Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, January 18, 1921, Page 18, Image 18

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    IS
THE 3IORXIXG OKEGOXIAX,v TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1921
mm
GIVES
AID, SAYS ETHERIDGE
Attack Declared No Help
Locating Assets.
CHARGES ARE MADE AGAIN
aiorris Is Alleged to Have Taken
Some $2 00,000 Out of Cor
poration Funds.
"Who has the missins assets te-
loiiKins to Morris Brothers, IncT"
That is the one question of supreme
interest to every creditor of the de
funct bond corporation, according to
John L. Etheridge, its ex-president,
who late yesterday afternoon renewed
his declaration that Fred S. Morris, "if
he will tell the truth as he knows it,
can clear up this mystery."
Mr. Etheride criticised a statement
given out Sunday by Dan J. Malarkey
of counsel for Mr. Morris, saying it
was not true and did not uncover the
missing assets, but was more in the
nature of an attack upon Mr. Bther-
idfre than anything else.
Mr. KtheridRe yesterday reiterated
bin nrevious statement, made on the
Htnes st.mrl in chancery proceed
inprs last week, to the effect that Mr.
Morris had transferred out of Morris
Bros.. Inc.. approximately $100,000 of
various securities and cash, in addi
tion to $100,000 in cash said to have
been presented to Miss .Henrietta a.
Morria, his sister.
Threats Are Alleged.
Another feature developed through
. a statement by Mr. Etherldge was
that Mr. Morris obtained from the
Pinkertons the complete prison rec
ord of Mr. Etherldge and kept it in a
lock-box for 12 years.
"Morris often reminded me that he
had this prison record." said Mr. Eth
eridge. "Is it not odd that he never
saw fit to use it until after I left
Portland on a vacation trip at his
own request?"
That he has "uncovered interesting
facts" relating to certain securities
which Mr. Etheridge swore were in
possession of Mr. Morris and Miss
Morris, but which in reality belong
to Morris Bros.. Inc., was admitted
by Receiver Whitcomb. This and the
fact that the case in chancery was
postponed again in federal court be
cause of the absence of Robert F. Mc
Guire, master, and the filing of addi
tional creditors' schedules with the
bankruptcy referee, were features of
the situation.
Ktherldare Aids Receiver.
Receiver "Whitcomb declined to en
ter into details concerning what he
has traced from the testimony of Mr.
Etheridge concerning the sworn
statement that Mr. Morris and Miss
Morris have, in addition to loo.uuu
cash given to Miss Morris, approxi
mately $200,000 in various securities
belonging to the wrecked corpora
tion. Since last Thursday, Mr. F.tfteridge
has been going to his old offices at
the corporation's headquarters on
Stark street for two hours each after
coon and, together with Receiver
Whitcomb and staff, has been as
sisting in the tracing of the records,
according to Mr. Whitcomb, who said
he had been of considerable help in
this regard.
Mr. Whitcomb had but little com
ment to make regarding the state
ment of Dan J. Malarkey, of counsel
for Mr. Morris, published in The Ore
gonian yesterday and wherein Mr.
Morris credited Mr. Etheridge the
wrecking of the corporation.
Malarkey Statement Noted.
"I noted Mr. Malarkey'a statement,"
eaid -Mr. Whitcomb. "It Is a step in
the right direction. Now, if only Mr.
Morris or Mr. Malarkey would tell
u where certain properties are, it
would help to clarify matters."
When a large crowd of interim
holders had waited for 30 minutes in
an upper chamber of the federal court
building yesterday morning for chan
cery proceedings to resume, it was
announced that Mr. Maguire had not
yet returned from Southern Oregon.
one seemed to know just when he
will return, but counsel for the re
ceiver heard yesterday that he might
be back in Portland Thursday morn
ing. That is taken to mean that he
will not be here before then and per
haps later and that the case will
therefore wait until then.
Bert W. Henry of counsel for the
receiver, yesterday filed with, the
referee in bankruptcy claims of the
Seattle National and the Commercial
National bank of Seattle for a total
of $265,900, basing his action upon
the fact that these claims must go to
the court for judgment as to whether
they constitute assets or liabilities.
Creditors' Claims Filed.
The amounts claimed are the result
of securities sent to them by Morris
Bros., Inc.. some time ago. with the
understanding that they might return
any unsold portion at any time and
that these would be taken up by the
corporation.
Mr. Henry also filed claims of a
number of preferred creditors, so-
called, who purchased preferred stock
Of the $1,000,000 corporation formed
by Mr. Etheridge after he became
president. He testified when on the
stand last week that he had sold
more than $100,000 of this, but be
cause of the Portland Telegram's "at
tack" upon him, he had to repurchase
all but $40,000 of it. Mr. Henry filed
claims aggregating $64,000 worth of
it. This, too. will have to await judi
cial decision as to its standing.'
Pacific Coast Shipping Xotcs.
VA.VCOL-VKR. B. C.. Jan. 17. (Special.)
The steamer Chancellor arrived today to
load flour and general cargo for the United
Kingdom. This is the flrat shipment of
flour from Vancouver mil's for Europe.
It consists of lioo tone.
The contract tr floating the tugboat
ifarvts, sunk last wek in 120 feet of water
in the harbor in collision with the tug
boat Karl In a fog. has been let to the
Vancouver Salvage Dredging company.
Probability of obtaining oil for fuel for
the Pacific fleet of the Canadian govern
ment merchant marine ships was Indicated
today by B. C. Keelev. the general agent,
who has return---! from negotiations car
ried out peronnfc- at San Francisco. Mr.
Keeley announced aio that the oriental
service of government snips would be in
augurated In March with the steamer Ca
nadian Skirmisher.
The motorshlp Buenos Aires, Captain
Atlerlfng. sailed this evening for Kurope
with 1mK tons nt wheat and 300 tons of
canned salmon from this poet.
The Pomona is now taking grain at the
government elevator. She will load 20O0
tons.
The Osaka Shosen Kalsha steamer Ata
bami Maru, Captain Hamagurhi. is in
port loading 2100 tons of general cargo
utword. She discharged .W tons here
Witnesses- from Alaska for the. Princess
eVvphia Inquiry at Seattle arrived this
morning on board, the Skagway steamer
Princess Mary.
On the grounds that the Coughlan ship
yards had broken the delivery clause of the
Contract and that the yards had brought
engine In Kngland for the Canadian ships,
the federal member of marine has canceled
the contracts for construction of two M.M)
deadweight tons steel steamers now build
ing at the Coughlan yards. The shipyard
officials state they expect to have the
matter settled satisfactorily The delay
in delivery was due to the fact that the
ateei from the Canadian mills la Nova
Scotia did not come until December. The
contract called for delivery of the ships
that month. Ai regard! the encinei, the
company says they were bought in Eng
land at a firure of 1140.000 lees than east
ern Catiad.a.i builders asked and as the
I government refused to bear the d.rierenct
In price the shipyards carried out ordinary
business methods and purcoaaea as aa
va.itageously aa possible.
COOS BAT, Or.. Jan. 17. (Special.)
The steam schooner Bandon arrived from
San Fraiu-inco this morning at 7:4t o'clock
an.) ' - V, .. ... I. lis - Hclr IrtBll flf lumber.
If I The port of Coos Bay commissioners
at a meeting- Saturday nlirni receiveu a rv
port from President Powers declaring he
had partially negotiated a sale of 1 100,-
0O0 worth of port bonds and probably
would conclude the deal this week. The
commission ordered an audit of the rec
ords of the commission from its inception
to a date two years ago.
SAN PEDRO, Cal.. Jan. 17.( Special.)
H. J. Kumrill, local agent of the Toyo
Kisen Kaisha, has received information
that another steamer has been added to
the South American service of the com
pany. The steamer la the Hashu Jlaru.
The steamer is new and recently was com
pleted at the Asuno shipyard in Japan.
The steamer Bemilyk of the Holland
American line will be due here tomorrow
from the north to load citrus fruits for
Rotterdam. She also will pick up approx
imately 1000 tons of general cargo con
signed to various European ports.
The steamer Chancellor will be due here
January L'.t to take on 2000 bales of lm
perial valley and Arizona cotton. She also
will load cotton seed cake and other south
ern California products.
