Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, October 03, 1919, Page 20, Image 20

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THE 3IORXIXG OREGOXIAX, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3, 1919.
WAR ON BOLSHEVIK
MUST BE IN EARNEST
Allied Forces Outnumbered
and Imperiled.
NEWS IS SUPPRESSED
of
Ma jor-.rnrrl Ironside Tells
f ailure of Offcnlv lb-gun in
June in -Northern Ku.-ia.
AF.flf AN'TKU (Cnrrfstmnd'no of
the Associated Tress.) The British-
Kussian offensive In North Russia,
whith was Intended this summer to
connect with Admiral Kolhak'n Si
berian army and establish Archangel
as a base throueh which allied sup
pliea miirht be handled for all antl-
bolnbevlk armies in the field, has met
Ith unexpectedly strong resistance
en the Irina river at the same time
tii at Admiral Kolrhak's armies hare
been driven backward Into Siberia.
Because of Insufficient forces, lark
of open support by the allied irovern
menta and the fact that natural fac
tors have aided the bolshevikl. the
. expedition. according to military
opinion In Archanpel at this time,
may be doomed this summer to a fail
ure equally as bad as that which met
last summer's efforts, unless large
forces are thrown in at once by the
allied governments and a war against
the bol.sheviki undertaken in earnest.
Poll I leal 4'oadltloBa Krarrd.
Throuchout the lone winter, when
the allies and Russians on the Arch
angel front were fighting a hard
pressed, defensive battle against su
lerior forces, the allied command wa
waiting the arrival of summer to take
the offensive.
Fearine that political conditions in
Kngland would be greatly disturbed I
it were to become known that the
two brigades of British volunteer
troops, sent ostensibly to effect the
relief of allied forces already im
periled and outnumbered, were i
reality to be used as a reserve for
this summer's offensive, the censor
did not permit the local announcement
to that effect to be cabled abroad.
This announcement, made to the
Archangel press on June 6 by Major-
General Ironside, commander-in-chief
of the North Russia forces, was to
the effect that Archangel yas to be
made a base for the Siberian army,
through an immediate offensive for
Kotless. on the River Dvina.
Kotlaaa Is Railhead.
Kotlass is the railroad for the line
running to Viatka. on the trans-Siberian
railway, a distance of approxi
mately 250 miles from the position
that time of Kolchak's advanced
posts, since then driven back many
miles eastward. In this campaign,
said General Ironside, the British
troops were to have acted as a re
serve, while the Russians went
ahead.
The offensive began late in June,
hut so far has advanced only a few
miles. Kotlass is still more than 100
miles .from the Russian and British
positions on the Dvina. which axe. in
fact, only at about the same point
w here the Americans were established
last autumn before the strong bolshe
vik offensive caused them to with
draw during the winter.
Expedition la Ontaamberrd.
Although, compared with last sum
Trier's pitifully small force, tn present
British and Russian command is well
equipped. It is still far below th
strength of the bolshevikl in both
numbers and artillery. The British
gunboats and monitors, of which s
large flotilla was sent for operations
on the LH-ina and .aga rivers, have
for the most part proved uselss be
cause of the low water.
Kven the British volunteer forces
have been informed that they will be
withdrawn from North Russia before
another winter sets in. All Americans
and French are now off the Archangel
front, and the newly-trained Russian
troops, most of whom were obtained
by draft, are limited in number, the
territory being sparsely settled. They
are. however, well equipped.
At present the North Russian gov
ernment, which has established, under
direction of General Kolchak. a
"strong" policy to hold up the disci
pline in the army and among the
civilian population. Is determined to
carry on the war against the bolshe
vikl to the finish, and the people ap
pear anxious to co-operate.
Late in July Major-General Iron
side announced to the British gov
ernment that the Russian troops In
the Onego district, about 100 miles
west of the I'vina. had mutinied and
handed over the Onega front and the
town of Onega to the bolshevikl. No
British troops were on the Onega
front.
COLLEGE DRIVE LAUNCHED
Indiana High School Graduates
Vrgcd to Continue Work.
INDIANAPOLIS A state-wide cam
paign to urge high school graduates
of 11S to enter colleges or univer
sities has begun under the direction
of the state board of education. O. H.
Williams, former state high school In
spector, and I'rofcssor W. F. Book,
head of the department of psychology
at Indiana university.
The campaign follows the test last
year of more than 6uu0 graduating
high school students as to their men
tal status. The purpose of the ex
amination was to learn Just what stu
dents should continue their education,
students who showed marked intelli
gence will be assisted in every man
ner so they may keep on in their
school work.
The test, said to be the most re
liable ever given, disclosed that of
those students who won the classifi
cation "very superior intelligence"
only 73 per cent plan to attend some
college or university. Of this num
ber 22 per cent must be given finan
cial assistance. Only 5S per cent of
the boys and 5; per cent of the girls
who get Intelligent scores above the
ataie median expect to enter college.
It has been disclosed that the col
leges and universities are failing to
draw niany students of first-rate
ability, while on the other hand, they
are attracting many students whose
scores place them in the lowest
groups. Fifty students whose mental
test score placed them in the lowest
group expect to attend college.
without renouncing his allegiance to
Germany, and that he later repudi
ated his intention of becoming an
American citizen by requesting recog
nition as a Spanish subject, Francis
P. Garvin, federal custodian of alien
enemy property In Chicago, has filed
a cross bill answering the count's pe
tition restraining the authoritie
from disposing of the brewery stock.
The bill, filed Just before closing
time yesterday in the office of the
clerk of the district court, carried a
complete history of Count Oberstad
and his antecedents and asks that the
custodian be charged with holding the
brewery stock until the government
disposes of alien enemy cases
throughout the country.
