The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, September 03, 1905, PART THREE, Page 29, Image 29

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    THE SU31X5.Tr OKEGCmZS, POBTiaNB, SEPTEMBER 3, 1905O
29
a complete line of new saying and jokes.
Searles and Rockwell are to be seen In a
musical muddle called The Cheeky" Mes
senger." Their offering has met with
gratifying success Jn every house on the
circuit, and they come to Portland with
splendid recommendations. Another fun
ny pair Is Earl and Hampton, who will
do something In the comedy line. One
member has a splendid singing voice,
while the other Is a graceful dancer, and
both combined present a very entertaining
number.
Roy MeBraln has prepared a special
song for the -wcok In "When the Fields
Are White With Daisies." The song is a
sympathetic one to pretty molody and ac
companied by attractive Illustrations. The
Starosoope will offer an amusing list of
subjects in "Bad Lodgers," "The False
Alarm," etc. Today and tomorrow the
show will be continuous from 2:30 to 10:45,
and today and tonight will be the last
chance to see the great novelty of Mu
sical KloisL
TATUM AT THE GRAND.
Continuous Performance at Popular
Vaudeville Theater Today.
This Is, the last day of the engagement
of Tatttm at the Grand. He Is the fore
most ralndreader of the world, and his
demonstrations in this strange and little
known science have bewildered and mys
tlftad crowds every aftornoon and night
during the past seven days. The demon
strations of the marvelous Tatum have
created endless comment in Portland and
lie is recognized by local students of
psychology as a man of exceptional men
tal qualities.
Today, also, the Grand returns to its
former policy of ' having continuous per
formances on Sunday, the shows running
consecutively from 2 till 10: P. M. To
morrow, being Labor day, the shows will
be continuous on that occasion, as they
will be today.
Tomorrow the Grand will offer a com
plete change of bill, and the management
takes pleasure in offering a bill that is
calculated to surpass anything this re
liable house has had in months. The top
Hner is that little magnet, Lottie Gllson.
Xiss Gllson is one of the best-known sou
brettos and entertainers In the vaude
ville world, and sho comes to the Grand
from the foremost vaudeville theaters of
the Bast. Miss Gllson Is making her first
Portland appearance in vaudeville at the
Grand. She will be assisted by SIgnor
Duproe. who is acknowledged as the pre
mier harpist of the world.
Brydon's canine circus is also on the
bill, and is the acme of animal education.
It is a new and novel act, and entirely
different from the usual dog show. Frank
Clayton lias a musical monologue, and
VMen and Dunlap offer a sketch called
"The New Girl." This is a shout of laugh
ter. Bennett and Sterling are offering a
unique comedy sketch, filled with molody
and mfc-lh. Fred Purlnton will sing "I'll
Be Waiting In the Gloaming, Sweet Gene
vieve.' Tbo Grandiscope Is to show a
Aim called "The Great Steeplechase."
AX INNOVATION.
Roso BJytlngc Decides to Give Class
Instruction inDraiuatic Elocution.
YteMtog to the pressure brought to
bear upon her, both personally and by
letter. Rose Eytinge. the well known In
struct er of elocution and dramatic art,
has deckled to inaugurate a new system
with the opening of her Fall work.
Pupils will be received in classes of
from two to five members, as
well as individually, and those who
elect to unite and take a collec
tive course will be enabled to materi
ally reduce the cost of tuition. Rose
Eytlnge's methods of Instruction In stage
work are well known and are heartily
approved by all the loading theatrical
managers .East and West, and her en
dorsement of a graduate's talent and abil
ity Is accepted by them without doubt. .or
question. In Portland; as clscwhorefflher
pupils have Invariably been" well received,
both or the stage and In parlor recita
tions, and not a .single failure has been
scored. Terms can be arranged at""71S
Eaat Burnside street. Phone Hast 2259
STAGELAND .
"Ttee Heir te the Hoorah" and "The Vlr
ElntM" started rehearoala Mender.
Frank Fannin?, the clever 3'eung leading
mim. in new with the Orpheum Stock in
Yaktma. Wash.
MM7 MMtor has ofTerod a scholarship in the
SnuAMpe-Wkeeteroft Dramatic School, and the
competitive examination? are now taking place.
Orace Van Studdiferd has been engaged by
tn atiubwts for tho loading rele In Lady
Tte. la the place left vacant by Lillian
RuMell.
Hall Catne is expected seen in New York te
attend the rah resate of "The Prodigal Sen."
Te Drwry Lane production Is being rehearsed
b- Arthur Collins.
