The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, June 09, 1912, SECTION FOUR, Page 4, Image 54

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    TOE SUNDAY OIIEGOXIAX, POTITLATTD. JUNE 9. 1912.
AUTOiST STARTS TO
IDEAL CAR DEFINED
STAGE MAN FINDS MOTOR CAES FAR MORE ECONOMICAL THAN HORSE AND WAOON.
1MARK DEATH VALLEY
"There for Wear"
ENGLISH WHIPCORD ROBES
Down at Archer & Wiggins Company
- Oak Street, Corner Sixth.
PURVEYORS Or AUTO 8P0RTIN0 GOODS
Inventive Autoists Give Advice
on 1913 Autos.
Prospector Will Post Signs to
Guide Travelers in Vast
Arid Waste.
BIG VALUE PUT ON COMFORT
I
600-MILE TRIP IS'PLANNED
Faaadena People) Contribute Cola to
Porcbaao rUnderti "20" for
Miner to Make Safe
Hlghwar In Ieert. .
To Un tb dancer of th f;rat
American d.z.rt and Ua annual toll of
human llf Is the silazlon on which
Lou Weaton Back, In a Flandere "20,
haa bcaun an all-eummer trip from
Paxadana, Cal. At Its wheel la Beck, for
zner proapector but now phllantbroplat.
has dedicated his life to the charter
ing and posting: of the Indefinite trails
which traverse the great Inter-moun-tain
region, and the Indication to trav
elers by plain and effective means of
tne spots where water may be ob
talned.
Mr. Beck's mission has been mad
possible by generous citizens of Pasa
dena acquainted with bis work, who
have subscribed the sum necessary to
purchase the car. Mr. Beck has Chris
tened it the "Chuckwalla Flanders '20, '
In honor of the famous bloated lizard,
the only rreature able to live In many
parts of the terrible waste.
An annual tribute of 2k victims is.
It is estimated, exacted each year by
the grim region which lies Immediately
Kast of the coast range. Practically
all of these are prospectors who, ig
norant of the nature of the country,
leave civilization with a scant supply
of water and fall to find more. Months,
perhaps years after, their bonea are
found, plucked clean by the vultures,
under the stragarllng shade of some
mesqulte bush where their miserable
fate had finally overtaken them.
"Desert Hats" they are dubbed by those
In the towns bordering on the vast
expanse.
' Deeert Clalma Motorists.
! To penetrate the desert In a motor
car has been tried several times but
with uniform failure. Two years ago
a party of seven in a high-powered
car attempted the trip. Two weeks
later a searching party came upon the
car apparently abandoned. Closer ap
proach, however, showed a black hud
die beneath the car. To the horror of
the searching party thla was found to
be a pile of corpses. Nearby waa a
poisoned spring from which all had
apparently drank.
Mr. Beck knows the desert better.
In all probability, than any living man.
not even excepting "Scotty" of trans
continental fame. He expects to post
his signs in a way that will not only
direct the "Rats" to good water, but
will also warn them away from that
which is bad. His signs are already
painted and represent his labors of the
Winter.
The "Chuckwalla Flanders' '20'
will penetrate this Summer as far ss
the notorious "Death Valley" and will
. be the first motor car to essay this
rid region. Its itinerary has been
arranged to cover about (00 miles. Mr.
Beck hopes to continue his work until
the entire deaert is as well charted as
a main-traveled highway. In the com
pletion of his task he is trying to en
list the services of the United States
Government, which, by Installing large
signs on buttes and mountain tops,
could fulfill a purpose very similar
to that performed by the lighthouse
and life-saving departmenta on tha
coasts and Great Lakes.
Dog la Kola ef Life Caver.
. In his work Mr. iJeck will be great
ly helped by "Kufus," a big red dog
of mixed breeding in which St. Bar
nard blood Is apparently dominant.
-Jtiurua- goes into tne desert with a
canteen strapped to each aide, and shod
with buckskin nearly to the knee ss
a protection against the hot sand,
. thorna and deadly sidewinders.
"Kufus" haa a record of saving a
round dozen lives. He hss uncanny
ability to find men lost in the desert,
and has on three occasions located a
lost trail which enabled his master to
return safely, after hope had been
abandoned.
