Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, December 20, 1920, Page 16, Image 16

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THE SUOBNTXG OREGOXIAX. MONDAY. DECEMBER 20, 1920
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E
SOIL POISONS OLIVE
Fruit Is Not Injured by Can
ning Methods.
CREDIT TOU. S. SURGEON
Sews of Cause of Contaminated
Product Given First Time at
Health. TarJey Here.
Botulism comes fora the soil and. is
not the result of the method of can
ning olives or other vegetables.
This scientific discovery was given
to the world yesterday for the first
time by the man who made the dis
covery Dr. J. G. Geiger, surgeon
Cn:ud States health service, speak
ing at the convention of health offi
cers at the Hotel Portland. Further
more, it was an outbreak in Klamath
Falls, Or- which supplied the miss
lng link in the investigation as to the
cause ' of deaths from eating olives.
Dr. Geiger explained that the inves
tigation was carried on by" Dr. E. C.
Dickson of Stanford university. Dr.
K. F. Meyer of the University of Cali
fornia and himself, representing the
United States surgeon-general's office,
but Dr. Lawrence Selling of Portland,
who was in attendance at the con
ference yesterday, informed the as
sembled health officers , that Dr.
GelErer was the scientist who had
tracked the germ to the soil.
Olives Have Clean Bill.
When a number of deaths occurred
In various parts of the country from
eating California olives, the national
' can tiers' association raised $50,000 to
finance an investigation to discover
what was wrong; whether the fault
was in the process of preserving the
olives or whether something was
wrong with the food. Drs. Dickson,
Meyer and Geiger were selected to
carry on the work and have pinned
down one concrete fact the source of
the fatalities is in the earth. The
olives have been given a clean bill of
health insofar as they are concerned,
but the public has become scared of
olives and a 130,000,000 industry in
California has been ruined.
Bacillus botulinus, explained Dr.
(Geiger, is widespread in nature ard
the investigators have scarcely
started on the subject. The spores
have been found on vegetables, fruit,
meat and fish. Where the investiga
tors have been able to follow up out
breaks they have found that the in
fected food came from gardens or.or
chards where manure was used for
fertilization.
Cook Well, Is Advice.
To play safe against this deadly
bug. sterilization is the only protec
tion. Take canned food and cook it
for at least 10 minutes before eating,
advised Dr. Geiger, and always throw
away spoiled food.
Commercial canners, under sugges
tions of the commission, are now able
tor rid their products of the danger,
but the home-canning industry, par
ticularly in California, said the scien
tist, is in a bad way. The bug has
been able to resist 230 degrees of heat
for 30 minutes and boiling. for four
.. hours, recounted Dr. Geiger, to show
that botulinus bacilli are extremely
hardy. Now canners subject the food
to 240 degrees for 40 minutes under
pressure, which makes the product
safe. This, pointed out the investi
gator. Is more than the home canner
can do, for the home-canner does not
. have the equipment for terrific tera-
perature under pressure to bring
about thorough sterilization. Salmon
canners, he said, will come to a
realization that an enormous cook
will be necessary, but 240 degrees for
90 minutes will clear salmon of bacil
lus botulinus.
Alcohol Is No Help.
Even alcohol, unless a very high
percentage, does not feaze botulinus.
Dr. Geiger told of a man on a Cali
fornia farm who tossed all the stale
- fruit on the place into a barrel, threw
In some yeast, discovered the result
had a "kick" and organized a poker
, party. Twelve men who participated
and drank the stuff died. The spores
have been found on grapes, but thus
far the investigation has not disclosed
, the spore In wine; something in the
process of fermentation may destroy
them, but Dr. Geiger is not prepared
;'to discuss this matter with authority
' yet.
Responding to a question by Dr.
Andrew C. Smith, Dr. Geiger said that
oil made from infected olives will
carry the bugs; that the olive oil ap-
pears to be a good carrier.