For tfcn Moore Thsator. In Seattle, re grading
feas hew begun, and 100HX) cubic yards win
be removed te got down the necessary 30 feet
te tfee new street level.
DonaM Bewles and George Bloomquest are
having a glorious Summer vacation yachting
aleng the osant of Massachusetts, making
Otowceeter their headQuarters.
Artkttr Bj-ran has been placed under contract
by LleMer & Co. and will probably be starred
a Latimer In Channlng Pelleek's dramatiza
tion of "In the Bishop's Carriage."
Ida Conquest railed Friday for London,
wteere sfcc will appear in the leading female
rote wltk -WIMUm Collier in "On the Quiet,"
at the Comedy Theater In Septomber.
Rube Welch, who built the Columbia The
nlrr. In this city, and managed It for a time.
Is new starring In a piece called "The King
of Kalamazoo" at the Chutes in Los Angelea.
(Jajmw XollI and Bdythe Chapman Nelll have
proved se popular a drawing card with Bish
op's Playera at San Francisco that Manager
Tttsfeep baa extended their engagement from
September 28 indefinitely.
Headed by Max Flgman, the company en
gaged te support Florence Roberta, who will
etar In Ann La Mont, will leave New York
September 6 for Ogden, where rehearsals will
be conducted by the author.
James K. Hackett sailed last Wednesday on
the Kroaprln Wllhelm, -to begin rehearsal
of "The Walls of Jerloho," at the Saoy
Theater. He brings with him two of the
principal members of the company.
Cherldah Simpson has been engaged for the
principal boy part. Jack Horner, In "The
Gingerbread Man," the new musical comedy
by A. Baldwin Sloane and Frederick Itanken,
which will be produced this season.
Madame Bertha Kallch, after several
months in the mountains, is enjoying the
latter part of her Summer's rest at the sea
shore. She will first appear under direction
of Harrison Grey Flake in "Mon'na Vanna"
la October.
E. H. Sothern and Julia Marlowe arrived
Saturday on the Campania. Rehearsals for
their Shakespearean season began yesterday.
"Taming of the Shrew," "Twelfth Night"
and "The Merchant of Venice" will form
tholr repertoire.
a
Wilton Laekaye will be supported on the
occasion or his visit to this clty'ln "The Pit"
by the original cast. The company has been
together for the past two seasons, and is said
to be the biggest money-maker William A.
Brady ever had.
the McNutt Hoepltal. San Francisco. Very
few astrcsses have had such a long and trying
wasen as was Miss Roberts' last one, and
ehe concluded to absolutely forsake all dis
tractions until the time for her reheaersaJs in
Osdcn next month.
StrjGIIbert Parker is expected In New York
this .week or the week following, to confer
with Henry B. Harris In regard to the drama
tization of Sir Gilbert's Canadian stories.
"Pierre and His People," to which Mr. Harris
holds the stage rights.
Oliver ilorosco has completed booking
Harry Mestaycr In "Ghosts." The tour will
open in two weeks. In the company will be
Edwin Bailey and Grace Lockwood. as Engr
stom and Mrs. Alvlng. Other peqple win be
(scared to LQ AjlkcJrs.
PORTLAND MUSICIANS AGAIN BUSY
Home From Vacation Spots Organization of Church Choirs
What the Outer World of Music Is Doing. ?
H M. Ceurtlenne, pianist, is engaged to
play at a- piano recital this month at OlynT
pla. Wash. 4
Mrs. Walter Reed, contralto, has returned
from her vacation trip to Victoria, B. C,
and Spokane.
The concert by Madame Norelll, the Port
land prima donna soprano, announced for Sep
tember 32 at the White Temple, lit postponed
for the present.
Miss Anne DItchburn, contralto, will sing
"Elsa's Dream" from Wagner's "Lohen
grin" at the wedding of Miss Elsie Lyons,
Wednesday.
This is the beginning of the music season
of 1005-00, and singers, instrumentalists,
and oholr members are nearly all back from
vacation trips.
Lauren Pease .was tenor soloist at both
services last Sunday at the White Temple,
and his selections were: "Face to Face"
(Herbert Johnson) and "Jerusalem" (Park
er). His dnglng was very enjoyable.
Probably the flrot of the "European in
vasion" of musicians for the coming reason
will be Harold Bauer, the pianist He comes
this month for the Worcnrter (Maw.) Fes
tival, after which he proceeds direct to the
Pacific Coast, where the real work of bis
fourth American tour will begin.
