The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, May 22, 1910, Page 3, Image 3

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    THE SUNDAY OREGONIAN, PORTLAND, MAY 22, 1910.
GLAFIK WOULD OPEN
WOOLEN SCHEDULE
MOST PROMINENT FIGURE IN THEATERDOM TODAY IS
"BREEZY WESTERN DIPLOMAT." AS STYLED BY RIALTO.
Hew Idea
Patterns
10c
All Styles and Sizes
ew Idea
Magazine
10c
Price, 50c a Year
Pledge Against Further Demo
cratic "Tinkering" Offered
by Leader.
The Most in Value, The Best in Quality
Prices Have Been Cut to Vanishing Point in This Mighty Trade-Winning IE vent
R)SS FAVORS COMMISSION
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In Maiden Speech, New Member At
tacks Payne-Aldrich Bill Non
Partisan Board to Report to
Congress Demanded.
WASHINGTON. May 21. Continuing
the debate upon the tariff, with the
sundry civil bill nominally the subject
under consideration. Champ Clark, mi
nority leader, and Eugene N. Foss, new
ly elected Democratic Representative
from Massachusetts, made radical at
tacks upon the present tariff.
Clark said in conclusion that he had
a proposal to make to the Republicans.
It was that if a bill proposing substan
tial reductions in the woolen goods ,
aoneauie were onerea, ne wouaa givo
bond that every Democrat would vote
for It without offering an amendment
of any sort.
Clark called attention to what he
called Inconsistency In President Taft's
utterances. He said:
"I wish to call attention to the fact
that the President said, on August 6,
1S08, that 'the bill la not a perfect bill
T a complete compliance with the
promises made prior to the election of
1908.'
Taft's Popularity Hurt?
'In September, 1909, the President
went on an extensive speech-making
tour, beginning with a speech In Bos
ton, In which he eulogized Sen
ator Aldrich, to the skies. That
was the first serious wound which
the President inflicted upon his own
popularity, for right or wrong, and I
think right, the American people hold
Senator Aldrich largely responsible for
the enormity of the Payne-Aldrich
tariff bill. On the 17th of September,
1909, the President said in Winona,
Minn.: 'On the whole, however, I am
bound to say that I think the Payne
tariff bill is the best tariff bill that
the Republican party ever passed.'
"When the American people read that
declaration the next morning and remem
bered the utterance which I have quoted
from the President's statement of August
6. they wondered what change had come
over the spirit of his dream. They could
not reconcile the two statements. They
knew that the tariff bill had not changed
aince August 6, 1909, and they marveled
as to how a bill, which the President de
clared on that day to be neither a per
fect bill nor a complete compliance with
the promises made, could on the 17th day
of September be the best tariff bill that
the Republican party ever passed. All
the perfumes of 'Araby the Bleat' cannot
sweeten the Payne-Aldrich tariff bill to
please the dainty nostrils of the people.
They believe it to be the worst tariff bill
ever passed by the American Congress.
That speech was the serious wound num
ber two, which the President Inflicted on
his own popularity."
Sugar Reduction Small. '
Clark attacked the sugar schedules
of the Payne-Aldrich tariff law and
ridiculed Republican tariff on refined
sugar. The reduction, he said, was so
small that every man with common
sense knew that the consumer never
would be benefitted by it In any way
whatsoever. Clark declared that the
Payne tariff had not reduced the price
of clothing, but had Increased It and
resulted in a shoddier class of goods.
Foss said that the people were de
manding protection, but It was pro
. tectlon against the Payne-Aldrich bill
they wanted. He favored a tariff com
mission, provided it were a non-partisan
one. Declaring that a commission
should report to Congress and not to
the President, Mr. Foss demanded:
"Why does the Administration seek to
be solicitous that this small body be
absolutely under the control of the
executive, seeing that It Is primarily
Intended for legislative purposes. Is
there an ulterior motive?
"If the commission Is to be merely
an executive Instrument and report
only to the President, how is Con
gress to receive the Information, ex
cepting that which the President may
wish to transmit It. and what is to
prevent the executive department from
withholding or suppressing or coloring
such information as has more than
once been done heretofore?
