Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, January 24, 1921, Page 9, Image 9

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    TIIE MORXIXG. OREGONIAN, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, -1921
9
innrn niiin
AUbA
mi i rn
m L'ALLLLI
TURBULENT PEOPLE
Pastor Says Nation Is Close
to Frontier of Civilization.
CRIME WAVE DISCUSSED
Dr. W. T, McElveen Declares That
United States Police Sys
tem lias Broken Down.
"We Americans are a turbulent, un
disciplined people. Many in our
midst turn very easily to violence and
to lawlessness. The fact is, we
haven't got very far away from the
old frontier civilization with its vig
ilance committees and its lynching
'bees' Even our courts often hold
the law In contempt. Judge Anderson
and Judge Charles Hughes insist that
the attorney-general of the United
States ordered illegal invasions of
homes and illegal seizures of proper
ty in Its attempt to put down tne
W. W. hysteria."
Thus taid Or. W. T. McElveen In his
sermon last night at the First Con
pregationaj church in discussing the
question. Is America (Join? to th
logs?" and commenting upon the
crime wave.
"This crime wave." he said, "is the
logical aftermath of the war. The
war gave men's animal pass'ons
chance to express themselves, and It
familiarized them with guns and the
killing of men. ,
Pollre System ' Falls.
"Our pclice system has broken
down. Policing is a science. It is
jrofession. C'rim'nals have developed
a kind of technique in the perform
ance of their crimes. To catch these
clever criminals the police must be
more clever than they. Raymond
Fosdick, in his informing book, The
American Police System.' gives some
fl'ttlllllS DlftLISLlta LilttL DilUtT IHAl
while thi crime wave knows no geo
graphical boundaries, it is worse in
America than any place else.
"In 1316 there were 9 murders In
London and 105 murders in Chicago
yet Chicago is only one-third the" size
of London. There were 20 more mur
ders in Chicago with a population of
2. 230.000 than there were in all Eng
Luivd ard Walea with a population of
2S. 000.000. In 1915 New Tork had
J1.6T.2 burglaries, London had 1459.
There were more automobiles stolen
In five large American cities last year
than woiud be necessary to move the
whole cfty of Geneva to another ete,
if tha league of nations so decreed.
People Are Blamed.
"This does not mean that the
American police are inactive. They
break th world's record for arrests.
In 1917 here were 32.520 more ar
rests in Boston than in London, and
there were 111,874 more arrests m
Kew York than in London. But with
all their activities in arresting, the
rate of crime does not diminish.
Sometimes our police 'strain at gnats
and swallow camels.' But the Amer
ican people are to blame. Even de
cent people break minor laws. If we
would all behave ourselves for a
oouple of weeks perhaps the Portland
police could catch shadow.
worse, but he is vastly in the minor
ity, and we find that while wrong is
in the land, It does not "rule; that
while the devil walks up and down
the land, he never owned a home
stead, but is a squatter, and that just
as Ion? as sunshine keeps chasing
shadows, cheerfulness d i s p I &..C e s
gloom, and Ood Is In the land, wrong
will never rule.
"The spirit of brotherhood Is abroad
and is growing. Men are waking Op
to the fact of these wrongs and the
need to right them, and are willing
to make the sacrifice and pay the
price to advance civilization.
"While the world seems upset and
conditions discouraging, the church
is building a programme and raising
up leaders to right these wrongs.
The need of our own country is to
Americanize and Christianize our
people, to instill In their minds the
necessity of a brotherhood founded
on the polden rule."
Dr. Kohlstadt outlined the world
cantenary programme beinr carried
out by the Methodist church, and told
of its accomplishments in assisting
this world need. He quoted Babson,
the barometer of the business world.
who says "The integrity of any com
munity is better than its stock's and
bonds. Business safety is due to
churches and Christian principles. The
issue confronting the world today is
a moral Issue."
FOREST DEPLETION
IS
OHD
Sales Market Is Injured, De
clare Lumbermen.
DISARMAMENT IS DISCUSSED
Dr. Joshua Stansfleld Declares
'united States Should Lead. t.