ASTORIA, Or., Jan. 17. (Special.) The
tank steamer El Segundo, bringing a cargo
oi tuei oil lor Astoria and Portland, ar
rived at 7:50 this morning from California.
The steamer osaqumsick arrived at 7:30
last night from Puget sound and went to
Portland to load grain.
The steamer Kastern Ocean arrived at
12:80 this morning from San Francisco
and proceeded to Portland.
The steamer Pawlet, carrying a cargo
from Portland, tailed at V o'clock last
night for China.
The steamer Alaska, bringing freight
and passengers for Astoria and Portland.
arrived at 4:30 this morning- from San
Krancisco.
The steamer Coaxet, with a part cargo
of lumber irom Grays harbor, arrived at
10 o clock" last night and went to Port
land to finish her cargo.
The steamer Mexican, with part cargo
from Portland, sailed at 8:30 last night
for Boston and way ports.
The steamer West Momentum sailed at
4 o'clock this morning for the orient with
freight from Portland.
Barge 93 arrived this afternoon from
California with fuel oil for Astoria and
Portland. She was towed up the coast
by the steamer Captain A. F. Lucas, wnioh
proceeded north.
The steamer Steel Inventor, with part
cargo for Portland, arrived at 11:33 today
from New York via San Francisco.
The Japanese steamer Tenpaisan Maru
Is due from the orient en route to Port
land. The steamer West Kader Is due from
Honolulu and will go to Portland.
The steam schooner Celilo, which will
be due at midnight from San Francisco,
is bringing freight for Portland.
The steam schooner Santlam will be due
during the night from San Pedro to load
lumber at the Hammond mill.
The steam schooner Daisy Matthews.
which is en route from San Francisco, has
been listed to load lumber at St. Helens.
The steamer Julia Luckenback finished
loading boo.ooo feet of ties this after
noon at Knappton for the Atlantic sea
board and shifted this evening to Port
land to discharge Inward-bound carsro.
Captain Macgenn, master of the steamer
Rose City, Is preparing petitions which
will be circulated among the shipmasters
ana oiner snipping interests, asking the
navy department to establish radio com
pass stations at Cape Blanco and Cape
Dlsappoinment for assistance of vessels
plying along the Oregon coast. In carry
ing on this campaign he has enltsted the
aid of the officials of the lighthouse de
partment.
PORT TOWXSEND, Wash., Jan. 17.
(special, i un ner second attempt to
reach the West coast, the steamer Santa
Alicia met with mishap compelling her
to return. On her first attempt when
she reached Cape Flattery, her fuel tanks
leaked, causing her to return for re
pairs. On this occasion she had pro
ceeded to a point off Swiftsure light when
she ran into a storm of unusual violence,
which caused her to take a ten-degree
list to port. The storm showed every in
dication of continuing so her master de
cided to return here to, wait instructions
irom ner operators. W. R. i;race at Co.
The steamer Ohioan arrived tonight
ana proceeded to Seattle. After d scharr
ing and loading part cargo, .tie will shift
to rorlland tor additional freight and
will complete at San Francisco for the
Atlantic.
GRAYS HARBOR, Wash.. Jan. 17.
(Special. ) The steam schooner Salano
sailed yesterday for San Francisco.
The shipping board steamer Coaxet,
with lumber from the Bay City mill at
Aberdeen, sailed last night for Portland.
TACOMA, Wash., Jan. 17. (Special.)
uotn Ilia -Norwood and Admiral Schley
arrived nere tins morning from San Fran
cisco and were expecetd to sail tonight.
The Norwood will go to Bellingham where
It Is said she will be used in connection
with handling canned salmon. The vessel
had a fair amount of cargo inbound. TI.e
Evans had a large amount of freight In
and outbound for California ports.
The Africa Maru of the Osaka Sh-oscn
Kaisha. carrying a capacity cargo of
freight from Tacoma, saiied this afternoon
for the orient. The steamer had a num
ber of Japanese passengers from here. The
vessel will stop downsound long enough
to pick up mail and other passengers be
fore going to sea. The Alabama Maru of
this line shifted to Vancouver yesterday to
load and will return here to complete her
cargo the latter part of the week.
The Stanwood which was expected to
sail tonight for San Pedro, will not get
to sea until Tuesday noon, it is said by lo
cal shipping men. The vessel has a full
cargo of lumber outbound this voyage.
The West Norranus. which has been
laid up on the sound for several weeks,
will shift here Thursday to load . wheat
for Europe. The Coolcha to load flour
here for west porta is Hated to arrive to
morrow morning. The West Cayote of
the European-Pacific line discharged cargo
at the Baker dock yesterday, then shifted
to Seattle to go into drydock. She will
return here to load lumber.
After a stormy voyage from Alaska, the
steamer Northwestern arrived here last
night with 1300 tons of copper ore for
the smelter. Captain William Jensen
reported one of the worst trips he has
had. So serious did a storm encountered
by the vessel become, that when the snow
changed to rain and mist last Thursday
night. It laid up four hours off Cone is
land. The Northwestern is a regular caller
here, being engaged in the ore-carrying
trade from Cordova to the smelter. Sne
also brought a cargo of fisli and several
passengers came to the sound on her.
PAN FRANCISCO. Jan. 17. (Special.)
Storm warnings issued by the United States
weather bureau from Point Reyes to Ta
toosh inland Saturday night, have been
extended to include every station from
Point Reyes to San Diego. The glass,
which ' dropped steadily Sunday, hovered
at the low point today, indicating further
wind.
The rough weather reported from every
station giving accounts to the marine de
partment of the chamber of commerce did
considerable damage, details of which
were just beginning to come in tonight.
The steamer Richmond, also from Point
Wells to San Francisco, while coining
Into the harbor yesterday had her srtearo
steering gear torn away and it was neces
sary to bring her In with thi hand peer
ing gear. The Richmond had barge 0.1
in tow and was in ballast for the Standard
Oil company. .
From Mverpool via the canal. the
steamer Howarden arrived todar for Will
iams & Co., with general merchandise.
The steamer Queen got away for San
Pedro yesterday with a new crankshaft in
place of the one that broke, off Point
Arena, a week' ago Sunday.
The new tug Sea Iion has completed her
dock lists and the trial trip will be held
this week.
KKATTI.E. Wash., Jan. 17. "(Special.)
With shipments of oriental cargo, the
steamship Tyndareus of the Blue Funnel
Una sailed from Yokohama for this port
January 10 and Is expected to arrive here
Sunday, according to Seattle representa
tives of the Hue.
The steamship Talthybius, also of the
Blue Funnel line's trans-Atlantic fleet,
will sail from this port for Japan, China
and the Philippines Thursday morning.
The steamsliln Kurydamus of the Puget
ound-United Kingdom service sailed from
Tacoma tonight for London, Liverpool and
Glasgow. ,
Christian Harhnff. managing director of
the C. K. Hansen Steamship company of
Copenhagen, Denmark, will arrive in Seat,
tla the latter part of February, according
to advices received by the foreign trade
bureau of the chamber of commerce today.
He will come here with a view to estab
lishing a steamship line to this port. The
hulk of his ships are prepared to handle
lumber.- The I'nlversal Shipping ft Trading
company has been appointed agent here.
IE RECHTEH,
DUE HEBE ON FEB. 1
Steamer Will Carry Wheat
From City to Europe.
THREE VESSELS ARRIVE
9500-Ton Steel CraTt to Load
Grain; West Kader Comes in
From Honolulu.
The shipping board steamer Nile,
previously announced by Max Houser
as chartered by the Pacific Grain
company to carry wheat from Port
land to Europe, was announced by
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. as re-chartered
by that firm in the same trade. The
vessel is- expected here from Puget
sound before February 1.
Whether or not another vessel has
been taken by the Pacific Grain com
pany to carry that cargo which was
to go on the Nile could not be learned
from officials of that company.
inree 9uOU-ton steel vessels arrived
at Portland Sunday and Monday to
carry wheat to Europe. The Mosella
docked Sunday at municipal terminal
No. 4 to load for Kerr. Gifford &
Co.. and the Osaqumsick and Eastern
Ocean reached the local harbor yes
terday. The Osaqumsick moored at
the Montgomery dock to load for the
Pacific Grain company, and the East
ern Ocean, which is under charter to
Kerr, Gifford & Co.. berthed at the
Columbia dock.
