The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, June 26, 1910, SECTION TWO, Page 2, Image 16

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    THE SUNDAY OREGONIAX. PORTLAND, JUNE 26. 1910.
2
FAMOUS
TBUKH
HEREWITH STRING
Dick Wilson, Noted Racetrack
Man, Brings 35 Horses
for Fair Meet.
WORLD TEAM RECORD HELD
Among Fine Steeds In His Stable Is
Alleen Wilson, 2:02 1-4 Patch-
en ,Boy, Registered Stal
lion, Sire of Fast Nags. - .
BY W. J. PETRAIN.
Portland's $10,000 stake offered for a
trotting: race at the track of the Port
land Fair and Livestock Association
during: the coming- race meet is al
ready attracting: Eastern .horses and
drivers. Dick Wilson, one of the most
famous trainers in the business, is now
at the track with 85 horses.
Wilson is a picturesque figure in
American harness-horse circles. He has
raced his stables on the Grand Circuit
for the past 15 years, but this is the
first time that he has brought his
horses to the Coast for a Fall meet
when the big: Eastern tracks are busy.
It was Dick Wilson who made a
world's record with a team on the
Readville track ' last year, when he
drove Hedgewood Boy and Lady Maud
C. to pole in 2:024. Wilson has al
ways enjoyed a reputation as a keen
and clever driver, and his many suc
cesses on different tracks have caused
him to be rated on a par with Ed Geers
and the other noted drivers.
Some of the horses Wilson has
trained and driven, and the marks they
made with him up, are as follows:
Alleen Wilson, 2:024: Bumps, 2:04 4;
Gasconda, 2:054; Courier-Journal, 2:06;
Silver Chimes, 2:07: The Bishop. 2:06;
Dick Wilson, 2:08; Byron Kay, 2:084;
William Tell. 2:11, and many others.
Wilson is especially proud of his
registered trotting- stallion. This horse
has sired some of the greatest racing:
horses In the country. Patchen Boy is
a beautiful blue black stallion by
Wilkes Boy out of Lady Clay by Metro
politan. Alex Williams, a promising: young:
trotter and one of Patchen Boy's get,
is being: carefully handled by Wilson,
for he thinks this horse can win the
big: stake, though this will by no means
be the only Wilson entry. Alex Wil
liams has a mark of 2:12. as a 3-year-old,
and has been making: 2:16 and bet
ter in the morning: workouts at the
track. Ken West. 2:14, Is another
promising; Wilson entry. The horse is
. a spirited black beauty of the Patchen
strain, and is one of the best-waited
trotters seen on a Portland track in
some time.
While Wilson likes the performance
of Ken West and Alex Williams, he
has another black beauty that promises
to be heard from, Lucille Patchen, 2:16,
a 4-year-old by Patchen Boy out of
Fanny by Beaumont.
Besides handling- his own horses and
working them on the track each day,
Dick Wilson is grooming the entries of
a number of Oregon horsemen who
have secured his services as trainer to
prepare ' their horses for the North
western circuit this Fall. Among the
. horses Wilson is looking after is Frank
E. Alley's Sonoma Boy, a full brother
of the famous Sonoma Girl. Sonoma
Boy has a mark of 2:05, and Wilson
says he can do better than that. On
the strength of his knowledge of
pacers, and especially of the Sonoma
Girl strain, he expects to pull Sonoma
Boy through this Fall with a new mark.
Another horse being handled for Frank
Alley is Staline, one of the most prom
ising trotters now at the track. Wil
son says that Staline's record of 2:22
will be lowered considerably this sea
son. Paul Wessinger's Oregon Patch and
Dick Hal are also being handled by
Wilson, who pronounces both as horses
of great promise. Wilson likes to
handle horses that have had little or
5o previous training, and his success
with them Is remarkable. His work
with the Oregon horses thus far Is most
pleasing to the owners who have placed
their entries in his care.
A. C. Lohmire's Arclight, and A. C.
Shreve's Rubyllght, comprise another
pair of likely performers. Both are the
get of the famous Searchlight, and Wil
son predicts a successful career for
them.
"I have been most agreeably sur
prised at the number and quality of
good horses owned in the Northwest,"
remarked Wilson the other day. "Be
fore shipping my own horses to Port
land I had been led to believe there
were few really good horses In this
section. I must admit , that my In
formants were either Ignorant or mis
informed as to the true state of affairs.
Oregon and Washington have several
high-class performers, horses that
would do well in the company of the
Grand Circuit, and I am greatly pleased
to find such enthusiasm among the
horsemen as now exists here."
Dick Wilson will race his horses and
handle a number of others through the
Pacific Northwest Fair Association sea
son.
i..ilftMiwiiMil-TrT'r, ' f FAMOUS TRAINER AND HORSIS NOW AT PORTLAND TRACK.
I i " " " "" 1 '"'""A" j'r'""'' i-""' r J&j asj I
P'-L-V V--.' v
l .. ! X M
. iTmx t?pic i j- - --- - r?-"
GOLF PROGRAMME AXXOUXCED
Gold Medal High Prize In Western
Amateur Tournament,.
