Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, October 20, 1919, Page 10, Image 10

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THE MORNIXG OREGOXIAX, MONDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1019.
PRIZES AWARDED IN
T
Exhibits of Home Products
Please Excursionists.
ALL LINES ON DISPLAY
Windows in Grants Pass and Rose
burg:, However, Considered as
Having; Edge on Others.
Window displays of Oregon prod
ucts, large in number and of unusual
high quality, were shown in all the
five towns of southern Oregon visit
ed by the excursion of Portland busi
ness men last week. Portland manu
facturers were gratified with the
showing of Oregon-made products.
Prizes aggregating $250 were given
to the three winning displays in each
town, $25 to each first prize winner,
$15 to the seconds and $10 to the
thirds. The displays were staged un
der the general auspices of the Asso
ciated Industries of Oregon, which
organization gave the prizes to the
winners.
The following were the winners,
having best displays of Oregon-made
products in the various towns:
Garnett Wins In Medford.
Med ford H. C. Garnett. first; H.
K. Marsh, second; Leo J. Miksche,
third.
Klamath Falls Baldwin Hardware
company, first; K. Sugarman, second;
Star Drug company, third.
Grants Pass Golden Rule store,
first: Rochdale store, second; Peerless
Clothing company, third.
Ashland J. P. Dodge & Sons, first;
H. G. Enders & Sons, second; White
House grocery, third.
Roseburg Peoples Supply company,
first; Bellows' store, second; Hat
Shop, third.
Without detracting from the splen
did showing made by any of the
towns. Portland business men who re
turned from the excursion yesterday
epoke particularly of the displays at
Grants Pass and Roseburg. Neasly
every store in both these places had
exhibits and some wonderful dis
plays were reported. In the displays
in all five of the towns, Oregon-made
goods were shown throughout, that
being one of the rules of the compe
tition. Gratification Is Expressed.
"We were much gatified and pleased
by the interest shown and by the
splendid displays of Oregon products
made in all five of the towns visited,"
said H. C. Huntington, president of
the Associated Industries, yesterday.
"The displays showed to an extraor
dinary extent how Oregon products
are actually being used and in con
stant demand over the counters in
this part of Oregon. Practically all
lines of goods manufactured within
the state were shown in the exhibits
' and the displays show that all Ore
gon stuffs, particularly foods and
fabrics, find ready sale."
A comprehensive digest of the Ore
gcn labor laws, including the late
rulings of the industrial welfare com
mission, relating to the employment
of women and minors, has been pre
pared by Thomas McCusker. secre
tin y-manasrer of the industrial asso
ciation of Oregon, and a limited num
ber of the digests will be available
for distribution, according to Mr. Mc
Cusker. The digest covers seven closely
typewritten pages, and takes up the
following topics for explanation and
discussion: Employment by state or
subdivision thereof; maximum hours
of employment in mills and factories;
lighting of factories: employers' lia
bility; reporting accidents; workmen's
compensation; deducting hospital
funds from employes: liability of em
ployer and employe in the matter of
employment; payment of wages when
employe quits work or dis discharged,
or when employes go on strike; state,
conciliation board; criminal syndical
ism and sabotage; anti-injunction
law; employment of women and mi
nors; records of such and special reg
ulations; sanitation; minors; minor
boys; minor girls; employment by
canneries; mercantile occupations,
manufacturing occupations: personal
service; laundry occupation; telephone
and telegraph; office occupation;
public housekeeping occupation;
women elevato, operators.
The industrial association has a
limited number of copies on hand,
over and above the amount necessary
to supply its own members, reports
Mr. McCusker, which the association
will be clad to mail upon request to
employers of labor throughout the
state, while they last.
The Timm-Cross Paint company,
one of the largest of Portland paint
manufacturing and wholesaling firms,
has purchased the property of the
Fisher-Thorsen company, another local
paint concern, and will move its fac
tory to the new quarters, greatly ex
panding its business.
The property is located on the
Macadam road near the outskirts of
the city and has direct rail connec
tions. The consideration was $24,500.
The property is 120x200 feet, with a
two-story building of mill construc
tion The Timm-Cross company will
immediately start work, remodeling
the plant, installing a r.ew lighting
system and new boilers, and will
move into the new plant, according
to present plans, about January 1.
The Fisher-Thorson company un
derwent reorganization a couple of
years ago, and the plant, it is under
stood, has not been running to capac-
ity. The Timms-Cress company will
move, as soon as the new quarters
are ready, from the present home at
the foot of Harrison street, to the new
plant, which will be used both for
manufacturing and storage.
"Our business has outgrown the
present quarters. said Mr. Timms
"In view of the fact that this whole
section is about five years behind in
painting, we are looking forward to
a continuation of heavy business. At
the present time the company cells
throughout Washington, Oregon and
Idaho.