The shipping board steamer "West
Kader, operated by Sudden & Chris
tenson, which is generally understood
to have been fixed for a grain cargo,
though no announcement has been
made, arrived in the Columbia river
yesterday afternoon from Honolulu
in ballast and left up from Astoria
at 4 P. SI. for municipal terminal
ISO. 4.
All grain carriers to arrive within
the last two days will clear to the
fanama canal for orders.
iCU.1 kUCEEN'BACIt COWING
Vessel to Load General Freight
Ties and Lumber Here.
The steamer Julia Luckenbach
coming to start regular service
the Luckenbach line between Port
land and other Pacific coast ports
and those of the Atlantic, arrived in
the Columbia river yesterday after
noon and left up for Knappton, where
sne win pick up a shipment of lum
ber before continuing to Portland
Coining from the Atlantic coast in
this vessel is 300 tons of general
freight, and outward cargo of 300
tons of general freight and 1.000.00
feet of ties and lumber will be loaded
here.
The Luckenbach line vessels com
Ing to Portland will be handled here
by J. G. Eoson, agent of the Genera
Steamship corporation. Others of tin
intercoastal fleet are the steamers
Edward Luckenbach and F. J. Luck
enbach. These should be the next to
arrive.
Ports of call for the Luckenbach
service on this coast are Los Angeles
San Francisco, Portland and Seattle
On the Atlantic side the boats will go
to Boston, New York, Philadelphia
and savannah.
RECORD-SIZED CRAFT HERE
Japanese Merchant Vessel Anyo
Maru Largest Ever in Columbia
The Japanese freight and passen
ger steamer Anyo Maru, the largest
merchant vessel ever to come into the
Columbia river, arrived at municipal
terminal No. 4 yesterday morning
from Valparaiso, Chile, via west coast
ports, San Francisco and St. Helens,
to load general freight for the orient.
Passenger reservations on the big
steamer are also being made here and
about 50 travelers to the far east will
be taken aboard here before the ves
sel sails.
The Anyo Maru is one of several
palatial steamers operated in this
service by the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, for
whom the. Oregon-Pacific company is
local general agent. She Is 470 feet
long and has a beam of 60 feet.a Her
deadweight tonnage is ls.ooo and her
net weight registered tonnage 6739.
SCHOOXER BATTLES TEMPEST
Lumber-Laden Craft Has Ttoug-li
Passage to Honolulu.
HONOLULU. T. H.. Jan. 17. The
lumber . Bchooner Helene, from Port
Angeles. Wash., with lumber for
Honolulu, arrived here recently more
than two weeks overdue after a voy
age of 36 days, during which she
weathered a 1,0-mile gale which blew
for 24 hours, according to Captain A.
Lumhke, her master.
Describing the storm in which Cap
tain Lumbke said he expected from
hour to hour to lose his ship, he as
serted that at times the waves com
ing down on his craft were from 75
to 100 feet in height.
Swiftwind to Dip Today.
The 12,000-ton tank steamer Swift
wind, the second such craft to be con
structed here, will be launched at
noon today from the plant of the
Northwest Bridge & Iron company.
Four hours earlier in the day. the
steamer Swiftsure. the first 12,000
ton tanker 'to be built in Portland,
will leave the dock of her builders for
Tamptco, Mexico, to load her first
cargo of oil for England. Both of
these tankers, as well a-s five more
building and to be built at the plant
Port Calendar.
To Arrive at Portland.
Vessiel . From
Tine.
. .Jan. 1R
. .Jan. 18
..Jan. 1!)
...Ian. in
. .Jan. 20
. .Jan. 21'
..Jan. 22
...lan. 24
..Jan. 25
Str. I'elilo .- I.. A.-ei. F. ..
Sir. Tenpaisan Maru. -Orient
Str. Daisy Matthews. .Honoltlu ...
Str. Nile Seattle
Str. Pomona Europe-S.F.
tr. Weal Nlyarla North China
Str. Tokuvo Maru
Str. Ohioan
Orient
. X. Y.-S. F. . .
. .Undon-6. F. .
.Phlla
. (ialveston-SF
Str. Kenidyk
Str. West lsleta .
.Jan. 25
.Jan. L9
3tr. Dewey
To Depnrt From Portland.
Vessel For ri , -
Sch. John M. Wells. . .Puget Sound. .Jan. IS
tr. Swiftsure 9. F.-Tamnlco .tan ia
Str. El Segundo San Fran .Tan' la
Ptr. Alaska San Fran Jan. 20
Str. Anyo Maru Orient Jan. 20
Str. Wapama F.-L. A. ....Jan 20
Str. Celilo F.-U A Jan. 21
Vessels in Port.
V Berth.
Str. Anyo Maru Terminal No. 4.
Str. Alaska ..Ainsworth dock.
Str. Coaxet Terminal No. 4.
-Str. Kastern Ocean. . ..Columbia dock.
Sir. Kl Segundo Standard Oil dock.
Soh. John W. Wells. . -Peninsula mill. '
Sir. Julia Luckenbach. Knappton.
Str. Kelbergen Supple-Ballin dock.
Str. Mosella Terminal No. 4.
Str. Steel Inventor ...Terminal No. 1. I
Str. West Kader Terminal No. 4.
Str. West Keats Terminal No. 1,
Str. West Kebar Supple's dock.
Str. Wapama St. Helens.
Str. Yalza .St-Johns mill. . . . .
In South Portland, are for the1 Swift
sure 'till Transport company'of New
York.
Steamer Here for Ties.
The Dutch steamer Kelbergen, op
erated by Sudden & Christenson, ar
rived at 8 o'clock yesterday morning
from Rotterdam via West Hartlepool,
England to load a full cargo of ties
for Immingham, England. She began
loading yesterday afternoon at the
Supple-Ballin dock. The steamer
West Kebar, also under the manage
ment of Sudden & Christenson, and
also taking a full cargo of ties for
the United Kingdom, is loading at
Supple's dock.
Ship Reports by Radio.
(Furnished by Radio Corporation
of
America.)
Positions reported at S P. M. yesterday,
unless otherwise Indicated, were as follows:
' STANLEY POI.LAR, San Francisco for
Vancouver, 835 miles north of San Fran
cisco. January 10.
C. A. SMITH, Coos Bay for San Fran
cisco, 173 miles north of San Francisco,
January 16
GRIFFDU, Seattle for Ban Francisco,
off Kureka. January 16.
EVERETT, for San Pedro. 560 miles
south of Everett. January 16.
CELILO. San Francisco for Portland.
70 miles north of Blunt s.reef, January 16.
ROSS CITY, Portland for San Fran
cisco, 300 miles north of San Francisco,
January 16.
W. F. HERRIN, Llnnton for Avon, 3S0
miles from Linnton. January Id.
EASTERN EXPORTER. San Francisco
for Honolulu, 2S7 miles from San Fran
Cisco. January 16.
MOTORSH1P SIERRA. San Francisco
for Beilingham, 25$ miles north of San
c rancisco. January 16.-
ADMIRAL DEWEY. San Francisco for
Seattle, 376 miles from San Francisco,
January 16.
Positions reported at 8 P. M. yesterday,
unless ntherwis" indicated, were as follows:
ADMIRAL WATSON. Seattle for San
Francisco. 252 miles north of San Fran
Cisco. '
SISKITOU. San Pedro for the Columbia
river. 1,0 milea north of San r rancisco.
SAN DIEGO, San Pedro for Tacoma. 22
miles south of Blunts reef lightship.
PORTER, Everett for San Francisco, 554
miies from Everett.
YOSEMITE, San Francisco for Seattle.
15 miles south of Cape Blanco,
TATOOSH, towing barge ftl. Eureka for
San Pedro. 530 miles from San Pedro.
BROOKLINE, Norfolk for Bremerton,
342 miles north of San Francisco.
SIERRA, San Francisco for Bellingham,
456 miles from San Francisco.
