The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, October 27, 1912, Page 6, Image 6

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    NEW SNAPSHOTS OF COLONEL ROOSEVELT TAKEN SINCE ATTACK ON HIM BY WOULD-BE ASSASSIN
IN MILWAUKEE. ,
I. R. FINDS HIMSELF
DONT MISS
THE GRAND REVIEW OF
U. S. WAR VESSELS
Held in New York Harbor,
October 10-15
Shown in Moving Picture
TODAY AND TOMORROW
at the
fiLOBE THEATER
Eleventh and Washington Sts.
Good Dressers
Prefer
Chesterfie
Stroll With Mrs. Roosevelt Dis
closes That Weakness Is
Not Overcome.
Clothe
WORK ON SPEECH IS DONE
F
Oil
STRONG
id
Doctors Fear Collapse Will Inter-H
rupt Dell-very Unless Patient Is
Careral Birthday to Be
Celebrated Today.
OYSTER BAY, N. Y.. Oct 26. Colonel
Roosevelt attempted to get back to
something like his usual manner of
life today with a walk in the fore
noon and several hours of work with
his secretary in the afternoon, but
long before the day was over he found
he was far from well.
The Colonel drfcsed early and set
out for a stroll with Mrs. Roosevelt
It was the first time he had been out
of doors since his return. They went
down the hill as far as the tennis
court and sat in the sun for a few min
utes, then turned back toward the
house. When he began to climb the
hill. Colonel Roosevelt realized how
weak he still was. He was glad of a
rest when he reached the house.
Work. OB Speech Tazea Strength.
He found his secretary waiting for
him, and worked ior an hour with nls
correspondence. This afternoon he
said he must 'complete the speech he
expects to deliver in New York next
Wednesday night. He remaineo ai
work until the task was ended, but
found that it taxed his strength. He
was greatly fatigued and stopped work
for the day.
No visitors were received today. Colo
nel Roosevelt said he hoped that by
Monday he would be able to see as many
visitors as he wished. He also planned
to work several hours a day from Mon
day on. There was some doubt tonight
however, whether the Colonel could go
on with this programme.
Physician Enjoins Rest.
Doctor George W. Faller, of Oyster
Bay, one of his physicians, impressed
upon him the necessity of avoiding
over-exertion if he is to gain sufficient
strength to make his speech next week
Colonel Roosevelt declared he would
make the speech whether or not His
physicians fear that unless he is con
siderably stronger on Wednesday, he
will become exhausted and will be un
able to finish. The address, as he has
planned it will require 25 minutes for
deliveryI
Colonel Is 54 Today.
There is to be a dinner at Sagamore
Hill at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon to
celebrate the 54th birthday of the head
of the bouse. At dusk today Mrs.
Roosevelt walked down the hill and
met one of her boys, Quentln, who came
home from Groton Academy for the
birthday celebration. Archie, who is
at Andover Academy, was unable to
come on account of examinations, and
Kermlt is in Brazil. Theodore, Jr., the
other son, arrived from New York to
night with his wife and baby. All day
long messages of congratulations were
coming in, as well as dozens of gifts.
WEST HEARS COMPLAINTS
Citizens of Carlton and Gaston Al
lege Liquor Is Sold Illegally.
SALEM, Or., Oct. 26. (Special.)
That J. W. Bones, Mayor of Carlton
druggist there, and ex-Representative
in the Legislature, is conducting a
blind-pig establishment In connection
with his drug store, that the favored
few may secure liquor there at any
time desired, and that others may se
cure it through a prescription of a
physician who makes his headquar
ters at the drug store for that pu
pose, are charges made by a resident
of Carlton in a letter to Governor
West
That conditions are also bad In Gas
ton, a neighboring town, is also
charged in a complaint from Dr.
Hawke, Mayor of Gaston. He states
that there is a gang of bootleggers
there which the citizens have been at
tempting to fight and that considerable
money has been expended in ti.e fight
The Governor states that he Is han
dicapped through lack of money in the
employment of special agents, but he
will come to the assistance of these
towns as soon as possible. '
BEVERIDGE RETURNS COIN
(Continued From First Pane.)
anything of that kind," answered Bev
eridge. "My information is." said Poraerene,
"that Perkins supplied through you
$560,000 to finance the Indianapolis
Star."
Mr. Beveridge produced letters show
ing that he had returned to his cousin
F. L. McLean J1000 which he contri
buted to the Roosevelt campaign fund
because Mr. McLean was for Presi
dent Taft
Senator Clapp wanted to know if Mr.
Beveridge had received any acknowl
edgment of the return of the money
of George W. Perkins. Mr. Beveridge
said he had received a telegram, but
he demurred when asked to say what
it contained. He was finally prevailed
upon to repeat it It read:
"Letters and enclosures received. An
honest man's the noblest work of God."