Cart Denton, organist of Trinity Protestant
Episcopal Church, will play the following
programme of organ music today: 11 A. M.,
"Cantablle" (Lemalgre); first and second
movements from "Second Organ Sonate"
(Mendelssohn), and finale from Third Sym
phony (Mendelssohn). 8 P. M.. "Song With
out Words" (Deshayes) and "Grand Choeur"
(Salome.
Clementine de Vere, who Is still In Eng
land, has been engaged to sing In "The Dam
nation of Faust" at the Sheffield festival In
October, under the direction of Herr Wcln
gartner. Her other engagements Include
Blackpool. Bristol. Edinburgh ("The Mes
siah") and a re-engagement with the Moody
Manners Opera Company.
H. V. Mllllgan, organist of Calvary Prerby
terlan Church, will leave this week for Ta-
coma to arrange for the organ recital that
will be given in the First Presbyterian Church
In that city. September 18, by William C (
Carl, the distinguished New York organist. (
Mr. Carl will give two organ recitals in Port-
land later.
rrofessor Irving M. Glen, baritone, 'of the
University of Kugene. was an esteemed ote
lrt last Sunday at the First Congregational
Church and sang "And the Mountains Shall
Depart." from Mendelssohn's "Elijah." He
was in splendid voice, and it was a rare treat
to hoar sueh magnificent vocalism. Professor
Glen should sing eftener In Portland.
The next sacred concert by the Beyer chorus
will be given at Festl-al Hall, Exposition
grounds, about the end of this month, and
the programme will consirt of Father Dom
inic's "Beautiful Willamette," Sullivan's "Fes
tlval Te Deum," and Roeslnl'a "Stabat 31ater."
A chorus rehearsal for this concert will take
place at the First Congregational Church.
Wednesday evening. A
The programme for Edgar E. Cenrsen's
tenth 20-mlnute organ recital tenlght at the
First Presbyterian Churoh: "Prelude and
Fugue In F" (Bach), "Lamentation" (Gull
mant), "Second Andantlne in D Flat" (Le
mare). The choir for next season, consist
ing of Mrs. Fletcher Linn, soprano: Mrs.
Max M. Shlllock, contralto; J. Ross Fargo,
tenor, and Dom J. Zan, baritone, will sing
together for the first time today.
Organ notes: The pipe organ wa first In
troduced into church use during the latter
half of the first mlllenlum, A. D. The first
keyboard Is etated to have been placed into
the organ In the cathedral at Magdeburg, at
the clpee of the 11th century. In the early
organ with keyboards. It required a blew
from a fist to put each Jcey dawn. Pedals are
of 15th century use. The swell Is of English
origin and la called the recltatif on the Con
tinent of Europe.
St. David's Protestant Eplsoopal Church
choir will Ing today at both eervlces for the
first time since July. The morning service
will be choral communion, with proceseion
and sermon. Frederick W. Goodrich has ar
ranged, this programme of organ music:
Morning: Prelude, "Br the Sea" (Schubert);
Postlude. "Marche Pontifical" (F. de la Tom
belle). Evening Prelude, "Berceause" (Dee
bruck); offertory, "The Answer" (Holsten
holme); Postlude, "Alia Marcla" (Petrall).
Mies Grace Wilton recently gave a success
ful piano recital at Hlllcboro. She was as
sisted by Mrs. Oliver Gates, contralto, of
Klamath Falls, and Mr. A. L. Lay ton, so
prano, of Reno, Nov. Miss Wllma Waggoner,
who was the hostces of the evening, was a
splendid aooompanlstc Miss Wilton played ten
numbers. Including two of her own composi
tions, her best number being the "Erl-Klng"
(Shubert-Liszt). Both piano and vocal num
bers Wire well received.
' Professor C. F. H. Mills, one of Portland's
valued musical composers and pianists, has
left for Lincoln, Neb., te accept a position
as a member of the faculty In the conserva
tory of music, Wesleyan University. Pro
fessor Mills is a musician of rare ability,
and he is equally at ease In interpolating
Bach, Chopin or other composers of equal
merit. In his playing he excels in tone
blending, and his compositions display abil
ity and marked originality of thought. Pro
fessor Mills was recently organist of Grand
Avenue Presbyterian Church. ,
One of the new tenors that Helnrich Con
rled has engaged for the New York Metro
politan Opcra-House is Carl Burrlan. a
youthful Wagner singer, who won bis first
honors at Hamburg, where he sang for sev
eral years until he went to Dresden to take
the first place In the company. He was In
vited to go to Munich to sing while Helnrich
Knote I in this country, and he would have
done so but for his contract to, stay in
Dresden for a certain number of years. Now
he is free to eing anywhere, so long as he
does not take any regular contracts.
