Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, May 26, 1920, Page 3, Image 3

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    TIIE MORNING OTtEG ONIAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 2G, 1020
RAILROADS DEFEND
PLEA FOR BILLION
S Cfr J G C C
$ Cfr & & $i Q li
F Bring ..Us Your Old Clothes!
Only one garment
IS
accepted from each
Efficiency of Private Man
agement Also Defended.
customer.
Here is an opportunity to buy your summer apparel at a saving and at
the same time assist two worthy causes. Read this advertisement carefully.
EXPENSE CUT EXPECTED
S?
J si T" f).o 17 .- .J77 w77.J L 1
CI l JLSULLLM.I O LMJ LLL tC U.LLKJ LMJ KZLX KJl L LI tC LJU.1 m
All Roads Declared at Least One
Year Behind in Purchases
of Equipment.
chase price of a new garment
(This applies to garments priced from $37.50 up.)
If you bring us your old coat, suit,
S'
UJ
s y
WASHINGTON, May 25. Efficiency
of private management and the jus
tice of the railroads' demands for a
billion dollars additional revenue
were defended by railroad represen
tatives today before the interstate
commerce commission apainst cross
examination of counsel for shippers
and employes.
Under private control the roads ex
pect to show greater efficiency and
reduced expenses, Daniel Willard,
president of the Baltimore & Ohio
railroad, declared in answer to ques
tions by Glenn E. Plumb, representing
the railway employes. For a period,
Mr. Willard said, preater service will
be demanded which will cut into im
mediate savin? by the roads.
Equipment Declared Lacking.
All the roads were at least one
year behind in their equipment pur
chases, he asserted, adding that the
responsibility for this should be
placed on the war conditions rather
than on government operation.
Frank Nay, v icq-president of the
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific rail
way, explaining the questionnaire sent
out by the roads on which was based
the estimated need of an additional
income of a billion dollars, said that
on account of unsettled conditions
due to the coal strike last fall, fig
ures for the year ending October 31,
1919, were usea.
Freight Rise la Favored.
Additional income should be raised
entirely from freight revenue, Mr,
Nay declared, and not from passen
ger traffic, demurrage or terminal
charges.
G. M. Schrlver, vice-president of
the Baltimore & Ohio, described in
detail the statistics presented by Mr.
Willard on which the carriers of the
eastern territory ba.se their requests
lor a iu per cent advance in rates.
If tlje commission should reduce
the freight increase from 30 to 25 per
cent, or allow a 5 per cent return
instead of 6 per cent, or reduce the
property Investment account valua
tlon of the eastern railways by 10
per cent, he said, the $60,000,000 sur
plus provided for in the estimates
would be wiped out and those car
riers would lose the benefit of the
new transportation act, he asserted.
WILSON GREETS VETERANS
dress or furs.
S
CO'
$10
Men's Suits,
Raincoats,
Overcoats
Allowed on
On any purchase of a suit, raincoat or overcoat
that is regularly priced from $37.50 and up we will
allow you TEN DOLLARS for your old garment.
On any purchase of a suit, raincoat
or overcoat that is regularly priced at
less than $37.50 we will allow you FIVE
DOLLARS for your old garment.
Women's Suits,
(C Dresses, Coats
JLhJ'
NEAR EAST RELIEF
t i
AMLAtCA COMUfTT FC ARutMAPl AS SYPJU RuCT
Ilea cnMa win m
and Furs
m t. Kit,
Allowed on
$5
On any purchase of a suit, dress, coat or fur that
is regularly priced from $37.50 and up we will allow
you TEN DOLLARS for your old garment.
On any purchase of a suit, dress, coat
or fur that is regularly priced at less
than $37.50 we will allow you FIVE
DOLLARS for your old garment.
$5
Men's Hats
This includes
both Felt and
11 Panama Hats
Allowed
Purchase a new hat
at this store during this
sale and we will allow
you ONE DOLLAR for
your old one.
Women's Waists, Petticoats,
Skirts and Sweaters
On any purchase of one of the above garments
amounting to $15.00 or over we will allow you
Two Dollars and Fifty Cts. for your old garment.