Senator Pays Own Expense.
Beveridge concluded with a state
ment In which he said he bad never ac
cepted even when his owe expenses in
political campaign. He said he quit
a lucrative law practice when be en
tered the Senate and had made his
living since by writing magazine
articles and books.
H. C Starr, of Indiana, testified that
In the 1904 campaign he was chairman
of. the executive committee of the Re
publican State Committee of Indiana
and was also chairman of the legisla
tive committee that year. He could
make no statement as to the amount of
money spent In the legislative cam.
palgn. His recollection was that the
state committee received 1125,000 from
the National Committee for use in In
diana. .
W. R. Allen on Montana Ticket.
HELENA. Mont. Oct 26. The Re
publican state ' central committee
named today W. R."Allen, of Anaconda,
to fill the vacancy on their ticket due
to the death of W. F. Meyer, candidate
for Congress. Allen is Lieutenant
Governor of Montana and was a lead
ing candidate before the Republican
state convention for Governor, but
withdrew in favor of Harry L. Wilson.
T m J i - V" X m-S!- -saw'"1' """" !: '. 4'v ' l rSI
NTif " 1011
sSfeSi'. , ill CJS.iil
ft Si I 4 It taV
. Tr. tl lr m i mill iiniiiimojnun tmrmm.rirnmmtififikf f11 &M'"ta'' .
TOP, LEFT, COLOXEL STEPPING FROM TRAI.V AT SYOSSET. LOJfG ISLAND, ON WAY HOME TO SAGAMORE
HILL; RIGHT, ARRIVAL AT OYSTER BAY BOTTOM, COLONEL LEAVING MERCY HOSPITAL, CHICAGO. -
HARMON MAKESPLEA
Ohioan Attacks Both Taft and
Roosevelt.
VOTES FOR WILSON ASKED
Speaker Says Colonel Is Greedy and
Brntal and Tbat Proposal to
. Control Private Industries
Is Monstrous.
BALTIMORE. Oct. 26. "The Presi
dent and the Colonel are like two boys
with a toy." declared Governor Har
mon of Ohio, in a speech here tonight
In which he asked for the election of
Governor Wilson to the Presidency.
" 'Let me have it,' says Theodore. 'But
you gave it to me,' replies William. 'I
only let you have It to bold awnue,
now I want it back.' returns Theodore,
'Indian giver,' cries William, and they
clinch.
"I cannot really say that Governor
Wilson was my first choice for the
nomination," said Governor Harmon, in
referring to the Democratic nominee,
"but he has conducted his campaign
with tact dignity and ability and there
is no reason for anybody, certainly
none for any Democrat to prefer
either of the candidates to him.
Governor Harmon's speech was an
attack on Colonel Roosevelt a discred
iting of President Taft and a brier ref
erence to Governor Wilson near the
close.
' "Colonel Roosevelt" said the speaker,
"is greedy for power, and brutal to
everything and everybody who stands
In the way of his getting and using
it aa he pleases, and the only definite
thing he proposes is to put the great
Drlvate Industries or tne country,
which have no public character like the
railroads, under control of a commls
sion to be appointed by the President
This is the most monstrous proposal
ever made seriously in a free country."
Referring to President Taft the Gov
ernor said:
"As he was nominated only by a
bare majority in the face of most bit
ter opposition, which has . since taken
the form of an organic break in his
party, he comes before the voters dis
credited by nearly, if not quite half
of his own political comrades.
CRUDE OIL MEN ORGANIZE
Four-Fifths of Those Affected
Standard's Xevr Order Meet.
by
BAKERSFIELD. Cal., Oct. 26. (Spe
cial.) Preliminary organization of the
Oil Producers' Marketing Association
was effected today at a meeting or
representatives of 27 oil companies.
having an aggregate production of
nearly 20,000 barrels a day, or about
four-fifths of tne total production ai
ffcted by the recent announcement of
the Standard Oil Company that it would
take no more oil under 18 gravity when
the present contracts have expired.
A committee consisting or toionei
Timothy Spellacy, G. A. Barlow, Colo
nel T. H. Minor, L. P. Gulberson and
H. A. Jastro was appointed to perfect
plans of organization and also to inter
view the Independent Oil Producers'
Agency, the Associated, the Standard,
the Union and other possible agencies
for the disposal of crude oil and report
at a meeting to be held November 9.
Coos Streams Get Trout.
MARSHFIELD, Or Oct 26. (Spe
cial.) Twenty thousand trout have
been received here from the state
hatchery to be placed In the streams
of Coos County. The fish have been
turned over to Frank Smith, superin
tendent of the county hatcheries, and
he will manage the distribution of the
fish. Local enthusiastic fishermen have
been active in an endeavor to secure
the fish and offered to pay part of the
expense, and the shipment of trout is
due largely to the efforts of the sportsmen.