CHICAGO, June 25. The official pro
gramme for the Western amateur golf
championship has been given out by
Charles E. Wlllard, secretary of the
Western Golf Association. The tour
nament will be held during the week
of July 25 over the course of the Mini
kahda Country Club at Minneapolis.
Thirty-six holes will be qualifying
round this year. Eighteen holes will
be played on July 25 and the 64 best
scores will be eligible for the next 18
holes on Tuesday morning. The first
match round will be played by the 32
victors Tuesday afternoon. This round
will be 18 holes, but the remainder will
'be at 84. The second round will be
?layed Wednesday, the third Thursday,
he semi-finals Friday and the finals
Saturday.
A gold medal will go to the cham
pion, a silver medal to the runner up
and a .bronze medal to each loser In
the semi-finals.
Entries, which must"- be made
through club secretaries, will close at
5 P. M., July IS.
CORN
H OARSMEN
E
fiEGATTIf VICTORS
ntercollegiate Regatta Hon
ors Again Go to Ithaca
Teams.
FAST TIME; ONE ACCIDENT
Just as Columbia Crew Crosses Fin
ish Llne In Four-Oared Race,
Shell Capsizes Members
i
Picked Up by Tugs.
POUGHKEEPSIE. N. T.. June 25.
Cornell repeated her last year's feat of
winning the three races of the Inter
collegiate regatta today.
The varsity elgbt-oared race was not
finished until after darkness, which
made it Impossible to distinguish the
crews. Pennsylvania pressed Cornell
closely through the race and was but
a half-length behind at the finish.
The Judges placed Columbia third.
Syracuse fourth and Wisconsin last.
Official time of the eight-oared race
was: Cornell. 20:42; Pennsylvania.
20:44; Columbia. 20:54 1-5; Syracuse,
21:13; Wisconsin, 21:15 3-5.
Cornells victory in the four-oared
race and the freshman eight-oared race
was eaBily gained.
Taking the lead on the Jump In true
Courtney style, Cornell's varsity four
won the first race scheduled of the
Intercollegiate regatta. Syracuse was
second. Columbia third and Pennsylva
nia fourth.
Just as the Columbia shell crossed
the finish line one of the oars struck
the stake boat and the shell capsized.
Good Time Recorded.
The official time of the varsity four
winner was 11:37 4-5. Syracuse's time
was 11:43 2-6, Columbia's 11:48 1-5,
Pennsylvania, 12:22.
The official time for the freshman
eight-oared race: Cornell, 10:40 1-5;
Columbia, 10:53 2-6; Syracuse. 10:53 4-5;
Pennsylvania, 11:09 1-5; Wisconsin,
11:15 1-5.
At 7:45 o'clock the five varsity eights
awaited instructions from the referee's
boat. Darkness was fast settling down
and it was difficult to see a mile away.
The start was made at 7:46. Wiscon
sin caught water first, Pennsylvania
second.
Columbia spurted and passed Cornell
at the two-mile mark. Pennsylvania.
Wisconsin and Syracuse were rowing
next in order.
Cornell Long in Lead.
At the 2 -mile mark Cornell led,
with Pennsylvania second. When the
crews approached the bridge Pennsyl
vania spurted and Its shell shot up on
almost even terms with Cornell. Co
lumbla was third, Syracuse fourth and
Wisconsin last.
At the three-mile mark Cornell was
. only inches ahead of Pennsylvania
with Columbia third by a length; Syra
cuse fourth and Wisconsin last.
Brooklyn Thursday. In a statement Is
sued last night President Lynch says:
-'While I recognize the fact that prov
ocation for this player's attack on a
spectator was great, stillhe cannet be
allowed to take the law Into his own
hands. The rules of order and disci
pline on the ball field allow of no such
conduct, and the good repute of the.
game itself cannot be jeopardized by
players resenting their grievances in
this manner.
"Devlin had redress by appealing to
the umpire for protection, who, after
satisfying himself of the Identity of the
offender, could have insisted on the lat
ter's removal from the grounds, and the
game would not have continued until
the umpire's orders were obeyed. The
payment of an admission fee to a ball
game does not permit spectators to
abuse the players. In the case of play
ers Doyle and Devore, they are fined
$50, because they acted as accessories
where they might have been better em
ployed as peacemakers."
Devlin was made defendant today in
a civil suit for ?6000 damages, brought
by Bernard J. Roessler, a Brooklyn
garage keeper, who charges that Dev
lin knocked him out for seven minutes
with a right swing to the -Jaw, whils
he was watching the New York-Brooklyn
game yesterday.
Roessler insists that the man for
whom the swing was meant sat directly
behind him. This man, he says, had
been calling Devlin names, but when
the ballplayer reached the box seat sub
sided, and Devlin punched Roessl'-r by
mistake. Roessler today swore out a
warrant for Devlin's arrest.'-
r
HOGAN STILL LEADS
Vernon Manager Strongest in
Stick Work Last Week.