" 5Q On any purchase of one of the J -d QQ
less than $15 we will allow you
ONE DOLLAR for your old
garment.
Allowed
Allowed
Men'sShoes
This includes
Shoes and
Oxfords
Allowed
Let us sell you a pair
of new shoes or oxfords
and we will allow you
ONE DOLLAR for a
pair of your old shoes.
BIBLE LA U
M N
Wr. t.
ron Im-xd . Or
h mr i ot la j . sir thobauA
r 0Tm frr tbeir u.a sel
tl'i t rov roh Blrut lut ntt. W
- i' sar ta c rr tnlBitlu,
f 1 t -rrr th ctH tml for ?mt
i U1 ua a aabatatlal aaii tn t y-nr sub
a'.nbg'.leu as tiu oas ba ibrvardad la anla
I ti&a for inn pc oemisg wioar, atitab avea
aa r&iaaa to ta ona r tta aora arar laoaa.
Cn;iallj 7nraa
Ukff
(J Cata Viraoter.
Maiaaajaaaaaaaayaaiaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
MKMOItlAL DAY MESSAGE
SENT TO LEGION.
IS
Celebration Declared Consecrated
to Heroic Dead Who Have
Given Lives for America.
NEW YORK, May 25. A memorial
day message from President Wilson
to American veterans of the world
war was received here today by the
American Legion Weekly. It read:
"We approach the annual celebra
tion of Memorial day with our hearts
filled with tenderest and grateful
memories of those who have given
their lives tor America. The day has
by custom been consecrated to the
country's heroic dead. This is ob
served by those who were comrades
in arms and who shared with the
well-remembered dead, the experi
ences, the hardships, the perils and
the glory of war; this Is celebrated
by the people of the country gener
ally who take it as an annual occa
sion to renew their loyalty to the
country and to draw fresh inspiration
for the tasks of peace from the mem
ory of the sacrifices which were made
eo freely in times of war. The day is
therefore filled with both memories
of the- past and inspirations for the
future. It gathers the traditions of
what we have done in order that we
may have the courage for what we
tave to do.
"Progress moves like an army; it
has its days of training and prepara
tions, its days of conflict and its days
of vindication: it has its campfires
and its memories. To you who were
soldiers of America in the great war,
I send affectionate greetings. What
your arms have done for liberty in
France your spirits will continue to
do for justice at home. Great experi
ences make great men and out of the
tragedy of this test a new, heroic
duality lias come to the American
manhood you represented, and your
country's affections for what you
have already done is only equalled by
its confident hope of the manly i-art
ycu are still to pl-iy."
Ip Jp- Jp JJ"
$ el it
p ip p p'
WASHINGTON ST. AT TENTH
The Gray-Tile Corner
All
Old Garments
We Receive
will be given
to the
Salvation Army
and the
Near East Re
lief Committee
Every old garment
that we receive during
this sale will be given to
one or the other of these
two worthy organiza
tions. Surely you have
some discarded garment
that you can give to this
cause and at the same
time save a good per
centage of the purchase
price of a new garment.
$$$
rence-C. Gray, 22, both of Portland,
also .Were married. They were ac
companied by the girl' mother, Mrs.
Minnie Wilbur Coleman, Twenty
third and Umatilla streets, Portland.
HEARST SCORES IN COURT
Interference With Sale of Maga
zines Is Forbidden.
ST. PAUL, May 25. A temporary
injunction, issued by the United
States district court in New Mexico
restraining: the state council of de
fense and' certain officials of that
state from interfering- with the sale
and circulation of the Hearst maga
zines in New Mexico, was upheld by
the United States circuit court of ap
peals here today.
The state council of defense. Gov
ernor Lindsey and others sought to
discourage circulation of the Hearst
magazines through popular appeal,
basing their action, according: to the
complaint, on alleged anti-British and
Pro-German statements published in
Hearst newspapers.
FISHERY. TREATY SIGNED
VMIED STATES AND CANADA
TO PROTECT "SOCKEl'E."