Miss Jeannette L. Glider has given to the
September Critic a lengthy and careful re
view of the English translation of the "Let
ters of Richard Wagner to Matbllde Wesen
donck." Wagner Is so much himself in his
writings that every one, more especially
lovers of music, should become Intimate
with him by reading his letters. Here we
have a volume of remarkable love letters,
whloh are prefaced by a letter from Wagner
to his sister, Clara Wolfran. some seven
years after his first appearance with Mme.
Weeendonck, which is one of the most ex
traordinary letters ever written by an ex
traordinary man.
The Temple Beth Israel quartet, lira. Rose
Bloch Bauer, Mrs. W. A. T. Bushong. W. H.
Boyer and W. A. Montgomery, with Miss
Leonora Fisher, organist, sang for the first
time this season at the Friday evening serv
ice. September 1, the selections being "Be
Still, Be Still" (C P. Scott) and "God to
Whom We Look Blindly" (Chadwlck). All
the singers showed the beneficial effect of
their vacation, and sang unusually welL
The Cbadwick number is a beautiful one,
but is rarely sung on account of its diffi
culty. Mr. Montgomery sang in place of J.
Adrian Epplng, who la away on vacation.
One of Tsohaikowskys operas. "Pique
Dame." is in the list of novelties to be pro
duced at Milan during the next season, which
begins December 20. This opera was first
produced at BU Petersburg in 1SP0. and sub
sequently became very popular In Russia.
It Is based on Puschkin's novel bearing the
same name, and consists of three acts and
seven tableau. Other new operas to be
heard In Milan are AJfredo Catalane's "Lore
ley." "The Insurrection." by A if an o, and
"La Flglla dl Jorlo" (based on D'Annunrio's
drama), by FranchettL There win also be
seen a new Japanese ballet, "Day-Sin," by
Fratesl and Manenco.
Marie Hall, the famous English vioIlnUtr.
who is coming to this country next Winter for
& concert tour under the management of
Henry Wolfsohn, is to be the recipient of an
unusual honor from her fellow-countrymen and
women. By public subscription a famous
Guenarius violin, worth 2000 guineas, will be
prerented to tho young artist, who la the first
instrumental performer of great merit that
England has produced In nearly a century. The
violin will be presented to Miss Hall at her
lait public concert in London, previous to
her sailing for this country next month, for
which concert her famous teacher. Bevel k. is
coming to London from Prague to conduct
the orchestra.
Musical programme this morning at the
First Unitarian Church: Prelude. "Lento Ex
pressive" (H. Warelng); "Gloria" (Bee
thoven); anthem. 'Break Forth Into Joy"
(Scbnecker); response, "Bow Down Thine
Ear1' (F. Schilling); offertory, soprano solo,
"Ava Maria" (H. Millard): "Nunc Dlmlttls"
fEawVjrJ: PortlU.de leUeV Otrlfi ta tit
GIFTED CONCERT VIOLINIST
WILLARD E. IVEniE, OF SALT LAKE CITY.
Amonjr the musicians who lately scored a success at tho Lewis
and Clark Exposition concerts, wis "Wlliard E. Wclhe. violinist, from
Salt Lake City, Utah. One of the soloists witn the Mormon Taber
nacle choir, from Ogden, Utah. Mr. "Weihe proved to be a popular
as well as an able, cultured artist, who played music that meant
something Educatod In Europe, Mr., Woihc is a thorough musician
and makes his viol'.n speak. His tone and technique are worthy of
the' high mus cal reputation that preoeded him.
absence from the cjty of Mrs. F. J. Raley.
the music until her return will be uader
direction of P. I, Packard, wlte has ebgaged
Miss Maude Aehor, contralto of Christ
Church choir of Cincinnati. O., for today's
service. Mrs. J. J. Kelllher. of North Head.
Wash., will substitute for Miss Mastlck and
lng the offertory.
Among those who have won worM-renown
as a violinist Is Kubelik. There Is a fas
cination and myttery about him, sueh as re
calls the mysticism of PaganlnL A sorcerer
of the violin surely is this soulful, poetic and
temperamental young Bohemian, one who
charms, transports and enthralls Ms hearers;
one who has the technical mastery of Paga
nlnl, the passion and the tone of Saraoate and
the musicianship and classicism of Joachim;
an artlrt scarce past his youth, who is said
to have in a degree the greatest attribute of
each of the consummate mastem of his Instru
ment. Kubtfilk is to tour America this sea
son, lncludiBg the Pacific Coast.