NONE OTHER IN .300 CLASS
. Newsboys to Play Ockley Green,
The Newsboys second baseball team
will play the Ockley Green team this
afternoon on the Ockley Green dia
mond. This Is expected to be a fast
game, as both teams are speedy for
amateurs. The Newsboy Juniors have
met and defeated a number of fast
local amateur teams. Campbell and
Rantlell will be the battery for the
street merchants. . The White Cross,
Mllwaukie, Mount Tabor and Kerrigan
teams are some of the nines with
which the Newsboys have played this
season.
Batsmen or Coast League Generally
Take Slump Gus Fisher, Pre
mier Hitter for Portland, Tum
bles From .290 to X279.
All of the leading batsmen of the
Pacific Coast League suffered a slump
during the past week, for ' only one
regular player remained among the
class noted as .300 hitters, and he Is
"Happy" Bill Hogan, the Oakland hard
hitting utility player. At that. Bill
slumped several points, but the pitch
ers worked exceptionally well during
tne recent games.
Gus Fisher, Portland's premier hit
ter, fell from .290 to .279, but once he
gets back on the home lot next week
he can be expected to climb again.
Felix Martinke, now a Portlander. but
hitherto a veronlte. Is the second Port
land batter, with an average of .264.
while Bill Rapps slumped to the .250
mark.
Roy Brashear Is giving Ping Bode
a run for the homerun tatting honors.
for he Is close on the heels of the hard
hitting Seal. Howard, of Los Angeles,
is the leading base stealer, while Port
land's best performer In that line is
Olson.
The averages up to and Including
the games played June 20 are as fol
lows:
. . Batting Averages.
Player AB
Thomas, Oakland in
Hogan. W-. Oakland 20
Perry. Sacramento 265
Ross. Los AnEeles 113
Iwls, San Francisco lltt
Pish or, G.. 1'ortland 244
Bodle. San Francisco 27!
Cameron, Oakland 2S3
Dalcv. Lo Anseles 290
Melchlor. San FTanclsco..
Howard, Los AnKeles. .. . .
Martinke. Ver. and Port.
rtAnzie. Racramento 193
Burrell. Vernon 140
Bernard. Los Angeles 214
Tennant. San Francisco 322
Wolverton, Oakland
Rapps. Portland........
Mannert, Oakland
Hunt. Sacramento
Carlisle, Vernon
Tozier. Los Angeles
Castleton. Los Angeles.
Hitt. Vernon
Brashear. R., Vernon...
Brlggs, Sacramento
Roth. Los Angeles
Bhaw. San Francisco lUfl
Coy. Vernon ,804
Murphy. Los Angeles 2S4
Casey. Portland 151
.801
.282
. .258
. .229
242
71
20 (J
2n
R 1BH AV.
' 2 5 .313
32 63 .301
40 75 .294
14 :t:t .287
12 3.1 .285
27 BS .279
42 77 .270
29 78 .276
83 80 .208
34 80 .266
42 75 .266
31 64 .264
17 61 .264
14 86 .264
27 56 .262
80 - 84 .261
26 59 .261
34 65 .259
24 62- .256
5 IS .254
65 75 .254
5 12 .260
0 1 .260
4 18 .250
43 70 .248
24 72 .243
14 72 .241
24 47 .240
84 73 .240
30 68 .239
15 36 .238
Wares.' Oakland r.OO 32
Cutshaw, Oakland 316
Mosher, Oakland.: 64
uisen, jfortiana
Waning, Los Angeles...
Swander, Oakland
Wlllett. Vernon ,
Boardman. Sacramento..
Brasher. N:, Vernon.....
Speas, Portland
VUt. San FTanclsco
riasrle. Los Angeles
Van Buren, Sacramento. .. ,275
Ryan, Portland 261
McArdle. San Francisco. .. .231
Dillon, Los Angeles 271
Brown. Vernon ............ 136
Ort. Portland 147
Fisher. W.. Vernon 222
Hetling. Portland 187
Pearson. Sacramento.
Whalen, Sacramento.
McCredie, Portland...
Mitse. Oakland 179
La Longe. Sacramento
Breckenrldge. Vernon...... 53
Carroll. Oakland 190
ptovall. Vernon 88
Smith. Los Angeles.... 84
Capron. Oakland. ......... lO
Carson, Vernon 10
Records at tbe PI tenors.
287
.. . 26
.. .303
...52
.. .192
.. .223
. . .246
. . .247
53
. .112
.. 42
. .151
32 71 .237
38 74 .234
5 15 .234
43 07 .2:t3
4 6 .21
27 70 .231
4 12 .231
12 44 .229
20 61 .220
24 56 .228
SB 60 .227
4 12 .220
25 62 .225
27 68 .223
21 51 .221
33 OO .221
9 30 .221
14 32 .218
22 48 , .216
16 40 ' .214
lO 24 .214
2 9 .214
15 32 .213
16 38 .212
7 23 .208
6 11 .208
19 39 .203
7 18 .205
8 17 M2
1 2 .200
2 2 .200
GUP TEAM SHORT
Lack of Talent Brings Vet
erans to Front.