At the First Methodist church last
night Dr. Stansfleld, in speaking for
international disarmament on a. slid
ing scale and upon international honor
and agreement, urged that the Upited
States ehoulfl take the initiative and
a bold leadership in this most urgent
and necessary movement.
"America is the greatest world re
public of a free people and represen
tative government, founded upon the
'rule of reason' and human rights.
said Dr. Stansfleld. "True to her best
self, Ametca should lead for the 'rule
of reason' and not 'force' in the life of
the nations. ' -
"Further, America Is today the rich
est, ablest and best equipped and re
sourceful of the nations of the world
and with a smaller national debt and
military burden than any of the lead
ing nations.
'yet America's debt is menacingly
large today and the estimates recently
presented to congress for maintenance
of the army and navy for the next
fiscal year amount to more than
JD.OOO.OOO for every working day of
the year. Our naval estimates for this
year are nearly $700,000,000.
The increase or continuance of
present armaments would be a sui
cidal policy, for it drains, the people
excessively by taxation and diverts
the productivity of the nation, and the
burden and draft will be intolerable.
As Major-General Bliss, America's
representative in the supreme war
council, well says, 'Disarmament is
the only means of preserving the
world from bankruptcy and civiliza
tion from ruin.''
SUBSTITUTES HELD USED
A :
Talk of Timber Resources Being
Decreased Called Injurious Be
cause Demand la Lessened.
N
LATMEX'S DCTtES .DISCUSSED
PASTOR SPEAKS OF DIVORCE
Kn. G. H. Bennett Declares So
ciety 31 use Solve Problem.
Marriage and divorce were dis
cussife by Rev. George H. Bennett in
his morning sermon yesterday at -Pat
ton Methodist church on "lue ills
takes of Jesus."
"The law of marriage and divorce
mentioned by Jesus, is pointed out as
a notable example of his unwise treat
ment of this problem," said Dr. Ben-
nctd "The Catholic and Protestan
churches, following the teaching of
Jesus declare divorce lawful, either
not at all, or only on the ground or
adultery. The objector says such
dogma might be expected from an
unmarried zealot, who knew nothing
of the problems of marriage from per
eonal experience
"It is known the world over mar
riage is a lottery, in which a prize is
not always drawn. This law of
Christ, the critic declares, presupposes
all men and women to be wise, to
know all the mental, moral and phy
eical qualities of the person selected
for wedlock.' But as people are not
all wise, and have but a superficial
knowledge of others, such a law Is
void.
"He says, the Sabbath was made for
man, and not man for the Sabbath
and likewise was marriage made for
mankind, and not mankind made for
marriage. Wedlock is not irtended to
be a curse, but a blessing to the race.
If divorce be denied, or be granted
on the one ground only then mar
riage becomes a curse in many In
stances.
"Many homes have been turned to a
Jiell upon earth by cruelty, drunken
ness and Incompatibility. And does
Ood require men and women to en
dure such conditions, and be robbed
of a true home,- because their judg
ment proved unwise? Wedlock does
not carry any such penalty, morally.
The objector thinks also, if people
were all wise, they would never marry
Unhappily but since many do marry
unwisely and unhappily. It is a de
mand of nature and of reason that
such ties be severed.
"Every person is entitled to a happy
home unless by lawlessness he for
eits that right. The critic denounces
the law of Jesus, und the churches.
as contrary to nature an4 reason, the
enlightened world so regards it, and
45 of the 4S states in-the union so
regard this law.
"Society was left to work out these
principles In laws, politics and rituals.
to the world now lives under the
golden rule, and laws of justice, pru
dence, temperance and mercy. Basing
wieir laws on tnese high principles,
46 states have chosen a middle ground
between the extremes on divorce.
recognizing certain crying evils suf
Ziclent for divorce. If churches fail
to see this, it may. be because "the
eniiaren or this world are wiser in
their generation, than the children of
ffM, as Jesus said."
LITE'S OBJECTIVES nitrrccrn
Dr. E. D. Kohlstadt Says World Is
Facing Moral Issue. ,
Tr. E. D. Kohlstadt. executive sec
retary of the centenery area of St.