"I recognize that the people have
lost confidence In the Republican party
and that they are - no longer looking
to them for an honest revision. The
people have turned to the Democratic
party. Now the responsibility of an
honest revision of the tariff is up to
the Democratic party with the aid of
the Insurgent and such Independent
elements as will ally themselves with
us.
Reduction Is Demanded.
"The people demand that the revision
and reduction of the tariff be carried
out by the Democratic party as soon
as the new Congress can convene. The
Democratic party ought to raise the
issue that there shall be an extra ses
sion next Spring to do the work which
Congress has proved faithless to. The
people have made the immediate re
duction of the tariff the issue and the
Democratic party must pledge itself
in a most distinct and specific way to
carry out this course; in order that the
mandate shall 'be a compelling one:
that the victory shall be so complete
that the Republican executive will be
forced to acquiesce in it and call Con
gress together."
Mr. Foss declared that the rallying
cry shall be made "Free wool and cheap
clothing."
"Today," he said, "millions of our
people are deprived of comfort and
health and even of life by the so-called
protective tariff on wool and woolens
for the benefit of the sheep ranchers
and woolen trusts."
Mr. Foss declared for lower duties on
sugar and said the people were de
manding further reductions in iron and
steel.
Upholding the Republican party as
the ardent and consistent champion of
the protection of American industries
and American labor, Crumpacker, of
Indiana, urged the proposed appropria
tion of J250.000 for extending the work
of the tariff board in obtaining infor
mation. "The only fear the country's Indus
tries need entertain," said he, "Is the
Democratic party with its fatuous ad
vocacy of Its grotesque tariff for rev
enue only policy."
T
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1
JOHN COKT, OF SEATTLE.
GORT BRIGHT STAR
New York Theaterdom Anx
iously Watches Westerner.
PACIFIC COAST BENEFITS
Best Plays Produced to Come West
With Completion of Now Famous
Rebellion of 1000 Theater
Owners Over Country.
(Continued From First Page.)
Botha Will Form Cabinet.
CAPE TOWN, Cape Colony, May 21.
General Louis Botha, Premier of the
Transvaal, has been summoned to form
the first Union Ministry Cabinet of
United South Africa, of which Viscount
Gladstone is the first Governor-General.
The trouble is they want more than a
fair chance."
"The syndicate has some mighty good
plays," added Mr. Cort, "they should be
seen by our audiences, and I hope they
will be. But there are also many excel
lent shows put out by the Shuberts.
Why should these be kept from our
patrons simply because there is a fight
on between two organizations?
"The newspapers and the public were
both clamoring for these independent
attractions, and the only way we could
play them was to organize Independ
ently. The past season was a disas
trous one for many of the circuits, and
most of us decided that it was about
time that Erlanger fought his own bat
tle with the Shuberts. We, as theater
owners, were not interested in this fac
tional warfare, but for years we have
been used as ammunition by the syndi
cate. "I am thoroughly satisfied with th
outlook for next season," said Mr. Cort
In conclusion. "We managers are go
ing to get a run for our money, and
the theater-goers will get a run for
theirs. And the Pacific Coast will have
a chance to see the plays that have
made New York famous, and not the
cast-off scraps of the syndicate's
table."
In theatrical circles they - are still
talking In hushed whispers of how
Cort, single-handed. . started., and won
his famous revolution. When he came
to New York, a few weeks ago, the
general Impression was that the West
erner had arrived to receive his book
ings for next season.
"Dead Ones" Reported Displayed.
The story is that Erlanger spread out
to Cort's horrified gaze a list of "dead
ones," and told him that they were
intended for the entertainment of Pa
cific Coast and Northwest patrons.
"There is one play that might do,"
Cort remarked after a careful survey of
the outfit. "And this drama lsn t bad.
1 although we had it last season. But
the rest! Why, I couldn t sit through
them myself without shedding tears,
And they are supposed to be comedies."
Erlanger assumed his justly celebrat
ed Napoleonic attitude. One might
have expected that he was about to
summon the "Old Guard."
"Take what I give you, or take
nothing," he decreed.
"By George, I believe I will take
everything," Cort is reported to have
replied, and the rebellion had started.