PITCHER.
0 10001
.191.V 41 0 .789
11 S U .12
1410 4 0 .7141
18 121 6 0.667
I 41 2 1 1.667
17111 Of 01.647
1811 6 11.647
.1221131 8 11.6191
7
5
Sutor, S. F. .
Mosher, O. ..
Lively, O
Xagle. L. A.
Krapp. p. . . .
Carson. V...
Nelson, O....
Hitt, V
Henley. 8. F.
Miller. 8. F. .
Seaton. p... .
Henallng. V
Tosler. L. A. . . .
Willett. V
Ames. S. F. . . . -
Eastley. a. F. . .
Sharer, V
Steen, P
Gregg. P
Willis S. P-o'.'-'lSl ft1!
Brlswalter, L. AJ13 a 7
Hunt. S !19 810
Baum. 8 18 8 Id
Breckenrldge, V. 181 8 10!
Thornaen. L. A. 14 5 8
Whalen. S 113 5 8!
Harkins. u ill; 4; T 0;.atS4
Stewart. 8. F...I ! 2! 41 0 .3331
Dank. O J 6 2 41 0 .333,
Delphi. L. A...1 6 2 4 (I .3:in
Butler. L. A 1 j 1 2! 0 .3.13
Garrett. P 10 31 7 0 .300
Christian, O 110 3 7 0 .3001
22: IS 81
ls;ll 7
12 7 5
14 S'
15'. 81 6
7 8
0 5( 4
9 fri 4
1A 7 A
!'.'.'. .'. ".U2i e
& f A V Ol
T
ii'.ei
0 .611
0 .583
0 .571
1 .671
O .671
0 .536
O .556
8 .539
0 .500
0 .500
0 .462
0 .462
1 .444
0 .444
0 .444
1 .883
0 .883
Stovall. V . . . .
Crieger. L. A
Fitzgerald. S. . .
Kourse. S
Browning. S. F.
Hosp, L. A
Castleton. L. A.
Klir.e.- L. A
Tonneson. O-. . . .
Brown, S
1 3 .230
9 2' 7 0 .222!
14 311 O .214
5 1) 4 0 .200
1 1 o .ooo
1-1 Ol 1 oi.ooo
1 0 1 o .ooo
31 8 01.000
000
000
3 i 3 0 .41
7! ! 7 Ol.C
! i TTt.
5- s a x a
IIf.lL
0 O 0 0 0
3 0 13 1
2 10 18
3 0 2 0
8 ll 2 4 2
0' O' O O 0
3 0 2 1 4
4 10 10
8 0 0 2 3
0 O 0 1
3 0 2 2
8 0 1 4.
1 O 0 OH)
1 0 1 2i 0
i o o o;
0 0 110
1 0 0 0 0
0102
I 8 0 0 1
0 0 0 1 0
10 10
2 0 O 2 0
4 0 114
4 0 12 0
1 O 0 0
2 O 1- O 2
10 112
3 0 0 2 3
0 1 0 O 0
0 0 1
O 0 0 1
0 O 0 0
1 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 o
0 0 o o
1 0 0 0 1
0 O 0 1
o o 0 o o
0 0 0i o
o 0 o 0 1
0 0 01 o o
I 0 ol Ol 0
I o ol o o
- Individual Records.
Leading sacrifice hitters Wares 29, Olsen
Speas, . Murphy and K. Brashear 20 each,
Dillon and Lindsay 18 each, Rapps, Mohler
and - Roth 16 each. Ryan, Melchlor. Daley,
Howard, Van Buren and Raynor 14 each,
Vltt. Dclmas and Carlisle 13 each Bodie,
Bernard. Ross. Carroll and 8wauder 12
each. Burrell and W. Fisher 10 each.
Leading base stealers Howard 27, Daley
22. Wares and Cutshaw 19 each. Olsen, Vltt
and Shinn 8 each, Marttnke 17, Melchlor
ana union in eacn. &peaa, uarcisie ana
Brashear IB each, Tennant 14. Mohler and
Maggart 13 each. Perry and Murphy 12
each. Lewis, Van Buren, Cameron, Carroll
and Coy 11 each. Ryan. Rapps, W. Hogan,
Bernara ana Llnacay 10 eacn.
Honrs runs Bodie 14. R. Brashear 13.
Swander 7, Perry 6, G. Fisher. Ryan, Berry,
Coy, Howard, Brlggs and Carlisle 3 each,
Rapps, Wllllama, Nelson, Delmas. Maggart.
Cameron, ff. Brashear and Cutshaw each.
W. Hogan'. Melchlor, Pierce. Tennant, Lewis.
Kagle. Breckenrldge.. Lindsay, Hunt, Van
Buren and Carroll 1 each.
