The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, August 04, 1912, SECTION FOUR, Page 4, Image 48

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    g , . THE SUNDAY OREftOXIAN. PORTLAND. AUGUST 4, 191.2. , 1
SLAVIN AND TAYLCE'S PERRY ROADS BEING- REBUILT INTO TWO OP BEST HIGHWAYS IN STATE
10 FINE COUNTRY
"Man Know Thy Speed"
PUT ON A GOOD SPEEDOMETER
GET A STEWART
ARCHER & WIGGINS
Found at the Corner of Sixth and Oak Streets.
IS
Long Stroke Motor Makes New
Formula Necessary.
Slavin and Taylor's Ferry
Highways to Be Models
When Completed.
CRANK RADIUS ENLARGED
RATING IS CHANGED
ROAC
SHAPED
88
CURVES ARE ELIMINATED
Thoroughfares In Southwest Portion
T'of MnJtnomah to Be Example
of Modern Construction.
w Machine Csed.
When Improvements which are now
under way on the Slavin and Taylor's
Terry roads are .completed, those two
highways, extending- through the south
west portion of Multnomah County, wlil
be among the best In the state. The
work on the TayMir'a Ferry road has
been completed to a large . extent, but
It wlil be several weeks before the
flavin road Is finished, owlns to im
portant changes which are to be made
In Its course, eliminating curves and
cutting down grades.
On the Taylor's Ferry road, which
extends up from -.he Macadam road In
the Fulton istrict. the work for the
most part has been resurfacing, the
county having placed a new coating
of rock on the top of the old road foun
dation, making a smooth surface for
the heavy traffic to which this high
way is subjected the year around. The
Improvement has been made whenever
needed from the beginning of the coun
ty's portion of the road near the Kiver
lew Cemetery west and south to the
crossroads south of Multnomah Station.
Eeven.l portions of the highway are
yet to be fixed before the work will
be finished and the road placed in shape
for the Winter.
Work Is Bis Tank.
The improvement of the Slavin road
has been a much, larger undertaking
Inasmuch as it was In bad condition in
many places. The work is being ex
tended from a short distance east of
Bertha Station to the east end of the
county's part of the road near South
Portland. So far a long stretch has
been entirely rebuilt, the old road hav
ing been torn out and a new highway
built from the foundation up to the
fine upper layer of crushed rock form
ing the surface. This work has been
done with great care and it is expected
he road will withstand the heavy
traffic for many years.
Among the improvements on this
highway is to be the elimination of a
series of curves which have been a
part of the road since it was first con
structed years ago. There are about
ten of these which are to be taken out
and the road made perfectly straight.
This work Is under way at present,
forces of men being engaged in ex
cavating for the new course which is
to be arranged with heavy macadam.
The old road is to be torn out and the
base rock used for the base of the new
course.
This change will make the Slavin
road immeasurably better than It is
at present and will afford an excellent
highway to connect lower Corbett
street with the new Terwilligcer boule
vard. The boulevard enters the Slavin
road at a point about a mile and a half
south and west of where the Slavin
road leads out of Corbett street. Auto
mobiles use this road in going to and
from the boulevard. When the curves
are taken out and the road resurfaced
and a number of grades reduced there
will probably be no finer stretch of
highway in the county.
Road Has Heavy Traffic.
The Slavin road is heavily traveled
by teams and automobiles, it being
the main artery of a wide farming dis
trict and presenting exceptional scenic
attractions for automobiles. From the
time it leads out of Corbett street it
gradually rises up the side of the hills
in South Portland, passing through
rare forest scenery on one side and
overlooking the lower part of the city
and the Willamette on the other. After
reaching the summit of the hills it pro
ceeds almost duo west to Bertha Sta
tion, from where it leads southward
into a beautiful forest and farming
country.
The work at present is being done
sear the entrance to the Terwilliger
boulevard. A large number of men is
employed. The portion which has been
rebuilt indicates the excellence which
Is to characterize the rest of the high
way. In two places grades have been re
duced, and in a dozen or more
places Irregular stretches have been so
changed that the road is both straight
and level.
Stw .Machine Tried Out.
On the Slavin road the county of
ficials under the direction of Super
visor A. H. White are trying out a new
scara'ier. a machine for digging up old
road construction. The machine is re
ported to be working well and is ex
pected to help in keeping down the
cost of the improvements on the road.