"It la hard for tha average man to
understand the fascination the desert
haa for one who has once braved It.
and come back," says Mr. Beck. "He
piay hold out against Its call as long
as the hardships and sufferings he en
dured are fresh In his mind. But,
sooner or later, be finda himself sigh
ing for the heat, the sands, the moun
tains, the solitudes and the wind that
sweeps along at a rate of 100 or more
miles an hour, scorching his face as
It passes. Then with pick on his back
and canteen at his side, he leads his
faithful mule, laden with a month's
provisions, out on the trail.
"Sometimes ha comes out. haggard
and bronsed from thirst and privation,
but with his animal loaded down wltb
that precious metal which will,, when
turned Into coin, make him and his
family rich . beyond their wildest
dreams. Far mora often,, though, his
ghastly remains are found beslda some
dry spring or where, crazed by thirst,
ha had drank from a pool, poisoned
with alkali or borax."
FIRE CHIEFS GET CARTERCARS
Milwaukee Follows Lead Taken by
. Detroit Seven Years Ago. . .
An order for seven model "R" road
sters was received last week from th
fir department of Milwaukee, by the
Chicago brand of the Cartercar Com
pany. These cars will be used by the
department chiefs In responding to
alarms and will add much efficiency
to the department.
In this connection it will be remem
bered that the fire department of D..
trolt has soma Cartarcara which have
been In use for seven years and they
have just recently added five more to
their equipment.
Good Service Rewarded.
Th city of San Francisco has bought
Its second Plarce-Arrow. Th car Is
a six-cylinder. tS-horsepower model,
seating four passengers and Is to be
used by Fir Chief Murphy. The fire
department bought Its first Fierce
Arrow In 1910 and th service given by
It has been so satisfactory that a car
nf th same make was decided on
when the second one was bought,
despite th fact that Its price was ap
proximately 1900 higher than other
competitive bids.
Factory Figure Surprise.
When tha dimensions of some of th
modern motor car factories are dealt
with some Interestingly large figures
are fared. As an Instance, IS acres
of lnnd are occupied by the Fierce-Arrow
factory at Buffalo and In the plant
there are 20 acres of floor space. There
are 12 acres of glass In the-roofs and
Idea of th buildings.
ill
fT-lf.
ptjrGr.m beadt for ovkrlaxo joi rvkt from roskbiro to myrtle poixt.
C. P Barnard, of Roaeburg. has provn by practical meana the economy of the automobile for business.
Mr. Barnard operates a stage line between Roaeburg and Myrtle Point, on the Marahfleld route. Until last
year ba need horses on this run. Then ha switched over to motor cars.. He tried out several machines,
trucks Included, and finally select d two Nationals and six Bulrk touring cars. Mr. Harnard. in a letter to
Mel Q. Johnson. Oregon National and Bulck distributer, praise the automobile and declares they are far mora
mora efficient and economical than horaes.
HORSE IS PASSING
Sales Manager
King Says
Efficient.
Trucks Most
QUICK WORK IS VALUABLE
Delays Costly In Business World To
day Because Tbey Mean Tled
Vp Investment and Rob Car of
Chance to Create Talnea.
'Most of those who are in any de
gree familiar with motor trucking will
accept It as an established fact that
th better motor trucks are efficient
from the standpoint of machinery and
that they ar capable of doing much
mor work than horses," said C K.
King, sales manager of th H. L. Keats
Auto Company.
"The real problem In motor truck
ing now concerns the reformation and
re-adjustment of conditions and cus
toms that have grown up around beast
haulage, so that the truck may have
full play In th realisation of Its po
tential efficiency. It Is a simple matter
ol saving time, of keeping th truck
moving so that its motion minutes will
exceed to the largest posslbla xtnt
its stopped time.
'Arnold Bennett cells time the raw
material of everything.' It Is Indeed
th raw material of motor truck serv
ice. But this should not be misunder
stood. It does not mean that th truok
should be speeded up. Under favorable
conditions our present normal truck
speeds of 10 to Ik miles an hour ar
sufficient to revolutionise our street
end highway transportation.
The problem Is to reduce the truck a
stopped time by bringing th efficiency
of the methods used. In loading and un
loading up to the efficiency of the truck.
It Includes also such traffic arrange
ments as will permit th truck to pro
ceed at Its normal speed through tha
streets.
Delays Are Costly.