In answer to a complaint filed last
May by Attorney Frederick Brown,
attorney for the McHenry. III., "mys
tery man." in which the count de
clared that, as a resident of Chicago
for eight years and a declarant for
citizenship, the authorities should be
be restrained from selling his brew
ery stock or otherwise actively ad
ministering his affairs, the cross bill
denies both the former statements.
"Count Bopp von Oberstadt," it al
leges, was born in Stuttgart, Ger
many, In 1S6S. and came to the United
States from Bremen June 20. 1911.
He has not lived in Chicago continu
ously since that period, but made reg
ular trips to Germany.
"In August. 1914, while on one of
the trips, he was held as an alien en
emy in Kngland and sent to the Brit
ish prison camp at Dorchester. He
was released in December upon fur
nishing bond and on the promis that
he would retur to the United States
for the period of the war."
November 12. 1918. the bill declares.
the count, contrary to his insistence
he wished to become a citizen of the
United States, wrote a letter to King
Alfonso of Spain.
In view of the black ingratitude
f a number of the German people to
ward their rulers'." the bill quotes the
letter as saying. "'I find it Impossi
ble to remain a German or return to
lermany."
The same charges of non-rttlzenship
re made in the bill against the
'ountess Klizabeth Bopp von Ober-
tadt. daughter of the late Pete
choenhofen. who holds the disputed
rewery stock Jointly with her hus
hand. At the outbreak of the wa
the countess and her children escaped
from Munich to Switzerland and. ac
cording to the bill, is still a subject
of Germany.
At the last hearing Judge Land Is
Issued an injunction prohibiting the
custodian and his directors. Thomas
J. Webb. Thomas J. Healy and Rob
ert T. L'pham, from declaring, brewery
stock dividends.
The property rights, the standing of
the on Oberstadt family, and othe
details will be ironed out when the
case is taken up for final settlement.
RED CROSS FIGHTS
TYPHUS IN SIBERIA
Terrible Epidemic Disease Is
Combatted by Americans.
RELIEFTRAIN TRAVELS FAR
Appeal for Aid to Carry on Great
Work on Bigger and Broader
Scale Is Made.
2600 ATTEND COLLEGE
1422 XEW AGGIES APPEAR AT
CORVALLIS THIS YEAR.
Difficulties as to Housing Are Good
Xaturcdly Met More Than
600 Students Are Women.
OREGON AGRICULTURAL. COL
LEGE. Corvallis, Oct. 2. (Special.)
The 2600 mark has been passed in the
total registration of students In the
college, far exceeding the enrollment
or any previous yeat.
u nh a total of 1422 new students,
all but 24S are registered for regular
degree courses, these few taking
vocational training. Many of them
are completing their academic require
ments before being eligible for degree
work.
Worthy of praise is the spirit of
the new students, a large percentage
of whom were considerab.y incon
venienced by the lack of accommo
dations. All of the difficulties have
been appreciated by the old and new
students alike, and work and college
life is already working out harmo
niously. Many of the students who
have returned from service in the
army and navy are resuming their
college work after an absence of
two or three years, and the student
body is correspondingly made up of
older and more mature men. This is
true alike of the women.
Divided according to the schools in
hich students have enrolled, the
latest reports are as follows:
Engineering. 837; agricultural, 598;
commerce, 493; borne economics. 467
pharmacy. 141; vocational, 248; op
tional. 4S; music. 14. The numbers
are still increasing and now there are
more than 1600 men and about 600
women in the college.
DANCE PATRIOTIC AFFAIR
DOWRY AGAIN AT ISSUE
IT. S. Government Assails ' Ober
etadt's Title as Purchased.
Count Oscar Bopp von Oberstadt,
whose fight against the government
handling of his $1,000,000 dowry in
stock of the Peter Schoenhofen brew
ery made him a prominent figure in
the alien enemy cases of the war
period, returned yesterday to the
limelight of the federal courts.
Declaring the count had purchased
bia U lie lor ii.00 from the Vatican
Hundred Per Cent American Party
Planned at Mabel, Or.
MABEL, Or.. Oct. 2. (Special.) A
hundred per cent American dance will
be held in Mabel Friday evening, Oc-
ober 3, under auspices of Coast
Range post number 13 of the Ameri
can Legion, locals 50 and 51 of the
Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumber
men and the Mabel Social club. The
proceeds will go to a charitable purpose.
The famous Elks band of Eugene
will be present and will give an open
air coneert on the school grounds
rom 7:30 to 9 P. M. Dancing will be
gin at 9 and at 11 o'clock supper will
be served by the Mabel Social club.
Those in charge are Mrs. J. R.
Stephens, Mabel Social club; Edward
Flynn, Loyal Legion of Loggers and
umbermen; P. E. Freydig and H. F.
Thomas, American Legion.
Arrest Alleged False.
SAI.EM. Or.. Oct. 2. (Special.)
Mrs. Violet Grimm has filed suit for
$10,000 damages in the circuit court
here against B. Cummings, in which
she charges false arrest In connec
tion with the alleged theft of a tent.
Mrs. Grimm sets out in her complaint
that she was arrested by the sheriff
of Multnomah ccMinty, but was later
acquitted, exonerated and freed of
all complicity In the matter in the
justice court of Salem. Because of
her arrest and humiliation, Mrs.
Grimm charges that her health was
impaired and she was incapacitated
from the performance of her house
hold duties for several weeks.
Officers Return Suspects.
ASTORIA. Or., Oct. 2. .(Special.)