163 Cases la South.
There have been 163 known cases of
botulism In California. Regarding the
olives which started the Investiga-
tion, they came from two yards, one
at Oroville and the other at Lindsey,
. two of the best yards in the state. Ba
cillus botulinus was found in the dust
1 on the olives Cases have been traced
to the public market in San Francisco !
ana nearby towns and cases developed
at Saratoga, Cal.
Klamath Falls, Or., supplied the
final clew, where a complete history
and investigation was possible. For
a number of years beans had been
grown by a woman in her garden and
home-canned by the cold pack process.
Last winter the woman opened a can
of beans; they did not smell whole-
' some and she threw them out to the
chickens. Next morning all were dead
. save one, which had "llmberneck."
. Dr. Geiger appeared on the scene.
He found that the beans had been
canned in the same manner as in pre
vious years, but that the garden for
this particular crop had been ferti
lised with manure. The Investigator
got some of the beans, the chickens
end dug up some beanstalks and soil
- and carried them away. The analysis
disclosed that bacillus botulinus was
In the soil.
Manure May Be Caase.
"If we assume that the manure in-
noculates the soil with bacillus botu
linus," stated Dr. Geiger, "it leads to
endless speculation and ramifications
and possibilities. '
. "Having recognizad the soil as a
source of botulinus, it appears IorI-
cal to suspect that vegetables may be
contaminated witbavthe spores. This
suspicion has - proved to be correct;
peas, beets, radishes, asparagus, car
rots, parsnips and string beans bought
. in the open market in San Francisco
and neighboring towns revealed by
cultural methods the presence of botu-
' linus spores."
Fresh vegetables are more or less
cleaned by washing In fresh water.
The scientist did not dwell on this as
much as on canned food, however.
The recooking of food from cans be
fore it is eaten destroys the toxlne,
but not the spores, and it is the toxins
that brings swift death. The inves
tigators, Drs. Dickson, lieyer and Gel-
SB
DISCOVERS
ger, have .evolved a scrum which has
been a protection to animals In 95 out
of 100 cases.
Water Needs Protection.
I D. Mars, sanitary engineer. United
States public health service, precipi
tated a debate on "Pure Water." He
said that Oregon should protect its
water supply. Some of the health
officers present contended that moun
tain water isn't pure because it be
comes contaminated and should be
chlorinated. This caused others to
declare that chlorinated water is inju
rious to people, citing how fish placed
in water so treated quickly die.
Dr. John B. Anderson, Washington
state health commissioner, closed the
conference programme with a paper
on interstate co-operation in. prevent
ing the spread of contagious dis
eases. '
POULTflY RAISERS MEET
CO-OPERATIVE SALE OF EGGS
DISCUSSED BT SPEAKER.-
C. li. Cpson Tells Benefits Gained
.by Members of Association
Jiewly Formed In State.
EUGENE. Or., Dec. 19. (Special.)
Benefits accruing to the poultry
raisers of the state through co-operative
marketing of eggs by the Pa
cific Co-operative Poultry Producers'
association were explained by U. L.
Upson, manager of the association, at
the afternoon session of yesterday's
meeting of Lane county farm week.
This was poultry day and' the largest
attendance of the whole week was
noted.
Jlr. Upson said the new association,
which succeeded the Oregon Poultry
Producers' association,1 was now on a
strong financial basis and that own
ers of 150,000 hens had been signed
up. Mr. Lpson urged the Lane county
poultrymen to enter the association
in order to reap the benefits of co
operative marketing of eggs.
Mr. Lpson explained that the asso
ciation was responsible for the pres
ent comparatively high prices re
ceived for eggs in this state, declar
ing that the poultrymen could not
stand a much lower price, as they
would be operating at a loss. He
said that the association actually
held the price of eggs down In Port
land last summer to keep up con
sumption, acting upon the theory that
consumption of eggs all the year
around at a medium price was better
than consumption during a portion of
the year at a low price and no con
sumption the rest of the year owing
to an excessive price.