Bergmann shoe oil, one of the Port
land products which has come to the
attention of the public recently
through an advertising campaign in
augurated by the manufacturing com
pany, the Thomas Bergmann Shoe
Manufacturing company, is enjoying
a rapidly increasing sale, according
to members of the firm. As a result
of the advertising campaign inaugu
rated, the company expects, from
present Indications, to dispose. . of
within six weeks a quantity of oil
originally considered a six months'
eupply.
The Paul Sales-company has recent
ly been organized in Portland with
the purpose of handling and selling
the products of local manufacturing
firms. Headquarters have been
opened in the Yeon building. The
company will buy the entire produc
tion of local firms, it Is planned, and
dispose of the products through act
ive selling campaigns. E. V. IX Paul,
who is vice-president and general
manager of the company, has had
OREGON
wide experience directing sales cam
paigns, and anticipates no difficulty
in disposing- of the goods on the
merit of being Oregon products.
Frank Waller is president of the con
cern, L. W. Gronan is secretary
treasurer and Maurice Seitz. Ben Wal
ling and Dr. M. G. AlcCorkle are directors.
ROAD BOOSTER TO SPEAK
Chamber Forum Will Hear Chair
man, of Federal Council.
S. M. Willlaims of Washington. D.
C, chairman of the federal highway
council, who arrived In Porotland
yesterday, will be the speaker this
noon at the regular weekly luncheon
and membeVs' forum of the Portland
chamber of commerce, telling of gov
ernment plans for the development
of a better national highway system.
The federal highway council was
created during the war and has as
its object the development of a broad
and systematic highway plans for this
country. The council is backing the
Townsend bill, now before congress
and which provides for new highway
laws and additional highway develop
ment by the government. Mr. Wil
liams is making a tour of the middle
west and Pacific coast in the interests
of the counoil.
Members of the newly-appointed
federal highway council of Oregon, as
well as others interested in highway
development, are expected to attend
the luncheon. The Oregon council is
affiliated with the national associa
tion. U.-O. SLOGAN SELECTED
"Home to Win Again, Oregon,"
Will Advertise Homecoming.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, Eugene,
Oct.t 19. (Special.)-"Home to Win
Again, Oregon," was decided upon yes
terday by the committee as the offi
cial slogan for homecoming week-end,
November 15. The author of the slo
gan prefers to remain anonymous, and
the prize of $6, which, it was an
nounced, would be awarded the win
ner will be turned over to the
woman's building fund. The mem
bers of the committee were Lindsay
McArthur of Baker, chairman; Mabel
Weller of Eugene. Charles K. Cran
dall of Vale. E. C. Simmons, president
of the Chamber of Commerce; Mrs.
P. E. Snodgrass and Professor W. F. G.
Thacher. .
The slogan will be used on all the
posters, stickers and letters advertis
ing the w-eek-end. November 15 is the
day of the football game with the
university's old rivals, Oregon Agri
cultural college.
LIEUT. ALLEN IS HONORED
Soldier Cited for Exceptional De
votion to Duty.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, Eugene,
Oct. 19. (Special.) Lieutenant Ches
ter Allen, brother of Eric W. Allen,
dean of the school journalism, has
been cited for exceptional devotion
to duty, energy and zeal, according to
word received today by Dean Allen.
Lieutenant Allen was connected with
the 5th division and dl da variety
"of work. For some time while over
seas he was chief division intel
ligence officer, part of the time he
was in observation work and later he
was assistant dean of the college of
engineering at Beaune.
His citation reads in part: "He dis
played courage, energy and efficiency
during the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Ar-gonne
offensives. He was frequently
in the front lines as an observer under
severe machine gun and shell fire.
thereby gaining valuable information
for the division intelligence section."
MISS DUNIWAY CHOSEN
Portland Girl Associate Editor on
University Paper.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. Eugene.
Oct. 19. (Special.) Leith Abbott of
Ashland, editor of the Emerald, a tri
weekly student publication, has se
lected his staff of assistants for this
term. Other additions to the renor-
torial stalff will be made 'soon.
Abbott has appointed Dorothy Dun-
iway of Portland as associate editor,
Harry Smith of Eugene make-up edi
tor, Lyle Bryson of Eugene news edi
tor, with Nell Warwick of Marshfield
as her assistant. Helen Manning of
Portland will handle dramatics. The
reporters are Adelaide Lake. Velma
Rupert. Jacob Jacobsen and Paul Far
rington, all of Eugene; Earle Rich
ards of McMinnville and Raymond
Lawrence of Woodburn.
Alaska Iron Ore Tested.
NENANA, Alaska. (By mail.)
tisnt tons or iron ore, the first, it is
said, to be treated and shipped In
Alaska, are being tested in the electric
furnaces at Treadwell. The ore comes
from a deposit owned by Barney Hines
on the beach at Snettisham, a port in
Stephen's passage on the Alexander
archipelago.