Other transportation agencies are
affected by tb same conditions. Louis
D. Brandies has recently attributed
one of the greatest leakages In the
system of railroad management to th
needless stopped time of rolling -stock
n the yards. Tne a-reat or ana grain
boats which ply on th Great Lakes
owe their efficiency largely to the fact
that they ara loaded and unloaded with
amaslng speed. Ten thousand ton of
or has been put Into on of th greet
carriers of the Pittsburg steamship
Company In 25 minutes it Is always
don In less thsn two hours. The same
cariio Is unloaded In from three and a
half to five houra.
Quick work at the terminals I Just
as valuable In th operation of th mo
tor truck.- Delays ar costly not alone
because they mean a tied -up Invest
ment. but because they rob the truck of
an opportunity to create values, what
the economist call place values, in ex-
ceaa of th amount repreaanted by in
terest on th truck Investment.
'Successful co-operation In motor
trucking la a three-cornered affair. It
muat Include th shipper, the truck
operator and tha receiver, whether all
hree happen to be parts of a alngle
company or are separately managed.
The mor complete the co-operation.
he mor work th truck will do and
he greater will b Its value.
Co-perat1oa ! Imperative.
One Arm of building supply dealera
with which I am acquainted, by making
an Investment In hoppers and other
quick loading devices, has Incressed the
efficiency of its tracks far beyond what
was necessary to make tne equipment
pay for Itself. But at th other and of
the truck trips It has beast haulage
conditions to contend with.
Building contractors ar still blind
to tha advantagea of co-operating with
th dealer In his truck operation. They
place their concrete mixers In planes
Inaccessible to trucks. Thus they delay
he unloading process, reduce tha mo
tion minutes of the track, and Impair
efficiency. By so doing they are
also delaying their own deliveries.
"Retsllers wbo receive motor truck
deliveries from wholesale henaea ar
equally Indifferent to their own Inter
ests, chiefly because they do not resi
ze what motor truck service meant
o them, or might mean to there. By
tardy receipts of constg-nmente they
keep tha truck standing Idle, delay-
ng freight for the next man on th
rout as the one before delayed theirs.
Co-operation her would keep things
moving tor tne nenent of everyone.
Metheda Lack Efflcteaey.
Wharves for th exclusive us of
motor trucks would be a great help at
water shipping points. Trucks are
now delayed by slow moving teams.
Suitable hoisting devices Installed pn
ucn wnarves would greatly reduce the
truck's stopped time.
Trucks need never rest aa horses
i. and Idleness meana nothlna but
loss. Th Socloty for th Prevention of
- i
Cruelty to Animals asks 'too more con
sideration for a motor truck than for
a compound locomotive.
"Our greatest truck problem, to turn
up, concern not the truck Itself, but
the manner of tta use. We need to
keep every feature of the transporta
tion system up to th efficiency of the
truck. Th motor truck has been so
badly needed for the last decad that
It will not take long to work the prob
lem out when Its Importance is thor
oughly understood. The wonderful
things already accomplished by the
motor truck bring horn th necessity
of th solution."
Combined Show Planned.
New York will have but on auto
mobile show next Winter and It will be
so big as to make necessary the uss
of two buildings. This waa settled defi
nitely last week, when a contract was
signed for the use of Madison Square
Garden by the Automobile Board of
Trade, which also haa a lease on th
new Grand Central Palace. The com
bined ahows will be held under the
auspices of the Automobile Bosrd of
Trade, tha exhibits being divided be
tween the new Grand Central Palace
and Madison Square Garden.
KLAMATH WILL BE HOST
SEATTLE ATJTOMOBILIST TO VIS
IT SOUTHERN' OREGOX.
Delegate to San Francisco Good
Road Convention Plan Trips
to Crater Lake.
KLAMATH FALLS. Or- Jun S.
(Special.) Between 10 and 100 mem
ber of th Seattle Automobile Club
are expected to visit this city late In
June or early In July. Tbey ar com
ing In machlnea and will either be here
on their way to San Francisco to at
tend the Pacific good roads convention
or on their return home.
Th Seattle ' Automobile Club num
bers mor than (00 members, and while
no announcement of the exact number
of tha a who expect to -tsIt Klamath
Fall ba been obtained her. It Is
stated that mor than half of th mam
bershlp of the club will attend ths
convention In San Francisco, and that
probably nearly half cf thla number
will see th Klamath country.
Membera of th club expect to see
aa much of tha country aa possible
during the trip. Each car will start
Independently, with the object of meet
ing In San Francisco on a atated date.
