Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, August 21, 1919, Page 5, Image 5

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    THE MOKXLNG OKEGONIAi THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1919.
BORAH ID JOHN
JUSTIFIED, THEY SAY
Position on League of Nations
Confirmed by Conference.
MORAL OBLIGATION BINDING
Cse of Force Held to Be Required
to Check Aggression; 'Wilson
Rapped on Shantung.
WASHINGTON'. Aug-. 10. Senators
Johnson. California, and Borah. Idaho.
republicans, declared In a statement
last nitrht that upon the facts developed
at the White House conference today
the position they had maintained "in
respect to thia covenant of the league
of nations Is justified and confirmed."
"The league of nations as construed
by the president." they said, "leaves It
clear and unmistakable that when we
enter it we are under a 'compelling'
moral obligation, to say nothing of the
legal obligation which other support
ers contend we are under, to take part
In the disturbances, the conflicts, set
tlements and the wars of Europe and
Asia. If any should arise, and It is
equally true that under his construc
tion, Europe would necessarily be
under the aame Impelling force to take
part In the settlement of American af
fairs."
The senators said that In their opln
Ion "the significant facts developed by
the Interview with the president were
Other Treaties Waltlag.
"There yet remain treatlea of peace
to be made with Austria. Hungary. Bul
garia and the Ottoman empire. These
treaties deal with subjects as Impor
tant, territory as extensive and mat
ters aa intimately affecting the United
Mates as the treaty with Germany. The
obligations of the United States, there
fore, that our country assumes In the
future, cannot be determined until
thee treaties are completed and pre'
sented to the United States senate.
"Ths president regards the obliga
tlons which will be assumed under the
league of nations, and particularly
under articles 10 and II as moral obli
gations. Theae. however, are of 'com
pelling' force, and would require action
upon our part. For instance, the presi
dent concedes that in an undoubted
eaaa of aggression from the Balkans
upon the newly acquired territory of
Italy, it would be our duty to come
to the assistance of Italy and prevent
nch aggression. The president's con
struction of article 10 is at variance
with the construction of the democratic
attorneys of the senate.
Moral Obligation Rrata.
"A moral obligation, the president
Insists, rests upon us to carry out the
terms of the vaVious treaties of peace.
This moral obligation, the president
states, requires us under the German
treaty for IS years to maintain Ameri
can troops In Kurope.
"The president did not know, nor
had he heard of the secret treaties for
territorial acquisition and partitioning
various territories until he reached
Paris. (Here the senators outlined the
treaties referred to).
"The president opposed the Shantung
decision. It was officially conveyed to
him that the Japanese would not sign
unless the Shantung rights were given
to Japan. The United States experts
advised the president that Japan's
verbal promise to return the sovereign
ty of the territory in Shantung while
retaining the economic concessions was
a return of the shell of the nut by
Japan white she retained the kernel.
The Chinese insisted the retention of
the economic privileges meant practical
sovereignty, but the president says he
disagrees with this view.
Secret Treaties Adhered V.
"England. France and Italy adhered
at the peace conference to their secret
treaties disposing of peoples and ter
ritories in the Shantung case; therefore,
the president was only the disinterested
Judge. The decision, however, was
made unanimously.
"The United States asked China to
enter the war.
"The American commission at Paris
urged that a definite sum of repara
tions be fixed in the treaty. Why this
view did not prevail, the president felt
he could not state without divulging
mattera respecting other governments
he felt he should not divulge. .
"For this reason, he could not divulge
the vote upon racial equality nor how
the United Statea commissioners voted.
to the great law of evolution. Our
physical eyes no longer perceive them,
our lips, or our hands cannot touch
them, but their eyes behold us and
their hands touch us. They walk with
us. they know our trials, they help us
by mental suggestion and they com
fort us with loving tenderness.
Psychic Waves Fellow War.
"It is a sad habit we have formed
of believing that this earth, the phys
leal of nature, is all that concerns us.
Under this deadly and false assump
tion all wider views and spiritual con
ceptlons are stifled. A tremendous
psychic wave Is now sweeping the
country. The vast and devastating war
brought certain spiritual tendencies
and aspirations, certain grave needs.
certain desperate urgings Into the lives
of a multitude of men and women, an
has led to a great unrest and searc
for non-earthly thine Lowell ex
pressed it when he wrote:
We but half the causes of our deeds.
fchins them wholly In the outer life.
And heedless of the encircling spirit world
H hich. though unaeen. Im felt and sows tn u
All srms of pure and world-wide purpoaesu
I believe that all those whose bod
les shells I call them lie in Flanders
fields and all others who ever were on
this earth, do persist. I know that souls
over there In the beyond still take an
Interest In what we are doing, that
they help us, and know vastly more
about things than do we. I believe,
too, that from time to time they are
able to communicate with us. I refuse
absolutely to be limited by accepted
laws. I have devoted 27 years to
thought on conditions prevailing be
yond what is generally termed the ma
terla! and by combining the mental
and vital with the tangible and physi
cal forcea I have held communion with
those passed on.