BUSINESS REVIVAL SLOW
SITCATIOX COUXTRY FACES
MOST TRYIXG IX HISTORY.
Lumberman Home From East Says
Opinion Is That Liquidation
Will Continue Long Time.
EUGENE, Or., Dec. 19. (Special.)
Opinions In the east as to when
business generally will revive range
from early in the spring until late in
the fall of 1921, says A. C. Dixon,
manager of the Booth-Kelly Lumber
company and vice-president of the
West Coast Lumbermen's association,
who has just returned from an ex
tended trip through eastern cities.
"The country is facing one of the
most trying situations in Its his
tory," said Mr. Dixon. "It may be
many months before business returns
to normal. After conferring with
lumbermen, bankers and other busi
ness men from many parts of the
United States, my opinion is that de
flation is progressing rapidly in most
all parts of the country, but that
business win not reach a normal
besis until the process of liquidation
has gone much further. Jn a number
of producing districts liquidation has
Just begun."
Mr. Dixon attended a meeting in
Chicago of the directors of the Na
tional Lumber Manufacturers' asso
ciation. Consideration was given to
theincome and excess profits taxes
as they affect the lumber producers.
He attended also a meeting of the
Scuthern Pine- association, and re
ported that, wage reductions in some
of the southern lumber mills ranged
from $1.80 to $2.50 a day.
STATE DEPARTMENT COLD
RUSSIAN STOWAWAY MUST RE
TURN' TO SIBERIA.
Romance of Young Woman Who
Came to America to Wed -San
Francisco Man Shattered.
SEATTLE, Wash., Dec. 19. (Spe
cial.) Eva G. Prints, the Russian girl
stowaway who has been held at the
immigration detention station here
since November 2, must return to
Siberia. Her romance is shattered.
The appeal which had succeeded in
softening the heart of the. acting sec
retary of labor, who was willing to
waive rules and regulations in Miss
Printz' case, struck an iceberg in the
state department at Washington.
Today a letter was received by
Eimon L Wiener, attorney for Miss
Prints, from the acting chief of the
vise office, declaring that inasmuch
as Miss Prints did not comply with
passport regulations "the department
of state declines to waive the pass
port and vise requirements."
"I intend to appeal to the secretary
of state himself and to the president,
if necessary," declared Wiener.
Miss Printz said on her arrival here
that she came to America to marry
Lloyd D. Jacot of San Francisco, to
whom she became engaged while he
was at Vladivostock with the Ameri
can forces. "
Jacot came to Seattle at the girl's
request. He attempted to obtain her
release, saying that he would marry
her. and told of having met the girl
in Vladivostok.
Schools Get Mechanical Equipment.
Mechanical equipment for- local
schools, part of the army surplus
stock, has been purchased for the. dis
trict by Director Thomas, who has
just returned from the east. He was
gone six weeks selecting' machinery
for Benson, Polytechnic school. Be
tween $16,000 and $17,000 worth was
contracted on the basis of IS cents on
the dollar. , .
Sheriff Sued for Wood.
OREGON CITT. Dec 11. (Speclal.)
M. Biven has entered suit in this
city against Sheriff Wilson to recover
the possession of 55 'cords of wood
which the sheriff attached some time
ago. Biven alleges that the county
shall either turn over tha "wood to
him or pay him the equivalent in the
sum of $412.50. The suit was fi.led
in the circuit court here. . '
E
AGAINST FERN EVIL
Non-Productive Lands More
Than Irrigated Area.
FIRE GREAT DESTROYER
Burned Forests In State Total About
Four Million Acres, Says
Report " of Board.
There are more non-productive
fern Jands in western Oregon than
irrigated and irrigable lands In the
entire state under the present irriga
tion systems or in projects already
declared feasible," says W. E. Law
rence, station ecologist at Oregon'
Agricultural college.