Some of them will start two week or
mor before th time they are to be
in the Bay City, and the members of
each car will pick out the route they
desire to travel and the country thay
want to see. Word comes that many
of the autolsts going en the good roads
mission will pass through Klamath on
their way to Crater Lake If th roads
ar open so they caa reach that place.
While It la not likely that more than
two or three cars will be here at once,
these will be taken In charge by
Klamath automobile people and royally
welcomed. They will be piloted
throughout the country and taken for
a side trip to Pelican Bay Lodge.
Eagle Ridge -Tavern and Spring Creek,
as well aa many other of th adjoining
fishing resorts, .will also t visited.
GOVERNOR JOHXSOX TO SPEAK
Notable Will Add re Annual Con
vention of Pacific Highway.
Hiram Johnson. Governor of Cali
fornia, and P. J. Walker, prealdent of
the California State Automobile Aaao-
clatlon. have accepted Invitations to ad
dress the third annual convention of
tha Pacific Hlabway Association which
will be h4d In San Krancleco August
(. and 7 in th convention hall of th
St. Francla Hotel.
This. In addition to Samuel Hill and
the Paclflo Highway pathfinders. P. K.
Sands and Chester Lawrence, will help
to make an Interesting programme
The) most prominent other speaker to
appear will be the Hon. Thomas Tay
lor. Minister of Public Works of Brit
ish Columbia.
All Indications point thst this year's
Paclflo Highway convention will be
th most notable gathering of Its kind
aver held la the West. Delegstes from
many parte of the Pacific Coast that
ar not now on th Paclflo Highway
route will be on band to take, part In
the deliberations. Already prominent
cltlsena of Humboldt County. Califor
nia, have accepted Invitations to attend
the convention.
Judge J. T. Ronald, president of the
Pacific Highway Association, haa just
returned from a trip to Los Angeles,
and has received a great deal of en
couragement from th good roads n
thuslasts la Oregon and California. At
all points Prealdent Donald waa as
sured that ha had the hearty co-operation
of th public-spirited citizens for
the Pacific Highway project.
Almost dally letters oft commenda
tion ar coming Into association head
quarters from motorists who ar tour
ing up and down the eoent. praising
tha sign- work that thla organization
haa dona.
i
ateww-!j
SIMPLICITY IS
Motor Car Designers Seek to
Eliminate Puzzling Parts.
SWIFT PROGRESS IS MADE
Automobile Buyers Now Tnderstand
Advantage of Certain Con
struction Methods,' Say
Winton "Six" Agent,
"Advancement In the construction of
automobiles and tb growth of th in
dustry has been so greet that one must
look back a few years to fully appre
ciate the marvelous strides the motor
car has made," declared C. S. Mantell,
manager of th Portland Motor Car
Company, which has tb agency for
tha Winton "Six." "A state of per
fection In automobile building haa been
reached by tb high-grade car makers
that leaves llttl room for Improve
ment, especially along th line of me
chanical advancement
"Considering the advancement th
manufacturer' have made In the last
few years and the knowledge possessed
by th present day owner of ears
brings to mind a situation which Is a
rarity today, although It was quite
common up to a few years ago. It
used to be a frequent sight to see a car
stalled with soma minor troubl and
tha driver on his back, with hi full
kit of tools, trying to 'make th blamed
thing go.' An empty gasoline tank, a
dead battery or a fouled spark plug
might have been th cause, buf he did
not know and did not understand.
Adveiaeemeat la Rapid.
"The manufacturer has made wonder
ful etrldes In perfecting and simpli
fying the automobile, especially th
high-grade machines of medium price.
From an expensive luxury enjoyed by
a few, the automobile Is now prac
tical Investment for the average man.
Not only ia it a help to him in his bus
iness, but It Is th means of providing
health, . enjoyment and Inexpensive
recreation for his whole family. When
the weather la favorable, the automo
bile draws him from Indoors to th
boulevard or the country road for a few
hours of refreshing motoring.
"The automobile enthualaat haa ad
vanced with tha manufacturer, and th
average owner today doe not expect
the Impossible from the car, but real
izes thst, while It Is a wonderful piece
of machinery. It la subject to slckneaa
juat tha asm aa a human being. He
naa siuaiea and understands the con
struction of his car and la able to make
slight adjustments when neceaaary and
which. If neglected, would doubtleaaly
cauae serious trouble and discomfort.
Pnblle Naw Meter-Wise.