Deputy Sheriff Bakotich and Dan Bel.
cher left today for St. Joseph, Mo., to
get Frank Barnett. alias Frank Wag
ner. Albert Meadors and James Tait,
alias James Clergy, who are wanted
here to answer a charge of blowing
the safe in the Walter Kallunki atore
on the night of August 15, securing
approximately $10,000 in gold, cur
rency and liberty bonds. The officers
go via Salem to have the extradition
papers approved by Governor Olcott.
Salem Aviation Field Plowed,
SALEM. Or, Oct. 2. (Special.)
Colonel Harts of Spokane, who had
contemplated visiting Salem in a large
bombing plane and had made applica
tion for the use of a landing field
2000 feet square, today was advised
by Governor Olcott that the local field
recently was plowed up and that no
other accommodations are available
at this time.
Read The Oregonian classified ads.
VLADIVOSTOK. Siberia. "Youcan-
not see the siKhts that I have seen
without breathing a prayer that the
American people n.ay hear of Siberia's
condition, may learn of these condl
tions. may pour forth money and per
sonnel and make such conditions lm
possible In this, the 20th century."
This appeal for American aid on a
blggerf and broader scale in Siberia
is the conclusion of the report of
of the allied unti-typhus expedition
operated for the past five months by
the American Red Cross.
The anti-typhus train has ended the
first phase of its work. Bukeley is
n Vladivostok, whither he was. called
by the Red Cross headquarters to
render an accounting to the allies for
he money they put into the opera
ion of the train. And no sooner
had he reached the city than a tele
gram came to the Red Cross from
i'crm, nearly 5000 mtles away, ap
pealing urgently that help be given
he city and province to combat new
outbreaks of terrible epidemic dis
ease.
Within a few hours after the tele
gram was received, assistance was
on Its way. The anti-typhus train
had been left at Omsk, bare of sup
plies, hut otherwise ready for opera
tion. Telegrams to the west ordered
It Immediately Into the emergency
service at Perm, and it Is leaving
with new stocks of drugs, medicines
and underwear material to fight the
ravages of typhus, recurrent fever
and abdominal typhoid.
Typhus Train Effective.
The reputation of this train as an
effective weapon in fighting typhus
has spread far and wide. Built by
the American Red Cross for the allies,
it was. originally intended to be used
first in the maritime provinces of
Siberia. Then came the tremendous
epidemics of typhus out west in the
heart of winter epidemics that ran
the number of hospital cases up into
the tens of thousands and the unre
ported cases into the twenties of
thousands. From military camp and
concentration point, from soldier and
prison barracks, from hospitals and
orphanages and refugee colonies.
from railroad trains crowded with
homeless people and stations even
more crowded, come reports of the
spread of the "spotted fever."
So the great white train went west
long cars for bathing men, women
and children unwashed for months:
cars for cutting the hair and steril
izing the clothes; cars laden with
medicaments and clothing, and be
gan its work of aid and mercy and
prevention of even worse epidemics.
That white train of the Red Cross
delivered the goods." There is am
ple testimony to that effect, some of
it from business-like officials who
were in the beginning, if not skepti
cal, a least unconvinced that the
train would be a success. .When ty:
phus began to die down with the
coming of summer and the train was
taken to Omsk with its supplies al!
distributed, the question arose as to
its disposition. General Knox, head
of the British military mission, who
has seen the train and knows its
operations, telegraphed to Vladivos
tok. The train has done grand
work. he wired. "It must not be
scrapped."
Ana it will not be scrapped, for the
Red Cross has now ordered it out to
the stricken province of Perm as a
piece of distinct Red Cross relief
work, but with the cordial friendli
ness of the allies toward this ma
chine for battling with the dread
disease.
Relief Work Continuous.
The train left Vladivostok on Feb
ruary 2 and since then has been con
tinuously engaged In its relief work.
The director was Captain F. A. Dal-
yn of the Canadian expeditionary
force, a sanitarian of long exper-
ence. On April 2 Dallyn went down
with typhus while he was cutting the
hair of a patient. His escape from
death was narrow, but Red Cross
doctors and nurses pulled him through
and he is now at Vladivostok, convalescent.
Bukeley. who had been financial
manager of the train, became direc
tor. The train went steadily on with
t swork, though it had an epidemic
of Its own. The typhus broke out
among the sanltars, or attendants.
Sanitar after sanitar came down and
was sent to Petropavlovsk, a short
distance away, where the American
Red Cross maintains a big typhus
hospital which has done notable
work.
Bathing hundreds of men daily.
sterilizing their clothing, giving out
medicines and garments, the train
visited city aftre city. Its trail of
mercy reached from Vladivostok on
he east to Chelyabinsk on the west.
12a miles. On May JO Bukeley. who
had been ordered to Vladivostok,
turned the train over to his' right
hand man. Lieutenant Francis Conor,
who has since been appointed director
to handle the anti-typhus campaign
n rerm province.
Relief Force Stricken.
Fourteen of its personnel of 31 had
been stricken with typhus. Eight
sanitars ut of the original eight fell
victims. A czecn guard, a car porter.
a male "f;ldscher" or nursing attend
ant, and an assistant feldscher were
taken down. Typhus even went info
the crew of firemen looking after the
water-heating apparatus. But the
rain went on. Men were employed to
taloe the places of those sent to hos
pitals. It is gratifying to record that
at last reports all of the patients
were recovering. Diagnosis of the
disease at an early stage, prompt dis
patch to the hospital, and careful
nursing pulled them through. Their
recovery testifies to the thorough
ness of Red Cross medical service, and
is an indication that typhus,' fought
with -modern weapons and plenty of
them, is no invincible enemy.