CLAREMOXT, Willapa harbor for San
Pedro, 152 miles from Willapa harbor.
WEST NOMBNTUM. Portland for Yoko
hama, 124 milea from Columbia river
lightship.
WASHTENAW, Portland for Port San
Luis. 531 miles from Port San Luis.
COL. E. -L. DRAKE, Point Welis for San
Pedro, 420 miles from Point Wells.
WILLAMETTE, San Francisco for Port
land. 170 miles south of the Columbia river.
SANTA INEZ. San Francisco for Tacoma,
583 miles north of San Francisco.
CAPT. A. F. LUCAS. San Pedro for Cor
dova. 903- mliesi from San Pedro.
JEFFERSON, Ketchikan for Seattle, off
East Point.
NORWOOD. Tacoma for Bellingham. 45
milee north of SeAttle.
-PAWLET, Portland for Yokohama, 210
miles from the Columbia river.
STANLEY DOLLAR. San Francisco for
Victoria, 120 miles from Victoria.
STANDARD ARROW. San Francisco for
Hongkong, 5SS miles west of San Fran
cisco. CHARLIE WATSON. Point Welle for
Richmond, 4t5 miles from Richmond.
CELILO, San Francisco for Portland. 32
miles south of the Columbia river.
WEST KEENE. Seattle for Honolulu.
675 milea from Honolulu.
MAUI, San Francisco for Honolulu, 1510
milea from San Francisco at S P. M., Jan
uary 16.
CITY OF RENO, Manila for San Fran
cisco, 57S milea from San Francisco at 8
P. M., January 16-
BROAD ARROW. Shanghai for San
Francisco. 12.S0 milea from San Francisco
at S P. M., January 16,
MATSONIA, Honolulu for San Francisco,
522 miles from San Francisco at 8 P. M
January 16.
EVERETT, Everett from Ban edro, nil
miles south of Everett.
GRIFFDU, Seattle for San Francisco.
20 miles north of San Francisco.
ROSE CITY, Portland for San Francisco,
22 miles north of San Francisco.
QUEEN. San Francisco for Wilmington,
AO miles south of San Francisco.
IRIS. San Pedro for San Francisco. 115
miles south of San Francisco.
EASTERN GUIDE. KahuJul. tor San
Francisco, 765 miles from San Francisco.
SENATOR, Corinto for ban Francisco
28 miles south of San Francisco.
HERRIN. Llnnton for Avon, obo miles
from Linnton.
EASTERN MERCHANT, San Francisco
for Ilo Ilo. ten miles south of Manila.
WEST CARMONA, Kobe for San r ran
cisco, 860 miles from San Francisco.
Movements of Vessels.'
PORTLAND, Jan. 17. Arrived at 6 A
M.. steamer Coaxet, from Aberdeen. Ar
rived at 8 A. M.. steamer Kelbergen, from
West Hartlepool. Arrived at 11 A. M..
steamer Eastern Ocean, from San Fran
Cisco. Arrived at 6 A. M., steamer Osa
qumsick. from Seattle. Arrived at 2 P.
M.. steamer AiasKa, irom can r rancisco.
Arrived at 7 P. M., steamer El Segundo.
from San Pedro. Bailed at midnight.
steamer Wheatland Montana, from St.
Helens, for orient.
ASTORIA. Jan. 17. Arrived at 7:20 and
left ud at 9 A. M-. steamer El Segundo.
Arrived at midnight and leit up at 2:30
A. M., steamer Eastern ocean. Arrived at
,nd left up At 6 A. M., steamer Alaska.
Irfft up at 7:30 last night, steamers Coaxet
and Osaqumsick.. Left up at 9:30 last
night, steamer Kelbergen. Sailed at 2 A.
M.. steamer west momentum. lor north
China ports. Arrived at 1:30-P. M. and
left up, steamer West Kader, from Hono
lulu. HONOLULU. Jan. 17. Arrived, steamer
-West Camargo, from Portland for Auck
land.
SAN PEDRO. CaU. Jan. 17. (Special.)
Arrived, steamers Humboldt, from San
Francisco, 2 A. M. ; Hartwood, from San
Francisco, 6 A. M.
Sailed, steamers Admiral Evans, for San
Diego, 10 A. M. ; Humboldt, for San Fran
cisco, 9:30 P. M.: Charles Chrislensen, for
Willapa, 0 F. AI. ; Redondo. for Portland:
Wahkeena, for Grays Harbor, 6 P. M.
SAN FRANCISCO. Jan. 17. Arrived
Richmond, from Seattle; Hawarden, from
Liverpool.
Sailed Calcutta Maru, for Kobe.
SEATTLE. Jan. 17. Arrived Saginaw.
from San Pedro via San Francisco.
Departed Cordova, for southwestern
Alaska.
TACOMA,, Jan. 17. Arrived Norwood.
from San Francisco.
Sailed Africa Maru, for Yokohama:
Norwood, for Bellingham; Admiral Schley,
for San Francisco via Seattle.
Marine Xotes.
The Japanese steamer Tenpaisan Maru.
coming from the orient via Puget sound
load lumber lor cnina, was due off the
Columbia river lightship last night.
The steamer Steel Inventor of Norton.
Lilly & Co.'s Isthmian line, arrived itr the
river yesterday afternoon and left up from
Astoria at 8:30 V. .11. She will dock In
the slip at mu-niolpal terminal No. 1.
The steamer Celilo. of the McCormlck
line, was due at the lightship at midn:ght
last night from Los Angeles and San
Francisco.
The Admiral line steamer Wheatland
Montana, which came here from Seattle
to complete a cargo for the orient, was
scheduled to sail late last night from Ml.
Helena.
The Standard Oil company's tank steam
er Kl Segundo arrived at her dock at 7
o'clock hast nJght with her usual cargo of
oils. Standard oil barge lo. 93, which
was towed up the coast by the ta-nker
aptatn A. r . Lucas, was on ner way up
he river last night and should reach her
dock by 1 o'clock this afternoon.
The steamer Coaxet, of the Admiral line.
which went to tjrays Harbor a few days
go to start her cargo tor the orient with
shipment of lumber from the mills there.
returned to Portland yesterday morning.
docking at municipal terminal No. 4.
Report From Month of Columbia.
.-.--i.Tii li r ,. it ,--..,!..
the sea at 5 P. M.. mooth; wind, south- '
east, 20 miles.
Tides at Astoria Tuesday.
High. - Low.
13 A. M.
. . .11. B ft 10:25 A. M 3.1ft
. . .60 ft. 12:34 P. M. ..,..1,6 ft
:3S P. M
Anlo Rebuilding Is Taxable.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17. Concerns
nsraered In building: over automobile
ops or bodies for installation on new
r old chassis were held to be manu
facturers and subject to tax as such,
n regulations issued tonight by the
ureau of internal .revenue. . . . . .
SHEEP. NURKETJS FIRM
IPIUCES ARE 25 TO "50 CEXTS
i HIGHER AT YARDS.
H QuaPter rd?r Saturday's
Level; Cattle Steady and "Un
changed; Day's Run Large.
There was a liberal run of 120 loads at
the stockyards yesterday, of which 13
loads of cattle, two of sheep, one of hogs
and one mixed load went through. The
sheep market was firm and yearlings,
wethers and ewes were 2550c higher.
Hogs were a quarter .lower at $11.73 as J
me regular top. The cattle maraet was
steady and prices were unchanged.
Receipts were 2136 cattle, 118 calves,
106 hogs and 4S31 sheep.
The day's sales were as follows:
Wgt. Price.l Wgt. Price.
IS steers. 9IH5 $ 8.00' 28 calves 1 HO $ 8 00
7 steers. 12:2 7.:0! 27 calves- 2.5 o.ao
15 steers. 801
7 .00 15 calves 4K1 7 2.
4 ,W 1 calf. . 340 ' 7.50
2 steers. 730
13 steers. 1AT9
14 steers. loj
4 steers. 962
8 steers. 1116
fl s:eers. 1U
12 steers. 1O02
7 steers. 975
2 steers lio,-,
4 calves
3 calves
3 calves
3' calves
1 hull. .
1 bull. .
1 bull..
1 bull. .
1 bull. ,
2 bulls.