"The prospective buyer also under
stand pretty well the construction of
cars and knows why various deslo-ns
are used. He raallsea, for Instance, that
Dan-bearings produce non-friction and
wear-realatlng qualities Ha know th
varloua carburetor and masnrtoa: h
know tb advantage obtained from
the use of aluminum In certain Darts.
of the us of vanadium steel for springs.
steering arma and other parta where
strength Is most important. He knows
that the best gears are made from
chrome nlekel etael."
Auto Repairing
FRED DUNDEE
575
Jeff.
Main2S58. A265S
CUDDEN TOUR WINNER
Always in the Lead
The car of proven Durability, Economy anJ Reliability
UNITED AUTO CO.
522-52S Alder Street Phones Main 4337 A 7171
Motorist Sugest Machine Prlven by
Aerial -Propeller as Mean of
Eliminating Gear and
NeedWa Weight.
Salient advic and euggeatloa aa to
how tha ideal automobile for ltll
should be constructed Is given In a
series of lettsra to Tba Automobile by
motorists wltb Inventive minds bent
on the best, newest and most comfort
able In the motor car line. These let.
ters, written by practical autoista from
all section of the country, contain
widely different Ideas aa to what the
"ideal" machine ahould contain.
The following two letters ara taken
aa representative of th numsrous
one printed: '
"I have om definite opinions on the
subject of the Ideal car. which I leel
differ materially from many of those
hitherto Bet forth In your eolumne,"
writes Homer G. Bradley, of Denver.
Colo.
"in the rlrt piece, my car should be
Isrge enough to rare for my entire
family, which is seven atrong. The
mechanical details of Its construction
do not appeal to me ao strongly as do
its possibilities fur comfortable tour
ing. Of course, to be Ideal, there should
be no fault with any part of the
mechanism, and tb most advanced
Ideas In automobile engineering should
be followed.
Lara Meter Sasaeated.
"The motor should have aufflclent
power to get the car over any sort of
a hill without great effort -about Co
horsepower would be enough. I think.
There should be a large radiator and
there should be a positive water cir
culation systf-m. so that all possibility
of overheating under heavy load would
be eliminated.
"Pprlnaa and car suspension ara very
Important. The springs should be very
long and of the three-quarter elllptlo
variety, both front and rear. Thla type
of spring, la my opinion, gives most re
sistance to road shocks. In addition to
this manner of suspension, there should
be shock absorbers of a design not yet
brought out. I do not know how they
should be designed, but I am aura of the
reaulta which ahould be obtained from
their use. The occupant of th ear. in
other word, should not ba able to dis
tinguish between ' th vry roughest
roads ovar which they travel and the
very smoothest, ao effective should tb
absorbers be. No on haa yet devised
a shock-absorblns; outfit which would
meet theae requirements, although some
of the later ones coma very near to it.
Com fart Mala Preblex.
"Every luxury and devlc which
would in any wy add to the comfort
of the ear's occupants should be Includ
ed in the equipment. The car would
cost quite a lot of money, but why not
have what you want In your Ideal T It
costs ao more for perfection In one's
ldnsls than for mediocrity. Too many
of your readera appear to b aatlafled
with a cheap car. Ideal ar not
easily attained. In my opinion."
"I am quite intereeted In readers'
sccompanylng letters, views and draw
ing of thav Ideal cars. hare noticed
that they all. ao far. have followed the
aame general dealgn and construction
of the manufactured car of today,"
ssys B. Harrison Howe, of Chicago.
"I take the liberty of sending draw,
tngs and explanations ef my. proposed
car. It Is not ezactly my Ideal ear, but
It may revolutionize the automobile
problem of the future aa far aa light
weight and minimum number of parta
Is concerned, and also mske shifting
of gears, which Is a complicated oper
ation, a thing of th past. It Is an au
tomobile driven by an aerial screw or
propeller. This type of machine haa
been tried out. and. It la claimed, ha
attained the speed of IS mile an hour.
"A car of thla design. If properly
made, ahould easily attain a speed of
to to 100 miles an hour. I have de
signed, as I think, a car that will re
duce head resistance and th vacuum
at th rear to a minimum.
Faataatla Dvalsm Deflated.
"The construction of such a car
should b of extreme Ilghtnesa and
strength. Ira wheels with an
aluminum body are used In th con
struction ss far as possible. There are
no gears nor hesvy transmissions, very
little air resistance and consequently It
will be a very light and speedy car.