That fire and. fern are responsible
for non-productivity of large areas to
an extent not yet recognized. Profes
sor Lawrence is convinced. He says
that excellent progress has been made
in reclamation of desert, swamp and
alkaline lands, but that little has been
done to bring the fern areas into
profitable use.
Not all fern lands are considered
as waste lands, for in some areas re
forestation has been undertaken and
a new crop of forest trees has been
started. The timber crop is the most
important single crop In Oregon. Pro
fessor Lawrence says, and lands de
voted to growing a new forest stand
are not to be regarded as waste
merely because of the ferns, which
are not a serious detriment except
as they interfere with grazing.
Many Millions Needed.
To get an Idea of the extent of the
recIamaCle fern lands Professor Law
rence cites estimates of irrigation re
clamation of 144,555 acres in Oregon
up to June 30, 1916, at a cost of J4.-
000,000. It will call for many mil
lions more to reclaim lands now in
irrigation projects or proposed for
future reclamation. For a very much
less sum investigations could be com
pleted and tests made which would
result in reclaiming larger areas of
burned-over fern lands.
Three great fires in the middle of
the last century resulted in ' destruc
tion of the following areas:
Taqulna burn, 1846, extending from
the coast to. the Willamette valley,
450,000 acres; Cape Perpetua burn,
1843, in Siuslaw district, 207,000 acres;
Nestucca burn, date unknown, but be
tween '50 and '60320.000 acres; total
of these three burns, 977,000 acres.
. Burned Area Is Millions.
Scores of lesser burns have brought
the entire area of burned forests to
about 4,000,000 acres, according to
estimates of the Oregon state board
of forestry.
Approximately all the burned-over
areas are potential forests, but many
of them are not being reforested.
Three things operate against the re
stocking of these areas seed trees
and seed bed were almost completely
destroyed, the growth habits of .young
ferns crowd out struggling seedlings,
and the practice of burning the ferns
each spring over much of the areas
kills the young seedlings before they
get well started.
Douglas fir and spruce covered
these large tracts before the forest
fires denuded the lands. The fine
stands of large trees on much of the
area would now, if living, be a fine
heritage of inestimable worth.
CLOVER CULTURE IS AIDED
EXTEXSIOX SPECIALIST TELLS
OF SOII IXOCjTJLATIOX.
Professor Carpenter Describes in
Detail Methods TJsed by Ag-
ricultural College.
Inoculation of clover seed with
suitable clover bacteria cultures has
been practiced with success in the
state in districts where clover will
grow but has not generally been
grown, according to W. S. Carpenter,
farm crops extension specialist at
the Oregon Agricultural college. Mr.
Carpenter said that if this fact" were
more generally known it would be of
great assistance to farmers in deter
mining whether they would find it
profitable to apply bacteria cultures
to the seed before planting. -"The
risk of getting a poor stand,
or no stand at all, is too great to be
taken in trying for a stand in dis
tricts not already growing the crops
with success and where there is dan
ger that no bacteria are present in the
soil," said Professor Carpenter.
"Throughout western Oregon seed
inoculation is not ordinarily neces
sary, but wherever there is any doubt
as to the need for, inoculation, it
should be made. It is inexpensive
when the cultures are obtained from
the experiment - station bacteri
ologists.
"Any soil that has grown a good
clover crop with'n recent years will
not need inoculation. When needed.
the inoculation may be made with ar
tificial cultures, or by bringing in
and distributing soil from a field
that supports a good crop- of clover.
"One or two wagon boxes of top
soil will be enough to inoculate an
acre. The soil is most effective when
taken fresh from the field on a cloudy
day. and immediately scattered on the
new field and harrowed in, to prevent
the sunshine from drying out and
killing the organisms. (
' "The soil method of inoculation is
thoroughly reliable, and satisfactory
so far as results are concerned, but
It involves considerable expense and
labor as compared with the artificial
culture method, which is easy and
cheap." -
ORCHARD GRTmBBIX
CG AD
VISED
Apples Declared Unprofitable in
Grays Harbor Country.