1 bull. .
1 bull. .
1 bull. .
1 bull. .
1 bull. .
1 bull..
4 bulls.
1 bull. .
2 bulls.
2 bulls.
1 bull..
1 bull. .
190 12.00
ISO
12. 51
fi 75'
6..W
7. 25'
7.25!
7.00:
8.25
7.00
6.50
8.00:
8.50J
7.25'
8.0OI
7.2.V
8.9ft'
6.50'
7.50i
8751
7.3
7.00i
407
256
1490
12lO
IKK)
13S0
1570
1530
1510
1400
17-11
1930
1870
1100
1052
1100
1535
720
730
1470
202
21
200
20i
29.1
2
188
7.00
7.75
5 25
5.50
5 75
5.50
5.50
5.50
5.00
4.50
5 50
6.25
6.00
5.00
5 25
5 00
5 50
5.00
6.51
5.50
11.75
11.50
9 75
11.71
9 75
11.85
11.73
2 steers.
4 steers.
2 steers.
19 steers.
27 steers.
46 steers.
2 steers.
12 steers.
2S steers.
870
895
9G5
lias
1045
io.-.o
1 0X5
912
102
11 steers. 1058
6 steers. 1025
i steers.
10116
14 steers.
8SD
27 steers. 1202
9 00'
9 steers.
3 steers.
998
,V! 68 hogs. .
750
6.501 10 hogs. .
9.221 4 hogs. .
8 00; 29 hogs. .
8.50' 10 hogs. .
7.50' 93 hogs. .
7.25' 79 hogs. .
6 50' 9 hogs..
8.00' 89 hogs. .
8.10' 9 hogs..
8 steers. 1035
5 steers. 962
2S steers.
2-5 steers.
20 steers.
8 steers.
10-J."
950
996
991
372
9 75
29 steers.
lOT
208 11. 7
240 9.75
41 steers. 10",
50 steers. 9:tt)
8.101
19 hogs. .
115
9 75
12 steera.
3 steers.
3 steers.
2 steers.
2 steers.
966
523
706
695
975
8.10'
1 hog. . .
7 hogs. .
3 hogs.
2 hogs. .
8 hogs. .
1 hog. . .
3 hogs. .
3 hogs. .
440
181
216
210
7.00
11.50
1-1.00
11.75
11.50
7.0OI
6.00
S.7.V
6.501
7.851
7.001
7.75'
212
15 steers.
1140
220 11.50
34 steers.
9 steers.
20 steers.
22 steers.
25 steers.
2 steers.
790
82
9.16
1041
1285
99
1026
996
102 1100
120 11.00
7.75! 11 hogs. .
8.00! 3 hogs. .
;io
11.25
553
7.00
9 S.il 74 lambs
7.0O196 iambs
8.0014O lambs
7.00! 12 lambs
8 9ft1 28 ewes.
7.50 161 ewes.
8.S.V230 ewes.
6 ol 1 ewe. .
5.0O' 2 ewes.
5.50' 9fi ewes.
5.5O'202 ewes.
6 ,V 190 ewes.
6 85 222 yearl.
6.65' 1 wether
19
10.00
80 10.00
25 steers.
72 9.50
8 steers.
50
83
9,s
8.50
2.23
35 steera.
115.S
1100
8 steers.
4.50
5 steers. Ills)
100
80
80
110
112
108
92
ISO
4.50
2 00
2.00
12 cows
797
2 cows.
1095
1020
1076
90
IO5
1095
20 cows. .
4 AO
5 cows . .
4.50
25 cows. .
4.50
8.25
6 00
8 75
6 71
2 cows . .
16 cows. .
4 cows. .
3 cows. .
1 8 cows. .
loso
5.25 27 steers
1175
1023
1091
1132
K8S
1130
815
looo
1196
1!4
1070
lass
673
910
875
934
1041
1190
1070
1046
940
708
1205
1 1CV5
870
778
IftlO
1-f43
1013
056
840
1032
lo.lo
lOtM
1IMO
3.40
1023 5 00' 3 steers
1 lOt:
6 501 19 steers
8.7
9.3
20 cows. .
1103
1102
147C
ins
853
935
911
875
870
860
7 CO 2 1 steers
8. no' 27 steers
5. (yj 25 steers
4.50i 4 steers
3.00: 1 steers
4 0O 8 steers
5.75 25 steers
3.251 35 steers
5 7.V 2 cows.
R.OO' 3 cows.
6 35 1 cow. .
7.25' 22 cows.
6 50i' 26 cows.
7. Oft' 8 cows.
5.50' 1 cow . .
7. 1ft' 12 cows.
5.50' 13 cows.
7 2.V 11 cows.
7.00! 14 cows.
6 00 4 cows.
6.75i 16 cows.
5. Oft' 18 cows.
5.00! 5 cows.
3.00! 2 cows.
5.5ft' 19 cow-s.
5 75' 26 cows.
4.2V 3 cows.
3 Oft' 13 cows.
5.00' 21 cows.
6.50 1 cows.
6 ,V 1 cow. .
7.00' 20 cows.
7.101 1 calf. . .
5 91 Icalf...
4 cows. .
2 cows. .
2 cows. .
3 cows. .
4 cows. .
8 00
6.
6 75
8.00
8.50
8 00
5.00
5.00
5.00
24 cows. .
cows. .
cows. .
COWS. .
14 cows. .
909
Scows.. 1212
3 cows.. 1198
6.2.-.
7.25
6 00
6.50
5.00
4.50
6 50
6.75
6.25
6.75
5.00
6 00
6.73
6 75
6.00
6 75
6.50
5.75
6.50
7.00
8.O0
o cows . .
4 cows. .
80S
1030
9."v0
990
S6
997
846
1135
1095
1116
963
13
7.16
850
995
11 114
1280
1162
1 005
1025
1003
91ft
13 cows. .
4 cows. .
5 cows. .
19 cows. .
3 cows . .
9 cows. .
2 cows. .
8 cows
3 cows. .
8 cows. .
10 cows . .
2 cows. .
2 cows. .
5 cows. .
6 cows. .
7 cows. .
23 cows. .
23 cows .
34 cows. .
2 cows. .
2 cows. .
1 calf. . .
2 calves
1 calf. ..
9 calves
1 calf. ..
1 calf. . .
4 calves
13 calves
4 calves
2 calves
2 calves
1 calf. ..
1 calf. ..
1 calf...
1 calf. ..
19 calves
mo 12 oo
1490 5. 50
1455 5.00
1 65ft 6.0O
151 11.25
189 11.75
219 11.75
216 11.75
198 11.85
460 9.85
255 10.00
35 9.75
170 11.75
285 9.75
3.10 11. Oil
1 52 11 0O
213 11.75
130 11.25
4.10'
1 bull. .
2 bulls.
1030
,0O'
2.io 10 oo: i bull. .
31-6 8.0ft 6 hogs.
2O0 10 0ft; 24 hogs. .
221 13 .00' 48 hogs. .
lift 13 ftOilftl hogs. .
70 10.00' 98 hogs. .
3H2 7.0O 1 hog. . .
165 IS.Ort 26 hogs. .
212 6.5.V 2 hogs..
225 9.O0' 1 hog. . .
125 12. DO! 14 hogs. .
160 13.00' 1 hog. ..
120 12.0l! 4 hog. .
200 11. hot 52 hogs. .
160 13.001 11 hog-s. .
4d2 j.ro
The following pric
as are current at the
local yards:
Cattle
Choice steers
Good to choice steers
Medium to choice steers ....
Fair to good steers
Common to good steers
Choice cows and heifers ....
Good to choice cows, heifers.
Medium to good cows, heifers
Fair to medium cows, heifers
Common to fair cows, heifers
Ca iners
Prices.
.$ 8 501 9 25
...8.00 8.50
. 7. 50101 8. On
. 6. 50 'it' 7.50
. 5.50' 0.5O
. 7.00 r( 7.50
. 6 25i. 7.00
i. 5.50 w 6.00
:. 5.O0W 5.50
i. 4.00SH 5.00
.. 2 50tfi 3 V
. 5.0041 6 00
. 12-OOW 13.00
. lo.onw 12.00
6.0O.fT'. 7 50
. 6 75r 7.25
5.75 6. 1 5
Bulls 5 0041
Choice dairy calves ...
