Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, February 17, 1921, Page 13, Image 13

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    13
mailt will consist of songs, music and
stories, with a coupla of other tea .
turea which will ba kept secret until ,
tha night of tha meeting;. Secretary
Herman says there will be no admis
sion charged for tha members.
MIDGETS WIX FROM LIONS
Holy Xame Basketball Quintet De
feats Y. 31. C. A. Youths.
Tha Holy Name Midgets basketball
Clapham Wants Finish Bout
With Ted Thye.
War Said to Be Waged in
Barbaric Fashion.
met,
team defeated tha X - Al. a. uium
on tha association floor Tuesday night
by a score of IS to .
Onirir ii Riiara were the atari fo
tha winners, while Prica played well
NEW CHALLENGE ISSUED
for the losers.
Th llneun:
ALLEGED CRIMES LISTED
n.l. Kama MM UOIIS (8).
Filer. S r JJT
White 2 " McCUln
Fl.lt J C Dr
Quick O U Drew
Xetxt Wrest IIn Contest Here to Be
Gafuoa ......
Prisoners Tortured, Women Out
Held Abont March 1, and
Britisher May Appear.' .
raged, Men Forced to Do Military
Work, Says Communication.
POLO DATES MARCH 120
TITE MORNING OREGONTAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1921
- - . i " "
m ITCH SOUGHT
Bf GRAPPLER HEBE
nrwiirni miinnrn i 1 1 n
ut VALttiA bMiibra
BRITISH PARLIAMENT
Who are tlie Gusto
V
Joe RIeg. local sportsman, who Is
having fair success In bringing tne
wrestling game back in Portland does
not know the exact date of Bis next
card, but it will Probably be held
around March 1. Attendance at the
wrestling; shows has been picking; UP
right alone, and at the match Tues
day night between Ted inye ana am
Claphara the S- R. O. card was hung
out
Clapham Is not satisfied with the
outcome of the match between him
self and Thye and would like to en
tice the midd:eweight into the ring
again. Thye holds one decision over
Clapham and held him to a draw
Tuesday night, which gives the local
(trappier one up on the contests to
date.
Clapham Intends to stay In the
city for a short time, and there Is a
possibility of Rieg using him as one
of the headllners on the next card.
Whether It will bo a return match
between Thye and Clapham or wheth
er another outside man will b
brought In es an opponent for the
British lion Is not known.
Clapham said yesterday that If he
went into the ring again with Thye
it would have to be a finish match.
The two men wrestled to within a
few minutes of the midnight hour
Tuesday night, and if they were
matched for a finish match they
would have to fret- started earlier.
There Is a city ordinance which com
pels all bouts -o be completed by 12
o'clock midnight.
Thye gained many friends ty his
howing against Clapham Tuesda
sight. , The English champion out
weighed Thye by at least 15 pounds,
and it was only by his gameness and
splendid condition that the local boy
managed to stick out the two hours
Of wrestling.
Clapham has several matches lined
ID In Honolulu and will leave for the
Hawaiian Islands next month. He will
go from here to San Francisco and
take the boat there for the islands.'
The English light-heavy has also re
ceived an offer from Jark Curley.
eastern promoter.' for a match In New
York, but was forced to decline, as
he had already accepted the offer
from Honolulu.
COROXADO TOCKXASIEXT MOST
IMPORTAXT OF TEAR.
Matches for Pacific Coast All
America Trophy and Junior
Championship Included.
McARTHUR FOR IICXTISGTOX
Congratulations Penned on Reten
tion of Coach at Cniversity.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. Eugene.
Feb. 16. (Special.) Representative
HcArthur has sent a letter of con
gratulation to Coach Shy" Hunting
ton, saying that he was- pleased with
"Shy's" retention as football mentor
for the next year. McArthur was a
graduate of the class of 1901. and for
number of years a member of the
athletic council. The letter follows:
"My Dear Shy' I have Just read
ef your re-election as coach of the
Oregon team for next year, and I
wish to take this opportunity of con
gratulating the team and the uni
versity, and to commend the dignified
and manly way In which you with
stood the attack of the little group
of trouble makers who tried to un
horse you. I am satisfied with your
record as coach and believe you will
turn out a winning team this year.
"With best wishes I am yours
faithfully. C. X. Mc ARTHUR."
GOLF APPOINTEES ACCEPT
Four Appointed Extra Members of
v Executive Committee.
