The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, January 14, 1900, Page 17, Image 17

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    1?
splendid nor enthralling. But it was In
fused with ardor, and his delivery of the
lines was often fervid.
And Juliet? Oh, no, I have not forgot
ten. The simple, reckless, passionate love
of Juliet was far to seek. "With a voice
lacking In resonance, In sentiment, In deli
cacy, with a personality utterly untouched
of poetry, how can one successfully play
Juliet? EARL MASLIN.
4900
THE SUNDAY OEEGONIAN, POBTL'AND, JANUARY 14', 1900.
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Ballade of a NeYr Tear.
52i8 tour lias struck and the curtain la down.
The play lfl ended, the lights are low,
Ttaa Jester's cap hangs on a monarch's crown,
And Falstaff Is one -with Borneo;
"We have playei our parts with a pomp and
show.
Striving In common to reach the coal;
But -what if te pace he last or slow 7
Tima la the prompter -and death our dole.
We have stalked the Blase with an aching
heart.
And bowed to a palpitant pit below;
Prince or peasant, we've mummod the part.
Dives or Lazarus, bessar or beau;
"We nave feigned the friend while -we felt the
foe;
Smiled when the Iron was in the ami;
But to every tide is an ebb and flow
Time is the prompter and death, our dole.
Tlce has played Virtue in masquerade.
She has shammed in a cowl of snow,
.Poverty flaunted a gay brocade,
"While -wealth was content -with a calico;
But the pendulum's swinging to and fro.
Clicking the seconds from pole to pole,
The part is played ah, let It go!
Time is the prompter and death our dole.
ENVOY.
Prince, ere the curtain rings up once more,
3t "us pledge the future with flowing bowl;
The drama is grim but there's no encore.
Time is the prompter and death our dole.
John X. Hilllard in Dramatic Mirror.
WARDE IS ALWAYS WARDE
'A Rinaldo or Romeo, or Something
Ela, He IjaclaB Intellectual Keen-
nesa Company Mediocre.
I witnessed the descent of the curtain
upon, the last act of "The Lion's Mouth"
-without a single regret. I left the play
louse unreluctantly, and "without the
sense of parting from a personality. It
is true that, in a broad sense, all art
must be Impersonal; but it is true, and in
a larger sense, that all art must be per
sonal in a supreme degree it must reveal
the artist's temperament and his personal
vision. Mr. Henry Guy Carleton's play is
a mere collection of situations and say
ings which he has forgot to forget.
One's tongue is forever trembling to say
the exact passage in some classic of the
romantic play which he has reclothed in
Ills conspicuous rhetoric and spoiled by
the uncertainty of his instinct. But the
very faults of taste go to make the
sources not Instantly recognizable' We
do not ask that the quality Tvhlch "Words
worth has called "the consecration and
the poet's dream," so largely spiritual as
it is, be ever present in every romantic
drama of the passing day. What we ask
Is that there be something of a personal
vision, something of a voice, not wholly
love, and has sounded all its stops. The
coloring Is evr varying. Its beauty is
singular and Intricate. All the redness
turns to blood, all the water into tears.
The story seems bent, as by miracle or
magic, to the service of human passion
AT MARQUAM THIS WEEK.
Weill Company Playing: to Crowded
Houses Everywhere.
The Neill company, which begins a
week's engagement at the Matrquam to
morrow, has scored a splendid success
in Its tour from St. Paul to the Pacific
coast According to the unanimous ver
dict of the press, the large audiences
which have greeted it have In no case
' been disappointed. Every day during the
past week the Seattle newspapers have
reported that the seating capacity of
the big Seattle theater has been taxed
to Its utmost at the Nell performances.
MR. JAMES NBILL, OP THE NEILIi C OMPANY.
foredoomed to disaster. To the ardor of
the Italian love-story Shakespeare gave
his crowning imagination, and into it he
infused his spirituality. The primary pas
sions of the pagan "Veronese are retouched
with a spiritual fragrance.
I liked the Mercutio. The Queen Ma"b
speech was given with much Illustration
and Interesting detail, but the death scene
MR. JAMES NEILI AT THE MARQUAM.
ill
As Zacd Chumley.
As Chaunccy Short In
"A Gilded God."
As David Holmes In "A
"Bachelor's Romance."
borrowed, and, finally, something of me- ,
chanical and logical perfection in the de
tails of the plot.
Sophomoric Rhetoric.