Prime light calves
Heavy calves
Rest feeders
Fair to good feeders ...
Hf gs
Prime mixed
Smooth heavy
Rough heavy
Fat pigs
Feeder pigs t
Sheep
East-of -mountain lambs
Valley lambs
Heavy lamt.s. 90 lbs. and up. .
Feeder lamts
Cull lambs
Light yearlings
Heavy yearlings
Wethera .'
Ewes
11 5011.75
10.75 4T 11 25
7 504J 9
ICftOfrll OO
9 00 11. 00
9 5O(i?10.50
9 00'd) 9 .VI
7.0OW S.50
e.ftoa 7.
5.004i 6.00
7. 50O S
7.0O 7 50
6 504i) 7.00
1.00 4.50
Chicago Livestock Market.
CHICAGO. Jan. 17. Cattle Receipts,
29.000 head. Beef steers very slow, around
25c lower; no early action on rteers of $10
or higher vaiue: balk $"&9.30; few early
sales: fat heifers steady: bulk tending
lower on all butcher she stock; puik cows
and heifers. $5(8 7.75: canners and bulls
opened steady: bulk canner cows $3423 50;
hulk bulls. S5.2awn.2.i; catves siow 10
lower: stockem and feeders steady.
Hogs 'Receipts 59.000 neao. rainy
steady. Strong to 10c higher than Satur
day's average; big packers buying spar
ingly: top 9 SO; bulk $0.4O4j 9 65; pigs
!04D15c higher: ouik uesiraoie w 10 low
pound pigs. $9.7o4J9 S.i.
Sheep Kecet-pts neao. fvniing
fcrss generally about 50c lower: lambs
top $11.25: bulk $104?1O.7.i: top ewes. $6;
bulk $4.505.75: yearlings mostly 4NW8-50
Omaha Livestock Market.
OMAHA. Jan. 17. Hogs Receipts ftftOO
head Active, mostly 10c higher. Bulk
medium and light butchers $9 3oa9.45: top
$9.50; bulk, strong weight and packing
grades, $99.2.V
Cattle Keceipts u.-iru neao. neei steers
ostlv 134J25C lower: top early $8 85; early
sales to shippers: Fhe stock steady; closing
weak to lower: veala and bulls steady:
stockera and feeders about steady.
gheep Receipts 12..100. killing clasees
steady to 15c higher; cany top lambs
$11: yearlings. $8.50; wethers $6 50; ewes
$5 00; feeders steady; feeding lambs. $10.10
Kansas City Livestock Market.
KANSAS CITY, Jan. 17 Cattle. 1680:
beef steers steady to 25c lower, early salaa,
$74i9; she .stock mostly steady; spots
weak on better grades, good and choice.
l4i 7- rood heifers. $74i 7.50: canners and
bulls steady: good canners, $3.25: calves
steady to strong; top vealers. $12; Block
ers and feeders steady to strong; 1000
pound Texas steers, $8.85.
pheep 7.0OO: sheep and lambs fully
steady; wethers, $6.25; ewes, $5.25; lambs,
$10.90.
Seattle Livestock Market.
SEATTLE. Jan. 17. Hogs Receipts 851
herd. Steady. Prime $11.50rI2: smooth
heavies. $10 50 11.50: rough heavies, $8.50 1
9; pigs $911. I
Cattle Receipts. 590 head. Strong. I
Prime steers. $8.75r9.25: medium to'
choice, $7$t8 25: common to good. $6ifr7;
best cow-s and heifers. $707. 5ft; nredfum to
choice. $5 504?6 50; common to good. $44n
5.50; bull $44x6; calves light $11-12.50;
heavies, $637. 1
Ijqoidatlon in Coffee Market. I
NF7W YORK, Jan. 17. Reports of easier 1
Rio exchange and lower millers quotations j
led to further liquidation in the market 1
for coffee futures here during today's j
earlv trading. First prices were 13 to 19 j
points lower with March selling off to I
24o and May 6.67e. March rallied to I
6 39c and May to 6.82. with the market!
closing net unchanged to 6 points lower.
January. .00c; March,. 6.36c;. May. 6.78c;
I July, 7.19c; September, 7.54c; October,
f 7.6;c. December, 7.Sc.
i Soot coffee ouiet and nominally
changed at to 7c for Rio 7s and JSi
to loc for Santos 4s.
Metal Market.
NEW YORK, Jan. 17. Copper steady:
electrolytic, spot and nearby 13H13Vic:
first quarter 13"a13Hc.
Iron nominal. No. 1 northern, $S3; No.
2 northern, 3032; No. t southern J31
32. '
Tin weak. Spot and nearby, 3636.50c;
futures 36.506 37c.
Antimony, 5.15 5.50c.
Lead quiet. Spot 4.75c.
Zinc quiet. East St. Louis delivery, spot
6.6O5.70. .
Hops, Ktc., at New York.
NEW YORK, Jan. 17. Hops dull: state
11W0, 4045c; Pacific coast, 1920. 32 35c;
1919, 30fc'32c.
Hides and wool unchanged.
New York Sugar Market.
NEW YORK, Jan. 17. Raw sugar, J5.52
for centrifugal. Refined $7.75 for fine
granulated.
IS LESS
RECEIPTS IX PAST YEAR
PER CEXT LIGHTER.
15
High Price of Wheat Responsible
for Decline; Prospects for
Sheep Improve.
In summarizing the livestock situation
In 1920, the 11th annual report of the
Portland Ln!on Stockyards company says:
Feeding conditions during the first
four months of the year were bad through
out the territory. Grass came 30 days later
than usual and In April livestock raisers
had to go out and buy hay on a high
market to tide over the grass de.ay period.
Since about the first of May feeding condi
tions' have been excellent, abundant grass
for summer and fall and a big hay crop for
winter feeding. Prevailing price for al
falfa hay in stack is from $7 to $S per
ton and in some cases less. Since Juue,
cattle prices have declined steadily and
growers who were stocked up with high
priced feeders carried through the 1919
and early 1920 unfavorable feeding sea
fon. have taken serious losses. To th
extent of the ability of this market to
absorb cattle, the growers in the terri
tory tributary to this market were af
forded an outlet on a par with and at
times better than prices prevailing In
the central markets of the middle west.
This has been an advantage to the grow
ers in the Portland territory, saving them
loss to some extent.
Hog receipts show a falling off of 30.000
head, 15 per cent, compared with 1919.
and it would have been worse had it not
been for the fact 22,000 head were shipped
in from Nebraska and South Dako'ta to
help out the shortage. Hog production
in this territory Jias been on the decline
since 1915. High price of wheat since
that time, government restriction on use
of wheat during the war period, and ex
tremely high prices paid for hogs have all
been factors in causing farmers to sell
their hogs-, including brood sows, drop
the hog game temporarily and market
their wheat in sacks. Hog prices have
declined but wheat prices have not kept
pace with this decline. It is probable
that farmers will not have confidence in
the raising of hogs on a large scale until
hogs prices become firm and wheat prices
decline considerably, and what hogs we
get in the meantime will be those raised
on unmarketable wheat and other below
standard products of the farm. For the
year 1921 the stockyards company has a
programme for encouraging pig club work
In Oregon, Washington and Idaho, but
the early results to be obtained from tills
will be small in comparison with the need.
Reports indicate considerable good breed
ing stock in the territory, but very little
inquiry for it.
Conditions prevailing among cattle grow
ers of the territory apply also to sheep
growers. High-priced feeders carried
through the unfavorable feeding season
of 1919-20 with the serious decline In
prices offered during the last half of the
year, has placed the growers In a serious
condition. The present excellent feeding
conditions will help somewhat. I'.ecelpts
this year are In excess of 1919 and
doubt would have been considerably more
If more outlet had been available.
Since the company was orjcamKed in
1909, total receipts have been l.o:;5.213
head of cattle, 71,104 calves. 2,207.898
hogs, 2.443,534 sheep and J0,9o horses
and mules, or 73.311 carloads.
City Officials Installed.
WASHOUGAL. Wash., Jan. 17.