NEW TOP.K, Feb. 16. Secretary
Vanderpool of the United States Golf
association, has received acceptances
from the four men recently appointed
extra members of the executive co
anittee. These are H. D. Lapham. San
rTancisco. president of the Califor
nia uoir association; J. R. Lemlst,
uenrer. president of the Trans-Mis
viBsippi uoir association; W. H
.ttooks. Cleveland, nresirlent nf th
Western Golf association; W. Walker
jr.. isew lork. president of the Inter
tojiegiate uoir association.
These appointments were made In
accordance with an amendment to ar
ncie or tne constitution, which in
creasea tne committee membership
The 15th annual pclo tournament of
the Coronado Country club will be
Dlaved March 1 to 20. inclusive. It is
the most important series of the year,
including as it does the matches for
the Pacific coast all-America polo
trophy, the Pacific coast Junior cham
pionship, the California challenge
trophy and the Hotel del Coronado
handicap cups.
Polo on the Pacific coast has ad
vanced rapidly and the caliber or
game Is recognized by experts to be
on a par with the best shown any
where. Eight teams have been entered, bu
Major Colin U. Ross, manager of the
tournament, is angling for some more
teams and there is a possibility that
Portland and Chico, CaL, may be
added. So far the Midwick club of
Los Angeles has entered two teams.
Coronado Country club two teams
Del Monte, San Mateo, Point Judith
Tigers of New York, Riverside and
Wichita, Kan., one team each.
The rules recently passed by the
American Polo association will be
used. One of the new features of
these rules Is allowing free shots for
goals on fouls and safeties. Another
new rule' is the elimination of de
ducting overtime from the succeed
ing period.
The complete championship pro
gramme at Coronado follows: March
1 to 4. Pacific coast Junior champion
ship; March 5 to 9, California chal
lenge trophy; March 10 to 12, Joe
Jessup challenge trophy; March 13 to
1$, Hotel del Coronado handicap cups.
March 17 to 20, Pacific coast all-
America polo trophy. Entries for all
events close February 28.
KIXGDOX AFTER MORE WEIGJJT
Portland Shortstop to Show Fans
What Hitter Looks Like.
LOS ANGELES. Feb. 16. (Special.)
V es Kingdon, shortstop of the
Portland Beavers, and Kid Leathers.
tjiicago Cub Infielder, left for Fern
Lodge mountain resort today to pass
a week roughing before reporting to
tneir respective clubs.
i want to put on a little more
weight," said the youthful Kingdon
today. "I'm going to show Walt Mc
Credie and Portland fans what a real
hitter looks like.
l-RAXK HUGHES IS HIGH CUX
vo inner Contestants Defeated In
17th Aanual Interstate Event.
KANSAS CITY.. Mo, Feb. 16 Frank
Hughes, Mobridge, S. D., and Art Kil
lam. St. Louis, professional, were high
men today at the 17th annual inter
state irapsnooting tournament here.
Hughes defeated S6 other contestants
by breaking 141. Killam scored 143.
but could not qualify because of the
amateur rule.
William Hoon. Jewell, la,, finished
second with 140, and C. L. Waggoner,
.ls.iaoa. .-tu., jua uura wun 135.
E. C Wheeler, I'awhuska. Okla
won the interstate amateur wing-shot
cnampionsnip irom D. K. Dickinson,
jvanstis in "inning the cup
uteier oeteaiea rank Troeh. Van
couver, w asn, when they shot off
a tie.
UEXEFTT GAME SCHEDULED
American Association to Give Te9
timonial to Louis Knapp.
CHICAGO, Feb. 16. American as
sociation clubowners today finished
a two days' session of their annual
meeting with the adoption of a reso
luuon calling for a benefit ball garni
as a testimonial for Louis Knapp.
Knapp, who officiated in the associa
tion for six years, died last fall. The
proceeds will go to his widow.
It was agreed to play tha game in
Louisville early in the season Two
men will ba chosen from each of the
seven other clubs to play Louisville.
Revival of the old custom of a ball
park bus was not adopted. .
AXGLERS. SMOKER, PLAXXED
Regular Monthly Sleeting to Be
Held on February 25.
Tha regular monthly meeting of the
Multnomah Anglers' club to ba held
Friday. February 25. will be in the
form of a smoker, according to plans
cf the entertainment committee.
It is proposed to serve sandwiches,
bavo and smokes, while tha entertain-
Flves to Play for Championship.
ROSEBURG, Or., Feb. 16. (Special.)