"The Lion's Mouth" is often cumbered
with the sophomoric rhetoric of its au
thor. No regard has been paid to the
necessity of brief and simple speech,
which is the law of dramatic action. The
lines never send forth the impression of
Intensity, sincerity and distinction which
Is the soul of poetry. In spite of the con
stant and evident effort, there is not one
line in the play which Is stamped with an
arresting and alluring beauty; on the oth
er hand, there is not a single passage
which is not marred by some palnlul
lapse from taste that lacks all literary
decency.
A well-written and finely-constructed ro
mantic drama will always be a royal road
to public favor. It is not the highest
form of dramatic art, but it has Its place,
and justly. Stories are what tired men
and women want stories that shall en
thrall and beguile, and touch the iron
lacts of life with gold. He who can tell
such stories has a gift not to bo despised.
But it will not do to make the heroine
merely a labeled bundle of beauties; she
must be a woman. It will not do to hint
that the knight is young, and then get
on with the emprise. He must be a man.
It will not do merely to say that the moon
shines and the Mediterranean breeze is
blowing. We must be made conscious of
the moonlight; we must feel the wind on
our cheeks. The gift of atmosphere, the
gift of light and life they are lacking In
"The Lion's Mouth." It is not romantic.
It Is not poetic It Is essentially stagey.
Perhaps a poetic play would fall where
""The Lion's Mouth" has carried the day,
but there is always a treasurable audi
ence, though it be a small one, In all
towns, cities and societies, the applause
of which Is worth much roaring of the
multitude, for it carries with It the future.
Lacks Snbtlety.
Mr. Warde's Rinaldo is painted in fa
miliar colors. Indeed, it appears much
Mko every role that he plays. There is
exactly the same earnestness, but there
are also exactly the same gestures, exact
ly the same intonations and exactly the
same inflexions. Mr. Warde has not a
little of what the French call "panache,"
the large manner appropriate to the ro
mantic drama, but he is utterly lacking
In subtlety. He has a certain passionate
vigor, but little Intellectual keenness. Mr.
Richard Mansfield has shown us that a
dramatic personation may have breadth
and depth, and yet be not altogether with
out iineness of finish and execution; not
iltogether without the qualities of minia
ture painting. As for the rest of the
company in "The Lion's Mouth," it im
pressed me as being distinctly mediocre.
In the long list of Shakespeare's plays
there is none more poetic than "Borneo
and Juliet" The story is one of youthful
was disappointing. The Nurse is one of
Shakespeare's great comic creations, but
one would never guess the fact from Miss
Meredith's personation. She wobbled in
sipidly on the stage; she wobbled Insipid
ly off.
The Romeo of Mr. Warde was neither
Manager Heilig. who has just returned
from witnessing several of these produc
tions, says that they are the most per
fect that he has ever seen. The com
pany is a new organization to theater
goers of this section; in fact, this Is the
first time It has ever traveled. It only
recently closed an engagement of seven
consecutive months at St. Paul and Min
neapolis, the longest ever known there
"A Bachelor's Romance." which will ba
presented by the Neill company at the
Marquam Monday evening and at the
Saturday matinee, was expressly writ
ten for Sol Smith Russell, a man' with
very maiked peculiarities of his own,
who possesses an individuality which fla
vors every part that he undertakes;
therefore it redounds to Mr. Neill's credit
as an actor that he gives his own in
terpretation of the literary bachelor, Da
vid Holmes. His portrayal of the part
has met with commendation wherever
It has been witnessed.
On Tuesday evening "A Gilded Fool"
will be presented by the company. The
play is one of the be3t that over came
from the pen of Henry Guy Carleton,
and in it Mr. Neill has also made a suc
cess. By some ho has been thought to
bear favorable comparison with Nat
Goodwin in the role of Chauncey Short
On Wednesday it atinee and evening, a
play widely contrasting with the others
of the Neill company's (repertoire will be
given. It Is "Amy Robsart," a drama
tization of Sir Walter Scott's "Kenil
worth." In this play some especially line
opportunities are offered for the dis
play of p'cturcsque scenery; in fact, the
production is .one of the most elaboiate
presented by the Nellls, while the period
of the play, being in the 13th century,
the costuming is rich and elegant
Thursday night E. H. Sothern's brilliant
comedy success, "Captain Lcttarblair,"
will be the bill. C. Haddon Chambers'
drama, "Captain Swift," will be given
Friday evening, and Saturday evening
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MISS STELBAR BOMAR, OP THE "CHEERFUL. WAR" COMPANY, i
MANAGER CALVIN HEILIG HAS THE HONOR TO ANNOUNCE THE INITIAL
APPEARANCE INV PORTLAND OF THE INCOMPARABLE
SL&&
DIRECT FROM A
SEVEN
MONTHS' RUN
IN THE
TWIN CITIES
WITH
MR, JAMES IN
ESLL
PRESENTING THE FOLLOWING EXTRAORDINARY REPERTOIRE
Monday Evening and Saturday Mat. "A BACHELOR'S RO
MANCE,"So! Smith Russell's greatest comedy success.