E. M. Ceurtlenne, the weil-kaewa Portland
composer and pianist, has composed a festival
overture, "Glorious. America," whloh will be
played at the Lewis and Clark Exposition by
Kllery'a Band.' Those who have heard the
overture speak In the highest terms of lt i William Wallace Graham, violinist; Lauren
musical beauty. It is written la five parts Pease, tenor, and Mrs. Warren E. Thomas
and contains these movements; - "The Birth and Professor Frank Chapman, accompan
of George Washington." "Martha Washing- ( ists. Miss DItchburn will sing three a. b. c
ton," "A Prayer." "Victory" and "Liberty." numbers, and at the request of her friends
The Portland Board of Trade Journal recently
printed an article on Mr. Courtlennes musical
work in this city, and mated: "Mr. Ceurtl
enne Is not only a pianist of excellent reputa
tion, but he Is a thorough, educated musician,
and his high reputation as an artist is a guar
antee that whatever he undertakes will be
artistic In the fullest tense of that term."
S. H. Allen-Goodwyn. recently tenor with
the Ben Greet players, and now a .resident
of this city, gave a mualcale last week to a
few friends at the home of Mrs. Von Rhels.
and delighted those who heard him by his
exquisite singing of several English ballads.
His voice is a combination of the prime
robusto quality of tenor, and Is sweet and
effective particularly in the high notes up to
B flat and perhaps higher. He throws ar
tistic feeling into what he sings, and bis
voice will no doubt be particularly effective
in concert. and church music. Mr. Allea
Goodwvn is a decided gain te Portland musi
cal circles. He is an educated singer and
has hod the advantage of lessons from such
eminent teachers as the late Sims Reeves
and others well known In English musical
life.
The New York Evening Post, la Its notice
of a new theatrical production, sayn of the
encore nuisance: "Some of the other songs
were forced to tiresome encores by the usual
organized claque, which has become an abont- .
inabie nuisance nowadays, and ehould be sup- (
pressed. Audiences should not be bored by
listening over and over again to weird music '
which publishers are determined to make pop- ,
ular." Too frequent encores are a nalsanee, i
and in more than one Instance the managers ,
as well as the public are responsible. In the
English theaters audiences are more reason
table. Pretty songs are encored across the
water, but a single repetition of the last vem
is usually all that is demanded, ualecs the
song is particularly attractive. The encores,
however, are not encouraged by the musical
director to any such extent as is the case with
far too many of the light pieces produced In
our own theaters.
Never before in the history of the Chicago
Musical College has such keen Interest been
shown In the competitive examlnatle&B for
free scholarships as is being manifested this
year. The college building on Michigan ave
nue has been crowded for a month with young
men and women seeking the sehoiarshlp
awards made annually by the college faculty.
Forty-five free and 150 partial scholarships
are conferred. Examinations to determine to
whom the awards shall be made have been
In progress for several weeks, and the num
ber of contestants this yar Is much greater
than ever before. This beneficial idea is en
tirely philanthropies!, and the giving of these
ocholarshlps enables many deservlag studeats
to obtain an advanced education which other
wise would be denied them. A significant
feature In the history -of this movement is
that in past years many of the highest awards
tor proficiency have been won by free sehoi
arshlp pupils.
Francesco Tarns gno, the great Italian tenor,
is very l at Milan. Italy. He was born at
Turin, the son of an innkeeper, and as a
lad he uted to serve his father's guests. At
16 years of age he became a chorus siager at
the Teatro Regglo and he studied hard and
long before making bis debut as a seteUt. His
progrea in the profession after that was
rapid, so that when he mads his first appear
anco in London, July 3, 1&S9, he was hailed
as the greatest tenor e robusto oa the stage.
He was engaged by the late Henry E. Abbey
tor an American tour at JiOOO a night, and
made a great success In this country. On this
and subsequent vlslta to America, Tamagno
accumulated a large fortune, a large part of
which he is reported to have lost In 1897 by
a real ettata speculation In Rome. He is said
to have been excessively penurious, despite
his immense income, and stories are told of
his washing his stockings and underwear and
hanging them up to dry in his room at the old
Tremont House, Boston, and cooking steak
and onions over the gas for his "best meal."
InJOOS he was engaged for the gala perform
ance at Covent Garden, London, in honor of
Kin? Edward. ?