(Special.) Wasliougal's new city of
ficers were sworn In at a special
meeting of the council last week.
Thev were S. W. Nystrom, W. I)
Fitzgerald. J. L. Rasinussen, council-
men: T. S. Keep, treasurer, ri. c. car
penter, clerk. Rev. R. B. Parcel con
tinues a second year as mayor.
PAILY METEOROI-OGU'AL REPORT.
PORTLAND. Jan. 17. Maximum temper
ature, 41 degrees; minimum, .ia degrees.
River reading. S A. .VI. . s feel: cnanue in
last 24 hours, 0.3 foot fall, lotal rainfall
(5 P. M. to 5 P. M. . o il) men: total rain
fall since September 1. 1920. 28.49 inches:
normal rainfall since September 1. 23 ol
inches; excess of rainfall since September
'l. 1920. 5 48 Inches. Sunrise. 7:48 A M. :
sunset. 4:55 P. M. Total sunshine January
17. 2 hour 1 minute; possible sunshine. 9
hours 7 minutes. Moonrlse Tuesday. 12:17
P. M. ; moonset Tuesday. 2.01 A. M. Barom
eter (reduced Jo sea level! at 5 P. M..
29 61 Inches. Relative humidity at 5 A. M .
65 per cent; at noon, 66 per cent; at 5 P.
M., 80 per cent.
THE WEATHER.
5 if K7 Wind
o c S
3 3 1 J
STATIONS. J J "I ? I Wtath.r.
3 3 : : :
1 I :
c s : '
Baker ...
Boise . . .
Boston .
Calgary .
.1 36' 440. OS 12 SE Rain
. 36 56 0.00 24 SB ICInudy
I :iiv' 32 0.00 24 W ;Ci-ar
,-14 -20.001. .'S iOloudy
. I 8; 20 O.Ool. .i.NE ICioudy
Chicago ...
Denver
lies Moines
Eureka
2 14 0.0O . . E ICIear
44; 4S0.2.S'..'S ICioudy
60' 6s o.oo,. . si' !cinufly
Galveston
Helena 18: 30 0. 00 . ,.sw il.iouuy
Juneaut ..-I lo;22.oo' ; . . . V ear
Kansas City. I 12 18 0.0O 12 NE Cl.ar
14S Angeleu; r.4 2 ll. n n r. nam
Marshf ield
32j 40 o . 1 "' . . . . louay
4L 46 0.OS,. ,'N W.'P-aln
-Si 6 0.0IV..ISE ICioudy
..I 720.001.. S 'Pt. cloudy
... SO O.no'44 NWCIear
38' 420.14.20 SE lllain
54' 74 0.nu;..'E iC'oudy
34: 48 O.Oo IS s IPt. cloudy
37 41 0. 19 . , 'K IRaln
42' 44 0.2S . .INW'i'loudy
52! 56 1 .36; . . 's IRaln
12- 24 0.0O:.. .E li'loudy
44! 52 0.00!..;SE Vloudy
Medford ...
Minneapolis
New Orleans
New oVrk. .
North Head I
Phoenix ....
Poealello ..I
Portland ...
Rosebu rg ...
Sacramento
St. Louis
Halt Lake..
San Diego. .
64 0.OOI4SE H'louriy
56 1 .58 . . iSE !OIoudJ
S. Francisco! 50i
Seattle
Sitkat
Spokane
Tacoma
Ta toosh
Valdezt
:tt 44 0.10 10 SE IRain
j0'30 0.0O . . ;. . ..'Cloudy
24' 34 o.3S . .!E lllain
36' 42 0.10 . .'SB iRain
34' 420.22 10 K iRaln
10 12:0.(ll'. .IN 1S110W
26i 30 o. 00-. .;sw Cloudy
:;o' 32 0 . ooi . . ;n Iciear
lsd.
Walla Walla
Washington
Wlnnlpei
sn.oo 'E icioudy
Yakima
. . I, 20; 36 O.0-S T .1
f Rain
tA. M. today. 'P. M. report of preceding
daVj
FORECASTS.
Portland and vicinity Rain; easterly
winds. , , .
Oregon and Washington Rain; moder
ate to fresh easterly winds.
ASTORIA, OREGON
6 IMPROVEMENT BONDS
Tax Exempt..
Bonds in block from $ 1000 to $.ri0,000
At 95 to Yield 6:50
AT
. Ashley & Rumelin, Bankers
' Second and. Stark Sts.
:;!oEBW IS URGE BUB
EUROPE BIDS FOR WHEAT FOB
SPKIXG SHIPMKNT.
Persistent Foreign Demand Sends
Chicago Prices Higher; Tariff
Bill Is Factor.
CHICAGO. Jan. 1 7 Persistent expo't
demand led to a material advance today
In wheat values. Prices closed strong
2il&3Uc net higher, with March $1.7il
1.I61!. and Mav $1.69 V 1.69 "j. Corn
gained Hfe'lc and oats a shade to c
Provisions finished Irom 10c decline to
& advance
Wheat prices had an upward slant with
but few brief exceptions. Germany and
Italy were said to be purchasing and Ger
many wes credited with having bought
l,600.')0O bushels Saturday, but knowledge
of the amount of business done today was
withheld. A feature was European bidding
f.,t a-HmI shinments as far ahead as April
Hullish sentiment was a so encouraged by
the return of the emergency tariff bill to
the senate and by denial of gossip mat
70,000.000 bushels of wheat had b,-en
omitted from the United States' visible
sttnniv statement.
Corn and oats sympathized with wheat,
notwithstanding that rece.pts of corn were
the largest this season. LlDerai expon
hnvinir nC . nrn continued.
Provisions aa a rule were higher, lard
stocks showing a smaller increase than
expected.
The Chicago market letter received yes
terday by Overbeck & Cooke company at
Portland said:
Wheat It was a more sensational mar
ket than last week and although liquida
tion was renewed early in the day, the
pressure was not large and the market
soon developed a strong tone, stimulated
by evidence that substantial export bus
Iness would be done. Shortly before the
close it was estimated that at least
1.6OO.000 bushels hail been taken with the
possibility of final figures being materially
larger, liespite the heavy movement from
the country last week the visible supply
decreased 3,029.000. bringing the total down
to 38. 154.00U bushi ls, ah-ainst 66.089,000 l
year ago. Country offerings showed s
falling off. due to the decline in the mar
ket. The break in Argentine freight rates
was not considered significant, being at
tributed to the fact that there is no
grain loading out of that country at this
time, it was announced that the Argen
tine president -had called a special session
ot congress for January 20, to take action
on the tax question, which is expected to
have quite a bearing on the export de
mand here. The fact remains, however,
that foreigners continue Co show a keen
desire for our wheat, and while this con
dition obtains price recessions are not
likely to be of a lasting character.
Corn All things considered, this market
had a strong tone and displayed resistance
to selling inspired by the large receipts.
The arrivals for the day were the largest
of the season, but the spot market held
steady to only 2 cent lower. Shipping
sales were 500,000 bushels, including 400,-
000 bushels to exporters.
Oats Trade was active, with libera
buying at times by leading shorts. Th
shipping demand was good with sales of
125.0IHI bushels, and the casTT market had
a firm tune at Saturday's trading basis.
Provisions Light trading in provisions
and a steady advance in prices. Tuckers
and warehouses sold moderately on the
hard spots against slaughtering opera
tions, and scattered longs took profits.
Stock of hog productions in Chicago did
r.ot increase for 15 days as expected by
the trade.
Leading -futures ringed as follows:
Op'-n. His-h. Low. Close.
March
May .
$1 73 $1.7; $1 73 $1.7
1.65U 1.695i 1.65!i 1.69'i
CO UN.
.70 '1 .71' j .70'J .71",
.71 r, -72S, .71 tj -72H
OATS
Mav
July
May ... .45 'i .4t', .4Z .46
July 43 .45, .15 .40:'i
MESS PORK.
Jan.
May-
24 10
23.70
24.211
24.20
1. P. I.
13.25
14 00
24 00
23.60
24.20
24.15
13 25
13.05
Jan.
May
13 12
13.75
13.12
13.70
SHORT RIBS.
Jan.