YOUTHFUL BRIDES TAKEN
Two Girls, 16 and One 17, Are
Married at Vancouver.
VANCOUVER. Wash., May 12.
(Special.) Among those married here
today were:
Miss Bernice Erwin, 17. of Corval
lis. Or., was married to Trytue Leer,
22. also of Corvallis. Miss Erwin
was accompanied by her mother, Mrs.
Maude L. Krwin. 408 Monroe street.
Corvallis.
Miss Jewel Thomas, 16, to Loring
C. Robertson, 24, of Portland. The
girl was accompanied by her father,
P. F. Thomas of 223',i Pine street.
Portland.
Miss MartP G Wilhur. 16. and Law-
CANDIOATESS0NS MEET
Wood Jr., and JohnSon Jr., Era-
( ternize in Chicago.
CHICAGO, May 25. Two young
men who are political opponents of
a strange sort sons of two of the
candidates for the republican nom
ination for president met yesterday
at the headquarters here of Senator
Hiram W. Johnson. '
"I'm Osborne Wood." said the young
man in an army officer's uniform
to the western senator's son. "Heard
von were in town and thought you
might like to have cards to some of
the clubs. My father is doing the
same as your father running for the
presidency."
"That's mighty decent of you," said
young Johnson, as they shook bands.
The cards were to four of the lead
ing Chicago clubs.
IT TAKES THE JOY
Oat of I.lfo In the Spring When Im
pure Blood, Lost Appetite,
Lifelessness, lassitude and that tired
feeling pull down health to the low
level that invites illness.
The knees become weak and life
seems hardly worth living.
In this condition Hood's Sarsapa-
rilla has the real "human touch." It
meets the necessity promptly and
completely. It purifies the blood, ere
Htcs an appetite, "makes food taste
good" and aids digestion, thus natur
ally Increasing strength and in i
common-sense way building ud the
whole system. Then the bright days
of spring find In you happy response.
and the whole world smiles again.
Take Hood s barsaparma for your
Spring Medicine used as such for
nearly 60 years by thousands. It
"makes food taste good."
Keep on hand Hood's Pills as a
gentle laxative or (in larger doses) as
an active cathartic. Adv.
PATROL GETS NEW SUITS
Atm Will Visit Portland Xext
Month In Gorgeous Uniform.
VANCOUVER, Wash., May 25.
JSDecial.) At a meeting of the Van
couver Shrine ciud last nigni j. u
Sutherland was elected captain of
Afifi Datrol, John W. Schaefer tirst
lieutenant and Harry Sparks second
lieutenant.
Thirtv-five suits have been secured
for the members who will assist Al
Kader patrol in Portland in June. The
Vancouver patrol will also assist at
the launching of the Antmous
June 22.
The new euits are unusually at
tractive, having large Turkish trous
ers of brilliant red. blue Jackets, yel
low sash and red fez.
Arrangement Said to Be Xecessary
Because of Depletion of
Spawning Grounds.
WASHINGTON. May 25. A treaty
between the United States and Can
ada covering the "sockeye" salmon
fisheries was signed today by Secre
tary Colby for the United States, Am
bassador Gedde3 for Great Britain
and Sir Touglas Hazen for Canada.
The treaty provides for the protec
tion, preservation and propagation of
the "sockeye" and other species of
i salmon in waters contiguous to the
United States and Canada in the Fra-
ser river.
SEATTLE. Wash., May 23. "The
necessity of a fishery treaty between
Canada and the United States, cover
ing the taking of sockeye salmon,
arose from the fact that the sockeye
first enters American . waters and
American fishermen are thus given
the first opportunity to take them be
fore they reach Canadian waters and
run up the Fraser to the spawning
grounds." said L. H. Darwin, Wash
ington state fish commissioner.
"Canadian fishing interests have
insisted for years that American fish
ermen were taking too great a per-,
centage of th2 fish and have insisted
UDOn them restricting their opera
tions. The Americans have replied
that if they did not take the sock
eyes first the Canadians would. Un
able to reach an agreement, fishing
proceeded extensively on both sides
for years, resulting in terriDie aepie
tion of the sockeye run.