Crushed rock is being hauled from
the Taylor's Ferry county crusher,
which is running full blast for the
first time since a vast amount of rock
was uncovered by the city's unem
ployed last Winter. There is enough
rock at the quarry now to last many
years without further cost of removing
the top covering of dirt. The rock in
this quarry is considered of excep
tionally good quality and is probably
responsible for the exceptional roads
which are being built with it.
CAR'S EQUIPMENT COMPLETE
Dr. Wright's Buick Attracts Atten
tion of Californians.
Dr. G. S. Wright, one of Oregon's
foremost exponents of good roads and
inthusiastic motorists, is attracting
considerable attention by reason of the
completeness of the equipment on his
Bulck car. Dr. Wright now is tour
ing California. The following is from-j
the San Francisco Evening Post:
"Dr. G. S. Wright. ex-State Senator
of Oregon, is now on the way down
the coast from Portland, accompanied
by his wife, making- a tour for pleas
ure and jogging leisurely along tak
ing in the beautiful trip this route
embraces. The doctor has probably
the most novel and best equipped car
with whica such a trip has ever been
taken.
"The car a 40-horsepower Buick
roadster comes more nearly resem
bling a moving van than an automo
bile. Dr. Wright carries with him a
complete campina; outfit, consisting of
a collapsible stove with telescoping
stove pipe, folding table, pneumatic
mattress which Is inflated by the pump
from the engine of the automobile,
small gas stove and light supplied by
the prestnlite tank of the machine,
water bag, Amazon tent with folding
rods. 100 feet of rope with double
tackle. Two large combination- trunks
are built on the back of the machine
containing 'provisions and clothing
Every article Is strapped separately."
bpa Jyfm, i .
isrrXt" - - - - : - ' - - ------ - - . - ;
t , --ii
MOTOR TRIP CHEAP
Eugene Men Average 100 Miles
Daily fcr $2 Gross.
SMALL CAR IS ECONOMICAL
R. H. Pierce Has Brush "One-Lune-
er" Fitted With Electric Lighting
System and Camp Outfit
Gives Independence.
Ecenomv In motorinsr Is SDtlv illus
trated in the trip just finished by K.H.
Pierce and N. M. Clem, of Eugene.
Pierce drove his Brush car more than
3100 miles, at an expense, he says, of
less than $2 a day. The full signifi
cance of this can be had when the fact
Is taken into consideration that he
traveled an average of 100 miles a day.
The averase day's expenditure includ
ed both the cost of running the auto
mobile and his living expenses.
No less interesting than the low cost
of operation is the fact that Pierce's
trip took him from Southern central
Oregon down the Coast route to Tia
Juana, Mexico, and back up the val
ley route to. his old home. This was
all done In a "one-lunger" 10-hcrse-power
machine.
Fierce, s automoone ramonngs nave
taken him over many hundreds of miles
of Oregon roads, and through experi
ence he is well able to compare the
highways of this state with those of
California. He is emphatic in his de
nunciation of Oregon roads.
"After motorlne over the fine high
ways of California, it seems like a con
tinual drive through uninhabited coun
try to travel by auto in Oregon, saia
Pierce while in Portland last week.
'California roads are remarkably well
maintained, and they are fine roads."
A complete camping outfit was car
ried by Pierce, with an auxiliary gaso
line tank, a storage place for oils and
two extra boxes on the running boards.
Camping Increases Pleasure
"We didn't have to worry about keep
ing up a schedule or making a town so
that we could stay over lor tne nignt,
said pierce. "We were entirely inde
pendent and spent practically every
night in camp. Campins adds consider
able pleasure to such an outing. - Any
one contemplating a long automobile
trip should carry a camping outrit, n
possible."
with tne aaaea equipment, tne cr
welched 1600 pounds. Several little
conveniences not seen on small automo
biles feature the Pierce car. It Is
equipped with an electric lighting sys
tem, designed and installed by its own
er. He followed the same principle that
the Cadillac Company uses.
"My trip was a great demonstration
I."
of what one can do with a little car,"
said Pierce. "For 31 conseeutive days
I averaged 100 miles, over mountains,
through valleys, forded streams and
pushed along over all sorts of roads.