May
I 2 20
! 12 95
hard, $1.83
12.115 12.95 12.62
Citsh frrices were:
Wheat No. 2 red, $2; No. 2
r1.83'i,.
Corn No. 3 mixed, 64 be: No. '.
67 Si 70c.
Oats No. 2 white. 44 j? 41 c;
white. 424 43'c.
Rye No. 2. $1,115.
Barley 72:rS7e.
Timothy seed $4.5086.30.
Clover seed -$15022.
Pork Nominal.
Lard $13.25
Ribs $11.50& 12.50.
yellow,
No. 3
Seattle tiruin Markei.
SEATTLE, Wash.. Jan. 17. Wheat
Hard white, soft white and white club.
$1.65: hard red winter, soft red winter,
northern spring and eastern red Waila
$1.02: Big Bend bluestem, $1.75.
Feed, city delivery Scratch feed.. $61
ton: feed wheat. $63; all-grain chop. $51;
oats. $49; sprouting oats, $54: rolled oals.
$51: whole corn. $17; cracked corn, $49:
rolled barley, $50; clipped barley. $55;
mlllfeed. 39: bran. $39.
Hay Alfalfa, $27 ton: double com
pressed alialfa, $33; do timothy, $59; East
ern Washington mixed, $35.
Minneapolis (iraln Market.
MINNEAPOLIS. Jan. 17. March wheat,
$1.70lt: May. $1.86.
Barley. 53fa74c.
Flax No. 1. $1.96'.; o l 97
Dulilth l.inxerd Market.
Dl'LL'TH, Jan. 17. Linseed on track
and arrive, $1.98 Si.
Winnipeg Wheat Murkrt.
WINNIPEG, Jan. 17. May wheal, $1 90.
(.rain at San FranclM-o.
Si V FRANCISCO. Jan. 17. Grain
Mill-
ing wheat, $2.8.i la S.U.i ;
feed wheat, $2.75(J
FACTS M. I0"
PROTECTION
The protection of pave
ment foundations acafnst
the riipintepriitinj; effects
of traffic, water and all
other agencies tending to
destroy, is as much a
function of wearing mtr
fare as Is the resistance to
the wear and impact of the
traffic itsHf. None but n
hsphaltic type of pavement
wiLl ive the protection su
greatly needed. Specify
WARRENITE
BITULITHIC
And Yo Secure Thin
l'rotevtion.
WAUUKN BKOTHUKS CO.
HOTEL HOYT
Strictly Fireproof. Near both depots
and convenient car service to
all parts of city.
Single Kooins Without Bath, ?l anil up
Single Kooiiw With Bath, 2 and up
KI.BUKT S. KOHK, Manager.
8.05: red oats, feed. $1 .50 'n 1.75; rye, nom
inal; barley. pot. feed. $ 1 .50 ri 1 .55 ; slip
ping barley. J I . ci." ! 1 :Wl : w hite Kgyptlaii
corn. $2.75'u 2. hi; red mllo, $22.05.
Hay Fancy wheat, $20r21; tame oat".
$!7'u 19; wild oats, $10vi15: barley. $123'
15; alfalfa, $17u20: .stock. fli'irH.
Cotton Market.
NEW TOHK, Jan. 17. vpot cotton quiet.
Middling $18.05.
DAILY CITY STATISTICS
lurr'uige IJrene.
HElXRICKiS-STKl'liKNS Wit i.im U.n
ricks. 43 K.int KiftcHh MrfM, anI
B.ina Stfihn;. It K.iI, tfS Hi Forty-fourth
avenue Southeast.
Hl'SSKUI.- HA I LET Clifford John Bus
rl. '2$. H;irr hotel .and Edith .May Biiy,
i!-t Hnvt sirt-t.
ftt)fS-VKAN JHomer L. Ros.. IS, .V.2
East Kiirhth s:rf-t. and L.ucile V, Wean,
Hi, TtV2 Ka.-t K:t'Mh Mn'W.
NKWiHI lal- OA LAV A X I -a -w r v n c e X fr -bill.
J4. ;T4 .i:tsii.n street, und Hazel Ca.ii
vau, 'Jl. 4'S Jtftorsnn street.
lUi'H A Kl)si iX-rilKWS Robert Maurir
Ruhnrlson, 7." I'ow.Ml street, and
Cwroline Crows. IrirM, Portland.
WILLIAMS-CLINK Millard M. Will
iams, Ipk-'i I, !T0 Coinmert-tal ntroet. and
Olua C. Clin, legal, r.01 Kat Fifty-fourth
.street.
CHEXOWKTir-RRCK Arthur C. Chn
owoth. lepMl. 104 Kast Twenty-fourth sLrot
North, and Norma C. Reck, legal, 173
Fourteenth street.
NKLSON-CLOUG IT Donald H. Nelson,
22. 1710 iMviston street, and Kdwina Jo
sephint Cloun, 404 Ka.it Thirty-ninth
street North.
Vancouver Marriiisr IJrn.nr.
WILPON-HENRY MichaM M. "W. Wil
son. "1. of Vancouver, and .Mrs. Florence I.
Honrv. 2S, of Portland.
HAKR-IMJWNINO Robert P Parr. 21.
of KeNo, Waj-h., and Naomi Dow ning, is,
of Kelso, Wash.
WILSON-Sl'TIIRRI.IX rWnr If. Wilsnn,
.IS. of Portland, und Alra. Ida AL Sutherlin.
4J. of Portland.
M A N VI LLK-S AUER Ctnyton M. M an
vil !, 'SJ, of lOuKvne, Or., and Philipptna
Sauer. LM, of KuK'ne, Or.
P.ROOKH-PKASW A K CI. Ct. Brooks. 3.".,
of Vancouver, and Mra. Ruby K. Pca-shaK,
'J7, of Vaneouvr.
P.RVAN-Cl RRIK William Bryan. 3ft. o'
Astoria, Or., and Mrs. Pearl Curnu, J7, of
Astoria. Or.
PA wt'K-.IOIINSON Leonard II. raqiif.
1?J. of Portland, and Lottie L. Johnson, 11,
of Portland.
STKXKlt-PAXFORn-Stanton J. S(er
srer, 2L of Portland, and Grace M. Sanford,
IS, of Portland.
Conservative I i
Custodian J
Cnmr
Today is "Family
Budget Day." A
budget means spend
ing your money by
plan; one of the first
steps in getting
more out of your
dollar.
RlRlSlOnMKIlI
Call or write for list of
High-Grade '
to yield
to 8
TVjpS FREEMAN,
fltllW SMITH
OROUNP FtOOR
flPTH AKB -""
...rv B"0
HtA KI.KKS" -l llK.
STEAMSHIP LINES
(Slt-ainers ot I:. S. Shipping l!' irl
Regular Kxpross I'a.setiger
and Freight. Service
S.S. Aeolus
21.000 Tons - - - (a) 1 eh. 9
S.S. Martha Washington
13,000 Tons - - (b) Mar. 2
hi Is!. lnd and Unl iLis.
(b) IM. mill -tut el.ta.v
82-92 Beaver SL, N. Y.
llr.iiH'h Offlriv :n
Phi!a1''iphiit IJ;iilitIH.rc
, M. I.OUI .l"tllr
Matson Navigation Co.
U. S. S. B. STEAMER
HOLLYWOOD
Loading freight at FORT Of
ASTORIA, January 31, for HON
OLULU, KAIIULUI and IIIL0
For rates and further particulars,
apply to Traffic Manager, Port
of Astoria.
AUSTRALIA
Honolulu. Siivu. Nrw ZmlanU.
The I'alulial l'Hrrngrr btruiiirm
B. M. K. "Niuisan' It. M. fc. "MAKIKA"
2u,(HiO Tons i:;..V0 loii
Sail frnm Venvouver. II.
For ratr and wiilinKH apply Can. Par. Kail
Way. 5& Third St., Portland, or (unadiaa
Autrallan K"al Mull Lin. 410 Se luuur
hi,. Vancouver, tl.
Bonds
CAMP g
CO. I
W It's SUMMER
"N0W in
1 Af- SOUTH
ErE3n' jtONTrV I D to
f tmwoi AIRES
N
V