DAILY METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
PORTLAND. Oct. 19. Highest temper
ature, 61 degrees; lowest. 38 degrees. River
reading. 8 A. M..- 1.1 feet; change in last
24 hours, 0.1 foot fall. Total rainfall (5
P. M. to 5 P. M.), none;; total rainfall
since September 1, 1919. 3.69 inches; nor
mal rainfall since September 1, 4.04 inches;
deficiency or ramiall since September 1,
JS19. 0.35 inch. Sunrise. 6:33 A. M. ; sun
set. 5:19 P. M. ; total sunshine, 6 hours 4
minutes; possible sunshine, 10 hours 40
minutes. Moonrise. 2:17 A. M. ; moonset
3:18 P. M. Barometer (reduced sea level).
5 P. M., :,u. lncnes; relative humidity,
6 A. M., 98 per cent; 1 P. M., 80 per cent;
6 P. M., 55 per cent.
THE WEATHER.
"0 Wind
sin
? ? I
. a
-
to ;
im ;
6TATION3L
Wes.tb.sr.
Baker
Boise
Boston
Calgary
Chicago
Denver
Des Moines. .
Eureka
Galveston . . .
Helena
tJuneau
Kansas City.
Los Angeles.
Marshfield ..
Med ford
Minneapolis. .
5S'0.0010
60 0.01. .
64 0.001. .
4S'0.00 . .
Clear
Clear
Cloudy
Cloudy,
54 0.0OI12 NE
.lear
Clear
58 0.00 . .IS
64 O.ooilO SE
Rain
4 O.OO
. NWClea.r
60. OO
toti Jlear
4K o.oo 16;SW
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
48 0.401 . .S
70.0.0014SE
720.0O. -ISW
Clear
Clear
Clear
Cloudy
Clear
Clear
Clear
640.00. .INW
52 0.00)12 E
86.0.001 . . IN
.New Orleans.
New York. . .
North Head.
64 O.OOI14INW
54'0.00il4iNW
No. Yakima..
64I0.0O . .SE
Clear
Phoenix . . .
Pocatello .,
Portland .,
Roseburg .
Sacramento
St. Louis..
Salt Lake. .
San Diego.
84:0.00 ..IE Pt. cloudv
4iu.4,io;st; luiouay
61 0.00
56 0.00
76 0.00
66 0.00
480. 01
66 0.00
78 0.00
50 0.0O
is v Clear
NW
Pt. cloudv
NW
SE
NE
W
N
jiear
Clear
Cloudy
Clear
S. Francisco.
Clear
Seattle
Sitka
Spokane
Tacoma
Tatoosh Isld.
tValdei
46
NWj
Cloudy
Cloudy
S2I0.36I
38i0.0O
54IO.O0
5010.00
SW
Pt. cloudy
N
uiouay
Cloudy
SW
36:50 0.001. .INE
Pt. cloudy
Walla Walla.
421 64 0. 001. ,SW
Liouay
Clear
Clear
Washington..
6S 0.001. .ISE
Winnipeg .
400.00! . . NW
tA. M. today.
Ing day.
P. M. report of preced
FORECASTS,
and vicinity Fair
Portland
northerly
winds.
Oregon and
Washington Fair; gentle
northerly winds.
EDWARD L. WELLS, Meteorologist.
CAREER OF CAPTAIN
A. J. GEER IS
Weil-Known River Man Dies
at Portland Home.
LIFE AN INTERESTING ONE
Portion of Xearly Half Century De
voted to Steamer Operation
Spent in Far North.
Captain A. J. Geer, pioneer Colum
bia river and Alaska steamboat cap
tain, died yesterday at the family
home, S East Sixteenth street, fol
lowing an illness of several months.
His death closed a career of nearly
half a century as commander of fa
miliar river vessels plying from Port-
and docks. Among the vessels com
manded by Captain Geer. were the
Bailey Gatzert and the J. N. Teal.
Captain Geer was born at Butte-
ville, on' the Willamette, September 6,
185S. He was the son of F. W. Geer
Oregon pioneer of 1847. At the age
of 19 he began his career on the river.
ecoming a deck hand on the steamer
'City of Salem," historic vessel which
plied between Oregon City and Cor
vallis and which was wrecked at Rock
Islani about 40 years ago.
During the gold rush of 1898 in
Alaska . Captain Geer engaged in
steamboating in Alaskan waters. He
eft Vancouver. B. C, the latter part
of June, in command of the steamer
Ccnstantine, for Alaska, in tow of the
tug South Portlana. The vessel was
wrecked July 4, 1898, off the coast of
St Michael. Captain Geer and crew
made St. Michael safely, however.
and there he purchased the steamer
J. P. Light, with which he proceeded
up the Yukon.
Some Record Trips Made.
The trip from St. Michael to Daw
son City was made in 20 days. The
next season, 1899, Captain Geer took
command of the steamer Mary F.
Graff and made the round trip, St.
Michael to Dawson City and return, in
he record time of 21 days. That same
season he made a second trip to Daw
son City and return, being the first
man to make two complete trips in
one season. The 6400 miles was made
p 56 days.