Team Batting. Etc.
Teams Games AB R 1BH BAV SH SB 2BH 3BH HR DP TP SO
Oakland SI 26".l 27.1 622 .236 100 109 103 7 18 62 1 12
l.oa Angeles 82 2581 272 694 .2.10 139 IIS 95 5 7 56 . o 8
Vernon 81 224 2 SO 685 . 227 108 106 108 It 23 62 O 10
Fan FTanclsco 82 2721 284 593 .218 108 104 lOO 13 22 66 0 5
Portland 75 2416 245 323 .218 117 93 99 12 10 43 0 10
Sacramento 77 2487 209 629 . 213 90 75 114 14 . 11 63 0 10
Total 16460 1363 3158 21 2 93 342 1 S3
DOHERTYS OUT OF GAME
Gore, Barrett and Ritchie Seem to
Be Members of Body to fight
lor Tennis Honors This Year
With American Players.
LONDOX, June 25. (Special.) Eng
land Is going to have a hard time get
ting together a strong team for the
Davis tennis cup matches, should any
be held this year. Enthusiasts are
watching with keen Interest the play
ing of the more prominent experts In
the various tournaments now being
held, and it can hardly be said that the
promise of material is very great.
It is pretty certain that the men who
Journeyed to the United States last
year as England's representatives will
not find a place in the team this year.
Last Summer the English selection
committee was stumped by the same
difficulty which had so often presented
Itself to the American committee the
Impossibility of getting any of the
really first-class players to sacrifice
the time and money associated with a
trip abroad, and, in the event of a win,
to Australia.
Thus they were compelled to fall back
upon the men who have for some years
been near the top, but never quite
reached it. C. P. Dixon, Kenneth Pow
ell and J. G. Parke are hardly players
representative of the best in English
lawn tennis and in contests in Eng
land, where it is proposed' to hold the
preliminary matches this year, they
would hardly be considered by the se
lection committee.
Doherty Brothers Dismissed.
Although .each year there are rumors
that the Doherty brothers are getting
into shape and will play in first-class
tennisthey really can be dismissed as
possibilities- It is extremely doubtful
If they could ever approach their old
marvelous form.
H. L. Doherty, the younger of the
brothers, is too busy with golf, at
which he is' a dangerous opponent even
for the best of players, to go through
the hard course of training which
would be necessary before he could be
in any kind of shape, while R. F. Doh
erty confines himself to mixed doubles,
a harmless and easy form of tennis
compared with first-class singles. To
make comparisons. It would be just as
sensible to talk of the return to first
class form of Whitman and Ward, In
the United States, as to talkof the re
turn of the Dohertys.
As a matter of fact, one would never
hear this constant talk of the Doher
tys were it not that no new talent is
being produced in England. Lawn ten
nis here is really In a bad way. For
, many yeara baafe. tLg Wuumenti
have been compelled to depend abso
lutely upon the veterans for anything
above the most mediocre playing. Un
less memory is treacherous, not a sin
gle player of the first water has been
developed in England since the days
when the Doherty brothers ruled su
preme and Journeyed to the United
States to fight for the Davis cup.
This Year Jfo Kxception.
This year is no exception to the rule,
and the selection committee will have
to depend upon men who should have
retired from first-class tennis many
years ago, if we consider their ages.
If an American team comes across, it
is pretty certain that it will have to
meet a team composed of the follow
ing men, all famous in international
tennis: A. W. Gore, H. B Barrett and
J: G. Ritchie. Gore and Ritchie prob
ably will play in the singles, and Bar
rett with Gore in the doubles. Of
course, there is the possibility of one
or more of these men being out of form
by the first week In July, when the
Wimbledon tournament, during wlrfch
the selections are made, comes around.
Of these men. it is believed that Gore
is still the strongest In singles. He is
the present English champion, and
despite the fact that he Is not. at the
moment of writing, in the best of sin
gles form and is confining his tourna
ment play to doubles, it is said that
Wimbledon .will see him In first-class
physical condition. He Is a hard-hitting
player, who plays well back to
ward the base line, seldom coming up
to the net.
At present Ritchie is playing better
than any other expert in England. He
has Just won the Middlesex County
championship, going through a strong
field. It will be remembered that
Ritchie represented England in the Da
vis cup matches at Boston two yeara
ago, when he disposed of Beals Wright.
6-1, 6-3, 6-2, but lost to W. A. Lamed,
4-6. 8-3, 6-3. 6-3.
Barrett has been playing very little
in singles so far this season, and It is
impossible to get a line on his form.
He has appeared in doubles, however.
paired with Gore,- and they are un
doubtedly still the strongest combina
tion in the field. Barrett's playing Is
almost diametrically opposed to Gore's
In style. The former is crafty as a fox
and depends for his points upon luring
his opponent to some far corner of the
court and then-dropping the ball easily
but effectively In some uncovered spot.
Gore wins by sheer speed and hard hit
ting.
VANDERBILT WINS IX FRANCE
Two Horses' First, One Secxnd, in
Races at Boulogne.