MONTESANO, Wash.. Dec. 19.
HOTEL HOYT
Strictly Fireproof. Near both depots
sad convenient car service to
all Darts of the city.
Bhutto Booms. Without Batti, H and np
Binsle Kooma With Bath, $2 and ap
KLBKHT S. KOBK, Manager.
0EWER BOARD
FOR BETTER WALLS
- AND CEILINGS
BASMUSSEN & CO.. .
N. E, Cor. Second sad Taylor Street
LITTLE BEING
DON
BEAVER
BOARD
I
(Special.) That Grays Harbor orch
ardlst should cut down all their
apple' trees, excepting a few for their
own use, is the advice of County
Horticulturist Payne, on the ground
that competition on a commercial
scale with eastera Washington is im
possible. Climate and, soil are both
against apple-growing as a profitable
industry, he adds, and the sooner
cherries and pears are planted the
sooner will orchards in this county
become a paying proposition.
Mr. Payne is to make pruning dem
onstrations this week as follows:
Elma, December 20; Montesano, De
cember 21; -Porter; December 22; Sat
sop, December 23, and Summit, De
cember 28.
California Reported Prosperous.
California shdws no Indication of
the business depression reported
prevalent "throughout the east, ac
cording to Sam C. Meyer of the, Hip
podrome theater, management, who
returned yesterday from a three
weeks' vacation trip in the south.
Los Angeles seems exceedingly pros
perous, Mr. Meyer says, with a great
deal of building activity going on in
all lines. Five theater buildings of
from 2000 to-4000 capacity are under
construction in Los Angeles.
454 COWS ARE TESTED
NOVEMBER REPORTS" MADE OX
10 DAIRY HERDS.
Oregon Credited With Four Silver
Medal Jersey Bulls Out of
Ten In United States.
A total of 454 cows, representing
106 herds in Oregon, were officially
tested for milk production, in Novem
ber, according to the report of H. N.
Colman, superintendent of official
testing for the breeeders' association
and the Oregon Agricultural college.
Breeds and herds tested were as
follows:
Ayrshire, 4 herds, 15 cows: Guern
seys, 11 herds, 34 cows; Holstein, 17
herds, 60 cows; Jersey 71 herds, 338
cows; Shorthorns, 3 herds, 7 cows. It
was in these official tests that rec
ords were obtained under conditions
acceptable to the breeders' associa
tion. Hoard's Dairyman for December 3
reported that Valentine Ashburn Bar
onet, owned by J. M. Dickson & Son,
Shedd, Or., became the tenth silver
medal Jersey buU. due to the fact
that three or more of his daughters,
beginning their tests from 2 years
and 95 days up to 5 years of age,
produced amounts of butterfat not
less than 500 pounds at lowest age
and 700 pounds at higher age. This
was the fourth silver medal Jersey
for Oregon, four out of ten for the
breed in the entire country.
Twelve supervisors were employed
for this week, the expense of which
was borne by the breeders' associa
tions concerned. ' -
FARMERS TD HAVE WEEK
MOXTAXA RAXCHERS TO MEET
TO DISCCSS MARKETIXG.
Well Known Authorities wm Ad
dress Agriculturists at Big forum
Affecting Vital Question.
BOZEMAN, Mont., Dec. 19. Farm
er's Week at Montana State college,
during the second week of January,
1921, ill have as its feature a three
of marketing prob
lems of the farmer. In this discus
sion, which is to be in the nature of
an open forum, some of the well
known marketing authorities of the
country will participate. " Many
farmers' organizations in the north
west will be represented at the forum,
it has been announced, as well as
organizations in Canada. California
and many other states.
Among those who are expected to
discuss various phases of the market
ing problem of the farmer is Julius
K. Barnes, wheat exporter and former
director of the United States Grain
Corporation; Aaron Sapiro, attorney
for a number of California co-operative
marketing associations; A. A
Elmore, of Spokane, president of the
Washington Wheat Growers' associa
tion; D. G. Shea, president of the fed
eral land bank at Spokane and V. D.
