The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, April 24, 1910, SECTION FIVE, Page 3, Image 63

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    THE SUNDATOEEGOMAX, PORTLAND, APRIL 24, 1910
3
MRICAN GIRLJ' SOCIAL ACCESS
N ENGLAND
Quick Wit and Adaptability to
Circumstances Enable Them
to Win Constant Admiration
V. B : :.
pr . i u,t I
, 1 I ; - J' t
w; w - rut , tj4v; I " i
- A v s.. v-Vs-
' " - f sa I I . v kC
4 , - - vt v4 I a . i , s,
-aV$ v I ; " If" f i I
.1 K " r-xt''"
k $rt ' . x:r" ,vr
x Ik -if 'rtfeifyt' - -W 4 If
IN BIARRITZ, tiio otlier iay, a sunny
to--n In the south of FYancp, -vi-here
IClng Ed-ward of England has been
pending a few weeks, some one heard
his Royal Majesty pensively 'wish hat
Consuelo, rowager Duchess of Manches
ter, could bo recalled to life.
King Edward was In a lonely rnood. A
slight cold had made him uncomfortable-,
and It was no more than natural that ha
HhOUld Wish azaln in rhnt f i t Vic wnm.
j an who, during her life, he had. many
turoa owjd ol as oeing xne possessor oi
"one of the quickest wits in England."
The Dowager Duohess of Manchester
was an American girl. The quick wit and
ready tongue that are the American girls
birthright were hers.
With. King Edward she had always been
a favorite. She waa foremost among
American women abroad, and her charm
ing personality won her the highest social
position As Miss Tznaga, she was one- of
the most beautiful girls in New Orleans,
and warmly regarded for her charms of
character.
King Edward, as Prince of Wales, was
one of her warmest personal friends, and
he was frequently a visitor at Sandring
ham Palace, During her illness King Ed
ward was one of the first to make in
quiries as to her condition
Many times since her death the King
has spoken of her, ad referred to her
brilliant conversational powers and at
tractive manners.
It is Just such characteristics as were
possessed by the Dowager Duchess of
Manchester that form the secret of the
American girl's popularity in England.
The daughters of no other nation are
received in London with sixsh popularity
as the bright, young women from this
country. The quick wit and the adapta
bility to circumstances of the American
girl are the reasons for her social suc
cess. A striking example of the' American
girl's power to adapt herself to circum
stances and surroundings is to be found
In 'the case of the present Ducliess of
Manchester, who was formerly Miss Hel
en Zimmerman, of Cincinnati, the daugh
ter of Eugene Zimmerman. The present
Duchess of Manchester is scarcely less
popular than was the Dowager Duchess.
She has entertained His Majesfy at din
ner several times and on one occasion
wu hostess to both the King of Spain and
the King of England.
The success of the Duchess of Manches
ter SX hostess Of tllA Klnc is fill tllo mnr.
remarkable because of her early life,
which was eimple and far removed from
that of courts.
She did not belong to th Astor and
..Vanderbilt set, and haughty New Yorkers
never supposed she would ever achieve
her present social popularity.
The transformation from her youthful
surroundings to the splendor of court life
was like an Arabian Nights tale, yet she
adapted herself to the new order of
things, and because of her charm of man
ner Jumped at once to popularity.
Consuelo, Duchess of Marlborough, is a
great favorite with England"s Queen. This
beautiful American girl, who was Con
suelo Vanderbilt, was chosen by Queen
Alexandra as one of her attendants, at
her coronation, thereby arousing the en
mity of many of England's peeresses.
Several Duchesses .were much affronted
because their claims were overlooked.
The Duchess of Marlborough Is tall and
slender, pretty and quick witted. During
late years, though much sought after, she
has gone in for a quiet life and avoided
society as much as possible.