BOULOGNE, France, June 25. W. K.
Vanderbilt had a good day in the rac
ing meet here today, having two
winners and a second horse. His Ra
messeum won the Prix de . la Porte
Maillot of $1000, a distance of five fur
longs, and his Oversight won the Prix
de Seine at Marne of $4000 over a dis
tance of a mile and a half.
Mr. Vanderbilt's Messidor III came in
second in the Prix de Courbevols, for
3-year-olds, of $3000, distance one mile
and seven furlongs.
LAJOiE STILL LEADING
PEERLESS CLEVTXAXD PLAYER
IX FOREFROXT OF LEAGUE.
Chemawa- Indians Lose Game.
The -Brooks baseball team defeated
Chemawa in a hotly-contestedV game at
Brooks yesterday, the final score of
which was 9 to 6. The pitcher for
Brooks was the steadier in the pinches,
while the two pitchers used by the In
dians were hit hard and often.
Ty Cobb, of Detroit Tigers, However,
Is Giving Veteran Rnn in Race
for Batting Honors.
The peerless Napoleon Lajoie, erst
while manager of the Cleveland team
.and still a member of that club, con
tinues to clout the ball In the speedy
American League at over .400.
Ty Cobb has been coming strong, and
Is now hitting .388 and may take the
honors away from the big Frenchman
yet. Ted Easterly, the former Lo An
geles catcher, Is also one of the Ameri
can's leading sluggers.
The American League averages are as
follows:
BATTING AVERAGE.
Player Club. G
Lajoie, Clev...45
Cobb. Detroit. 62
Schmidt. De't.15
Bender. Athl'c.13
Speaker, Bos.. 45
Murphy. Athl.48
Delehanty, Dt.62
Easterly, dev. 19
Gardner. Bos.. 31
Laporte, X. Y.44
H. Davis. Ath.4S
Chase, N. Y...48
Ike, St. L. ..15
Newman, St.L.16
Coombs. Phil.. 11
Knight, N. Y..15
Clcotte, Bos... 13
Wood, Boston. 16
Wallace. St. L.4U
V. Jones. Det.36
Stahl. Boston.. 42
Barry. Athl...42
Oldrlng. Ath..41
Lewis, Bos 42
Bush. Bos B2
Elberfeld, Wn.35
Collins, Athl..4S
Lord. Boston . . 49
Crawford, Det.52
Stone, St. L...47
Hoffman. St.L.43
Baker. Athl...44
Carrlgan. Bos. 49
Milan. Wash.. 62
Bailey. St. L. .14
Quinn. N. Y...12
Flick. Clev 21
McBrlde. Wn. .49
Lellvelt. Wn..43
F,ngle, Bos.... 19
Oessler. Wn ... 52
Block. Chi 22
Hooper. Bos... 47
Austin. N. Y..45
Turner, Cle...45
Walsh. Chi... 18
Zeider. Chi 45
Heltmuller, A. 18
Falkenberg. CI. 12
SchwelT. St.L..42
Stanage, Dt...4H
Griggs. St. L. .44
Nlles. Cleve...26
Dougherty, Ch.38
Simmons. Dt..20
conroy. Wn...27
Melntlre. Dt..25
Hemphill. N.Y.46
T. Jonea. Dt..3S
Hartzell, St.L.49
Thomas, Ath..22
Mullen. Dt 20
Me In nee. Ath..ll
Lapp. Ath 23
Wagner. Bos. .44
Moriarty, It..6
Mitchell, N. Y.13
Wolter. N.Y...48
Sweeney. N.Y.30
Roach. N. Y. . .27
Hansel. Ath.. 41
French. Chl...23
Scott. Chi 11
Unglaub. Wn..47
Cree, N. Y 40
Lord. Cleve...82
Walker. Wn...l3
PASKERT PASSES MAGEE
CIXCIXXATI OUTFIELDER XOW
LEADING NATIONAL HITTERS.
Philadelphia Slugger Goes Back
Notch Snodgrass Bats- .439, but
Has Played Only 20 Games.
Dode" Paskert, one of Cincinnati's.
outfielders has usurped the lead among
the batsmen of the National League, for
the Red Stocking hit the ball often
enough recently to pass Sherwood Magee,
the Phlladephla slugger who has enjoyed
the premiership for several weeks.
Hoffman of the Cubs, and Wheat of
Brooklyn are also well up among the hit
ters of the old league. Larry McLean,
the former Portland catcher, continues to
hit at a goodly mark, and is also among
the leading batsmen of the old circuit.
The averages of the National Leaguer
players up to a recent date are as fol
lows: BATTING AVERAGE.