Two light tubular axles, frame, motor
and propeller are about all there I to
th car. Th motor could be of any
standard make today developing about
10-JS horsepower and of fairly good
speed. A clutch between th motor
end propelles Is all that Is necessary s
that the motor may be left running
when the car Is standing.
"I would ssy thst the propeller be
about IVj feet In diameter, with a very
heavy pitch. Thla car would have one
set of brskee acting on the rear wheels,
also a small brake on the propeller
shaft to keep the propeller from whirl
ing when clutch Is out.
"However. It would be extremely dan
gerous to tske curves at high speed on
account of skidding. I have helped te
eliminate thla by placing a vertical fla
In tha rear to keep It In a straight
course. This also acta as a wing for
th wind to bank against, which helps
to reduce aklddlng on turning corners.'
An elderly London von-iaa. whs lived for
many yeara with ae ether roa-ipaaloa thaa
a das. died, and It la new found that ah
left her r-Mldenre te be eaed ea a caava
leacnt bom and aequeatliea the auia ef
t.io.ooo for Ita widowinMt
BALL BEARINGS RE-GROUND
Atterbury Truck
Columbia Carriage Auto Woria, Afta,
S09-SII Front Street. Food Main 839X
(kaeril Auto Repairing. Bodies and Wheel Built to Order.
AUBUR
I
1
BALLOUS WRIGHT
Largest Stock
Automobile Accessories
M. & W, C & J. and Hartford
Tires, Monogram Oils
S0-S2 Seventh St, Car. Oak. Portland. Or.
MOTORCYCLES
INDIAN AND EMBLEM
BALLOU & WRIGHT, 80-82 Seventh Street, Cor. Oak
BOWSER
Crowe
Sixteenth and
RAMBLER STUTZ
MAIS TRUCK (Gear Driven.
The Best American-Made Truck
Distributers for Oregon and Southern Washington.
TLTOiOlPt.
ii HaJllL-aV Best for the Money
Ford Motor Car Agency
E. E. Sleret, Pre, ea Mar E.
ValeaBlslns Rilrtailaa. M. ML ILUDOIlTT, 2 a-11 J. 141a.
THE AMERICAN
l1t CNDKtftt.t'0.
A Car far the nteerlMlnetlna Ktw Tl af..t Car aa Kartth
CAHAblb ITUKAUK- HLPAIHIJIU,
Nob Hill Garage & Auto Co., Inc.
aa Keener at bilwm TtteaO-flret aa4 Tweaty.aaeaV
AFFERSON STEARNS REO
NORTHWEST AUTO CO.
DISTRIBUTORS
F. W. VOGLER, President
617 Washington Street. Phones Main 7179, A 4953.
' a
PREER CUTLERY & TOOL CO.
Headquarters for Shop Supplies
and Automobile Tools
74 SIXTH AND 311 OAK STREETS
Schacht Motor Car Co.
COMMERCIAL AND PLEASURE CARS
COR. FIFTH AND HOYT STS.
We Guarantee Oar Repair Work Work Called for and Delivered.
STEVENS VULCANIZING CO.
TIRE SUNDRIES AND AUTO SUPPLIES
349 Oak Street, Portland, Oregon.
Main 513. Open Till 2 A. M. O. W. Stevena, Trop.
Oar Motto: "Qnalitj and Square Deal"
Western Hardware & Auta Supply Co.
SEVENTH AND PINE STREETS
Vulcanizing, Hardware and Auto Suppliea.
Phone Vain R2. Ilmw A 201
OAKLAND
OREGON DISTRIBUTORS
Main 75-Phonea-A 46S5
PACIFIC MOTORS CO.
682 Waahlnaton Straet
Anburn Motor Car Co.
1 ROBT. SIMPSON. Hp.
1 505.7 Burnaido Street
A 7SS9. Main Mi.
GASOLINE and OIL TANKS
aTOHACH IVITKMt KH I'lnLIU aAD rH
V ATM UARAQIC.
. O. ataae-ar. Aat, au Veiaaakia MI4a. Mats 14. a
Auto Co.
Alder Streets
MARION
K-RIT
JOHN DEERE PLOW CO.
Northwest Dietributora,
EAST MORRISON AND SECOND STS.
Phone: E. SS87, D 1625.
The car that comes fully equipped
Mala Tee a,