On June 19, 1917, Captain Geer
t-rought the steamer Bailey Gatzert
over the rapids at Cascade Locks,
bringing 125 passengers. This was
the first time the rapids had ever
been rnn with any considerable num
ber of passengers. High water had
closed the locks and in making the
run from The Dalles to Portland it
was nc.iessary to bring the vessel
throughin this way. The two miles
of rapids were covered in three min
utes.
Celilo Rapids Also Shot.
Captain Geer also shot the Celilo
apids on several occasions, once
about eight years ago aiding- Captain
Duluth in bringing down the steamer
Norma. That same year he shot the
tapids with two wooden barges, los
ing one member of the crew in this
danrerous trip when a deckhand was
washed overboard at Big Eddy.
Captain Geer was a cousin of T. T
Geer, ex-governor of Oregon, and is
survived by the following immediate
relatives: his widow, Mrs. A. J. Geer,
and three children. Airs. Bertha Brown
of Seattle, Miss Amy Geer and A. C.
Geer of Portland. A. C. Geer is cap
tain of the steamer Shaver. Two sis
ters, Mrs. A. McCulIy of Butteville and
Mrs. Frank Brewster of Portland,
also survive.
TUG KERN IS DAMAGED
Repairs to Towing Gears Will De
lay Boat Here.
The tug Daniel Kern suffered an
accident to her towing- gear while
coming up the river Saturday nisrht
and it was announced yesterday that
fine would probably be laid up for re
pairs for several days.
The tug: was scheduled to leave
down with the Columbia contract
barge 39 carrying boilers for the
W iliamette Iron & Steel works for
delivery at Victoria, B. C. The barge
has been loaded with four Scotch ma
rine boilers and the shipment will
complte the contract of the Portland
concern for the delivery of 28 boilers
to the Foundation shipyards in Vic
toria.
Pacific Coast Shipping Notes.
SEATTLE. Wash.. Oct. 19. CSnfri1 .
Bringing b00,0o0 gold bullion from the
mining camps oi the be ward peninsula and
a big passenger list, the Alaska Steam
ship company's liner Victoria, Captain Fred
warner, arrived in Seattle at 6 o'clock
this morning. The treasure cargo is the
most valuable received here this year.
The Victoria is from Nome. St. Michael.
Colovin and Unalaska, bringing cannery
employes or Libby, McN rill & Lib by at
Libbyville, Alaska, and the crew of the
sailing ship Abner Co burn, wh orefused to
come to Seattle in the vessel, claiming sue
is unseaworthy. The Abner Coburn is now
In Unalaska and will be towed to Seattle
by the steamship Cordova of the Alaska
Steamship company.
The steamship Curacao of the Pacifi
Steamship company arrived In Seattle at 7
o clock this morning from southeastern
Alaskan ports with 35,000 cases of canned
salmon. Iti5 tierces of mild cured salmon
and 230 boxes of herring.
The steamship Admiral Evans of the
same company is due in Seattle this even
ing with passengers and freight from ports
in southeastern Alaska.
The Pacific Steamship company an
nounced that the steamship Admiral Wat
son will sail from Seattle November 3 for
Anchorage, via southeastern and south
western Alaska. She will be the last, ves
sel to leave Seattle this year for Cook
inlet.
For general overhaul and engine and
deck repairs, the steamship Santa Alicia.
W. R. Grace & Co., entered dry dock of the
Todd Dry docks, inc., yesterday. She also
will undergo annual inspection, having
her tall shaft drawn.
The steamship Bala California. South
American Pacific line, left dry dock at the
plant yesterday after cleaning and paint'
ing.
The express steamboat Indianapolis,
Puget Sound Navigation company, w
docked yesterday for semi-annual over
haul. The shipping board's steamship
western tiien. wnicn aamagea her bottom
on a reef in Japanese waters on a voyage
from Seattle, left the Todd plant last
week after having a plate renewed and
several faired.
ASTORIA, Or., Oct. 19. Special.)
Bringing a cargo of fuel oil for Portland
the tank steamer Wm. F. Herrin arrived
at 7 this morning from California.
The Norwegian motor ship H. C. Kan
sen. lumber laden from Portland for the
United Kingdom, shifted to the local -har
bor at 1 o'clock this afternoon. She ex
pects to sail tomorrow.
Seven members of the crew of the
steamer Celilo, which is taking on bun
ker coal at the port dock, were paid off
last evening. Among the number was
Benny Williams, an I. W. W. organizer.
whose passport was re voice a oy the cue
toms authorities. Sufficient men to com
plete the vessel's complement will be
signed on tomorrow morning.
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Oct. 19. fSoe
cial.) The United States coast guard serv
ice is facing a shortage of men, both
ashore and afloat. Patrick J. Casey an
nounced today that he was leaving the
service due to the small wages paid. He
lias been witn tne coast guard for the nas
eight years, serving aboard the Sentinel
Casey's resignation makes the fifth man
connected with coast guard duties in San
Francisco bay to leave the service In th
last few months. The wages paid the men
range from 51 to $61 a month and found, f
with an allowance of only $20 a year for
rim h.