Few were the times I had tire trouble
and such a thing as a balky engine or
generator was unknown.
"Taking a vacation in this manner Is
the only way, and the cheapest, too, to
have a real outing. There Is real fun
In driving about the country if you are
not in a hurry to get to places and are
well provided to live in the open. It is
not hard to keep up an average of 100
or 160 miles a day, even with a "one
lunger." Even In the hot San Joaquin
Valley, California, I made my average
mileage with ease.
Small Car Preferred.
"For comfort, economy and pleasure
there is nothing that will come up to
the small motor car for vacation. The
average man cannot afford the luxury
of a big motor car; its initial cost is
too large and the maintenance runs
into high figures. But how is one going
to get as cheap a vacation as I had?
Bailroad fare would cost a great deal
more; I enjoyed a 3100-mile trip at the
cost of camping in the mountains for a
month, or stopping at a resort for two
or three weeks. -
"California has made wonderful prog
ress in the matter of good roads. For
about 700 miles, after entering the San
Joaquin Valley on the south to Red
ding on the north, there Is a fine, level
and almost straight road. Although
the heat in the daytime in the San
Joaquin is Intense in Summer, the morn
ings and evening3 are delightfully cool.
The roads were so good that I could
lay over when the heat was oppressive
and Btlll keep up my average daily
mileage.
"There Is a beautiful stretch of road
for 40 miles out of Los Angeles on the
valley road north. It is pared and kept
in excellent condition. Boads through
out the Sacramento and San Joaquin
Valleys are fine. This eopditlon also
obtains from San Francisco south to
Santa Cruz."
Among the towns visited by Pierce
after leaving Eugene were: Ashland,
Klamath FaUs, . Lakeview, Alturas,
Chico, Marysville, Stockton, San Fran
cisco, San Jose, Monterey, Santa Cruz,
Salinas, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles,
San Dleso, Tia Juana, Riverside, Bak
orsfleld, Visalia, Fresno and the Pa
cific Highway cities to Eugene.
CADILLAC PCT TO HARD TEST
American Car Wins Honors From
Royal Automobile CInb.
For the second time the Cadillae
motor ear has come to the forefront in
London, England, in a manner some
what startling; and certainly signifi
cant. The most reeent achievement of
the iDetroit-majle car was a remark
able demonstration of the efficiency of
its electric eranking device, a test
which proved to be as spectacular aa
the standardization test of some time
ago when the parts of three cars were
mixed up In three different pile and
then three whole oars rebuilt from
those parts.
The self-starting test, word of which
has Just been received, was made diffi
cult by the fact that the cars used were
taken from crates that had been stand
ing on the docks for 80 days, and each
car was started 1000 times. Both the
standardization and the self-starting
tests were conducted by the Royal Au
tomobile Club, the most authoritative
body of Its kind in Europa
This Accounts for Sixty Per Cent
More Horsepower Than Square
Motor Is Figured to Supply,
Says Hupmoblle Agent.
W. 8. Dulmage, of Dulmage & Smith,
Hupmoblle distributors, has an ex
planation of the 83-horsepower rating
of the new type of machine of this
make, about which he says he has
been asked often. The question as put
to him was "why this car was rated
at 32-horsepower when the American
Licensed Automobile Manufacturers'
formula-abased solely on the size of the
bore would only give a rating of 18.9."
As this formula developed in 1904 is
a rough means of comparing the power
of automobile motors and seems still
to be regarded as an authority by many,
a brief comparison might be Interest
ing. "As you know, the A. L. A. M. for
mula horsepower equals D square N
divided by 2.5; where D is the cylinder
bore in inches, N is the number of
cylinders and 2.5 is a constant," says
the'Hupmoblle man. "At the time this
formula was adopted automobile mo
tors bad strokes virtually equal to their
bores, so this formula gave a fair idea
of the power, but at that, even this
was only regarded by experts as a
vm.o-v, fftrYtmin nnri nfleful chiefly be
cause of its simplicity. Eight years of
improvements in camureiors, mosuowc
and in motor details greatly increased
the power of automobile motors so that
the present A. L. A. M. rating expresses
only about 80 per cent of the power de
livered by the average 'square' motor.
a tno.iv wa rflto nnr small mo
tor, which is 3 inches bore and 3X
inches stroke, as a zo-norsepower, al
though the A. L. A. M. rating would
i -- i . o ico A Annllpri to the
long stroke motor the fallacy of the
A. L. A. M. rating is at once apparent,
as it does not take into consideration
the length of the stroke and gives the
same rating to our model H, which is
3 54 Inches bore and 5 inches stroke.