Paul, Minn., filled the pulpit of the
Sunnyside Methodist church yester
day morning, and preached a svmon
on "Life's Objectives." He said in
part:
"As I travel from city to city and
state to state, I find days of joy and
days of tears, times of rejoicing; and
disappointments, and so it i in life,
but in the blending of all- these ex
periences, combined rith a faith In
God. the great rules make the suc
cessful life.
"The pessimist with his prophecy
of despair is abroad everywhere, pro
claiming that the world is getting
Salesmanship, the will to go to the
builders and big consumers of lum
ber and substitute products and con
vince them that lumber meets their
needs, is the surest means of bring
ing the premier industry of the Pa
cific northwest back to Its feet, de
clared E. T. Howson, western editor
of Railway Age. in an address at the
banquet tendered the visiting delega
tions of the Mountain States Lumber
Dealers.- American Wood Preservers
and National Tie Producers' associa
tions by the West Coast Lumbermen's
association at the Portland Saturday
nlgst. v ,
Lack of effective salesmanship te
combat the, inroads- of eteel and ce
ment have cost the lumbermen mil
lions of dollars of business in the
railroad industry, alone.- Mr. Howson
declared, quoting statistics bearing
out the decline of lumber used in
freight car and bridge construction.
Mr. Riley Gives Ltue.
Lumber interests also sholld work
to overcome the impression that tim
ber is almost depleted, for the im
pression only acts as a spur to the
manufacturer of use substitutes, it
was asserted.'
Frank Branch Riley delivered his
illustrated, lectureon the great north
west, placing special emphasis on the
forest scenes, lumber manufacture
and transportation.
Howard Andrews, Nashville, Tenn.,
of the National Tie Producers: C. M.'
Talmadere, Elizabeth, N. J., American
Wood Preservers; R. D. Mundell, Den
ver, Mountain States Lumber Deal
ers: E. B. Humphreys. Raton. N. M.:
John Foley, forester of the Pennsyl
vania Railroad, and Mrs. O. H. Elli
son, Grand Junction, Colo., were called
upon as representative speakers.
Mr. Talmadge spoke of Chester J.
Hogue, in connection with the New
York office of the West Coast Lum
bermen's association and the work he
Is doing in the eastern 'markets.
R. W. Vinnedge. North Bend, Wash.,
president of the West Coast Lumber
men, presided as toastmaster.
Highway. Trip to Be ' nken.
The delegates were guests on a
trip over the Columbia highway and
at dinner at Crown Point yesterday.
They left last nigrft. for San Fran
cisco and other California points.
The .visitors passed Saturday at
various points of interest adjacent to
Portland. Producers and preservers
visited the Clark & Wilson Lumber
company plant, the Charles R. McCor
mick company plant at St. Helens and
inspected logging operations and log
booms and rafts along the Columbia.
The Mountain States party visited the
Eastern & Western plant following
their arrival from Grays Harbor.
Earlier in the trur the 84 members in
the party visited vt Spokane, Seattle
and Aberdeen.
-riM& ,.a-n 1 1
Rev.' Joseph Boyd Issues) Call for
Congregation's Help.
The value of laymen to the modern
church and their peculiar responsi
bilities were discussed by 'the Rev.
Joseph Boyd af Church of Christ yes
terday morning.
"Be ye doers or the word and not
hearers only is Hie call to Christian
laymen." said the pastor. "Laymen
must place the church in. relation to
human conditions and needs. They
must help the church escape the dan
gers of hesitation, helplessness and
unfruitfulness.
"Lavmn tiaed trt thlnlr flhAtit nth
ers and not of themselves If they JAX REPAYMENT PROBLEM
from a field to a forco. Instead of
demanding time and attention from Treasury
the ministry, they can place their
own time and efforts at the disposal
of the church. Instead of being ex
acting In their demands of the church,
they can be liberal in their own serv
ice for the church.