Tuesday Evening "A GILDED FOOL," Nat Goodwin's
Best Comedy Success.
Wednesday Matinee and Evening "AMY ROBSART, a
Dramatization of Sir Walter Scott's "Kenllworth."
Thursday Evening "LORD CHUMLEY," E. H. Solhem'a
Success.
Friday Evening "CAPTAIN SWIFT," C. Haddon Cham-
bers Powerful Drama.
Saturday Evening " CAPTAIN LETTARBLAIR." written
by Miss Margaret Merrlngton.
Children under 7
years of age not ad
mltted.
"I take pleasure in commending Mr. Neill and his compyJ'-pnator Cushman .Davis. aI"JhoTfhSugh
eee Mr. Neill and company will miss a rare treat"-Governor John Lied. Minnesota. Lavish scenic mountings, xnrougn
special arrangement, tnere win. oe no uuvance iu yuuea.
EVENING PRICES.
Lower Floor, except last three rows.. 51.00
Lower Floor, last three rows oc
Balcony, first six rows oe
Balcony, last six rows
Gallery
People's Popular Playhouse
- - PRICES - - 1
5So.
4 ,
CORDRAVS THEATER
MATINEE PRICES.
Lower floor, except last 3 row3-. ,.TSo
Lower floor, last 3 rows .....EOo
Balcony, flrst 6 rows .....50a
Balcony, last 6 rows- .......25a
Seats Now Selling.
JOHN F. CORDRAY, Manager
Return Engagement
ONE WEEK, COMMENCING TONIGHT
SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, MATINEE SATURDAY
That Grand and
Beautiful Play...
The Idyl of
the Arkansas Hills
&,
o
The companion and successor to "SHORE ACRES." Direction Wm. E.
Nankeville. An exceptionally strong company, with special scenery
for every act, and exactly as produced at the Fifth Avenue Theater,
.NEW YORK C!TY
THREE HUNDRED CONSECUTIVE NIGHTS
' U5UAL PRICES
fsferf5z!VL
Next Attraction RENTZ-SANTLEY COMPANY.
n
METRO
P0LITAN OPERA
Clarence H. Jones, Manager
Third and Yamhill Streets
- WEEK BEGINNING SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1900
MATINEE SATURDAY
n IbJnliddlaMJr U iu JU1L1UD1
I i -
Great Musical Farce
DO NOT FAIL TO TAKE IT IN
v 1,000,000 PEOPLE HAVE SEEN IT
.PUN I FUN! FUN!
250 NIGHTS IN NEW YORK
200 NIGHTS IN CHICAGO
Theater Remodeled; New Bali-Bearing Opera Chairs; New Drop Curtain; New Scenery
will be devoted to the presentation of
Sothern's comedy, "Lord Chumley.
"HUMAN HEARTS' AT CORDHAV'S.
Wcelt's Return CiiBaseiiicnt Begins
Wltli Tonight's Performance.
"Human Hearts." which will begin a
week's engagement at Cordray's- tonight,
is one of the plays of which ihe lover of
melodrama does not readily weary. It
tells the old story of love beset by trials
and tribulations, and It is none the less
absorbing because the hero is a simple
blacksmith and the surroundings those
of quiet rural life. Indeed, the picture
of the homely village folk is one of the
secrete of the success of this popular
drama, and it lends to the play the same
charm that have made unending suc
cesses of "Shore Acres" and "Tho Old
Homestead." The company is one of un
usual merit, and the fact that It has
recently played a week here to crowded
houses shows that it is appreciated by
the Portland public. The "standing-room
only" sign was out for the most of tho
flrst engagement, and many of tho regu
lar patrons of the theater were not able
to seo the play at all. Now they will
have their opportunity. ."Human Hearts"
will run the week, with tine usual Satur
day matinee.
OPENING THE WINTER SEASON.
"A Cheerful lilar" at the New Met
ropolitan Tonight.
