
Main 648. EXPERT OPTICIAN.
WATCHES REPAIRED PROMPTLY
OLD AND BROKEN
JEWELRY MADE
I.IKE NEW AT A
SMALL COST
LKFFERT JEWELRY CO,
The Blrthntone-Window Store,
268 Waahlnston. M 7B26.