King Edward stayed at Blenheim and
stood sponsor for her eldest son. Lord
Blanford, and was many times a guest at
Sunderland House-
The Duchess of Roxburghe, formerly
May Goelet, of New York, for some rea
son known only to herself, has practically
given up her social life, though she is
counted one of the most popular women
in London. In recent months she has de
voted her time to charitable enterprises,
and spends days in planning bazaars and
visiting the poor. She is persona grata
with Queen Alexandra and her course
has astounded British, and American so
ciety. About three years ago it was thought
that the Duchess of Roxburghe was to
become a social leader. She has been re
ceived with marked favor at court, and
has but one rival, the Duchess of Man
chester. She entertained lavishly at that time,
and received the Prince and Princess of
Wales In the splendid old Castle of Floors.
Later she played hostess to the King and
Queen, and the attention paid her by His
Majesty was much remarked.
The Duchess of Roxburghe has the
charming winning manner that most
American girls possess. She speaks in
tones that are soft and low, with a most
delicate pronunciation, and is absolucely
free of arrogance.
Lady Arthur Paget, who was Minnie
Stevens, of New Pork, is counted as an
other of the popular women in English
society. She is a favorite with the King,
and with Queen Alexandra.
Amorican girls are gayer and more in
dependent in their "teens" than English
gtrls are at the same age. An English
woman recently told the whole story in
a nutshell when bewailing the fact that
some of the best parties in England were
being captured by American women. Her
advice was:
"Why do not English parents, instead
of cramming their girls with aceomp'ish
ments for which they very likely have no
aptitude, try to teach them that best
of all qualities in a wife, adaptability.
Then perhaps the plums of the matrimo
nial market might occasionally fall to
English belles instead of almost invari
ably to their more 'cute' and decidedly
quicker witted' American cousins."
'con men Work new york
Broadway Sports Taken in on
"Tickets to Big Klglit."
NEW YORK. April 23. A gang of
slick confidence men is working Broad
way and the sporting resorts selling
"tickets of admission" to the great arena
in which the Jeffries-Johnson fight will
take place next Independence day. It is
said that this gang has disposed of
hundreds of tickets at prices ranging all
the way from $10 to $100. and also has
sold transportation between New York
and San Francisco.
These tickets are worthless, and the
gang is believed to have cleaned up a
large sum during the few days it lias
been at work. There are some genuine
tickets for sale, and expensive arrange
ments for luxurious transportation to
the Golden City can be made through
the Gleason-Rickard interests and their
representatives. But most of the tickets
which guileless and unsuspecting "sports"
have sunk their money in. along the
Night-Light Alley will prove to be worth
no more than the paper they are
printed on.
The tip went along the line to beware
of the smooth-spoken, well-dressed chap
with a breezy. Western manner, who
might approach one with the proposi
tion to sell admission and transportation
to the fight. Sometimes he is a "duly
accredited representative" of somebody
or other who has something of other to
do with the fight, and then again he is
"a gentleman in distress" who becanse
he cannot get away in July, having to
go to Europe or some other confounded
place, would like to dispose of the ticket
and transportation he has brought with
him from San Francisco. The corridors
of the Broadway hotels and the cafes
and restaurants have also been visited by
this gentry.
Owing: to the depression in the cotton
trade the skating rinks at Burnley, which
at one period of the boom drew $5000
weekly, are being leas extensively patron
ized and three of the smaller ones hav
had to close their doors.
SDAY
BAY and'TUE
SPECIAL. SALE at
THE OWL, DRUG CO
Certainly there is something in this list that you reed, or something you are particularly anxious to have, or
that is especially attractive on account of the low price that is quoted for Monday and Tuesday. It
best to bring this list, select what you wish and observe the saving in price.
somethin
would be
Plasters.
Others
Price.
ALmazoin 50c
Angier's Emulsion. .$1.00
Antiphlogistine 50c
Apenta Water 35c
Ayer's Sarsaparilla. .$1.00
Native Herb Tablets. $1.00
Canthrox 50c
Carter's Pills 25c
Celestine Vichy 35c
Cooper's Discovery. .$1.00
Cuticura Ointment 50c
Danderine ' 50c
D. D. D $1.00
Diamond Dyes. . . , . . 10c
Hood's Sarsaparilla. $1.00
Hunyadi "Water 25c
Brorao Quinine Tblts 25c
Murine 50c
Omega Oil 25c p
Spurmax 50e '
Wampole 's Cod
Liver Oil ; .$1.00
Warner's. Safe Cure.$1.00
Williams' Pink Pills 50c
Zymole Trokej-s 25c.