In ballast, the schooner John A. Camp
bell. Captain F. W. West, arrived today
from the Solomon islands. For the first
time in four years the old Southern Pa
cific car ferry Solano has been brought to
San Francisco and laid up for repairs. The
boat, which plies the Carquinez straits be
tween Port Costa and Benecia, with trains
t and from the northwest, has a loose
flange on on of her paddle wheels. The
damaged part was rushed to the Sacra
mento railroad shop for repairs, where
three shifts of mechanics will work night
and day for two weeks on theflange. The
Solano is badly needed and has been In
continuous service ainca she was over
hauled In 191.",.
The Ble Fnnel line freighters Architect
and Crown of Cadiz arrived here today, the
former from Liverpool and the latter from
Honolulu. This is the first time that two
Captain A. J. .Geer. plonrrr river
man nho died yesterday.
of the Funnel lino steamers have arrived
here on the same day. The Crpwn of Cadiz
Is loaded with a cargo of canned pineap
ples, which will be taken to London. The
Architect will load cargo for Liverpool.
Kaliour. outhrle A Co. are local agents
for the line.
The ship Monongahela. Captain Arm
strong, with a number of United States
shipplns; board students, arrived here to
day after a fast trip from Manila. The ves
sel is operating; for the account of Strain
ers & Dixon.
The snipping board hull Peishwah ar
rived here today from Coos Say in tow
of the tug" Famson.-
The Standard Oil tanker Broad Arrow,
C.-.ptaln Jonasson, arrived here today from
Hongkong.
PORT TOWNSEND. Wash.. Oct. 1.
(Special.) Sixty-one days from Callao,
the schooner Resolute arrived this morn
ing, proceeding to Seattle, where she will
dock for overhauling. With a big ship
dock for overhauling.
With a big Hhipment of rifles and gen
eral cargo, the shipping board steamer
Delight completed her 12-hour loaded test
today, returning here to land the govern
ment inspectors and to make minor repairs
to her machinery, sailing for Vladivostok
this evening.
Bringing a full cargo or pineapples, tne
schooner Alice Cooke arrived today from
Honolulu, proceeding to Seattle to dis
charge.
Bringing a shinment of raw silk valued
at $77,000,000, the Japanese steamer Fushl-
I Maru is scheduled to arrive Wednes
day from Kobe. Another shipment of silk
valued at 15.000.000 will reacn puget sound
Monday on the Japanese steamer Arabia
Maru, these two shipments will be sent
east on special trains from beattie.
Retter to perfect the young men on the
training ship Brookdale in shipping and
seamanship, that vessel will make a trip
to Honolulu, carrying general cargo. She
will begin loading this week. Besides her
regular crew the Brookdale has 250 re
cruits on board.
Masters have been assigned to three
United States shipping board vessels as
follows: Captain W. C. Ansell to the Er
flngham. Captain J. O. Lurston to the
Cripple Creek and Captain H. Robrig to
the Cathlamet.
Movements of Vessels.
PORTLAND, Oct. 19. Sailed at 11 A. M.
-Steamer J. A. Chanslor. ror toan fran
Cisco: at noon oMtor schooner Babtnda,
for Bombay. Arrived at o f. il. steamer
W. F. Herrin, from Gavlota.
TACOMA. Wash.. Oct. 10. Arrived
Whalers Panginak. from Kooiak; i-atter-
son, Unimak, from Akutan. bailed steam
ers Sumatra Maru, for Yokohama; Quadra,
for Vancouver, B. C.
SEATTLE. Wash.. Oct. 30. Arrived
Steamer Victoria, from St. Michael; Cura
cao, from southeastern Alaska.
ASTORIA. Oct. 19. Arrived at 7 and
left up at 8 A. M. Steamer W. F. Herrin,
from Gavlota.
Steamer Johan Poulsen, from Portland.
Tides at Astoriav Mondaj.
High. Low.
11:32 A. M...8.4 feet I 5:31 A. M...1.2 feet
11:57 P. M...7.4 fe;t6:14 P. M...1.0 foot
Report From Month of Columbia River.
NORTH HEAD, Oct. 19. Condition of
the at 5 P. M., sea smooth; wind north
west, 14 miles; clear.
Banker Has 12 Rule.
George M. Reynolds in Forbes Maga
zine.
1. Choose your life work early.
2. Make your own rules of conduct.
3. Choose your friends carefully.
4. Do more than the routine work
of your job.
5. Decide quickly In all matters.
and act promptly.
6. If right, ignore criticism; It
wrong, change without delay.
7. Practice economy. lie neither
extravagant nor niggardly.
8. Avoid depending upon your
friends. Give as much as you receive
from them.
9. Practice dipromacy it smooths
the rough spots and gives you the ad
vantage on the next move.
10. Cultivate cheerfulness, to en
able you to carry the necessary and
throw off the unnecessary burdens.
11. Indulge in sufficient Play and
recreation to keep the body strong
and the mind vigorous.
12, Be square with yourself as
with those with whom you are associ
ated. ONLY ONE THING
BREAKS MY COLD!