"Laymen need to help a cause and
not merely enjoy a ministry. Laymen
alone can determine whether the
church shall be a 'religious club with
a private chaplain,' or a church ready
to give Itself as a ransom for many.
The demand of the day is that the
church serve the needs of the com
munity, and not merely live off of
the resources of the community."
STUDENTS HEAR SERMON
Baccalaureate Services Are Held in
Three Churches. '
Baccalaureate services were held
yesterday,in three Portland churches
for the graduating classes of the
Washington, Franklin and James
John high schools, who will be pre
sented with their diplomas Friday
night. -
The largest class, that at Wash
ington, attended the jfirst Presby
terian church in the morning in a
body. Dr. Harold Leonard Bowman,
the pastor, delivered the sermon on
'Solomon In Serge."
The Franklin graduates last night
heard Dr. Harold H. Griffis speak at
the First Chrlstmn enure on "Be
lieving a Lie." . The class at James
John attended the University Park
Methodist Episcopal church In the
morning. The pastor. Rev. H. T.
Atkinson, delivered the sermon.
Controller Wants Law
. to Prevent Duplication;
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23. Congress
has been asked by Controller of the
Treasury Warwick so to amend th
revenue laws as to prevent double or
triple repayment of taxes erroneously
collected. Many cases of actual du
plication of repayments have arise l,
he declared, aj.d have been discoverei
with difficulty.
The controller pointed out that un
der the present law three separate
claims might be filed by a taxpayer.
one for remission or abatement, of tha
amount assessed, another for actual
refund in cash and the third for
credit for sucn amounts on a current
tax return. Millions of dollars in
overpayments have been made by
taxpayers, but it was said that the in
ternal revenus bureau was unable to
estimate the full amount which must
be refunded.
-A NATION-WIDE 1NSTITUTION-
'resell
OCKS
D
e
Thotisand.
of
lSCOUIl
Dollar
ted.
The J. C. PENNEY CO.'S 312 Stores in 27 States, doing a business annually of
approximately FIFTY MILLION DOLLARS, are Meeting New Price Condi
tions. Every Price Based on Replacement Value, Regardless of the Previous Cost.
J BATH TOWELS .
- 2 for 39
-. . . -
Good heavy towels 33x18,
SILK UMBRELLAS '
$1.98 -:
Wanted colors fancy tips and
handlers.-
NEW DRESS VOILES
'V 49 YD.
The new spring colors 40 Inches
i - wide.'-
HUCK TOWELS
;; 2 for 25
Excellent quality generous size.
"During these abnormal times many un
scrupulous merchants, in order to get from
Sunder their load, resort to misleading
statements and deceptive methods which
prostitute advertising and result in a loss
of confidence among the buying public.
They become suspicidus and know not to
, whom to look for fair treatment and the
Yight price. We want you to know and feel
t that you can with impunity pin your faith
M 'to. the J. C. Penney Company arid be sure
that your confidence will never be abused.
We invite you to our store that you may
- share in the tremendous savings offered,
. knowing that you will not be disappointed.
. We invite close and accurate compari
son of our merchandise and prices because
comparison is the- true test of value.
MEN'S NEW SPRING
HATS $1.9S
Black, brown, green, gray,
our window.
See
YOUTHS' KHAKI
PANTS $1.69
A good Pnt. well made, all sizes.
GENUINE HANES
UNION SUITS $1.49
Heavy ribbed, all sizes for men.
MEN'S AND, BOYS'
CAPS 69
New spring caps brown, blue,
green.
CHILDREN'S PLAY
SUITS 83
Blue and stripe denim 3 to 8
years.
BLACK BEAUTY SATEEN
SHIRTS 89
Heavy Satin, Triple Stitched, '
14 to 17. " ;.,
MEN'S MECHANICS' SUITS
$2.69,
Heavy Khaki and Blue Denim, union made,
34 to 44.
Men's Heavy
CASSIMERE AND
WORSTED PANTS
$2.98
A wonderful pant neat patterns.
CHILDREN'S
RIBBED HOSE 25
Sturdy hose for toy or girl all
sizes.
ALL-SILK
PETTICOATS $2.98
Jerseys and Taffetas beautiful
color combinations.