The Metropolitan, Third and Yamhill
streets, newly painted, jfrescoed and fur
nished from top to bottom, will open its
winter season tonight, with Frazer's mu
sical farce comedy, "A. Cheerful Liar,"
built for laughing purposes only. Th:a
play had a run of nearly a year In New
York, and 20 weeks in Chicago, and has
been produced at the Strand, London, 10
packed houses for six months. It comes
to Portland, heralded as a bright, clean
melange of good things, in the hands ot
clever people.
At their head is Miss Stella BOmar, who
ha& beauty . and youth, coupled with, a
roenlnollnc nowfinfllltv find fl.' COOfl Voice.
Others in the cast arc: Frank Camp, Max
Stelnle, Bernard Jaxon, Jack Howard.
Robert Hall-croft, E. B. Gerard, Eunice
Mm dock, Rose Summers ana Leonle
Leigh. There is provided an abundance
of bright music and catchy songs and, as
in Hoyt's farces, there is a lavish display
of handsome gowns. If "A Cheerful
Liar" meets the expectations held out by
advance notices, it will serve to All the
new house for the week.
"TRIPIE ALIilANCE" COMING.
Louifl James, Charles B. Hanfortl and
Kathryn Kidder Expected Soon.
Negotiations are pending that WjII prob
ably bring to Portland early in February
one of tho most important legitimate the
atrical organizations on tour thi3 season
ter's Tale." The revival is said to be
one of tho most perfect in detail of any
production ever given of a Shakespearean
play. The scenery, costumes, draperies
and properties are as handsome as money
can provide. Moreover, the triumvirate
have first-class people in their support.
Louts James and Charles B. Hanford
stand in the front ranks in heroic trag
edy, and the work done by Miss Kidder
as Mme. Sans Gene and Lady Teazle
has given her an enviable reputation as
well. Miss Kidder possesses the happy
characteristic of approaching and cross
ing, when necessary, the thin border Una
which separates pathos from merriment.
Mr. James has never sought notoriety,
and has won his high position by legiti
mate means only.
Since reaching the Pacific coast, the
SCENE IN "HUMAN HEARTS."
Among- the plays which Mr. Frawley has
put on this season ie "With Flying Col
ors," a big spectacular and mechanical
production, which has received, favor
able attention from tho critics of tha
coast. The sceneryfor this piece was paint
ed especially for Mr. Frawley and under
his direction. Harry Duffleld. Harrington
I Reynolds, J. R. Armory, Theodora Hamil
ton. Clarence Montaine and Mr. Frawley
play the Important male coles, whdla
Mary Van Buren, Marian Barney, Phoea
McAllister and Pearl Landers assumo
the principal female ports. Mr. Frawley
will, in addition to "With Flying Colors,"
produce a number of standard playa
which are new in Portland.
Nance O'Ncil's Return.
Miss O'Neil has had a successful tour
since she left Portland, her newest suc
cess being in "Macbeth" and Ibsen-s
"Heddo. Gabbler." both of which will bo
given in Portland on the occasion of her
return engagement at Cordray's. Clay
Clement is now supporting Misa O'Neil,
and Barton Hill, "W. L. Gleoson and other
well-known actors who were with, her
earlier in the season are still members of
her company- Miss O'Neill, after playing
Portland, will sail from "Vancouver direct
to Australia, her engagement at Cordray's
being her last appearance in America.
A
the Louis James, Kathryn Kidder and
Charles B. Hanford combination, which
is appearing in elaborate revivals of "A
"Winter's Tale," "The School for Scandal"
and "Othello" throughout the country.
The "triple alliance" of stars is making
the chief feature of its repertoire this
season the costly production ot "A "Win-
business of the company has been bet
ter than was expected, the receipts aver
aging $1200 to ?14G0 .nightly.
The FrawlOT Engagement.
Interest among theater-goers is still
centered on the coming- engagement of
the Frawley company at Cordray's.
"Will Follovr "Human Hearta."
Following "Human Hearts" at Cor
dray's will come the big Renz Stantley
burlesque company, one of the oldest and
best-known organizations on th road.
Good houses have greeted it, and it his
been well spoken of by press and public
The engagement will be for a wek, with
the usual Saturday matinee.
"Solving the "Wind" Coming.
"Sowing, the "Wind," with what is said to
bo a fine "cast, will be the attraction at
the Marquam Grand, January 2ff and 27.
Dramatic Notes.
Katherine Oliver, the reader and Scotch
l impersonator, did a good business during
her recent tour tiirougn souinern -California.
She spent the holidays at her
home in Illinois, whence she will mals
I a tour of the East and South.