"That's Dr. King's New Dis
covery for Fifty Years a
Cold-breaker."
NOTHING but sustained quality and
unfailing effectiveness can arouse
such enthusiasm. Nothing but sure re
lief from stubborn old colds and on
rushing new ones, grippe, throat-tearing
coughs and croup could have made
Dr. King's New Discovery the na
tionally popular and standard remedy
it is today.
Fifty years old and always reliable.
Good for the whole family. A bottle in
the medicine cabinet means a short
lived cold or cough. 60c and $1.20.
All druggists. Adv.
Regular Bowels Is Health.
Bowels that move spasmodically
free one day artd stubborn the next
should be healthfully regulated by Dr.
King's New Life Pills. In this way you
keep the impurities of waste matter
from circulating through the system
by cleanBing the bowels thoroughly
and promoting the proper flow of
bile.
Mild, comfortable, yet always relia
ble. Dr. King's New Life Pills work
with precision without the constipa
tion results of violent purgatives. .25c
as usual at all druggists. Adv.
YOUNG MEN WANTED
FOR SERVICE AT SEA
Drive for 150 Apprentices to
Begin Here Today.
TRAINING SHIP IS READY
Merchant Marine Men-to-Be Will
Go to Seattle and Embark for
Cruise to Hawaii.
The enrollment of recruits for the
merchant marine of the United
States, which was discontinued here
a month agro. is to be resumed this
morning with a drive for the enroll
ment of 150 apprentices in ' two
weeks, according to orders received
from headquarters of the sea train
ing bureau by Lieutenant Harold C.
Jones, scad of the bureau here.
Recruiting- for the sea training
bureau wa closed here after the
last visit of the training ship Iris.
The resumption of the enrollment of
apprentices is taken to indicate an
expected increase in shipping on the
coast, and that the shipping board is
preparing to - meet future demands
for sailors.
Men enrolled during the two weeks'
campaign will be sent at government
expense to West Seattle, where they
will join the training ship Brookdale.
This training ship is a specially con
structed wooden Kerris-type vessel.
It will leave Seattle at the end of the
fortnight's campaign on a training
cruise to the Hawaiian islands. Lieu
tenant Jones says the ship will stop
at Honolulu and other Hawaiian
ports, and that apprentices will be
given shore leave.
All Departments Open.
Men are wanted for training in all
the ship's departments, deck, engine
room and galley. Any American citi
zen 18 years of age or over, who can
pass a physical examination, is eligi
ble for enrollment. The nllstment
is for the period of one year, six
weeks of which will be spent in
training, and the remainder in actual
service at the regular wage scale
aboard some ship of the emergency
fleet corporation. Pay during the
training period is at the rate of $30
per month, with uniform, meals and
quarters provided.
A new feature of the training
course is that the Brookdale will
carry a certain amount of merchan
dise in order to give apprentices
some training in the handling of
cargo. The Brookdale also will be
the first shipping board training
vessel to make an offshore cruise.
Earl M. Brockett. chief enrolling
officer of the shipping board, will be
here this week to aid in the recruit
ing campaign, and Captain J. Howard
Payne, chief of the sea service bu
reau for the northwest, will arrive in
Portland Wednesday.
Lieutenant Jonea Confident.
Recruiting for the eea training bu
reau will be handled in Portland
through the office of the sea service
bureau, 205 Concord building.
Lieutenant Jones, in charge of the
work here, is optimistic as to the
success of the campaign.
"We have been turning away a
steady stream of applicants since
the enrollment of apprentices was
stopped here," 'he said yesterday,
"and I have no doubt that we can
secure 150 men within two weeks."
TRAVELERS' GCIDE.
CP
C QUEBEC-UYERPOOL
1st 2d RJ
Empress of (170 $100 1 63 75
I'ntove, Nov. 25 up up
Montreal -I J verpoot.
10 A..M. Cabin Third
MM a Kama Oct. SO loo up 'J 50
Mellta Oct. :U 100 up 62..r.0
Minnedoa.Nov. 16 100 up -'.. "i0
Scandln'Vn Nov. 28 95 up 61 25
Montreal-GlMirow.
Cabin. Third.
Sicilian Nov. 1 'Jl) up 1.25
Montreal-Havre and London.
camn. i nira
Grampian.
Oct. 20 $!. up $61.
Co ru lean .
Nov. 2 t)5 up til. 2 5
CANADIAN PACIFIC
OCEAN SERVICES
I'Dnne nilwy. DO.
65 Sd St.,
fort land.
SAN FRANCISCO
S. S. Rose City
Depart 12 Noon
OCTOBER 23
From Ainsworth Dock
Fare includes Berth and Meals.
City Ticket Of fice,3d and Washington
Phone Main 3530
Freight Office, Ainsworth Dock
Phone Broadway 268
SAN FRANCISCO & PORTLAND
S. S. LINES
C&ccMft-' (JXeADMIRALLINSJ
8. 8. CITY OF TOPF.KA.'