More than 12,000 men had been han
dled by the train up to th time Cap
tain Bukeley left to come to Vladi
vostok. Since, then the mark has been
pushed up to about 20.000 the men
being bathed, their heads clipped,
their clothes disinfected, and in many
cases receiving underwear and medi
cal treatment.
From February 24 to May 10, the ferine-
k i a i ii imiiuicu i j iim3i iuucii (;ruwus
of civilians and soldiers at Xovonlco
lalevsk. Taiga, Tomsk, Bolotnairya,
Omsk, Petropavlovsk, Kurgan, Chel
yabinsk. Troitsk, Urgomish and Mlsh
klno. The largest number handled In
any one day was 999. A slight mis
take in calculation spoiled the 1000
record which the train crew had de
termined to establish. Bukeley re
ports that were it possible to keep
the men moving into and out of the
cars for 24 hours consecutively, it
would be well within the capacity of
the train .to handle 2000 cases,
fcida by. side with the purely physi
cal aspect of the anti-typhus expedi
tion that of train operation went
the work of education. In every city
or town visited the train officers ar
ranged conferences with the leading
officials, military and civilian, of the
district who were in charge of sni
taiy, medical or surgical work, and
placed the Red Crbss facilities at
their disposal. Where danger to al
lied troops was involved by reason
of typus which might get into the
allied camps, it was the allies through
this train, who placed their unique
weapon at the disposal of Russian
communities.
Arriving at a Russian town believed
to be typhus-ridden there were few
indeed free of the disease a meeting
of the various local officials was ar
ranged and the typus train officers
secured all possible information con
cerning health conditions of. this
distrist. Simultaneously physicians
aboard the train were sent out to
make separate examinations as to the
needs of the several hospitals. Ex
pert plumbers and engineers from the
train also were sent out, to examine
bath houses and the disinfectation
apparatuses used by the Russians. In
every city and town there was com
piled authentic information on which
the Red Cross can base future opera
tions against typhus.
For instance, many towns were
found very inadequately supplied
with sterilization apparatus. The
Red Cross has determined to meet
this need by next winter through the
construction of at Hast 200 sheet-iron
sterilizers of a familiar Russian pat
tern which has proved simple to oper
ate nad effective in disinfecting
clothing. For the towns also where
drug supplies were particularly low,
the Red Cross has accurate informa
tion on which to base autumn and
winter distribution.
Results Kar-Rearalnff.
The educational results of the anti
typhus expedition were far-rreachlng.
The very appearance of the great
white train in railroad yards and at
stations where thousands of people
congregated proclaimed to the Rus
sians that something new. Interest-
ng and helpful was afoot. Military
and civil officials were deeply in
terested in the train and its operations.
At the conference between the Red
Cross men and the local authorities.
plans were outlined and suggestions
made for local campaigns to combat
typhus and kindred epidemics, cam
paigns in which the Russians now
have the help of the American Red
Cross.
The danger to Siberia of the over
crowding of military concentration
areas, with inadequate sanitary ar
rangements, was determined beyond
question by the investigations of the
arti-typhus campaigners. Unques
tionably one of the most potent rea
sons for the rapid spread of typhus
during the winter of 1918-19 was that
troops suffering from the disease
cams back Into clean areas and
ii.fected their vicinity. Furthermore,
prisoners of war who were believed
to be sympathetic with the Omsk gov
ernment were in some cases freed
from prison trains and distributed
among loyal regiments. These prison
trains, coming Into western biDerta
frc-m beyond the Urals, were veritable
hctbeds of the disease. One of the
principal points made by the Red
Cross men after they had investigated
conditions in the west was that to
control typhus it is necessary to have
thorough-going organization in
western Siberia, which shall examine
all trains, bathe and disinfect troops
and groups 'of prisoners frequently
and absolutely forbid infected bodies
of men from going into clean areas.
Americans will naturally ask,
What does the Red Cross face in
necessity or future campaigning?
Th answer is that during the summer
of 1919 ttere will be comparatively
little typhus, but next winter it is
quite likely to be as bad as and pos
sibly worse than in 1918-19. It is al
together improbable that the acute
overcrowding of stations, trains and
all public buildings due to the hordes
of refugees, will be done away with
before next winter. They are living
now largely in the open, but as tha
chill of the Arctic comes down on the
first winds of winter they will of
necessity leave their huts and shacks
which abound in the outskirts of all
Siberian cities and will once more
hunt for warmer quarters.
Then, too, there is no assurance
that the war of Omsk government
will be over by the winter of 1919.
There may be still hundreds of thous
ands of men on the western frpnt,
and during the winter there is no way
of avoiding crowded barracks and
troop taxins.
The Red Cross men on the allied
anti-typhus expedition forecast the
probability of typhus outbreaks next
winter quite as bad as those of last
winter. They fear that the disease
will be even more widespread. So
far as the troops are concerned, there
will be better facilities, next winter
to care for them. One ol the gray
est shortages has been the lack of
underclothes. Soldiers with but a
single suit of underclothes each have
small chance to keep themselves clean
and free from the "cootie," and there
were tens of thousands of such sol
diers on the western front during the
winter and spring. There were tens
of thousands with no change of uni
form. Disinfection equipment was
terribly meager. Every condition
made for spread of the disease.
Though the Russian army will
probably be better equipped to fight
typhus the civilian population is well
nigh helpless in the face of the eco
nomic famine of Siberia. Summer is
now at hand a short summer and
there has been a comparatively neg
ligible supply of new clothing sent
into this huge country. The Ameri
can Red Cross sends westward train
load after trainload of relief goods
suiting, upnderclothlng, sweaters,
socks, etc., but the sum is inadequate
in the face of the staggering necessi
ties. Yet every garment counts, every
sweater knit by some devoted woman
or girl in far-off America may save
a life this winter.