Player 4'lub. G AB R H SB SH
Snodgrass, N.Y.20
Paskert. Cln...3i
Magee. Phlla...46
Hofman, Chi... .18
Wheat, Byn...48
Ewlng, Phila..l0
Campbell, Pgh.30
Crandall, N. Y.ll
Beaumont, Chi. 29
Math'ws'n. N.Y.13
Zim'rman. Chi. 26
Graham, Bstn. .44
Chance. Chi.... 1.1
McLean, cin..40
I.eincld. Pgh...ia
Bescher, Cin...40
Hoblitzel. Cln..4.1
Bvrne. Pgh....44
Devore, N. Y. . .44
Shean, Bstn... .44
Phelps. St. L..3U
Hummel, Bkyn.4
Mitchell, Cin...40
Downey. Cin...4l
Konetchy. St.L.44
Grant. Phlla. .46
Evers. Chi. . . ..15
Hiilswltt, St. L2B
Corridon. St.L 10
Bates. Phl'.a. 46
Corridan. St.L 10
L. Dcyle, N.Y 45
Lobert. Cin. . 37
Fletcher, N. Y.15
Archer. Chi... 26
41
115 IS
140 .11
12.-.
188
27
119
9
70
37
74
117
114
138
16
181
1 80
175
18
42
54
44
64
9
13 33
0 :i
1(10 38
147 16
113
180
171
140
158
18.1
129
61
IS
176
18
177
124
40
78
116
151
23
163
184
85
114
162
164
184
148
148
24
12
129
154
163
1 55
176
185
.40 144
.16 41
58
8
9
6
Daubert. Bkyn48 171 22
Seymour, N.Y.47 183 1
Davidson, Bkn.15 116
Meyers. n.Y..o
Bridwell. N.Y.43
Mclntyre, Chl.lO
.1. Miller. Pish 44
Huggins. St.L.48
McCute. Cln..l3
R. Miller. Bos. 31
Herzog, Bos.. 47
Oakes. St. - L. .43
Beck. Boston.. 50
Merkle. N.Y. .45
Sharpe, Bos... 39
Willis. St. L..12
Wilhelm. Bn-.IO
Sheckard. Chi. 37
Knabe. Phila. .42
Wagrer. Pitts. 44
Tinker, Chi... 43
Scliulte. Chi... 46
Murray. N.Y..4S
Ellis. St. I...
Moran. Phlla
Bresnahan. SL 20
28 49
15 34
3 11
1
46
49
:i
31
40
2 6
13 43
33 48
3 9
4 29
17 41
21 41
16 46
21 87
13 37
4
-2 3
17 3
16
10
21
AB R H SB SH AV
168 19 69 5 4 .411
201 41 78 30 6 .888
35 7 12 2 .343
39 3 1.1 o 0 .333
1S2 28 57 11 7 .313
175 22 54 5 8 .SOS
179 81 65 10 7 .307
60 3 18 4 2 .SOC
118 1U 35 3 7 .297
160 21 . 47 3 9 .294
160 6 47 8 7 .294
198 26 - 68 11 .8 .293
35 4 10 0 0 .286
56 6 16 1 1 .286
28 S 8 1 0 .286
30 4 11 1 1 .282
31 4 9 0 3 .281
32 5 9 0 2 .281
192 1.1 54 7 2 .281
111 29 31 S 1 .279
150 19 44 5 6 .277
138 21 38 6 7 .275
164 22 45 6 5 .274
161 17 41 3 9 .272
184 44 BO 16 15 .272
125 15 34 1 6 .272
191 83 62 27 6 .272
204 17 55 11 12 .270
204 24 55 6 8 .270
156 14 42 4 6 .269
162 13 43 5 4 .265
175 26 46 7 4 .203
161 22 42 6 10 .261
192 I 33 SO 10 3 .260
28 2 7 1 1 .25
. 32 , 1 8 3 0 .254)
61 5 15 2 1 .246
15U 13 89 .1 5 .246
156 18 38 6 4 .244
43 4 11 1 0 .44
185 20 45 5 3 .243
66 4 16 2 3 .242
1HO 23 43 10 11 .289
147 20 85 11 lo .238
178 21 42 7 9 .236
65 7 13 3 3 .236
179 16 42 10 5 .235
64 8 15 4 3 .23.1
30 3 7 0 2 .233
138 IS 31 12 6 .233
129 14 30 1 10 .233
164 7 38 2 6 .232
91 11 21 2 2 .231
139 12 32 9 .1 .230
01 7 .14 1 2 .230
00 8 22 3 3 .229
101 14 2.1 1 1 .228
172 24 39 11 1 .227
124 9 28 5 13 .226
173 15 89 2 8 .225
67 4 15 0 2 .224
54 3 12 1 .222
27 3 6 0 .222
63 8 14 0 2 .222
158 25 35 8 3 .222
163 18 36 41 6 .221
41 2 9 1 0 .219
182 30 41 13 6 .218
, 97 13 21 6 5 .210
93 30 20 4 8 .215
145 18 .11 9 6 - .214
94 10 20 2 0 .213
19 1 4 0 0 .211
171 11 36 9 2 .211
141 12 29 5 7 .206
113 11 2.1 3 4 .204
30 2 S 0 1 .20
Leach. Pitts. .38 125
Smith. Boston. 30 07
Steinfeldt. Chi. 26 160
Zaoker. St.L. . 19 63
Devlin. N. Y..4S HU
McElveen. Bn.20 68
Bronsneld. P. 39 143 .