McWhorter, superintendent of the
government experiment sheep ranch
at Dubois, Idaho.
Farmer's week opens on January
10 with a conference of Farm Bureau
presidents. Joseph Dixon, governor
elect of Montana, is scheduled to
speak on January 11. January 12 is
to be Livestock Breeder's day. The
annual Shorthorn sale .will 'be held
in the afternoon.
The marketing forum will be held
Jarftiary 13 to 15. During the week
the Montana Seed growers' associa'
tion will hold a seed show in Boze
man. Fire Department Officers Xamed.
OREGON CITT. Or., Dee. 19. (Spe-c!al.)-r-The
West Linn fire depart
ment elected officers for the ensuin6
year as follows: President, Harley
Wright; secretary, W. J. McLarty;
treasurer, K. McLarty; foreman, Joe
Nixon; second foreman, Bill Reinke;
third foreman, Roy Davidson; ser-geant-at-arms,
P. Christensen.
oftiteFIr
NOTHING NEW
ABOUT US
WE are not a new concern.
For tea years we've been
plugging along, right here in Port'
land, making printing, multi
graphing all kinds of advertising "
literature. We have grown, too
-and made some Mends. And
now our facilities for making ad
vertising literature that pays the
man who pays for it, are very
good indeed. Not the least of
these facilities is EXPERIENCE.
We try to stay down to earth and
write and plan literature that will
earn its salt not merely get by
the man with the check book. -
OVER 8,000 CLASSIFIED
MAILING LISTS ON FILE
Main 8829
THREE TRUNK
LINES
and Mall Advertising Co.s
WRITING
PRINTING
MAILING
AlKADrBUMS
MUITIGRAPHIN3
MAILINU- ,
tISTS
anibJirffPSOU
mrwQiir pnm try i -
LAILIIUIIL I UULMII
BREEDING PLANNED
Portland Men Ambitious to
Have Finest Farm.
FLOCK IS THOROUGHBRED
Development of Strain of Rhode
Island Reds Is Sought by
Poultry Fanciers.
One of the finest Rhode Island Red
poultry farms In the. United States is
the ambition of A. J. Raney, Portland
poultry fancier, and insurance man,
and Julius L. Meier, a great admirer
of beautiful fowls, who has taken a
great interest in thoroughbred sjock.
VY'lth that end In view. Mr. Meier's
farm on the Columbia river highway
near Corbett has been fitted up for
raising poultry and with Mr. Raney's
purebred flock as a nucleus the work
of developing a strain of Rhode Island
Reds which it is hoped will become
known all over the country has been
started.
The farm has already been equipped
with modern poultry houses and ap
pliances' including trap nests. A num
ber of fine birds have been purchased
to supplement the flopk already
possessed by Mr. Raney.
Breeding; Experiments Planned.
' Mr. Raney,- who Is to take charpe
of the management of tljo farm, plans
to conduct a number of experiments
ln breeding in the effort to develop
the best possible strain of fowls. His
plans include the mating of six pehs
of fowls. From each pen he plans to
grow as nearly as possible 50 fowls
and a close record of the results of
each pen will be kept. This series
of matings will lncluda experiments
with ard without birds 'having what
Is known as "smut," that is the black
bars In the web of the feathers on
the back of the bird.
The golden rule In chicken raising,
in the opinion of Mr. Raney, Is standard-bred
stock 25 per cent, correct
feed rations 25 per cent and care and
eternal vigilance In cleanliness 50
per cent. .
Mr. Raney has one male bird that
cost, him the best cockerel he had on
thr place and $10Q. This bird Is now
6 years old and each year Is mated'
to some of his direct offspring, fe
males that range from one to four
generations away. This is line breed
ing and is what is known as keeping
within blood lines in poultry circles.
v Birds Brine Cash.