Captain Bukeley's report to the
Siberian commission declares:
"If the American Red Cross does
not intend to pursue the problem any
further, this report might as well not
be written, 'and the work of the ex
pedition will have been largely wast
ed, and the sacrifices made in connec
tion therewith will have been made in
vain, for all that we have accom
plished will habeen emotional, spas
modic help, and we will not become
what I have hoped and still hope this
expedition may prove to be the germ
for the development of organized sci
entific work on a large scale.
"You cannot work? for months, as I
have worked, with Russian 'feld
schers' and sanitars without learning
to love and admire their unselfish
and fearless devotion to duty.
"You cannot see unmoved the suf
ferings that I have seen, the suffer
ing of men, women and little children,
and return home careless as to
whether their suffering is to be mere
ly a sample of what future winters
have In store for them out in western
Siberia, a forecast of what those lit
tle children will have to suffer until
they grow up, and other children as
yet unborn take their turn at suf-
L
K
MEASUnE IS BROKEN
House and Senate Conferees
Reach Agreement. .
QUICK ACTION EXPECTED
Prohibition Enforcement Bill May
Go to President Early Jiext
. Week; Few Changes Made.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2. Senate and
house conferees reached an agree
ment late yesterday on the prohibition
enforcement bill, breaking a three
weeks' deadlock.
Quick approval of the conferees re
port is expected by leaders and the
measure may go to the president
early next week.
The' bill, which establknes one-half
of 1 per cent as the maximum alco
holic content of beverages, was passed
Dy tne nouse July 22 and by the sen
ate September 5. The conference re
port will be acted on first by the
senate, to which it would report Fri
day, and then be sent to the house.
The bill will be returned from con
ference without fundamental changes
in its pirn for strict enforcement, both
of the wartime prohibition law and
the constitutional amendments by the
commissioner of internal revenue and
department of justice.
affiliated with any Pacific coast or
ganization and that the demands be
ing made by the Seattle and San
Francisco union tailors are not simi
lar to the local demands, these other
unions asking higher wage scales.
The merchant tailors here, on the
other hand, contend that the matter
should be settled by a conference in
San Francisco at which representa
tives from all the unions and all the
employers' associations on the coast
be present. This proposition was em
bodied ill the recent compromise which
the employers' association here pre
sented to the union.
A meeting of the union men was
held Wednesday evening to consider
the proposal of the employers, and
the officers of the union were au
thorized to meet with the merchant
tailors at a conference this morning
further to consider the offer.
VAXDEKLIP SAYS V. S. LOSWG
OPPORTUNITY.
Capital and Ijabor Urged to Unite
to Make Most of Greatest Pros
pects of Any Xatioji.
Amendment Is Approved.
The senate conferees, however, suc
ceeded in retaining virtually every
one of the 2S6 liberalizing provisions
adopted by the upper house, which
comprise mostly administrative fea
tures. The principal "liberal" amend
ment of the senate permitting home
manufacture'and consumption of cider
and light wines was approved as well
as another senate amendment extend
ing application of the constitutional
amendment to the Panama canal zone.
In the principal conference dispute
over imposition of the "burden of
proof" in prosecutions, the senate
managers were successful, for the bill
as agreed on provides that the gov
ernment must bear the "burden of
proof" and prove its case in prosecut
ing those selling beverages by show
ing that the beverages concerned con
tained more than the alcoholic limit
of one-half of 1 per cent. Manufac
turers, however, as provided both by
the house and senate bills must bear
the burden of proof that their prod
ucts contained alcohol only within the
amount prescribed.
No change was made by the con
ferees in the provision which would
allow a man to have and consume in
his own home liquor acquired before
the law goes into effect.
Examination Clause Stricken.
Other senate amendments accepted
included that striking out the clause
penalizing drunkenness on trains;
street cars, automobiles, ferries or
other public conveyances and the pro
vision prohibiting general public in
spection of the records of sales and
purchases filed with the internal rev
enue commissioner.
The conferees struck out the house
amendment requiring physical exam
ination by physicians of patients be
fore issuance of prescriptions for in
toxicating beverages.
For expenses in enforcing the bill
the conferees reduced the senate ap
propriation of $3.5J)0.000 to $2,000,000.
The senate amendment authorizing
manufacture and sale of "near beer"
and similar malt beverages contain
ing under one-half of 1 per cent alco-.
hoi was retained, but it is stipulated
that other names shall be used for
their designation than beer, ale or
porter.
In adopting the provision prohibit
ing advertisement of intoxicants or
formulas or contrivances for their
manufacture, the conferees approved
the senate amendment authorizing
commercial alcohol compounds in
trade journals.
claims, she instructed her counsel to
bring suit.
"Miss Lynch has the agreement
which Commodore Plant signed to pay
her $12,000 a year. Her services had
been of a personal character. She
had been his companion. The com
modore had shown gre.at regard for
her and she has 50 or more letters
and postcards which will bear out
this claim. Commodore Plant died
last November and up to the time of
his death the contract had been prac
tically completed with her last com
munication" from Commodore Plant in
1918. and he had called on her as late
as 1918 at Onset.
"The commodore , was married when
he met Miss Lynch 30 years ago in
Taunton. She was living at home with
her parents at that time and was a
very beautiful girl, being only 17
years old. She" newr married, and
later mover to New York, where she
made her home up to five years ago."
.Miss Lynch, besides being pro
prietor of the Hotel Onset, owns one
of the finest homes in the town.
AMrtExrvrs.
COMK OX, HOYS
HEILIG THIS MORNING 11:30
FAMOUS STAR BU I, BOARD
SOX vs. REDS
HOT DOiS, COKFEH AT THKATER
Salem Soldiers Return.