Another
100
Women's
One-Piece Dresses
Beautiful dresses of wavy all-wool serge and
trlcotine. See them in our window. Most
all sizes.
GILLETTE RAZOR
SETS $2.98 t
The regular J5 and J3.50 sets.
BOYS' OVERALLS
3 to 10 It to 17
S9? 9Sd
Heavy 220 blue d-nira no better
made
NEW SERGE SKIRTS
$3.98 :
Tailored and pleated models.
Rich navy blue, heavy-weight
serges. Most all sizes. A real buy.
HjlHl.L7.Ii.il t4,'iV'''''Wll,'J!-'i'-'J"''
Ill Fourth Street, Just North of Washington
WE NEVER HOLD A SALE
MEN'S UNION-MADE
OVERALLS $1.19
Heavy 220 blue denim. Both high
and-suspender backs jumpers to
match at same price. No better
made.
WrtisVVTiA
LEGION CONCERT TONIGHT
Dr. Emil Eddi, Pianist and Com
poser, Will Be Heard.
Dr. Emil Enna, pianist and com
poser,, assisted by a group of other
artists, will give a musical concert
In the clubrooms of the Portland post
of the American Legion In the Flat-
iron building tolfight. This will be j
the first of a series of. educational I
entertainments to be given, for the
legion men.
In addition to the concert there will
be a short talk by A. G. Clark, man
ager of the Assoalated Industries of
Oregon.
Dr. Enna is planning a large com
munity s'ng in February for the ben
efit of the Portland post.
GERMANS HINT AT DEAL
Supposedly Inspired Xewspaper Is
Favoring Indemnity Bargain.
LON'DOX, Jan. 23. The Daily News'
Berlin correspondent Tuesday wired
that apparently inspired statements
In tonight's newspapers, notably the
Berliner Tageblatt, suggest that the
German government is ready to ac
cept the entente's proposal not to fix
the total indemnity now, but to agree
to payayent in Ave yearly install
ments. ".Consent to this proposal will
be givn only if the entente makes
six concessions, as follows:
One, Upper Silesia to remain Ger
man: two, property connscatea Dy
allies to be restored; three, the armies
of occupation to be reduced; four,
freedom of commerce to be guaran
teed: five, the restoration of certain
shipping; six, the indemnity to be defi-
niteoy fixed as soon as possible.
Estate Valued at $18,000.
SALEM. Or., Jan. 23. (Special.)
Mrs. Luj-inda Patterson left an estate
valued nt approximately H.fldO, ac-
$75.00
cording to papers filed with the
county clerk Saturday. Two-third of
the estate is In Nebraska, where Mrs.
Patterson -lived before coming to Ma
rion county.- Mrs. Patterson died here
recently. -
Promotion Asked for Liggett.
WASHINGTON, Jan: 23.--Promotion
of 'Major-General Hunter Liggett to
lieutenant-general is propose In a
bill introduced Saturday in the house.
Oouncilmen Quit Jobs.
' CENTRAXJA, Wash., Jan. 23. (Spe
cial.) J. L. McCoy, who recently dis
posed of fels business interests in Pe
Ell, and Frank Rhyn have resigned
as members of the Pe Ell council,
Rhyne to accept an appointment as
city marshal. John Fear and Tl W.
Hockett have been appointed to fill
the respective vacancies.
Noted Civil Engineer Dead.
HARTFORD, Conn., Jan. 23. Lu
ther W. Burt, 73, civil engineer, who
had been connected with many rail
roads in h'o professional work, dded
Saturday.
Whitcomb Funeral Today.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hannah
www
as, ! u 1 1 . s i
ii i Waif I1
1
Salem Armory to Be Inspected.
SALEM, Or., Jan. 23. (Special.)
Annual arrffory Inspection conducted
by regular army officers from Camp
Lewis will take place in February,
according to the tentative schedule
received here. The first inspection
probably will take place at Ashland
on February 7, followed by similar
inspections in other sections of the
state.
on savings at the "Broadway"
will earn 'as much as
$100.00 '
in any other bank In the city,
because the Broadway pays
the popular rate obtainable in
other cities:
Indian Timber Confab Called.