Sails 9:00 P. M.. October 23. for Coos
Bay, Eureka and Saa Francisco, con.
nectlng with steamers to Loi Angeles
and San Dleffo.
First-class tar. Including berta and
meals:
Ban Francisco. Upper Deck. .... ..$25.00
Lower Deck 23.50
" Third Class 1800
Round Trip 43 0O
Eight per cent war tax added to
above rates.
TICKET OFFICE: 101 Third St.
Main 1466. A 8333.
PACIFIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY.
AUSTRALIA
NEW ZEALAND AND SOUTH SEAS
Vis Tahiti and Kara tonic a. Mail and paa
ftenfper ftervlce from ban Fraociaco every
5 day.
IMOS 8. 8. CO. OF NEW ZEALAND.
230 California St.. San Fraocifcco.
or local teamtiip and railroad aenclea.
I ii ? . i i'liij
iAILINCsj fj
BATES Cr V
lliflT
asy.n
PORTLAND MANUFACTURERS
tlDMiililiW:tllilMiiillH
Industries are like orchards
THEY have to be fostered, cared for and
encouraged until they get a. good start.
But once they start to bear fruit, they are the
source of wealth and prosperity for all of us.
Industries are no longer for the autocrats
and the "landed gentry." Fundamentally
they benefit the workers they make jobs
they give us all the opportunity to earn a
good living and to advance and prosper in
proportion to our ability, energy and am
bition. America is a great country because
of her great industries. Oregon is rapidly
becoming a great state because of her great
industries.
Let us all the peo
ple of Oregon pull
together, to make
Oregon's industries
bigger and better.
Associated Industries of Ore
'America s Greatest
MASON, EHRMAN &
Distributors of
"The Nation's Finest Cigars'
OREGON BRASS WORKS
If I fa Made of
BRASS, BRONZE. COPPER OR ALTTMIVTM
We Cam Fnralsh It.
OFFICEl SECOND AND EVERETT.
HIGH- 4T K onPTTVTaOC1 "wm"T"
GRADE L, Ab 1 UN ijbAV?
pl'oi-ir WESTERN FOUNDRY COMPANY
COMMERCIAL IRON WORKS
ENGINEERS FOUNDERS MACHINISTS
QUOTATIONS GIVEN ON SPECIAL 'SrACHINF.Tt Y AND CASTINGS,
REPAIR WORK, GENERAL JUKU1XU.
PHONES E 7312 E 7375. WORKS EAST SEVENTH AND MADISON.
We Are in the
Market
AT ALL TIMES FOR
FRUITS
FOR CANNING PURPOSES.
A. RUPERT CO.,
Inc.
PORTLAND, OREGON.
Buy the Miner Brand
1 Tfae Premier Cereals of the
Morthweit
ROLLED OATS
WHEAT FLAKES
FLAPJACK
FLOUR
PEARLS OF"
WHEAT
AND ALL OTHER
VARIETIES
Albers Bros. Milling Co.
THE FAMOl'S
AUBURN TIRES
J ARE HERE AT LAST.
A particularly attractive exclusive
dealer proposition. Write
OREtiON TIRE COMPANY,
81 First St.. Portland.
Distributors of
DINNERWARJS AND GLASSWARE.
MARSHALL-WELLS
CO.
Office 1S la and Lnvejoy Stsv
Broadway J Too.
Makes Babies Thrive
Tour druggist sells Dermos
Specialty Foundry &
Machine Works
Small Brass and Iron Casting-
Contract Work Solicited.
E. Seventh and Belmont. E. 3408.
Wall Paper at a
Lower Price .
I0e. lSe. SOc. 25c. 30e Doable RoIL
Varnish Tiles 4.1c. Oat Meal 30c
New Paper Shown In a New Way
SMITH'S WALLPAPER HOI SE.
lOS-llO Second St.. Portland.
P. SHARKEY & SON
1 I iuaat Oak; and Union Ave.
1 1 WW
S on
Moderafe Price CVar."
CO.
Phonest Broadnar B373. A 2373.
WE C.tLL FOR VOIR OLD
CARPETS.
Rnica and Woolen Clothine.
We Make llrfiut If ul Hand - Woven
FLUFF RUGS
All Work Turned Ont Promptly.
Itasr Hiikh Woven All Slim.
Mail Orilera. Send for llooklet.
Carpeta Cleaned. Laid and Refitted.
NORTHWEST RUG CO.
ISM East Eisrhth Street.
Phone East :;."s.
r -
u. r . onurr, rrea, ana uen i Aigr.
SHOPE BRICK CO.
Phone East 1S35; Res.. East 1797
FACE AND MANTEL BRICK
A SPECIALTY
Sl Vi East Morrison St.
COMPETENT OFFICE HELP
FURMSHKD.
No Charge to Employe.
Tell Me Your Employment Troubles
WM. E. GIBBONS
KU Hr. Ex. nl!B. .Main 4T.5.
PHOENIX IRON WORKS
& FOUNDRY
PORTLAND. OREGON.