SALEM. Or., Oct. 2 (Special.)
Herbert Savage and Phillip Ringle,
members of the 162d infantry and
later transferred to the famous 1st
division, have returned to Salem after
passing 20 months In France and Ger
many. While in New Y'ork they at
tended the weloome to General Fer-shing.
LONG 1 TRIP PLANNED
FOREST PATROL FLYER WILL
USE 90-MILE CURTISS PLANE.
SAN FRANCISCO. Rich in capital
and rich in raw materials, the. United
States today has the most favorable
opportunity that ever came to any
nation, yet its people do not know
what to do with their opportunity.
So says Frankr A. Vanderlip, for
merly of the National City bank of
New York and one of the great finan
cial figures of the world, on his way
to southern California. He said:
"At the outbreak of the war we
were just starting in on a period of
depression. All this was changed by
the war and we have become the
reservoir of credit of the world.
"Yet, in spite of this we are today
in a far from satisfactory situation.
There are disturbed labor conditions,
the railroad situation is chaotic, high
prices result in general dissatisfac
tion. Men are losing tbeir faith in
the efficacy of high wages and are
questioning the order of society.
"Never before was the world in
such a condition not even during the
Napoleonic wars. The wars waged
by Napoleon did not involve so many
countries and at that time Europe
was an agricultural, seir-supporting
continent, with 175,000,000 inhabi
tants. . "Then, largely as a result of the
opening of the American grain fields
and other sources of raw materials
there set in the great industrial era,
and Europe became an industrial con
tinent, with 410.000,000 inhabitants
largely a manufacturing and non-
self-supporting population.
"This war of today came and com
pletely upset all European industry,
thus affecting the livelihood of these
440,000,000 people. Men's minds were
affected and they do not go back to
work easily.
"Also the markets' are destroyed
and thus we have a paralysis of in
dustry that is unparalleled in the
world's annals.
"We cannot go back to handlooms
and to an idyllic agricultural exis
ence. Thus our problem is to find a
better adjustment between capital
labor, both here and in Europe. .Rut
there is a lack of loyal co-operation
and ignorance on both sides of the
fence.
"Many of Europe's great grain
fields lie fallow. Roumania used to
export 100 000,000 bushels of grain;
this year she will produce hardly
enough for her own needs.
"Europe will be hungrier a year
from now than she is today. Next
winter she will lack food and she will
lack coal. England's coal production
has fallen off 30 per cent.
"The Russian revolution is infin
itely more serious than the French
revolution, an dthe Russian ruling
minority only sees the existing prop
erties, and seems to have no thought
of production, which is the only
wealth.
"The problem is extending to other
lands, and unless, we have a more
intelligent democracyr democracy will
go on the rocks.
"The acceptance of economic fal
lacies is the great danger, coupled
with a wave of psychological discon
tent that is engulfing the world."
Discussing the Shantung matter,
Mr. Vanderlip said:
"The surrender of Shantung to
Japan does not square with the prin
ciples which, we are told are to be
defended by hte league of nations.
Whether we ought to throw over
the whole treaty is a question of
much discussion. Practical minds say
'No,' and the idealists say 'Yes,' but
which will eventually turn out to be
the real practical answer is yet an
open question to be answered by
the future.
AMUSEMENTS.
MATINEE TOMORROW
ALCAZAR
MUSICAL PLAYERS
with
MABEL WILBUR-OSCAR FIGMAN
In the Enchanting Comic Opera
"The Lilac Domino"
NO ADVANCE IN TRICES
Eve. 50-75-Sl. Wed.-Sat. Mat. 23-SOc
NEXT "3 TWINS"
TJCTI Tf"1 Broadway at Taylor
S. IttijlVJ M;
TONIGHT 8; 15
Iain 1 and A UXi
TOMORROW
Mt.H r
-POPULAR PRICI
j MAT. TOMORROW 2:15
THE MUSICAL COMEDY HIT
MY"
i.-
HONOLULU
GIRL
CATCHY
Ml SIC
FUN
PRETTY
tj III 1,9
Eve's Floor. $1.50; B.il., SI. EOc;
Callery, 5Uc.
TOMORROW'S MAT. $1, 75c. 50c.
.HEILIG -NEXT WEEL
Aa
BAKER
STOCK COMPANY.
Tonipht,All Week, Jlnt. Tomorrow.
Another Hie Laughing Hit,
, "SICK-A-BKO
Permission Klaw A Krlaneer.
Next week "The 13tb Chair."
A N T A G E Q
MAT. DAILY 2:30 O
The Sensation of Two Continents,
IVEI. JAPANESE.
Foremost experts In Risley and acrobatic
art, direct from the Royal Court of Japan.
6 OTHER BIG ACTS
Three Performances Daily. Night Curtain
at 7 and 8.
BREAD PRICE TO STAND
LOCAL BAKERS SAY INCREASE
XOT CONTEMPLATED.
First Lap Will Be From Eugene to
Olympia, Thence to Boise,
Helena and Cheyenne.
ROSEBURG, Or., Oct. 2. (Special.)
Returning from the fleer country
east of Tiller late last night, where
he spent a week hunting and enjoy
ing an outing, accompanied by Mrs.
Smith, Forest Supervisor S. C. Bar-
trnm onri U'ifA nnrl Mrs. Dean Bubar. I
Major Alber Smith of the army air- Flour Fails to Carry Food Staple
plane forces will leave lor Eugene
Thursday morning and from there
expects immediately to undertake a
flight over five northwest states.