$50,000 DAMAGES ASKED
Multltype Official Charged With
Defamation of Character.
' Suit for damages In the amount of
$50,000 was filed in the United States
District Court yesterday by E. P. Shel
don, attorney for J. R. Ervey, against
the Multltype Company and Its offi
cials, for alleged defamation of the
character of the plaintur. .
In his complaint Mr. Ervey alleges
that the officers of the company, alter
he had severed his connection with
the company, published to their stock
holders letters accusing him of fraudu
lent practices and that his business
standing in the community was seri
ously injured thereby.
Mr. Sheldon asserts that he has oth
er suits pending on behalf of various
stockholders of the company -against
H. S. Harcourt and L. P. Kruger, of
ficials of . the corporation, to recover
alleged losses in their transactions
with the company.
GOVERNOR PRESENTS PLAN
Division of Counties Into Classes
Would Aid Salary Regulation.
SALEM, Or., Oct. 26. (Special.)
Division of the counties of- the state
into classes is another plan of Governor
West in connection with bis scheme for
regulation of the salaries of county
officers on a uniform basis. He tenta
tlvely proposes, in the outline of his
plan, which is being sent to the higher
educational Institutions for discussion
among the students, that the counties
be divided into first, second, third and
fourth classes. . Multnomah County
would be in the first class and other
counties gradated accordingly.
As fast as a county increased In pop
ulation to a sufficient size to be raised
to a county of the next class it would
be so raised and the salaries of the
officers automatically Increased to the
amount paid the officers in that class.
Salaries of officials in each of the re
spective classes would be uniform.
PORTLAND MAN ACQUITTED
Salem Jury Out Ten Minutes in
Forgery Case of Elbert Warlord.
SALEM, Or., Oct 26. (Special.) Af
ter deliberating only four minutes, a
jury In Circuit Court today found I
Elbert Warford, of Portland, not guilty
of forging an Indorsement to a check
on the State Board of Agriculture.
Judge Harris of Lane County sat on
the case for Judge Kelly.
For two sessions Warford was em
ployed by the State Legislature and
at the fair of 1911 was employed by the
fair board. It was charged that he ab
stracted a check, which was being sent
for premium money, to Miss Elizabeth
Lord, daughter of ex-Govermpr Lord,
and cashed It by means of a false in
dorsement At a previous term of the
court the indictment against him was
fou;id to be faulty.
CELEBRATION IS ARRANGED
Erection of First House in City to
Be Commemorated.
A celebration of the seventieth anni
versary of the erection of the first
house in Portland is being planned by
the Oregon .Historical Society as a
feature of the Rose Festival next
Spring. The plans are being worked
out by George H. Himes, and others of
the historical society, who hope . to
make the celebration an important
event '
The first house in Portland was built
by William Johnson on what Is now
Macadam road in South Portland. This
is in 1843. The house was occupied
by Johnson and his Indian wife and
children. I
MOOSETTE' PUTOUT
Chicago Clubwoman Asserts
She Will Not Be Ousted.
TAG DAY STARTS SQUABBLE
Mrs. D. Harry Hammer Opposed to
.Women Asking Subscriptions on
Street .for T. R. Fund and
Loyalty Is Doubted.
CHICAGO, Oct. 26. (Special.) Mrs.
D. Harry Hammer, prominent club wo
man, is no longer an active "Bull Moos.
hjette." She has been ejected from tne
Moosette organization Dy Mrs. jaeam
McCormick, Mrs. John F. Bass and Mrs.
Kellogg Fairbanks. Mrs. McCormick
said so today and Mrs. Bass and Mrs
Fairbanks confirmed her story.
Mrs. Hammer is going to fight to
the finish. She says Mrs. McCormick
and Mrs. Bass and Mrs. Fairbanks can
not expel her from the organization, if
she knows It, and she thinks she does.
Tag Days Opposed.
These were the developments today
in the merry row of the "Bull Moos
ettes," which was on while 3000 women
were out on the streets of Chicago tag
ging men and soliciting subscriptions
to swell the coffers of the Roosevelt
Progressive. party campaign fund.
Mrs. Hammer is opposed to tag days
on general principles, particularly be
cause she believes young girls solicit
ing subcriptions on public streets are
subjected to indignities from men. Mrs.
Hammer gave utterance to her views
and Mrs. McCormick retorted that Mrs.
Hammer's opposition to the "Bull
Moose" tag day had been Inspired by
the managers of the Taft campaign.
She intimated that Mrs. Hammer was
not a good "Moosette" at heart Mrs.
Hammer talked some more. Then she
was officially expelled.
Nor is this all. Mrs. McCormick said
positively that other organizations of
women were not yet through with Mrs.
Hammer.