The Roseburg high school boys'
basketball team left for Medford this
morning, and tonight will meet the
players of the southern city. The
game is one In a series for the south
ern Oregon championship, Roseburg
won two games from Medford in this
city last week. Tomorrow night
Roseburg will play Ashland, return
ing to Medford for another game Fri
day night, doubling back to Ashland
for a second game there Saturday.
The preliminary game at Ashland
Saturday night will be between the
Roseburg and Ashland girls.
Olympics Beat Leaguers.
The Olympic club basketball team
won from tha Lincoln leaguers Tues
day night by a score of 27 to 14. The
Olympics lead at the start, but shortly
after the opening of the second period
tne leaguers caged three baskets- i
quick succession. That was the en
of their scoring, however, and th
clubmen gradually left them behind.
Stinnett and High scored all points
tor tne losers, with diminutive He
Aim leading for the Olympics.
Skater Wins Two of Three.
SARANAC LAKE. N. Y, Feb. 16.
Ed La my of Saranac Lake defeated
Everett McUowan of St. Paul n tw
out of three skating races today, du
plicating the westerner's feat of yes
terday. The two were tied at the end
of the meet.
DUBLIN. Feb. 1. Eamonn'De Va
lera, in a letter to members of the
British parliament In behalf of "rep
resentatives of Ireland," charged the
British troops with waging war on
the Irish people "contrary to all tha
rules of civilised warfare."
The communication. It is explained.
was sent lest under plea of ignorance
you should disclaim responsibility for
what is being done here in your
name."
The troops, he declared, were guilty
of torturing prisoners, assassinating
men and boys, murdering women, chil
dren and clergymen and outraging
Irish women and girls, flogging and
maltreating civilians; issuing and en
forcing "crawling" and such like hu
miliating and degrading orders; tak
ing men from their work and forcing
them to do military duty or work at
military labor as slave gangs; burn
ing and looting factories, creameries
and shops and houses; the destruc
tion of farmsteads and farm produce
and killing and maiming of livestock.
Although you have put your
troops on active service In Ireland,"
he say 3. "although you have sought
to Justify many vile deeds committed
as aots of war and although you
are armed with the deadliest modern
machinery of war and protected by
every means known to technical skill,
you now seek to purchase immunity
from defensive action from our party
by taking possession of all firearms,
an offense for which an Irishman may
be arrested and shot and for which
one has been shot and by carrying
Irish citizens in your military ex
peditions against our people.
"The orders to your troops are to
hoot these hostages, should the unit
wfth which they are traveling be at
tacked. Already under the specious
pretense that they were trying to es
cape, many Irish prisoners have been
brutually murdered by your troops.
Now representative' Irish citizens are
to be murdered similarly on the
ground, pretended or true, that the
party with which they are moving is
attacked.
"These things are done because It
Is your will that they should be done;
if you willed otherwise, they would
cease. It is you, not your troops, who
are primarily responsible.
ENOCH ID EN IS REVIVED
MAX BELIEVED DEAD COMES
TO BREAK UP MARRIAGE.
Annulment Proceedings Develop
Strange Case of Reappearance
of Missing Husband.
didn't
Football Star Graduates.
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Feb. 16. Ar
nold Horween, whose career as cap
tain oi lootoau at Harvard was
marked by an unbeaten record for the
eleven, was graduated from Harvard
today.
NEW ASSESSMENT MADE
Lists Prepared in Proposal to
Widen Glisan Street.
New assessment lists for the pro
posed widening of Glisan stret be
tween Fourth and Third, which will
throw virtually one-half of- the cost
of the Improvement on the railroads
owning the Steel bridge, have been
prepared by O. Laurgaard, city engl
neer.
Under the new apportionment, prop
erty from Glisan east to midway be
tween uav'j and Everett streets and
from Third to Broadway would be
Included in the first assessment dis
trict. From Third and Glisan to the
union station and from Third on both
sides of Glisan to Sixteenth street
would also be included.
Under the proposed Improvement
Glisan street would be widened in
diagonal trapezoid from Fourth street
to tne bteel bridge. The cost of
quiring the property and locating new
siaewaias win oe MJ.4UU. -
WELTY ASKS MEETING
More Evidence to Support Impeach.
ment Charges to Be Given.
WASHINGTON, D. C Feb. 16. Rep
resentative Welty, democrat. Ohio,
who brought Impeachment ' charges
against f ederal judge Landls In the
house Monday, asked Chairman Vol
stead today to call an early meeting
of the house Judiciary committee.
This Is so he might present ad-
itional evidence to support his
charges growing out of Judge Landia'
acceptance of the position of arbi
trator of organized baaebalL
Through the drab grist of the di
vorce mill, grinding in the court of
Presiding Circuit Judge Kavanaugh
yesterday, the dramatic tale of a
modern Enoch Arden emerged.