NESPELEM, Wash., Jan. 23. (Spe
cial.) Lee Muck, supervisor of for
ests on. the Colvitle Indian reserva-
on, left here a lew days ago en
route to Washington, D. C. He and
several other supervisors have been
called to Washington to confer with
Cato Sells, commissioner of Indian
ffairs, about timber on the reserva
tions and forest fire prevention.
Best grades coal. Prompt delivery.
Diamond Coal Co. Bdwy. 3037. Adv.
4
on regular savmgs; 3 on
special savings su-bject to
check; no charge to depositors
for collecting out -or -town
checks; no service charge on
cnecJiing accounts; open all
day Saturdays till 8 P. M'.
Phon your want ads to -The Ore-
gonian. Main tviu. Automatic &60-9.
B
Broadway and Stark.
LOWER PRICES
Due to the lower cost of flour we are now able to
re-establish a price of - ,
15c for Our lVfe-Ib. Loaf
During the past period of high prices we have
strictly maintained
AKE-RITE
Quality
We pledge ourselves to continue this policy regard
less of price changes.
Doughnuts, dozen now . M . .:.(... . .25c
Snails, dozen now ........... . ..-sr.- 25c
Rock Cookies, dozen now . .... . . . .-. . 15c
Fig Cookies, dozen now ..... 3.,..., ...v... , 15c
Oatmeal Cookies, dozen now ... .;.,. 15c
A Full Line of Bakery Goods
1 v
.No.
No.
OUR THREE STORES
1. 251 Yamhill St., Bet 2d and 3d.
2, 286 Yamhill St. Bet. 4th and 5 th.
No '3. 269 Alder St., Bet. 3d and 4th.
A. Whitcomb. who died suddenly last
Saturday afternoon, will be held at
1 o'clock this afternoon at the East
Side Undertaking parlors, l4 East
Alder street. Br. W. T. McElveen
nastnr of the First Cansresratlonal
:'
!:
ft
v
Cleanliness As You
Expect to Find It
If there is any one particular thing in
sisted upon in the maintenance of our
three lunchrooms, that thing is Cleanliness.
Wherever possible, mechanical devices
are used in the handling of food. Em
ploye are expected and compelled to
conform to the strictest laws of sanitation.
You can really enjoy a meal in any of
our lunch rooms, safe in the knowledge
that everything is clean.
COJWHVIENT LOCATIONS
2 91
"WASHINGTON
375
VSHINGTON
AT WEST PARK.
l 1
-tV.'
n
'If!
IffiEKTY THEATRE BIEC tjKMffigj)
church,
Ices.
will have charge of the serv-
P?QEZ5u33
FOR SALE
I have a limited amount of
stock in a financial institution,
composed largely of bankers
and successful men of the
northwest, that I will sill in
blocks and on terms to suit the
buyer. This is a permanent
institution and is destined 10
have a wonderful Influence in
the state, l-'or further infor
mation . write
BJ S5S, OrfK"nlnn.
rosace
BLISS
3?
s
lOHzoo.eusJ
P0HTHUTA&0
lODATL'RC OK
tvtflr PACK4SE
' OF TIB'.m
ANsrowsw
'Over One Million Tablets Taken Daily"
TONES UP
SYSTEM
CORRECTS
CONSTIPATION
NO CALOMEL Oft HABIT FOBMIUfi !
MADE FHOM FOOTS. HEKBS BARKS ONLY
MONEY-BACK CUARANTEE Iff EACH OI
ALON'ZO O. DLISS MEDICAL CO.
Est. 1888. WASHINGTON', D. C. 4
Deep-Seated Coughs
develop serious complication! if neglected.
KJwe mn old nd time-tried remedy that
baa given satisfaction for more thaanlty years
1J
ght
rung m1
epYour Eyfes
n Clear,." Houlth'
rita ts-fraafjfcCar Book-Mania- Ca.UvffHs
"VHIIIRIl
Ke
i
r.