Calder's Tooth Pow-
der 25c
Euthymol Tooth
fcist c 2oc
Lyon's Tooth Powder 25c
Palm Olive Soap... 10c
Resinol Soap 25c
Sempre Giovine 50c
Pompeiian Cream 50c
Bathasweet ........ 25c
Squibb 's Powder.... 25c
Phosphate of Soda 25c
Boneset. Catnip, llore-
hound, etc 10c
Gum Camphor, per lb 75c
Boric Acid, pound. . . 35c
Owl
Price.
10c
35c
69c
30c
19c
65c
71c
35c
14c
21c
79c
33c
28c
69c
8c
79c
19c
12c
) 35c
17c
35c
69c
-73c
35c
. 13c
14c
12c
14c
7c
19c
29c
31c
15c
15c
11c
4c
50c
17c
LOOK AT THESE RUBBER
GOODS SPECIALS
Here's where you save monev.
3-Quart Tyrian Fountain 1 Ct7
Syringe D
2-Quart Tyrian Fountain f 1 Q Q
Syringe OXOZ7
Rubber Gloves, good value. ..
J-Quart Tyrian Combi- J i no
nation Svringo Di70
2-Quart Tyrian Combi- - Ql
bination Syringe Dliu4
MONDAY AND TUESDAY SPE
CIALS IN CANDY
Dainty sweets at tempting prices.
Delicious Nut Balls, assorted Al
mond, Peanut Cocoanut. etc. These
are regular 60-cent goods. Lb-30
Peanut Butter Chews. One of the
most appetizing candles made. Kat
all you warn. C
Special, per pound ..... ZdC
Toasted Marshmallows, OCI
per pound, special ZOC
BABY RATTLES 15
Just as shown in the
illustration. A regular
25c value. SPE
CIAL FOR.
E:..15c
$1 VAL. BRUSHES 49c
CHICKEN
COCK
WHISKY
Variety of woods, solid
back, excellent values
in hairbrushes. A nft
SPECIAL FOR...H0G
Five years old,
bottled in bond,
aged in wood
and actually
worth I1.25 per
bottle. lyo
Special. . ItlC
TOOTH BRUSH HOLD
ERS 25
Made of celluloid exactly
(ike picture Santtarv and
neat- GOOD "VALUE OC
FOR ZOC
GSOVER WATER
POWER VIBRATOR
The only one of its kind in
the world. Demonstration
continues Monday and
Tuesday. An innovation
in vibratory treatments
well worth your while to
see.
PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES
This is the Kodak season. You
need supplies of all kinds. We han
dle the Eastman full line. Cam
eras, films, plates, plateholders,
mounts, print paper, developing
supplies and all other accessories.
Try our developing and finishing
department at Owl Cut Prices.
Ask for price list.
19c
Postcard
Album
Specials
Cinotrd at
way don n
prices.
Regula r
vals
for.
Regular SOn values, for. ...... .JtO
Regular 75r values, for Ji
Regular $1.00 values, for t!)f
OtberV Oivl
I'riee. Prlt-e.
68c
Peruna $1.00
Swift's Specific, large
size $1.75
Three in One Oil... 25c
Davis' Pain Killer. . 50c
Carlsbad Salt Crys
tals $1.00
Floating Castile Soap Hoc
Packer's Tar Soap.. 25
Listerine ...$1.00
Lesley Talcum ...... 1 5c
Eff. Phosphate Soda. 85c
Compound Licorice
pow., pound....... 50c
Henna Leaves
Tincture Arnica ....
Sulphur and Cream
Tartar
Rochelle Salts
Burton Scalp Tonic.