The Shuberts received the "rebel'
with open arms. In a day or so the Na
tional Theater Owners' Association
was formed, and the newspapers sat up
and took notice. Then came a striking
illustration or WeBtern diplomacy."
There Is an organization In town
known as the Producing Managers'
Association. It is, or rather was. doin
inated by the syndicate. The members
held a meeting a few days ago, and the
National Theater Owners' Association,
in writing, "humbly craved" a confer
ence.
The syndicate leaders believed that
Cort was trying to sue for terms, and
agreed to a conference on a later date.
After this action had been taken be
yond recall, it suddenly struck the
"Producers" that they had formally
recognizee: tne existence of an organi
zation that Erlanger said did not exist
So the syndicate managers all resigned
irom tne rroaucers. ' Later the Pro
ducers "expelled" the syndicate man
agers. Then Cort took all the .wind out of
the syndicate's sails by announcing that
he would book: any and all shows that
came along, provided they were good.
"Cort is bound hand and foot to the
Shuberts," Klaw & Erlanger walled.
To which Cort replied, "Send Along
your money-makers, and I will give
you as good terms as you extorted from
me for punk shows last year.
More 'Flop-Overs' Expected.
Even the managers who are sup
posed to be on the inside with the
syndicate, do not like the outlook.
Their territory, by Klaw & ErlangerS
edict, practically ends at the Missouri
River.. The bulk of the one-night
stands have slipped away, and one-
night stands , are mighty valuable
things to have. Several of these un
fortunate producers, fearing that next
season will wipe them out, are nego
tiating in secret, and it would not
be surprising to hear of more flops.
The list of attractions that is going
to the Far West has not yet been ar
ranged. But this sums up the situa
tion.
The Pacific Coast next season will
see the best shows in its history. The
fchuberts are going to send their stars
out West, and backed by strong com
panies, x ney nave got .to make good.
ana tney realize it. For the -."Cort Re
bellion," as it is called on the Great
White Way, has raised the greatest
rumpus in theatrical history. . .
over at Klaw & Erlanger's office
they "have nothing to say" regarding
plans for the Pacific Coast. Even
Press Agent John Murray has aban
doned his official manifestos attacking
For what is the use of savin ar that
certain man will not let von swim
wiien an me rime ne is calling:
-x,ome on in. The Pacific Coast
water is line.
CLARA MORRIS SINKING
Doctor Doubts Recovery of Health.
. Will Remain Blind.
NEW YORK, May 21. Clara Morris.
the former actress, had a severe sink
ing spell yesterday, and her condition
last night was reported critical.
The physician in attendance at her
home in Yonkers says no hope remains
that she will regain her sight and he is
doubtful of her recovery. .
TEN ACRES AND LIBERTY
Hovenden Acres, the old Hovenden
homestead, will be put on the market
June 1, by the Union Bank & Trust
Company, in ten-acre tracts.
Children
Especially
Like
The sweet, "toastie"
flavour of
Post
Toasties
Crisp, fluffy bits of
perfectly ripe white
corn -a o o k e d, rolled
and then toasted to an
appetizing brown.
Served with cream and
sometimes fruit, this
dainty food pleases the
whole family.
Give the home-folks
a treat.
"The Memory Lingers"
POSTITM CEREAL, COMPAJfT, Ltd.;
' Battle Creek. Mich.
A Triumph in Bargain Offerings
An annual challenge sale that will silence all competition absolutely during the week in which
this banner of wondrously low prices is unfurled. Not in the past and not in the future will such
extraordinary values be presented as those embraced in the stock concerned in this sale. Space
will not permit the listing here of a hundredth part of the offerings ; those we mention simply
indicate the savings. If you have present or future needs unfilled, prepare to fill them now. Do
not linger on the threshold, for the door of your greatest opportunity opens wide Monday morning.