Will Jeffrey was his name, and
though he left the city, when, on his
return from a long absence, he found
his wife had wed again, in the belief
that he was dead, it was too late. She
had glimpsed him in a street crowd,
had told her second husband, and an
nulment proceedings were begun
Mrs. Nellie Gatos Is the woman in
the case. She has resumed the name
of Nellie Jeffrey. Whether divorce
proceedings on the ground of deser
tlon will be instituted against Jef
frey, that Gatos and the woman
might be remarried, was not dis
closed.
The wife and second1 husband
Christ Gatos. both were In court to
testify. Mrs. Gatos said that her first
husband had left her and that some
time later she lerrned from a cousin
of his in San Francisco that he had
been shot and burled near his mother.
It was afterward that she was mar
ried to Gatos.
A few months sgo Jeffrey returned
to Portland, heard from friends that
his wife was married again, happily,
and disappeared, But before he left,
Mrs. Gatos saw him at a distance in
a crowd.
"I went the other way I
want him to see me," she said In
court. Later, thinking the matter
over, she decided to tell her husband.
The annulment proceeding, initiated
by Gatos, followed.
W hen Mrs. Hael Winsor, wife of
Ralph Winsor, manager of the Star
theater, returned home not very long
ago from a trip to Tacoma she found
hairpins of a variety she did not af
fect in their apartment; also gar
ments of a feminine nature which
never had been worn by her, she told
Judge Kavanaugh. She received her
decree.
Because her husband was "socially.
financially and mentally an impedi
ment to her 'progress" did not Justify
the severing of marital ties between
Nellie McCune and Frank H. Mc
Cune, which had bound the couple
for 25 years, decided Circuit Judge
McCourt after a warmlv contested
divorce action. Both Mr. and Mrs.
McCune were Christian Science prac
titioners, and of late the wife made
more money than the husband. There
were two children. Mrs. McCune tes
tified that on one occasion Rh a de
livered a speech to several thousand
persons In the public auditorium, that
her husband, who was In the audi
ence, left before she could iret awav
ana was asleep at home when she
arrivea mere alone. Mr. McCune in
reoutiai asserted that he had written
the speech for his wife, had listened
to her rehearse It for a week nnd
eft because she was surrounded h-
congratulatory friends with whom he
uiiouunt sne was going home.
Jjerauit divorces trranted h .v.
presiding Judge included: Bertha B
from Robert C. Fordnevi u frm
Joseph Remington; Evan H. from
Anna L. Hatcher. Cora from mn v
Wallace. Ralph TV. from Caroline
Kepler. Gladys from Edward Bintlipp
Hazel from Ralph Winsor, Mary J
from John E. Wilcox, and Lei. fr ."
Henry Mutschler.
Divorce suits were filed hv XT.
against Eugene Lounshurv and
B. against Lewis J. Hayse.
LNCE in a while even
now somebody buys
a car just to make
the neighbors sit up and
take notice.
But ninety-nine per cent
of American families buy a
car because they know 4of
ten times more useful ways
to use it than even car-makers
themselves can think of.
The greatest thing that ever
happened to the motor in
dustry was when the motor
car achieved the dignity of
. being an essential item in the
family budget.
A fact just as wholesome
in its bearing on the tire
business.
DURING 1920 the
makers of United States
Tires had their chance to
prove the mental good health
of the average American
citizen.
Nobfcdy can find out any
thing about motorists by
lumping more than 8,000,000
of them together as a mere
mass of tire prospects. Nor
by jumping into a free-for-all
tampede for their tire-money.
But when you think of
them as individual, separata
persons, surprising things
happen.
It is the United States
policy to make tires for the
men and women who ride in
the cars not just for cars,
no matter what price, weight
or wheel-base.
It is this same policy that
remembers that Americans
were raised on quality ideas
about merchandise. When
was there everany faith in job
lotters and price-dickerers?
ALL through 1920 every
. pressure'was brought to
bear to lower U. S. standards
in order to get out more
tires.
But the United States
Rubber Company didn't in-
tend to lower standards just '
to sell more tires.
It held to its standards.
As a result it satisfied more
people. It registered economy
in more individual pocket
books.
These people had their
own ideas about their own
money. They placed empha
sis on confidence.
They passed by the flam
boyant tire-bargains on every
street in the country, and
went calmly to the legitimate
dealer and bought tires certi
fied by the United States
quality-mark.