Enjrlneers, Founders. Machinists. Boiler
makers and Structural Iron Work.
Noted tor Quick and Satisfactory R. pairs.
W. guarantee everything.
360 Hawthorne Ave.
Pbone Eaat 5S6S
N. A. SCHANEN
MARBLE WORKS
MAR HIE AND ORANITE
FOR IlliLDlNOS
2S7 Hawthorne Avenne. Portland. Or.
Davis-Scott Belting
Company
Pacific Coast Made Pnre Oak Tanned
Leather Belting-
IOS-lin-112 Vnlon Avenue.
TeL East 30H. Portland. Orrcos.
TRAVELING BAGS, SUITCASES
Pistol Holsters and Cartridge Belts.
Ladies' Purses and Hand Bans
Repaired;-AIen's Belts. Wallets and
Poi'kelbooks.
PORTLAND LEATHER CO.
23A Waahlnjrton.
r . .
11 s I e ion 'jasteo. aoigara .new
Rogue River Catsup?
It la Delicious Ask Yonr Grocer.
Knight Packing Co.
Portland Oregon.
PHONE YOUR WANT ADS TO
THE OREGONIAN
MAIN 7070 A 6095
AND JOBBERS
ALLIGATORS
TIIK ONLY
UNION MADE
OIL CLOTHING
Thre Million I ed by Inde Sam.
These plonilid garments are weather.
wair a tin ci hi k iirtwii
hvery iCiriniii t
riiridlv . ruHnntK
lea k si w k
nor crack. Actually
like ivather.
We are pleased
to announce
that one of our
Isrce factories
i.t now released
from povern
ment work and
dealers can now
a K a i n secure
Immediate de
livery of this
w o nderfut
clot h in k.
Our New Alli
gator Feather
weight Coat,
made of B.A.
loon Cloth our
chased from
the XJ. iS. gov
ernment. 1? ;h
lichtest weight
absolutely guar
anteed water
proof coat ever
constructed.
Pricen to rlrl.
erp on applica
tion. PAUL C. MORTON
Paeifle Coawt Representative
ALLIGATOR OIL CLOTHING CO.
St. LouIm,
404 AliakT Baildlnsr. Portland, Or.
I'hone Main 4049.
r
"The
Life of
Leather"
A perfect n on -mineral, r.m -Injurious
oil for anv and all kinda of shoe. Shoes
reated with Bergmann Shoe Oil are made
waterproof, soft and pliable and their
'Ife greatly Increased. For sale at shoe
nam ware and sporung goods stores.
T11KO. BERGMANN SHOE MJfG. COM
1'ortland, Oregon.
ORDER YOUR KADDERLY
FURNACE
Now, and we can give it best at
tention. Don't wait until the cold
of Winter. We make them of steel
and boiler rivet them. Will last
for decades-
J, J. Kadderly
130 FIRST ST. MAIN 1382
Use
ELECTRIC
STEEL
CASTINGS
and avoid
expensive breakdowns.
ELECTRIC STEEL
ortland FOUNDRY
Th Cant In es That Give Too Con
fidence in a our Machinerv.
J. C. BAYER
R00FIXG AND SHEET METAL
WORK, SKYLIGHTS, METAL
CEILINGS, TANKS.
PHONE MAIN 461 J
207 MARKET STREET.
East Side Mill and
Lumber Co.
LUMBER, BOX S HOOKS, CEXERA1
MILL WORK.
Sell wood SOT.
B 13413.
t : . .-
i cicpaoBea uraaawar ssva, -A. khh.
Portland
Galvanizing Works
Office and Worlca. Twenty ceond
and Reed Stak, Portlauad.
e "
aHa.tutA.1 UMini-; au HtU3S
WORKS
Castings
OP" EVERY DESCRIPTION.
Phone Broadway 4115.
21st and I'paksr, Portland. Or.
t
IVentllatora and Chimney 'Tone to
Order. Repalrina- and (General Jobbing
JACUli LUSL1
TIX. COPPER AD SHEET-IROS
WORK
Tin and Gravel Roof Repairing;
31o Klrst Street. Portland. Oregon
Phonei Main 1424
ROSSITER BROS.
AUTO TOPS RE-COVERED.
TOPS AXD CURTAINS
RkiPAlHEJ).
Union At, at Pin
Phone Kant 364
The Snfety Oiling System for Ford Can.
Furnishes lubrication to all parts of tne
Tr.otor whether the machine travels up or
dov. n ftrade. Prevents burnt-out bearing
and .scored cylinders and pistons. C1hpp
torn brake-Hnirtr ard CKrbon deposits from
the oil. Eii minutes fouled park plutcs.
i;t more mileage out f the gasoline.
Cools the oil. preventing rapid carboniza
tion. Makes th Ford motor a cool runtime
motor. Tn S.-ifetv oilinK Pvtom Is sold by
AL U. niPPKI-. Western ale A rent,
KaNt !i road way, Portland. Or.
not to
w ear 1
J?
5