The first lap of the flight, wnicn
is for purpose of locating airplane
bases and obtaining data to be used
in forest patrol Tork next year, will
be from Eugene to Olympia, Vash.,
and from the Washington capital to
Boise, thence to Helena and Cheyenne,
according to a statement made today.
Major Smith will use a Curtis piane.
The machine now is awaiting his ar
rival at Eugene. The plane is
equipped with a 150-horsepower en-c-ine.
and is capable of making 90
miles an hour. Major Smith stated
that he prefers this type of machine
m
tea
The Driest Play on a
Wet IJuj In the
TODAY
TONIGHT
Till IIS., FRI., SAT.
'THE FIVE VIOLIN MISSES'
Comedy, Dancing, Music.
Beauty.
WARD AND HOWARD
KONSENSICAMTIKS,"
Positively They Are a Riot.
McCARVEU AND JACK HAWKINS
KOIIISON,
"Just
Two Fools."
A.VU COMPANY,
Comedy Skit.
"His Sister."
GRACE!
DE WINTERS.
A Ventriloqual
Surprise.
CHARI-ES
LED A (.Alt,
"The
Flying Boob.'
1 M
ANITA KING
1STAKEN IDENTITY."
Take a Tips Thin Sbow's Great!
T.n.tNIGHTS! OCT. 9, 10, II
POPULAR PRICE SIT. SAT.
MUSICAL REVUE SUCCESS
Stunning;
( borud
Knnrlnntina
MelotlieM
KVE'S f 1.50 to 50c.
SAT. MAT. 91.00 to 50c.
TICKET OFFICE SALE OPENS
NEXT MONDAY
AT HEILIG THEATER.
THE BESTI I N
VAUDEVILLE
8nn.-Mnn.-Tue.. Nichl. lftc to l.
Sun.-Mon.-Tue.-Wed. Af'noon. 15c to 7."ic.
"Not Yet Marie"
FARRELL-TAYLOR CO. MARTEI.LE' .SIDNEY AND
TOWNLEV DONALD E.' ROBERTS BII.LY t'ERN
CO. JACK MORRISKV t, CO KIN'OGRAMS
TOriCS OF THE DAY
n . SHOW CLOSES
lW WITH WED. MTIEE.
Rittf fnr
Classified Advertisements
In
The Oregonian.
Daily and Sunday
Ir line.
One line 12c
Two conxccutiv0 times 22c
Three comerutive times 3Uc
Six or seven connecutlve times 3o
The folio wins: claunt ration excepted,
the rate of which is 7c iter line er day:
Situations Wanted Mule. .Situations
Wunted Female. No ail tukeii fur lens
than two linen, .Count six words to the
line. AdvertiMements ieirept "lr
hoiiuIh") will he tuken over the tele
phone If the advertiser fc a sulmcrlher
to either phone. No prices w III be
(l noted over the phou. hut statement
wilt he rendered the following diiy. Ad
vertisements ure tii ken for The Dnllv
Oreiciuiiaii until 7::t0 I". M. ; for The
Sunday Oregonian until 6 I. M. Suturday.
TOO UTE TO CLASSIFY.
LYRIC
MISICAL
COMEOV
Mat Dally. Nights at 7 and 9.
Dillon and Franks and the ltoaebud
Girl. In
"BANANA LAND,"
A Tropical Travesty With 30 Screams.
Chorus Girls' Contest Tonight.
War Comedy Recalled.
LONDON, Aug. 30. A little comedy
of the war is revealed in an official
Rumanian statement just received in
London. When Austria-Hungrary col
lapsed and its various races set about
resolving, themselves into separate na
tions, the little Island of Orsova. at
the junction of three states Austria
Hungary. Serbia and Rumania, was
forgotten. After many months the
Orovans have just decided to place
tbeir laith in Rumania.
Cpward When Price Ad
' ' vances 40 Cents.
Bakers insisted Wednesday that, al
though the price of flour went up 40
cents a barrel Tuesday, they are not
going to attempt to increase the cost
of bread for the present. Announce
ment that such action was being
planned was made at the last meeting
of the federal fair-price committee,
by which a resolution was adopted
asking an inquiry by the food ad
ministrator. Notice of this action was not re
ceived by W. K. Newell, federal food
administrator, until late Wednesday
for the class f work he will engage afternoon and he had not yet had
in during October because it can be j time to loojc into the matter. Within
a day or so he Deiieves he will be
able to issue a statement concerning
possible increase in the price of bread
and the 1-cent rise on milk in effect
this week.
Proprietors of three of the largest
bakeries in the city said that, while
they still hold they are justified in
increasing the bread price, they had
contemplated no such action imme
diately, fi. H. Haynes of the Haynes
Foster. Baking company, William
Huesner of the Royal and H. F. Ritt
man of the Log Cabin, all made this
statement and said they knew of no
other bakeries in the city now plan
ning to institute an increase. Just
how long present prices will be ad
hered to they refused to prophesy.
CIRCLE
Fourth at
WnHUlngton
Marguerite Clark
in
"Let's Elope"
Also a Christie Comedy and Plctograph.
Open from 0 o'clock in the morning un
til 4 o'clock the following morning.
WANTKD 11)18 OR 1!)! t'HKVROl.KT
TontlNG . MI ST BK IM UlOD CON
DITION. WAX I'AY CASH. Nil IIKAI,
KHS. ASK FOR MK. SAM. S.'i.l HUUN
SIDE. l'HONB BROADWAY 3liN.V
WOMAN with runllniiKhttT ft yvara nlil
wishes position keeiilnff house for Ken
tlemun: would not iiiiiui ont- or two rhi!
dren. Mrs. Angle Davis. 3JI Second St.
Al'CTlON 8AI.KS TODAY.