They got the best of it.
THIS Is why the Company'
feels that it has more than
a "market," It has a fol w
ing. Independent-thinking,
brass-tack human beings. .
In 1921 this following will
get fresh, live tires of current
production.
There will be more and
better U. S. Tires this year.
And there will be many
thousands more people added
to the long nation-wide roll
of customers for United
States products.
United States Rubber Company
Fifty-three
Factories
The Oldest find Largest
Rubber Organization in the World,
Tvio hundred and
thirty-five Branches
PRUNES EO EVERYWHERE
CALIFORXLA. E VEX, GETS
TASTE OF REAL FRUIT.
Sales on Enormous Scale Reported
as Result of Campaign to
Move Product.
army wagons will be located at Sixth
and Alder streets.
The Boy Scouts also will give a
demonstration at that time with
bugle and drum corps.
Mail to Go to Berlin by Plane.
WASHINGTON, D. C. Feb 1 Th".
teamer Mount Clay, from New n.v
February 19. will carry mall for air
plane delivery to Berlin and Rhine
points in Germany, according to .n
nnouncement today by the oostoffi
epartment The mail will he dn.
red from the ship to a German hn.
gar in Cuxharri for forwarding,
Oregon prunes are even being sent
to California as a result of the Oregon
prune week campaign.
Fred S. Bynon, secretary of the
campaign committee, reported yester
day that a number of orders had been
received from California people and
that others had been received from
Oregon people for delivery to Cali
fornia friends.
In addition, the Oregon prune is in
vading practically ail other sections
of the United States as a result of the
prune week drive. Quantities are be
ing bought by the committee for de
livery in all parts or tne country.
Mr. Bynon said that reports 'now
coming indicated that a largev ole
would be made In the 22,000,000
pounds of prunes unsold in the state
at the beginning of prune week. In
addition, he said, purchases for relief
work were proving no small item.
"To my mind, though the quantity
of prunes sold now is but one phase
of the matter," he said, "the prune
campaign is putting over some adver
tising that will affect the Oregon
prune market for all time."
The prune committee was advised
from Salem yesterday that Governor
Olcott. .Secretary of State Kozer and
Roy FItner president of the state
senate, engaged in a prune-eating
contest on the steps of the state house
yesterday. The governor was reported
to have won.
A street demonstration Saturday is
announced as a closing feature of
prune week, Mr. Bynon reported yes
terday. The Spanish-American War
veterans at that time will get out
some real army wagons and stew
prunes for the newsies and others.
The veterans will be under the lead
ership of Seneca Fouts.
In case permission is obtained from
the mayor, it was announced, the.
WOMAN T0GEJ NEW JOB
Mrs. Willaiiiotta McEIroy to Be
Deputy City Attorney.
The city council opened the way
for Portland's first woman deputy
city attorney yesterday, when they
abolished the position of law clerk
and created an additional position of
deputy city attorney. Frank S. Grant,
city attorney, announced his inten
tion of appointing Mrs. Willametta
McEIroy, law clerk of the municipal
legal department, to the new va
cancy. Mrs. McEIroy has been in the cltj
attorney's office for the past 11 years.
having been appointed when Grant
was formerly city attorney. She
studied law at the University of Ore
gon law school and was admitted to
practice in Oregon about three years
ago.
As a law clerk Mrs. McEIroy drew
the contracts for the structure and
superstructure of the Broadway bridge
in such a satisfactory manner that
only minor detail changes were re
quired in her original drafts. She
will specialize in drawing contracts
and ordinances and in tax matters.
No change in salary from her present
one of 1165 was provided In the ordi
nance, which was introduced by Mayor
Baker.
Movie Censorship Provided.
SPRINGFIELD, 111, Feb. 16. "A
mild movie" censorship would be made
possible under the provisions of a
bill Introduced in the Illinois legisla
ture today requiring manufacturers
of moving picture films to pay license
fees to the department of registration
and education.
Eastern Folk Order Prunes.
ROSEBURG. Or., Feb. 16. (Special.)
Prune week activities here already
have been productive. Several orders
for Douglas county fancy prunes havel
been placed by easterners. Tomor
row the high school students will pa.
rade the business streets, each mail
ing a letter to someone east extoltlng
the merits of Douglas county prunes.
Cable Bill Not Presbed.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Feb. 18 Be.
cause of the crush of other business,
the senate Interstate commerce com
mittee decided today not to press at
this time Senator Kellogg's bill pro
posing state department regulation
of cable landings In the United States.
tr4' ' " '
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