"In its original form the treaty con
tained many provisions objectionable
to American fishermen, notably those
prohibiting: the use of purse nets on
the American "side and allowing per
sons punished by American courts to
be retried and punished by Canadian
courts.
"Xot having seen a copy of the
treaty as amended. I cannot predict
what its effect will be on the salmon
fishing industry in Washington."
thirds vote for passage, the plan
would permit only a straight out
vote for or against adoption. .
Democrats asserted they would put
up a solid front and with the help of
"insurgent" republicans defeat the
big tax measure. They claimed that
supporters of the bonus had failed
to obtain sufficient votes to give it
the right of way.
DEMOCRATS PICK OPENER
RREMEK OP MOXXAXA TO CALL
CONVENTION' TO ORDER.
ALBERS PARDON OPPOSED
American Legion Post at Oregon
City Against Leniency.
OREGON CITY, Or., May 25. (Spe
cial.) At a meeting of the Willam
ette Falls post, American Legion, in
the Moose hall here Monday night
the post went on record as opposing
any leniency towards Henry Albers
of Portland, who was convicted of
disloyalty during the war.
The post decided to take part in
the Memorial day exercises. A com
mittee was appointed to arrange for
a Fourth of July celberation in Ore
gon City.
SUGAR HEARING OPENED
(Continued From First Pase.
by W. N. Straup of Salt Lake City.
former Judge of the Utah supreme
court; R. W. Young of Salt Lake,
C. M. Thomas of Medford and H. D.
Norton of Grants Pass.
Merrill Nibley of Salt Lake City,
general manager of the company, and
Alexander Nibley of Portland, former
manager of the company in the Rogue
river valley, are at the hearing.
Martens Hearings Postponed.
WASHINGTON, May 23. Hearings
on deportation proceedings against
Ludwig C. A. K. Martens, soviet agent
in the United States, scheduled for re
sumption today, have been postponed
until June S.
BONUS BILL IS DELAYED
FRIENDS OF MEASURE WILL
TRY NEW TACTICS.
ALLEGED FORGER CAUGHT
Man Reported Wanted in Three
Counties Is Arrested.
OAKLAND, Cal., May 23. Thomas
J. Conway, declared by the Oakland
police to be wanted in three countries
for forgeries and said to have been
responsible for the defrauding of local
merchants of more than $2000 in a
week, was arrested here today.
The police said he is wanted by
Scotland yard. England, by Victoria
and Vancouver, H. C, and by the de
partments at Portland, Berkeley, Seat
tle. San Francisco and Sacramento.
Reports Indicate Arrangements at
San Francisco Will Be Com
pleted: In Time.
WASHINGTON, May 23. J. Bruce
Kremer of Montana, vice-chairman of
the democratic national committee,
will call the democratic national con
vention to order when it meets in
San Francisco June 8.
Mr. Kremer was selected, the na
tional committee announced tonight,
because Chairman Cummings has been
designated to act as temporary chair
man of the convention and because
it was thought fitting that a western
man should open the first convention
of the party to be held west of the
Rocky mountains
Both Chairman Cummings and Vice
Chairman Kremer will leave for San
Francisco next week to attend the
meetings of the committee on ar
rangements, which, it was announced,
will begin informal sessions about
June 10.
At headquarters of the national
committee it was said that reports
from George F. Mara, assistant to
Chairman . Cummings, sent to San
Francisco several months ago, indi
cated all arrangements would be com
pleted by the time the first delegates
arrive.
Only one contest, that from Georgia
between the delegations pledged to
Attorney-General Palmer and the del
egation selected by the followers of
Senator Hoke Smith and Thomas E.
Watson, has thus far been filed with
the national committee. This contest,
it was said, will be heard first by
the national committee and probably
will be carried to the credentials com
mittee to be organized after the con
vention opens.
There is also the contest for na
tional committeeman from Georgia
between Clark Howell, the present
committeeman, and WT. C. Vereen.