At Wilson's Auction House, 10
Furniture. 163-171 Second St.
A. M.
' MEETING NOTICES.
ROSE CITT CHAPTER NO.
SO. O. E. S., will ftive a regular
meeting this Friday evening at
S o'clock. Degrees. liy order
of W. M.
SAIIAH B. GUERIN, Sec.
landed on plots that would be im
possible for a De Havlland.
Major Smith expects to finish his
flight by October 20, when he will re
port at Sacramento.
TAILORS' PROBLEM LOCAL
STRIKING JOURXEYMEX AVAXT
SETTLEMENT MADE HERE.
Employers Propose San Francisco
Conference Both Sides Will
Meet Again Today.
Shall the strikiner joprneymen tailor
of Portland and the employers settle
their differences locally, or shall they
settle them in conjunction with the
other tailors' unions and the other,
employing tailors of the Pacific coast
cities? This is the prof-m which is
standing in the way of a settlement
of the local conflict and which prom
ises to prolong the strike further.
The local union favors settling the
strike locally and is strongly opposed
to going Into any conference in which
unions and employers' associations of
the other Pacific coast cities take
part. The officers of the union de
clare that the Portland, local Is not
WOMAN
Companion
SUES
ESTATE
Commodore
DANCE at
& COTILLION
HALL
Portland' I,nrireMt and Fin
est llnllroom.
piulic
i.vformals kvkjty eves-
BES1' MI'SIC BEST K VER YTIIING.
MOST WO.MiKHFlI.
BALL-UKARl.VU Sl'lU-VU FLOOR.
Dancing School
Private and ClaM Lrssnns Dally.
ProfeKHlonnl Inntrui'tora Only.
CHILDREN'S CLASSES SATLKUAY.
Fourteenth Street, Off Waataiuston.
Ildwy. 33S0.
Mt'TTNOMAH CAMP NO.
77, W. O. V. meets at their
hall, Kast Sixth and Kait
Alder streets, every Friday
evening at 8 o'clock. Visit
ins neighbors always wel
come, J. O. WILSON,
Clerk.
MULTNOMAH CAMP.
NO. 77, W. O. W., meets at
their hall. East Sixth and
East Alder streets, every
Friday evening at 8 o'clork.
Visiting .neighbors always
welcome.
J. O. "WILSON. Clerk.
PORTLAND LODGE. NO.
55. A.V. AND A. M. Special
communication this (Friday)
evrninK, ft o'clock. .Masonic
temple. Work In M. M. de
rree. Visit in if brethren wel-
By order W. M.
H. J. HAUGHTON. Sec.
HA5SAL0
to .Late
Plant Claims Breach of Contract.
OXSET, Mass. Miss Jennie M.
Lynch, proprietor of Hotel Onset, who
has brought suit for $200,000 against
the estate of the late Commodore
Morton F. Plant, alleging breach of
written contract, could not be seen in
her home here, but her counsel. Judge
Nathan Washburn, said:
"Miss Lynch for a long time was
unwilling to bring the matter into
court and on three occasions had her
counsel present the matter to the
esecutors of the Plant estate. As they
were unwilling to make what she j
believed was a settlement of her
Dance Tonight
Hear DEWEY WASHINGTON,
original entertajner. Real jazz
music, with dreamy waltzes good
time, good people, good crowds,
perfect decorum.
Temple Dancing Academy
SECOND AND MORRISON
Admission includes all dances.
Gents 50c, Ladies 25c, Plus Tax
BASE BALL
Portland vs San Francisco
SEPT. 30; OCT. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,
Double-headers Sat., Sun., 1:30 P. M.
yAUGHN-ST. PARK
ALBEHT PIKE LOIXJK.
NO. 111;;. A. F. AND A. M.
Special communication th Im
(KriUa') afternoon, October :i,
at 3 o'clock. Evening at 7
o'clock. M. M. dt-Kree. Y'laitinK
brethren welcome. A. H. LOM AX, V. Al.
WILL, meet this (Friday)
evening at 7:30 o'clock ut
J-lti AHler st. Work In the
Thlnl deirree. VlHltora are
cordially welcome.
L. W. WKISKXHUK.V, N. G..
P. CtiZKNS. Kec. Sec.
PORTLAND CHAPTER NO. 1)7. O. E. 8
Social club will give a card and CtuncidiK
party in the Masonic Temple this (Friday)
eveninK. '( 3- Benefit tor Magonlc and
Kastern Stur homeiAll O. K. S. and irleuUs
lnviietl. Aufhiyslon .Hie.
EVA J. JAMKSO.V, Secretary.
WEBFUOT CAMP NO. 65. WOODMEN
OF THE V'OUI.U meeta every Friday
night at W. O. W, temple, l'JS 11th atre. t.
All member welcome. Kum to Kamp
Friday nlehL H. L,. BAKMLli. Clerk.
EMBLEM Jewelry, button!, charms, pins,
new dentins. Jaeger Pros., tit a si.
FRIEDLANDER'S for lorigs emolsms,
class pins and medals. 310 Washington st.
OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY
Office, Koou) l.Vf Court lifcu, 6th at. ,
fciitrmnce.
hone from 8 to 5 MrId ?8, Horn
l'hme from 8 to 5, Mala J.S. lluiu
Krport all caf of cnirlty to the abort
arUirci'it. Klevtrlcal lthnl c ham her for
Mini 1 1 antmulH. Hunt amhiihiiira for lrk
and dittablrii animal at it moment' not ire.
Anyone ile-iring a. doff or other oet, com
municate with uh. tall for all lot or
strayed stock . an we look after the liu-
itoiimlitig. There la no more ciljr imuusft
uat Oregon Humane Societx,