The quartet choir will resume its duties for
the fime time this season at today's services
at the First Congregational Church, when this
programme will be rendered under the initial
direction of Miss Leonora Fioher, organist and
director: Morning organ prelude, "Largo"
(Handel); quartet, "There Is a Blessed Home"
(J. Christopher Marks); duet, "Emmanuel"
(C. Whitney Coombs); postlude. "March"
(Gaul). Evening Organ prelude. "Fantasia"
CBlume&thal); quartet. "While the Earth Re-
znalactk" (Xourrj; guarteU "Lord pt Our J
Life" (Field): postlude. "Triumphal March"
(RlebaruVun). One feature of the morning ser
vice will be the mprano and baritone duet
between Mrs. Rare Bloch Bauer and W. A.
Montgomery. It Is to be beped that many
duets from these two favorite singers wll
be heard during this season. Today's quartet
singers at the First Congregattonnl Church r
Mrs. Rose Btech Bauer, soprano; Miss Chloe
McClung. contralto; Arthur L. Alexander,
tenor; W. A. Montgomery, baritone; Mlis Le
onora Fisher, orgasfct and choir director. The
vaeancy for tenor soloist In this oholr has not
yet been filled. Mr. Alexander has only
agreed to be the tenor soloist for today's ser
vices. A coming concert In which Portland musi
cal people will be much Interested will be
that given at the White Temple. Twelfth
and Taylor streets. September 26. to mark
the departure for New York of Miss Anne
DItchburn. contralto. The eveat will be un
der the direction of Lauren Pease. Miss
DItchburn will be assisted by the Lakme
quartet, consisting of Mrs. May Dearborne
Schwab. Miss Ethel Lytle, Mrs. W. A. T.
Bushong and MisaMarlon -Stackpole; Mrs.
Pauline Miller Chapman, soprano, a mem
ber of the faculty of Pacific University:
will give a Shakespearean reading. Mrs.
Chapman Is a soprano who ought to be bet
ter known musically in Portland. She re
cently sang several charming songs at an
afternoon tea given by Mrs. Ralph W. Hoyt.
and for the past two Sundays she has been
the soprano soloist at the First Congrega
tional Church. The Lakme quartet has sev
eral novelties which are sure to be well
sung, and the concert will be worth keeping
in mind. Miss DItchburn possesses more
than ordinary talent.
He who taught Mme. Adellna Pattl and a
host of other singers. SIgnor Giuseppe Nic
olao. died In the front room of a little fiat
la New York recently. His lack of worldly
success embittered his declining years, apd,
blind and poor, he went to his death raljlng
an unkind fate. The children of the tene
ments came in them last years of his life to
hear him play, and at times he forgot the
realities and gave himself up to the melodies
that were in him as he did when as eon-
; duetor he held his baton over Italian opera
at the Academy of Music The walls of the
small parlor where SIgnor Nicolao died are
BAKER
01U0.X
SECOND WEEK, MUSICAL BURLESQUE SEASON
STARTING SUNDAY MATINEE TODAY, SEPT 3
REGULAR MATINEES:
Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday
Special Matinee Monday, September 4, Labor Day
No Performance Saturday Night
THE BRIGADIERS EXTRAVAGANZA COMPANY
PRESENTING EDMUND HAYES IN THE
il "WISE GUY" 1
AND AN ALL-STAR OLIO
Prices: Nights 25c, 35c, 50c,
NEXT ATTRACTION:
VAUDEVILLE
HEAD LINERS
GRAND
Today and Lahor Day Continuous
Frank Clayton,
Eccentric Musical Mon
ologist. Virden If Dunlap,
In The News GlrL"
Fred Purinton, .
Til Bo Waltlntr In the
Gloamlngr, Sweet Genevieve.
Special Engagement
LOTTIE GIL80H
"Tke Little MnjfBct,"
Assisted by
SIGNOR DUFREE,
The "World's Greatest
Harpist.
GENERAL ADMISSION, 10 CENTS.
Reserved seats on lower floor. 20c Dally matinees, entire lower floor,
10 cents. Box seats, 25 cents.
covered with photographs of the kings nd
queens of the operatic stage. The diva her
self sent him ten or more, and they bear
many messages of appreciation for her in
structor. Adellna Pattl had made her debut
as a child of 0. singing "Home. Sweet Home"
and "Comln Through he Rye" and simpler
songs such as she has since used for encores.
Max Strakcech placed her, when she was 15
years old, under the care cf SIgnor NIcolao.
and for two years she studied operatic roles.
She was equipped with a knowledge of "Lucia
de Lommermoor," "The Barber of Seville"
and "Somnambula." When he made her
operatic debut her sucCeta was Immediate.