The Portland breeder recently sent
one male bird to a California buyer
for $50 and five pullets to South Car
olina for $125.
Mr. Raney has acquired a national
reputation as the result of his suc
cess in the breeding of Rhode Island
Reds. He has inaugurated the
unique plan, of sending eggs for
batching on the guarantee plan. His
knowledge of and : love of raising
beautiful birds has brought him into
close touch with many prominent
breeders, and the last issue of the
Rhode Island Red Journal disclosed
that the members of the fifth district
of the Rhode Island club of America
are puttirfg him forward - as secretary-treasurer
and a member of the
executive committee of that organi
zation. His birds have won high
honors at practically all the recent
poultry shows of the country
Mr. Raney has the following ad
vice for beginners in the poultry
business:
"Go to a book store and get a book
called the "Standard of Perfection,"
compiled by the American Poultry
association. This book will tell you
exactly how your fowls should look,
no matter what breed. While you are
there get Walter Hogan's book entl
t;ed "The Call of the Hen." Study
these carefully, and if you have any
trouble of any kind call up any of
the large feed houses and ask them
to send their poultry service man out
at once."
Prunes Sent a9 Presents. '
VANCOUVER Wash., Dec. 19.
(Special.) Prunes from Clarke
county have been sent to every state
in the United States for Christmas
presents by persons living here. The
Washington Growers' association,
which has pooled about 75 per cent of
the -crop, has packed a large quantity
of prunes under the brand "Mello
west," in ten-pound boxes, and these
are being sold for Christmas pres
ents. They are selling rapidly and
hundreds of boxes have been shipped
by express and parcel post. On the
short haul the express rate is higher
than parcel post, but in the long haul
the express gives a half rate for
prunes.
Every large city has one newspaper
whlchr by universal consent, is the
Want-Ad medium of the community.
In Portland it's The Oregonlan.'
PORTLAND MANUFACTURERS ANDJOBBERS
COMMERCIAL IRON WORKS
ENGINEERS FOUNDERS MACHINISTS
QUOTATIONS GIVEN ON SPECIAL MACHINERY AND CASTINGS.
REPAIR WORK, GENERAL JOBBING.
PHONES E 7212 12 7275.
WORKS
Rasmussert&Co.
7
N.E.Comer
SECOND 54 TAYLOR C
PORTLAND TINWARE SHEET
METAL MFG. CO.
Wholesale and Retail Manufac
turers and Repairers of Tin, Cop.
' per and Galvanized Ironware.
47 First St. Bdwy. 3444
BARRELS AND
CASKS '
Aad All Klada of Cooperage at
Finke Bros. Cooperage Works
254 Front St. Weat End Hawtkorne
Bridge. Main 8143. .
'j
Ann
IP ' J
Click, Click the needles should suggest a name!
Isn't it fascinating to try to name things? Have
you ever tried to fit the right name to a fluffy
little kitten or a stray dog .that persisted in making
your home his? Here's an interesting time to
name yarn the first pure worsted knitting yarn
spun west of the Atlantic coast 'is spun here in
Oregon. Until the right name is suggested it
will be known as
e.
Oregon Worsted Yarn
It is made from the long fiber, wool fleece that is making
CJreg6n famous as a wool country ! It is made in all col
. ors. llie leading dealers of Oregon are selling it at 50c
the ball. . Ask to see it feel it think of the way it is
made and what it will make then NAME IT the
winning name eceives $250!
Rules of Contest
Anyone' may enter the contest. Submit as many names
as you like. Use the regulation contest blank or plain
paper. Impartial judges will select the winning name. -Only
one name can be used. If the winning name is
suggested by more than one person, the first one received
will be awarded the prize. Contest closes January 10."
Announcement of winner will be made January 15, 1 92 1 .
Address all names to Oregon Worsted Co., Portland, Or.
Oregon Worsted Co.
ROY T. BlSHOP, Vice-President and Manager
Portland, Oregon ,
TIMBER SURVEY SECRET
TWO
ROTJTKS LAID OCT
LIXT COCXTY.'