Pape s Diuretic . . ,
10c
25c
25c
10c
50c
50c
Palmo Tablets 50c
Avers' Sarsaparilla .$1.00
Mothers' Friend $1.00
Glyco Thymoline ... $1.00
Tarrant's Aperient . 50c
Hostetter's Bitters . .$1.00
Mission Olive Cream 50c
Malted Milk, Hos
pital $3.75
Kondon's Jelly 25c
Rexall Mucutone ...$1.00
Capillaris .., 50c
Wash Cloths. 4 for. . 10c
Stuart 's Dyspepsia
Tablets 50c
Marvel Spray Syringe $3.50
Mottled Castile Soap 35c
Emery Boards
Moth Wax, 1 lb ;
violet Ammonia, pr.. Hoc
Straw Hat Cleaner. 25c
10c
10c
$1.20
15c
31c
69c
19c
14c
59c
7c
69c
25c
7c
17c
17c
7c
25c
35c
33c
65c
69c
70c
33c
65c
30c
$2.70
15c
89c
32c
25c
34c
$2.47
14c
1 5c
7c
17c
15c
Meet
Me '
at
the
Owl
Drug
Corner
ORIGINAL CUTRATE DRUGGISTS -PORTLATvm
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND-LOS ANGELES - SEATTLE
North
east Corner
Seventh
and
Washing
ton Sts.
CONCENTRATION OF FACTORIES IS
CAUSE OF EAST SIDE'S CONGESTION
New York Committee Will Recommend Laws Forcing Industrial Plants to Other Sections in Intorest of Masses.
Clean-up of Chinatown Promised by Police, hut People . Are Skeptical.
BY -LLOYD F. LONERGAN.
NEW YORK, April 23. (Special.)
The East Side tenement section will be
cleaned out before long, If the ideas
of certain philanthropists and soci
ologists are adopted by the Legislature.
There Is an organization in- town
known as The Committee on Conges-,
tion of Population. This lias discov
ered that the main cause of the crowd
ing down town is the concentration of
factories.
Workers in these places ha.ve to live
on small pay. They cannot afford to
expend the twenty or thirty cents ,a
day that would take them to comfor
table homes in the suburbs. Also, as
their hours are long, it is impossible
for them to live at any great distance
from their work. 1
Laws tending to force factories away
from old congested sections are to be
urged by interests working for the
masses. The removal of the factories
will be followed promptly by the .de
parture of the workers to the new
scene of activity.
An. effort is also being made to limit
the height of tenement houses, and to
restrict the taking of lodgers by fam
ilies living in small apartments.
Realty interests and philanthropists
who are supporting the measures, have
statistics to show that population con
gestion in Manhattan is causing sick
ness which Involves the city in a loss
of at least $10,000,000 a year. Indi
rectly, of course, this falls on the tax
payers in the end.
Because of the high land values In
Manhattan, an owner, to obtain a fair
value on his holdings. must build
houses of six stories or more. And as
these houses are more expensive to
build every year, the landlord is com
pelled to charge higher rents.
This is forcing population out of
'Manhattan almost as fast as is t. e
rapid expansion of business. Indeed
the rise in land values is due largely
to the spread of business which can
afford to pay higher rentals than can
home tenants.
Tong Murders Arouse Police.
The recent Tong murders in China
town have "stirred up the police" as
usual, and statements are made that
the quarter will be cleaned up. In
spector Daly, who is in charge of the
district. Is announcing that he Intends
to take away all weapons from China
men, and also to close their gambling
houses.
Nobody believes that the police will
ever be able to accomplish anything.
They never have in the past and
Chinatown will probably run along in
its own sweet way, although for a few
weeks it may be quiet.
Nobody has ever been punished for
the murder of Elsie Sigel, or the
slaying of Bow Kum, the pretty little
slave girl. Probably the men who
killed these two women are in New
York to-day. But the police do not
know it, and will never find them.