U II m I m m mm
nit IDepartiii'iit OTiallenge
ale deductions
Our Cloak and Suit Department will be an active participant in this great June sale. The wonderful bargains described
below indicate our earnest endeavor to make this the greatest June sale we have ever had. Big reductions well worth
- taking advantage of are to be found in all manner of wearing appareL Take our suit offering as an illustration fifteen-dollar
suits without their equal at the price, stylish to an exceptional degree, perfectly tailored and of first quality
materials throughout, tailored coats in several styles, but only the .season's latest; pleated skirts; fab- fl 1 C flfl
rics are plain and striped serges, panamas and cheviot suitings, black and all colors, dark and light p JL O V v
Pongee Coats at $15.00
For a Summer Coat, what could be better f Made of a fine
quality natural pongee coating, full length, and semi-fit-
, ting, collar and cuffs of satin, in. black or a rich shade of
blue, with buttons to match. You will be highly pleased
with these stylish-appearing Coats. tf f f
$22.50 values J JLO.UU
Linen Suits .at
Stylish Suits of pure linen in the natural color; tailored coat,
three-quarter length, semi-fitting and pearl buttons, pleat
ed skirts. The ideal Summer garment, cool, Q f
comfortable, serviceable. Extra good value J O
j .Dress Skirts at $54:.U
Stylish Dress bkirts ot .Head's ocean serge, in black, navy,
brown and cream, tailored in the very latest rf A
pleated effects. Special value . PTTwOvJ
Silk Petticoats at $3.90
A Petticoat of fine quality silk taffeta, very stylish in ap
pearance, deep circular flounce finished with straps, corded,
and stitched ruffle, underlay and dust ruf- tf O Q f
fie of taffeta. $5.50 regular price, special P j J
Sydegrade Sateen Petticoats
A nice-appearing and strongly made Petticoat of first quality
hydegrade sateen, deep circular flounce with three rows of
cording, straps and stitched ruffle, underlay
and dust ruffle of same material. Sale price
Long Kimonos at $1.12
Long Kimonos of Japanese crepe in red, pink, lavender and
blue backgrounds, many different Oriental designs, in
variegated colors, full length, long sleeves and tueked
yoke, edging to match. Special reduction
$1.50
for tomorrow
$1.12
Challenge Sale Muslin Under w'r
Extraordinary purchasing opportunities have brought us the best values we have ver shown. Yet,
while the quantities are large and prices extremely low, that is not the only argument we use to
bring you to the sale. We wish rather to lay emphasis on the excellence of the materials and trim
mings, the beautiful workmanship and the good, generous sizes. Women who appreciate dainty gar
ments will be particularly pleased with this showing, and the prices are so low as to interest the
most economical Each garment represents the best possible value at the price.
Corset Covers at 59 Cents
These fine Corset Covers are made of good qual
ity nainsook' or crossbar dimity, and are dain
tily trimmed with pretty embroideries, laces
and ribbons. . A large assortment of these
dainty garments to select from. They are well
made and neatly finished, and are best values
to $1.00, Challenge Sale gA
price O 7 C
Muslin Drawers at 68 Cents
The Drawers are made of fine quality cambric or
nainsook, and are daintily trimmed with em
broideries and laces; they come in the wide cir
cular style or the regular width, and are ex
cellent $1.00 and $1.25 values, Q
Challenge Sale price O O C
Muslin Skirts at $1.18
A fine showing of lace and embroidery Skirts,
made of good quality cambric, with embroidery
insertion and deep flounce to match; other
styles have rows of fine Val. or Torchon lace
insertion, with ruffle to match; all are made
very full and finished with cambric dust ruffle
and underpieee. Challenge Sale tf 1 1 Q
Price iPialO
Children's Dresses at $1.25
An especially fine offering of a fine line of
children's Dresses, made of good quality lawn,
nainsook, or striped dimity, and shown in sizes
for children up to 3 years of age. All these
little garments are extra well made and prettily
trimmed with laces and em- tf -m y
broideries. Challenge Sale price X mmW 3
Muslin Gowns, Challenge Sale Price at 95 Cents
A great assortment of pretty muslin Gowns of fine quality muslins and neatly trimmed with pretty
embroideries and laces ; tney come in all styles, and are dainty, serviceable garments. p" .