IX
Koads Lead to Belt of Finest Un
touched Forest in the Cas
cade Mountains.
LEBANON, Or., Dec. 19. (Special.)
A crew .of railroad surveyors has
been working quietly for several
weeks In the eastern part of Linn
county for what Is said to be a log
ging road into the timber belt on the
upper Crabtree river.
The survey started near the town
of Crabtree, a station. of the Wood-burn-Springfield
branch of the South
ern Pacific, and extends easterly for
a distance of 20 miles into the fine
belt of timber owned largely by the
Hammond Lumber company.
Two routes have been surveyed, one
following up the Crabtree river valley
and the other going up the ridge be
tween Crabtree river and McDowell
creek. Both routes lead Into the same
body of timber, which Is said to be
one of the finest untouched bodies of
timber in the Cascade mountains.
It is not known definitely who is
behind the project, but It Is supposed
EAST SEVENTH AND MADISON.
J. C. BAYER
ROOFING AND SHEET METAL
WORK, SKYLiGHTS, METAL
CEILINGS, TANKS
PHONE MAIN 461
204 MARKET, STREET
Phone East 1S35. Res. East 1797.
D. F. Shope. President and
, General Manager.
' . SHOPE BRICK CO.
FACE AND MANTEL BRICK A
SPECIALTY.
3el'i.East Morrlaoa Street.
East Side Mill and
Lumber Co.
LUMBER, BOX SHOOKS. GKN
. . ERAL BULL WORK.
Sellwaed 57
B 1B3
Phone your want ads to The Ore
Konian. Main 7070. Automatic 660-95. i
' that the Hammond Lumber company
is, in view of the fact that It owns
thousands or acres of timber In that
section. This timber is ripe and
should be put on the market within
the next few years in order to save
much of 1L
Whether the company will erect a
mill near the timber tracts or haul It
out to some of Its mills already es
tablished Is not known.
The crew of surveyor has worked
so quietly that few knew what they
were doing for some weeks. .
ANNULMENT IS . ASKED
Marriage Tie Chafes After Few
Weeks' Experience.
VANCOUVER, Wash., Dec. 19.
(Special.) Some people who marry
in haste, coming to Vancouver to have
the ceremony performed, soon change
their minds and desire to have the
marriage annulled, or to secure a
TRAIN SERVICE
BETWEEN
PORTLAND
AND
SAN-FRANCISCO
WILL REMAIN NORMAL OPERAT
ING AS HERETOFORE VIA BENECIA
AND PORT COSTA TO OAKLAND PIER.
. - ...
RESIGNATIONS TENDERED BY EM
PLOYES OF FERRY BOATS OPERAT
ING BETWEEN SAN FRANCISCO AND
OAKLAND PIER HAVE BEEN WITH:
DRAWN.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY
JOHN M. SCOTT,
General Passenger Agent
Mm
illli
Following are examplet of
good names, nhkh for va
rtous reasons may not ba
use J: "Bo Peep," "Co
lumbia," "Coo J Shep'
herd." "Minerva," "Ore
gon. divorce. A few weeks ago a well
dressed couple came here from Port
land and were married. Saturday th
bride came to Vancouver, found ths
county attorney. W, K. Yalta, and
asked to have her marriage of a few
wecka annulled. She said she had
d'arovered that her husband had mar
ried her under an assumed name ami
she desired to live with him no lonm-r
aa she feared that all was not right
She waa Informed that aha would
have to' live In the state a yar to
establish a residence hrfors she could
even file suit for divorce, and that a
person might marry under an as
sumed name and tha ceremony would
be legal. Ths woman was very anry
and criticised tha county attorney for
not giving her an annulment.
The Oreuonlan publish practi
cally all of the want ada printed In
the other thres Portland papara, in
addition to thousands of exclualv
advertisements not printed In an)'
othr Inrnl pnper.
V
9 .
K
1
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