As to the present Tong- outbreak,
there will be a number of other mur
ders in all probability, and then things
will quiet down for a time. But no
one will be punished by the authorities
of the law.
As one result of the "Chinatown
War," the Chinese theatre in Doyers
street has been closed again. The
present proprietor is Raymond Hitch
cock, the actor, who expected to make
a fortune out of his venture.
But from the day that he went in
business was bad. The Chinese world
not attend, and the rubber neck crowds
have dropped oft lately almost to noth
ing. The future of this temple of
amusement is not known, but some
Chinaman will probably take it over in
a few weeks.
The other class of aliens who have
made much trouble for the police of
late, the Blackhanders, are not in evi
dence of late. This is due to the
severe punishment that was dealt out
to Lupo and his gang, who are now
in Atlanta penitentiary.
Black. Hand Out of Business.
Lupo was generally regarded- as the
head of the "Black Hand" in this coun
try. The police believed that he aided
to kill Detective Petrosino, in Italy.
They were convinced that he was
guilty of the famous "barrel murder"
a decade ago, but could not prove it.
Lupo Is not serving time for either of
these crimes. He is simply a counter
feiter, captured by the United States Se
cret Service agents.
Since Lupo moved to Atlanta for 30
years, the number of Black Hand crimes
has been reduced to practically nothing.
Nobody believes that all the bad Italians
are in jail. The general opinion is that
the fate of Lupo. and a realization of the
fact that the United States Government
is on the job, has caused these outlaws
to decide that the best thing for them to
do at present Is to lie low and say noth
ing. When the Lupo gang were sentenced,
threats were made that Judge Ray, who
presided, would be killed because of his
severity. The Judge laughed, refused to
accept any watchers, and has not had
even an unpleasant letter since.
Athletes Face Severe Penalty.
Recent developments have made many
members of the Military Athletic League
very sorry that they ever became involved
in it.
The M. A. L. is composed of amateur
athletes who are members of the National
Guard. They are. supposed to be governed
by the rules of the A. A. U-, but in ad
dition, they are subjected to military dis
cipline. When Melvin Sheppard was disquali-'
fled at the start of a race, all the
members of the Twenty-second Regi
ment Athletic team struck with him.
Now they are to be disciplined, and
the understanding- is tha they will be
dishonorably discharged from the mil
itia. Everybody admits that they should
be punished either suspended or ex
pelled from the field of amateur ath
letes. But the penalty proposed carries
with it a too severe punishment, for a
"dishonorably discharged" National
Guardsman is placed on the same par
as criminals. He loses his right to
vote. He is barred for life from hold
ing any Civil. Service or Government
position. He Is barred from all armor
ies. National reservations. Government
vessels. Federal buildings, etc. He
is also liable to court-martial, and to
be sentenced to serve a limited term in
the regular Army.
The realization that one hot-headed
action of a foolish boy may brand him
as a criminal for the rest of his life,
has dampened the enthusiasm of many
young men who have considered the
advisability of joining the National
Guard.
The general wave of reform that has
swept over the city of late, has even
involved the Aldermen. This ancient
and more or less honorable body is now
considering the advisability of putting
an end to what is known as the push
cart graft. And this lias been an
Aldermanic perquisite for many years.
At a public hearing held the other
day, citizens advocated a general over
hauling of the system by which
thousands of pushcart men are enabled
to evade regulations.
That there are fraud's in the present
system, is patent to any one who has
made a study of conditions. For in
stance, there are 3S00 licenses In ex
istence, but fully twice that number
of unlicensed carts are on the streets.
Owners of unlicensed carts manage to
avoid arrest by badge and license ex
change. One suggestion made that will prob
ably be adopted is to do away with the
present restriction, and issue a license
to any qualified person who applies.
It is also proposed that each year a
new style of badge be issued, and that
a definite time be set for the issuance
of licenses each year. Also that the
peddlers of foodstuffs use a badge and
license of a" different typo from that of
the merchandise peddler, and that the
Health Department be given a list of
all licenses for its use and inspection.