CALIFORNIA MAN ELECTED
Professor Merriam to Head Carne
gie Institution.
WASHINGTON. May 25. Professor
John C Merriam of the University of
California was elected president today
of the Carnegie institution of Wash
ington, to succeed Robert Wood Ward.
President Ward retires at his own
request after 16 years' service.
.UMBER WAGE INCREASED
Willamette Valley Mills to Pay
Daily Minimum or $4.60.
SALEM. Or., May 55. (Special.)
Endeavor Will Be Made to Get
Two-Thirds Vote for Suspen
sion of Regular Rule. .
WASHINGTON. Maj 25. House
leaders were "up in the air" today
over the question of soldier relief
legislation.
With democrats and about 50 re
publicans attempting to block im
mediate consideration, leaders started
a new move in the hope of breaking
the combination so that the bill might
be presented to the house not later
than Thursday.
Although Chairman Fordney of the
ways and means committee announced
that he planned to call up the
measure Thursday, there were indica
tions of a possible change in the re
publican programme and some uncer
tainty as to what might happen. In
stead of tho effort to give the relief
bill the right of way by a special
rule, republican fighting for the
bonus decided on other parliamen
tary tactics and announced they
would endeavor to get it before the
house by suspension of the rules.
Although this would require a two-
Advertising Measles
In the lower forms of advertising- life, the obsessing
idea is to put a picture of the factory into the space.
If possible, two pictures of the factory.
During the next stage of evolution, the advertising
manufacturer begins every sentence with "we" and tells
all about his business.
When at length he becomes convinced that the way
to sell his prospective customers is to tell them of their
wants, he has graduated from the tyro class.
But there is one more case of advertising measles
he has to have. This is the semi-colon.
It is a matter of life and death importance to him
whether it be a comma or a semi-colon; whether
"gotten" is better than "got"; whether the triangle or
the circle has the deeper "psychological" import.
From the semi-colon attack there emerges the real
advertiser who realizes that 99. of the importance of
his message is to make the reader realize a want which
will be adequately filled by the advertiser's product.
Sincerity of belief dictates the message, and semi-
psychological triangles take care
' colons and
themselves.
of
Butterick Publisher
The Loyal Legion of Loggers and
Lumbermen today announced the
adoption of a common labor wage of
$4.60 in district No. 2, which comprises
practically all of the mills of the
Willamette valley. This is an in
crease of 10 cents a day for some of
the workers and 20 cents a day for
others. The minimum wage scale pre
viously in effect here was $4.40 a day.
Companies affected by the advanced
wage scale included the Silver Falls
Timber company, Silverton, Lumber
MOTIITJS'FRIEM)
Expectant Mothers
ASSISTS NATURE
Al Alt Druztlsts
OmoJ B.ntla mm M,H,..J mmi Brnhf' FrM.
I BKAut ItLBTREGUtXTOR CO. Dwr. S-D, A-nJiwr. CA
Doctors Recommend
Bon-Opto for the Eyes
Physicians and eye specialists pre
scribe Bon-Opto as a safe home remedy
in the treatment of eye troubles and to
strengthen eyesight. Sold under money
refund guarantee by all druggists.
company. Oregon Pulp & Paper com
pany. Falls City Lumber company,
Charles K. Spaulding Logging com
pany and the Gerlinger mills at Dallas.
SHE IS A MIXTURE OF
Vivacious France
Languorous Java
Inscrutable Samoa
AND MUCH
SHIMMIE 1
pi i.bjii nil iiumiiMMHwww-
I I 1 llll
The Delineator Everybody's
t$2.5o a year) Magazine
m (2.7i a Tiear
The Designer
($1.60 a Year)
I - r
attractive box in
rich browns and
while. Inside dainty Bon
Bona arid assorted choco
lates of rare goodness.
The "Vogan Brown and
'White package wiU be ap
preciated by those you like
to please.
Ad your dealers.
VOGAN CAMOY COVtPAKT
Portland Seattle Spokane
Taeoma
5