"As a matter of fact, we get the
oon-.a amlnsinn nressure on the piston
of both our motors. But in the larger
motor, the model H long sirono, un
pressure has the advantage of acting on
r -nritV, - lnnr T&dlUS. SO that
it produces a turning effort equal to
1.63 times mat OI me Bmaiicr muiui.
In other words, it has over 60 per cent
greater pulling power. This pulling
power is maintained to as great a num
ber of revolutions per minute as in the
smaller motor, giving at least 60 per
cent more maximum power.
"Finally, additional confirmation of
this rating Is given by the formula
adopted by the English Institute of
Automobile Engineers after a test of
nearly 150 motors. This formula gives
our model H a rating of 33.6 horse
power." -
E FEDERAL
E "Extra Service" 5
S TIRES
jjj Will reduce your tire ZZ
expense. Let us
show you these dur- ZZ
able high grade tires SI
and explain the
reason.
ZZ Federal Tires are
ZZ known everywhere as
ZZ the tires of "Extra
ZZ Service." ZZ
H They deserve the ZZ
7 name. ZZ
ZZ In all typos for ZZ
Zi all standard rims "
mtm WEST COAST SUPPLY CO.
JJ Distributers, a
81-S3 North Seventh St.
3IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIf5
Atterbury Truck
Columbia Carriage & Auto Works, Agts.
. 209-211 Front Street Phona Main 2892.
General Auto Repairing. Bodies and Wheels Built to Order.
Auburn Motor Car Co.
ROBT. SIMPSON, Mgr.
505-7 Burnside Street
A 7339. Main 2674.
BALLOU 8 WRIGHT
' Largest Stock
Automobile Accessories
M. & W & & J. and Hartford
Tires, Monogram Oils
80-82 Seventh St, Cor. Oak. Portland, Or.
OTORCYCLES
INDIAN AND EMBLEM
BALLOU & WRIGHT, 80-82 Seventh Street, Cor. Oak
M
OWSER
GASOLINE and OIL TANKS
STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR PUBLIC AND PRI
VATE GARAGKS. S. D. Stoddard, Representa
tive, 305 Columbia Bide Main 1476.
CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY CO.
The Only Exclusive Automobile
Supply House in 'the City
"EVERYTHING BUT THE AUTOMOBILE"
627 Washington St.
Seattla Spokane San Francisco Fresno Los Angeles
JOHN DEERE PLOW CO.
Northwest Distributors,
EAST MORRISON AND SECOND STS.
Phones: E. 3S87, B 1625.
FORD
The or that comet folly equipped
Best for the money
Ford Motor Car Agency
B. E. Sleret, Pre, and Mr, E. 8tk and Hawthorne Ave. Phone Eeat MS.
TIRES
VolcanUln RatreadinK. R. E. BLODGETT, 20-81 N. 14th. Main 7006.
APPEESON. STEARNS. RSO.
NORTHWEST AUTO CO.
DISTRIBUTORS '
F. W. VOGLER, President
617 Washington Street. Phones Main 7179, A 4959.
PREER CUTLERY & TOOL CO.
Headquarters for Shop Supplies
and Automobile Tools
74 SIXTH AND 311 OAK STREETS
Our Motto: "Quality and a Square DeaL"
Western Hardware & Auto Supply Co.
SEVENTH AND PINE STREETS.
Vulcanizing, Hardware and Auto Supplies.
Phones: Main 8828, Home A 2016.
"The
Is DIFFERENT from
all other automo
biles." "If you know the dif
ference, you will buy
a Cadillac."
COVEY MOTOR CAR COMPANY
Washington and Twenty-first Streets Portland, Oregon
GLIDDEN TOUR WINNER.
ALWAYS IN THE LEAD
Tne Car of Proven Durability, Economy and Reliability.
UNITED AUTO CO.
522-38 Alder Street. Phones Main 43S7, A 7171.