More Action Is Promised,
"The organization of women in
charge of the regular tag day has as-
OFFICE FURNITURE FOR ANY CLASS OFFICE
8:1 l
11 ' 1
"If Used in an Orrice We Have It"
Bishop Stationery and Printing Co.
306 OAK STREET MARSHALL 1746
Opposite Commercial Club v
PATHE'S WEEKLY
OF IMPORTANT EVENTS
Also in Today's Bill
lOrf ALL SEATS 106
sured me that the women later on are
going to take action against Mrs. Ham
mer and many of the women has asked
us to have nothing more to do with
her," said she.
Seattle Firm Asks More Time.
SALEM; Or.. Oct 26. (Special.)
W. M. Kellogg, representing a marble
company of that name in Seattle, ap
peared before the State Board yester
day to arrange if possible for an exten
sion of time in completing the marble
work on the Eastern Oregon Branch
Insane Hospital. This contract was let
along with the plumbing contract and
was secured by Appling-Griggs of Ta
coma and the marble contract was sub
let to Mr. Kellogg.- Through difficul
ties arising with a Baltimore firm Mr.
Kellogg discovers that it probably will
be four months before he can secure
the proper kind of marble and he asked
if it would be possible to substitute an
Alaska marble for a Vermont marble.
This the board refused to accede to.
As a penalty of $100 a day is at
tached to a delay of completion of the
contract on his part he was anxious
to secure a favorable decision from
the board.
HEAD STUFFED? GOT
A COLD? TRY PAPE'S!
One Dose of Pape's Cold Compound
Relieves "Worst Cold or Grippe
No Quinine Used.
Tou will distinctly feel your cold
breaking and all the Grippe symptoms
leaving after taking the very first
iOBe. .
It is a positive fact that Pape's Cold
Compound, taken every two hours, un
til three consecutive doses are taken,
will end the Grippe and break up the
most severe cold, either in the head,
chest, back, stomach or limbs. -'
It promptly relieves the most mis
erable headache, dullness, head and
nose stuffed up, feverisnness, sneez
ing, sore, throat, running of the nose,
mucus catarrhal discharges, soreness,
stiffness and rheumatic twinges.
Get a 25-cent package ol .rape s
Cold Compound" from your druggist
and take it with the knowledge that it
will nosltlvelv and promptly cure your
cold and end all tne grippe misery,
sHthnnt nr assistance or baa alter-
ffflcts. and that It contains no quinine
don't accept something else said to
ba Just as good. Tastes nice acts
gently.
QUEER, Isn't It?
Isn't it queer that people will be
so careless about their eyes?
Some put off wearing glasses long
after they need them. Others buy
cheap, ill-fitting glasses full of de
fects and imperfections. Many go
to just ordinary opticians, but hun
dreds of discriminating people, those
who really value their eyesight go
to Dr. Pratt, the expert optometrist
They get comfort and satisfaction,
even after others have failed to sat
isfy, because Dr. Pratt's glasses are
always "RIGHT, JUST RIGHT." You.
try him yourself and see.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
DR. GEO. B. PRATT
OPTOMETRIST
Corner Third and Yamhill, Near
Morrison St., Ground Floor.
1 v-"l
Because they are superior to any
other make. The, style, the fity
the fabrics, the tailoring, are the
best that trained minds and
skilled hands can possibly pro
duce. . Chesterfied Clothes are
the fruit of a day's work, but a
life's work of half a century of
''. concentrated effort.
-GUARANTEE-
If front of coat breaks in one
year's wear, customer can
have a new suit free.
Suits and Overcoats
$20 to $50
Well be pleased to show you
correct Fall styles.
11. GRAY
273-275 MORRISON, AT FOURTH
NEW
LIFE
BEER
IT SPARKLES
IT'S CLEAR
NEW LIFE BEER
At luncheon, dinner or bedtime, it is a drink par excellence
for Health, Strength and Nerves.
Order a Case Sent Home.
TELEPHONES
Sellwood 1S45
Srlltrood 1U46
Home B 3173
Made Clean
Sold Clean
Delivered
Clean
FRANZ'
Butter-Nut
BREAD
Vye
MALLORY
Fifteenth and Yamhill
Portland, Or.
NEW
LIFE
SEER
IT BUBBLES
IT'S PURE
Mt. Hood Brewery
This label is on
every loaf and is
an insurance of the
best bread made.
Phones: 6044, B 2428
Designed especially for resi
dential patrons and offers all
the advantages and comforts
of a modern hotel. Absolutely
fireproof and located con.
veniently. yet in an ex
clusive district.
Special attention given to
our American-plan Dining
Room, catering- to those de
manding simple but adequate
service. Courteous clerks will
be pleased to show rooms or
suites and quote prices.
Our rooms are sunny and
handsomely furnished, and,
whether you are contemplat
ing a change or Just passing:
through Portland, let us show
you this beautiful hotel.