Nicolao biter took Via yousg singer to Italy,
where he was made a chevalier in recognition
of his discovery of such a voice. Signer Nic
olao was conductor at the Academy of Music
H years. Then the desire, to wander came
over him. and he went to the South American
republics and to Cuba with his own opera
company, winning the full measure cf artis
tic success, but falling to gain wealth. He
returned to this country and was for several
years associated with Colonel Mapleson. He
organized another company. Which came to
grief in Detroit. The music lovers of that
city Induced him to remain there and sent
him miDlJs. For IT years he taught in the
f Michigan city, and finally, at the age of 60,
d returned to New York. He found conditions
i greatly changed and that be was too old to
I compete with the younger teachers. He de
voted his days and almost his nights to com
posing and among his papers Is the opera of
"Pocahontas," wblih !s said to be a remark
able musical work. SIgnor Nlcolao'a "Ave Ma
rie' and bla trio, 'Tl Prego o Padre" are
well known to students of Choir mulc So
little did he care for money that rather, than
haggle over terms he gave away several of his
production. The conductor was of striking
appearance. His high forehead, strong nos
and his white imperial gave him an air of
distinction. Even in his poverty he main
tained his pride In his profeoBion.
This is a story of a violin trick In Paris.
Enjoying the cool of the evening in front
of his sausages, a pork butcher of the Latin
Quarter was spoken to by a piteous Italian
boy with a violin. Mother and sister were
supperless in their garret, and not a sou
had the poor little musician made that day.
If he left his violin as a pledge, would not
the pork butcher let him have a string of
sausages? The compassionate tradesman
agreed at onee, and the boy. handing over
his instrument, went off with a plentiful
supper. The next day a well-dressed man.
happening to look, in at the shop, saw the
violin, examined it. and started back in
surprise. Did the pork butcher know what
a treasure he had? It was a Stradivari oi,
worth any amount. Having heard the story
of the Italian boy, the amateur proposed
that the tradesman should boy the Instru
ment. It he got It for ISO francs it would
be dirt cheap, and the amateur himself
could sell it for him afterward for ten times
that amount. The boy came to pay for his
sausages and claim the violin. "Sell It!"
he exclaimed, when asked by the pork
butcher; "never, for it was his only treasure
left him by his grandfather, to whose grand
father it belonged before that." At last,
however, having gone home to consult his
mother, he agreed, and. embracing his be
loved violin, with tears In his eyes, parted
with it for S90. The supposed amateur never
turned up. The pork butcher took the violin
to a dealer, who pronounced It to be worth
72 cents.
TYnntcd a "Swearing" Bible.
Philadelphia Record.
"Havo you sot any well-bound second
hand Bibles?" Inquired a customer of the
old book store man.
"Yes. You want a swearing Bible, don't
you?" answered tho dealer. The patron
admitted that he did, and after he had
been supplied and taken his leavo tho book
Btore man entered upon an explanation
for tho benefit of an Interested third
party.
"There's always a demand for swearing
Bibles." he remarked. "Br swearing- BI
bles I mean copies of the Scriptures in
tended for use In the administration of
oaths. Instead of buying cheap, flimsy
covered Bibles, lawyers, notaries, roagis
trates and others who are required to take
affidavits supply themselves with strongly
bound second-hand editions. A swearing
Bible comes In for rough usage and a well
bound second-hand book, which can be
bought for a fraction of Its original price.
will outlast a half dozen cheap copies.
That Is why we have a good demand for
old Bibles."
Are Xou a 3rason?
Pittsburg Despatch.
Mr. Smith I was held up and relieved
of all my valuables on the way home
from my .lodge.
Captain of Police What aid the robbers
get?
Mr. Smith Everything except tho pass
word.
ROSE EYTINGE
Pupils received and prepared for pulpit,
stage, platform or parlor. Private or class
instruction. For time and terms apply at
718 East Burnsida St
Phone East 220.
FIRST AMERICAN TOUR
MARIE HALL
The Phenomenal English Violinists.
London St. James Gazette: "The splendid
performance of the Tschalkowsky Concerto
came upon me in tne ugnt or. a revelation."
London Times: "Her art the crowning
tone of genius."
DIRECTION Henry Wolfsohn. New York.
THEATER
PHONE MAIN 1907.
YAMHILL AND THIKD STREETS.
IBEJUEJ CO., L15JU. 610. L. IMEI, kUMSEZ.
OF VAUDEVILLE FAVORITES.
75c Matinees 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c J
KENTUCKY BELLES !
WEEK OF
SEPTEMBER 4
Performances, 2:30 to 10:45 P. 1C
Brydon's Dog Circus,
The Acme of Animal
Education.