The charge was openly made that
only men who "stood In" were able to
get licenses at present, and that the
unfortunates who have no licenses are
at the" mercy of the police, who compel
them to pay in graft much more than
several licenses would cost.
Judge Crain, In the Court of Gen
eral Sessions, has put the stamp of
disapproval on what is known as the
"third degree." The outburst came the
other day when Stephen Boehm was
arraigned to be sentenced for murder
in the second degree. Boehm testified
through an interpreter that he was
kept without food for 27 hours at
police headquarters, that several offi
cers beat him in the presence of his
wife, and that made an untrue confes
sion after an interpreter had prom
ised him that it would result in his dis
charge after a few days in prison.
"This confession evidence is dan
gerous evidence," said Judge Crain.
"and if I had my way. I would seal
the mouth of every police officer so
that never, under any circumstances,
could he testify to anything said by;
anyone while under arrest."
All of which pleased Boehm might
ily. The police were also happy, for)
the Judge, after his ringing remarks,
sent the prisoner to Sing Sing for not
less than 20 years and not more than
life, the extreme penalty of the law.
There is no doubt that this third
degree business is a matter which it
would pay Mayor Gaynor to look, up.
As it is worked at present, a man ar
rested on suspicion of having commit
ted a crime, is "remanded to headquar
ters." There, if the case is regarded
as Important, he is subjected to ques
tion after question, a relay of in
quisitors relieving one another in tha
task. The unhappy wretch has noth
ing to eat, and if he drops asleep from
sheer exhaustion, is rudely awak
ened. It is also said that men are.
frequently beaten to extort confessions,
but while this may not be true, it
would hardly seem to be necessary.
Keep a man without food and sleep
long enough, and he is almost certain
to break down at the end, and say
any old thing simply for the joy of
being left alone.
Of course this conduct on the part
of the police is utterly illegal, but they
have done it for years, and will keep
it up until some strong man like Mayor
Gaynor stops it. The only other way
for them to be curbed is to have tho
judges throw out the confessions se
cured In this illegal way. But up to
date the magistrates seem to be. con
tent to deliver a few remarks from tha
bench, which may cheer the prisoner
up, but certainly do no injury to the
thick-skinned police, v.-ho are only
worklne for results.
. .KAWt IM 1 1,
A DKTJCATKI.Y I'KKP.UKI) nrC;K
CLOTH 1'OK TlXTJNtS TUB PACK
PRICE 25 CTS.
Ak yoirr Drupicist. Department Siorr, lllr
tftvfwrvawiiA direct fit t lt- Mifuufaj-trirvrn.
iKNl -M. bTAML' r'OR UfcK aAMl'ifc.
SRAF BROS.,
('-IT
Q-.
8I2B'WAY, K.Y.
w
nil V)
- m a si mi v
Washington
Comforf5hoes
Genuine comfort that's what
it means to wear the stylish
Martha Washington Comfort Shoes.
They fit like a glove, and insure complete
rest and relief. No buttons or laces iust slio
them on and oS like a slinoer. Elastic at the sides
provides perfect fit over anv insteD. Yon will never
know how comfortable a good lookiner shoe Can lie n ntTt vnn have worn
MARTHA WASHINGTON COMFORT SHOES
Beware of Imitations. Only the senulne haoe the ntmm Kfr4t, H.A.'non
I T- 1 M 1 . , . -
iviaycr i raae marif stamped on tta tole. Refuse substitutes.
Your dealer wm supply you; if not, write to
FREE If you will send us the name of a dealer who
, not handle Martha Washington Cnmfnrt Shn.a
. sena you tree, postpaid, a beautiful Dicturs
, Washington, Size 15 x 20.
We also make HonorblltShoM fnrnm T.
Shoes, Yerma Cushion Shoes, Special Merit
ouoc ana worn onoes.
F. MAYER BOOT & SHOE
-nilwmikee. Wis. V r-Uem
Washington, ghee Mfg.
beattie, Waan.
'SIMM
xs: m
Schoo7 ?!m&&A