Regular $1.25 values, Challenge Sale price iO C Challenge Sale Prices
Ih ils Tiff 5&Vv?? 4 4
1 3 to 4-inch Embroideries, lOo kind,
price, yard
2 2 to 5-in. Embroideries, 121fec kind,
price, yard
3 2 to 10-inch Embroideries, 21c kind,
price, yard
to 14-inch Embroideries, 35c kind,
price, yard
5 5 to 18-inch Embroideries, 45c kind,
price, yard
at Half Price
The story for tomorrow Monday is of exceptional values, al
most sensational. Hundreds and hundreds of yards, our own direct
importation from one of the most noted manufacturers of St. Gall the dain
tiest, prettiest Embroideries you'd wish to see. The assortment far exceeds in
variety of designs any previous showinj. The effects are beautiful. Included
are the smartest newest things in cambric, nainsook and Swiss. THE PRICES
INSURE CONSIDERABLE SAVING. ,
o 12 to 18-in. Embroideries, 60c kind, May Sale r
price, yard 4 O C
7 Full 18-inch Embroideries, 65c kind, May SaleO O
price, yard 3t3C
8 Full 18-inch Embroideries, 85c kind, May Sale O Q
price, yard C
9 Full 27-in Embroideries, $1.25 kind, May Sale. J-
price, yard OOC
10 27 to 52-inch Embroideries, $2.50 kind, May r r
Sale price, yard y J
May Sale J
May Sale r-T
c
May Sale Q
May Sale p
May Sale
20c
Yd
Natural and Colored
Pongees 13 Ofi
27-INCH AND YARD-WIDE PONGEE
SILKS IN NATURAL AND COL
ORS, SHOWN IN ALL THE POPU
LAR WEAVES, REGULAR $1 AND
$1.25 GRADES, AT i...
There is not another silk offering in the city that compares with this
one. The hundreds of yards we have sold and the continual re-orders
from former purchasers are the best evidence of the popularity of
these pongees. They are all silk, full width, heavy, rich, lustrous, and
just the silks for stylish suits, coats and waists; these weaves to
choose from: Chefu Pongee in natural color, full 36 inches wide; 27
inch real Shantung Pongee in natural color; 27-inch Ottoman Cords
and Coating Pongees in natural color; 27-inch plain Tussah and Chefu
Pongees in natural color; 27-inch Cloth of Gold; 27-inch Tussah Pop
lin, with satin coin dots, in all the popular new colors; 27-inch Tokio
Rough Pongees in the new shade's; real Rajah Pongees in beautiful
shades. When you know how handsome these silks are, how well they
wear and that they do not wrinkle, you will appreciate this y JF
bargain. Real $1.00 and $1.25 Silks, Challenge Sale price. . DC
REAL ?1.25 FOULARD SDLKS ON SALE AT 79 A YARD
A great special sale of Cheney Bros.' celebrated "Shedwater' spot
proof Foulard Silks; included are all the latest and best designs in
new colorings, neat small patterns, polkadots, rings, small figures, etc.
All bright, new silks,-made to sell regularly at $1.25 a yard, are priced
for this sale at SEVENTY-NINE CENTS
A Challenge Sale on
Men's Wear
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS, BEST $1.50 VALUES AT 95
An extra special offering of men's Dress Shirts, made of high-grade
material and shown coat style, with cuff attached ; they come in 40
different patterns and colorings in light, medium and X
dark, all sizes. Best $1.50 values, Challenge Sale price.. J3C
NEGLIGEE SHIRTS, BEST $1.00 VALUES S5
An extra big special of men's Negligee Shirts, made of excellent qual
ity mercerized material, with soft button-down collar and faced
sleeves; they are shown in plain tan, cream or white, and are pood
custom-made Shirts that wear fine. Best $1.00 vaiues, Q
Challenge Sale price Q C
MEN'S SHIRTS.. VALUES TO $1.00, 63
A great assortment of men's Shirts, madewith fine fancy mercerized
bosom, with plain body to match; also fancy percale and plain
white madras, with pleated bosom; all of the very choicest pat
terns) and good values to $1.00, Challenge Sale Q
price 03 C
MEN'S UNDERWEAR, GOOD 50c VALUES, 39
A sale of men 's jersey and ribbed balbriggan shirts and drawers, made
of excellent quality material and are very elastic ; high-grade, form
fitting underwear that sells regularly at 50c a Jarment, O f
Challenge Sale price J