Bennett Jc Sterling,
Unique Comedr Sketch.
The Grandiscope '
Great Steeplechase.
MARQUAM GRAND THEATER
Phone Main 868. W. T. Pangle, Resident Manager.
Directum. N. W. T. Association; C Heiliy, President.
MORRISON STREET, BETWEEN SIXTH AND SEVENTH
ONE WEEK
MONDAY, TUESDAY,
WILTON LACKAYE
In Wm. A. Brady's Massive and Stupen
dous Production
THE PIT
Adapted from
Famous
THURSDAY "AND FRIDAY NIGHTS
AND SATURDAY MATINEE
In the Magnificent 10th Anniversary
Revival of
PRICES Lower Floor, except last three rows. $1.30; last three rows,
J LOO. Balcony, first six rows. $1.00; third three rows. 75c; last three
rows, 53c. Gallery, 25c vand 33c Booses anJ Loges. $10.00.
Seats are no-rv on Hale for the entire -nreek.
MARQUAM GRAND THEATER
Saturday, Monday and Q . Q 1 1 10
Tuesday Nights, Pept. V, li, 16
THE CHARMING ACTRESS
JOSEPHINE DEFFRY
Supported In Her Excellent Company In Following Repertoire:
SATURDAY NIGHT jt . MONDAY NIGHT
The Emotional Drama. The Society Drama.
"A Broken Heart" I "A Wicked Woman"
Tuesday Night, The Society Drama,
"A Deserted Bride"
DADfTTAD DDTTITC 25c,
lUlUlftR I UIUlvJo will
FMPIRF
JLjlIYlJL J.1.VJL.
Commencement of Regular Fall and Winter Season
Sunday Matinee, Today, Sept. 3
SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT OF CHAS. A. TAYLOR'S
NEW YORK COMPANY OF PLAYERS. OPENING
TODAY WITH THE BIG DRAMATIC SENSATION
ESCAPED
FROM THE HAREM
Play. Company, Scenery, Wardrobe, Up-to-date and
First-class. Best Attraction of the Kind on
Earth Appearing at Popular Prices.
REGULAR MATINEES
Special Matinee
EVENING 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c
NEXT ATTRACTION: QUEEN OF THE HIGHWAY.
BE LAS CO
(Formerly Columbia Theater)
MATINEE TODAY AND TONIGHT
LAST TIMES OF
ALICE OF OLD VINCENNES
COMMENCING WITH MlfYWFi A V C17DT A
LABOR-DAY MATINEE lYAVIlJra 2 , Ul-il X
All "Week. "With Regular Matinees Saturday and Sunday
15th WEEK BELASCO STOCK COMPANY, PRESENTING
HARRIET'S
HONEYMOON
Leo Dltrlchsteln's Great Comedy
As Played by Mary Mannerlng
SPLENDID PRODUCTION
DDTPrC NIGHT
A XvlVHiO MATINEE
Next Week: "JUDAH
Exclusive
Vaudeville
STAR
Today and Lafcor Day Continuous Performances, 2:30 to 10:45 P. M.
THE MEXICAN QUINTET,
High-Class Instrumentalists, direct from Juarez. Mexico.
EVA THATOHEE,
' "The Irish Lady"."
SEARLES & ROCKWELL,
In "The Cheeky Messenger."
EOT McBRAIN,
"When the Fields Are "White "With
Daisies."
GENERAL ADMISSION, 10 CENTS.
Evening's, Sundays and holidays.
Dally taatine'es, entire lower
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER
WEDNESDAY NIpMTS
Frank Norm'
Novel.
TRILBY
35c and 50c. The advance sale
open nc
icxt Thursday at 10 A. M.
THEATER
12th and Morrison
PHONE
MAIN 117
BEST MELODRAMATIC ORGANIZATION
IX EXISTENCE. PRESENTING ONLY MR.
TAYLOR'S PLAYS UNDER HIS OWN PER
SONAL DntEcnoN.
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
Monday, Labor Day
MATINEE 10c, 15c, 25c
PHONE
MAIN
311
Belasco & Mayer, Props.
BIG BELASCO CAST
2ac, 35c, 50c, 75c
25c, 35c, 50o
91 HENRY ARTHUR JONES
GREAT DRAMA
Week of Sep
tember 4
EARL & HAMPTON,
In an original sketch.
TEE STAROSOOPE,
The Illusionist,"' "Bad Lodgers,"
etc
Reserved seats on lower floor, 30 cents,
floor, 10 cents. Box seats, 25 cents.