Mowrey. St. L.38 12-
Egan. Cln 46 l-
Collins. Bos... 50 18
Erwln. Brook. 2 1 76
T. Smith. Brk.30 81
Rowan, cin...t
C. Brown. Bos.. 14
Ames. N. Y - l
I Kt. 1 1 3
Wilson, Pitts.. 37 124
Evans. St. L. .47 160
ti,. Thlla...33 131
Clarke. Pitts. .43 151
38
43
28 45
29 35
2 10
6 14
13 80
4 16
26 88
5 3 5
22 38
2 16
33
L'8
6
21
16
11
3
0
8
O
1
O
3
1
8
2
4)
23
9
10
13
4
5
4
10
7
3
13
6
0
15
0
6
13
4
2
6
6
lO
3
3
0
6
7
o
6
5
5
4
8
2
0
0
5
8 6
44) 10
23
12
24
37
30
43
53
47
43
.1.1
62
4U
40
45
52
36
17
5
49
18
23
17
6
8
2
3
7
ij
6
"4
88 15
42 9
37 3
16 2
6
4
5
6
24
2
3
lO
8
4
3
6
0
4
2
1
2
3
1
5
2
6
5
2
5
7
6
6
6
7
3
0
0
5
0
4
8
O
4
14
5
3
4
7
1
6
7
5
10
6
4
11
10
2
2
10
11
6
lO
9
7
:
1
8
6
2
11
.1
1
8
1
13
9
AV
.439
.305
.3H3
.3.2
.340
.:;:-.3
.333
.3:mi
.329
.324
.324
.316
.3111
.312
.312
.SOU
.34)41
.8413
.2!4
.29.1
.292
.2MI
.287
.286
.2K.-,
.2K4
.279
.279
.278
.'-78
.278
18 34
26 28
15 32
Sweeney. Bos. 54 J4, jo o.
Houser.St. L. .37 114 10 24
Luderus. Chi.. 16 43 3 9
r,i Thlla..36 115 8 24
R.k'r. N. Y..24) 20
' Pitts... 36 13 lO 26
Vlvnn.
T. tlarke. Cln.lo
Walsh. Phlla. .23
4
14
1
3
O
0
s
4
o
10
11
4
1
4
6
1
4
.24-.rt
.24i!
.268
.267
.267
.265
.261
i26l
.26L
.257
.254
.253
.254)
.250
.250
.250
.2.-.0
,2uO
.248
.247
.245
.245
.244
.24
.243
.243
.24 1
.240
-239
.238
.238
.216
.235
.231
.23)
.2.14)
.2--7
.224
.222
j.222
1577
.214
.214
.213
.213
.212
.212
.210
.209
.208
.204)
.204)
.200
.2410
A. C.
SELECTS NEW COACH
DEVLIN PUNCHES WRONG MAN?
Ball Player Sued by Man He Hit and
Is Suspended. '
NEW YORK. June 25. Arthur Devlin
has been Indefinitely suspended from
the New York Nationals by President
Lynch for his attack on a spectator in
George Schlldmiller, of Dartmouth,
Replaces Sol Metxger.
OREGON AGRICULTURAL COL
LEGE. Corvallis. Or., June 25. (Spe
cial.) George Schildmiller, of Dart,
mouth, and last year head coach of the
University of Maine, has been selected
as coach of the Oregon Agricultural
College football team for the coming
season. Mr. Schlldmiller played four
years on the Andover team before en
tering Dartmouth, where he was a
member of the football team at that
school for three, years, and was the
choice of all critics for a place on the
AU-American team. Mr. Schildmiller
played an end position and was cap
tain of the Dartmouth team during his
senior year. While coach of the Uni
versity of Maine football last year his
team went through the season with but
two defeats.
With the major part of the men
developed by Metzger returning to col
lege in September, the O. A. C. football
season has begun to assume champion
ship proportions.
FIELDER JONES AND TEAM LOSE
Chehalls Gives Way to Montesano in
Fast S-to-2 Contest.
MONTESANO. Wash., June 23. (Spe
cial ) Montesano won from Chehalis by
bunching hits off Callahan in the secnd
Inning. Studer held the farmers safe the
rest of the game.
Guln pitched what might have been a
shut-out game, but a hit by Fielder
Jones and a couple of errors gave Che
halls two runs in the eighth. The game
was an exciting one all through. The
score
R.H.E-I R.H.E.
CrieTialis : 2 7 6;Montesano ....3 7 i
Batteries Callahan. Studer and . Mc
Brlde; Guin and Moore.
The water in Lake Van. in Asiatic Tur
key, about 6 miles long by from 20 to 30
wide, is so strongly Impregnated with potash,
that the residents along Its shores use It to
-wash clothing without the use of soap.
1