Jaagllag of Bella e Heard.
I do not mean please get this
straight that I have had bizarre and
sometimes repellant manifestations.
Jangling of bells or rappings on tables.
Those to me are meaningless, and ac
companied aa they usually are by
charlatan methods, trances and what
nots, they do not, to me. demonstrate
the operation of unknown intelligences
and forces. But I do emphatically be
lieve In the survival after bodily death.
without material demonstration. It
comes to me in response to yearnings
and with the aid of faith. I do not
find In automatic writing or other
spiritualistic, so called phenomena, a
channel for communion of souls. It
Is a state. Independent of all material
agency, and attained only In seclusion
and aerenlty of soul.
"However," smiled Alexander, "the
weightiest evidence cannot Impress a
mind unwilling to believe and even
undeslrous to be instructed. A lot of
folk discredit anything outside their
limited range of learning, and while a
wholesome skepticism Is to be desired,
still there's such a thing as a closed
mind.
If (0 years ago I had predicted that
an air trip could be made from New
York to California in four days, that
an airship could cross the Atlantic
safely In six daya. if I'd forecaat
electricity in general use. mon
ster guns, wlrless or telephoning
across the continent, even automobiles,
I'd have been escorted to the nearest
lunatic asylum.
I am net a forecaster. But this I
do say. We are in the grip of a psychic
wave. Ignorance and superstition are
giving place to an earnest desire to
know what trustworthy evidence exists
in behalf of the super-normal often
but erroneously called super-natural
phenomena.
Nothing In nature is hidden from
man. no problem but that can be under
stood, provided we labor long and
earnestly toward a goal."
Portland's Coolest Theater CTc'
y ry-i.'--i.. .m nw. irnnY,
fea5 JL-
OLIVE
THOMAS
IN
LOVE'S
PRISONER
How would you like
to arrest the girl you
love- for common
thievery? There was
a way out, though.
1
Also
An Outing - Chester.
Big game hunting in
Africa.
and
A newsy edition of
the Screen Maga
zine. TODAY
COMING SATURDAY f
ck Plekford as Bill Apperaons Boy
MAYORS OF 4 CITIES
UNITE TO CUT COSTS
Ian to Prosecute Profiteers
and Hoarder Laid at Seattle.
HANSON TO USE POLICE
Portland, Tacoma, Spokane, Seattle
Executives Against Exportation of
Food to Producing Nations.
At the Theaters.
BT LEONE CASS BAER
ALEXANDER at the Heilig has a
message for those that mourn,
ths mothers and fathers and sla
ters and brothers and the little ones
and all the loved ones of the brave
boys who will never come home from
the war.
Alexander's message Is quite sepa
rate from his entertainment. It has
nothing to do with the theater. It
comes from the mind of a man who has
given IT years to a devoted study of
psychic research. He. too, has lost
four dear and near ones in the war.
He speaks convincingly:
"There is no death. I say to those
who grieve, there are no dead. Those
we loved and who love us, have simply
gone on. progressed, to a new exist
. ence. a new plane of life. In obedience
GIRL, 8, IS HIT By AUTO
LEOLA WILSON IS PERHAPS FA
TALLY IXJCRED.
Car Driven by R. Rosa in my Report
ed to Hate Traveled 35 Feet
After Hitting; Child.
Leola. Wilson, aged 8, of 364 Vi East
Morrison street, waa perhaps fatally
Injured Tuesday when she was struck
by an automobile driven By M. Ro
sumny, 127 Front street, at Second and
Salmon streets. She was rushed to
Good Samaritan hospital, where it was
said the child was In a critical condi
tion. According to witnesses, Rosumny was
traveling at a good rate of speed at
that point when his light auto truck
bore down on a group of three children,
of which the Wilson girl was one. The
other children were not injured. Ac
cording to a report made to the police,
Rosumny's truck traveled 35 feet after
hitting the child.
The child's mother. Mrs. Ora Wilson.
is the support of the family of three
children and she was engaged in can
vassing for household articles last
night. Hospital authorities were unable
to get in touch with her. The child's
father la an invalid and at present is in
California.
GAME WHEN PROTESTS
DISMISSAL FROM CNION FOR
REPORTIXG HUNTERS.
Special Deputy Declares Delegate In
formed Him to Resign or Give
Up Longshoremen's Card.
r 7 s
& Jecommend
Resmol
to that friend with
skin trouble!
If yoo hare a friend totTering
with eczema or other itching,
burning- eruption, what greater
kindness coo Id you do aim than
to say :
" Why don't you try Resmol ?
I know yoo have experimented
wish a doaen treatments, but I
believe Resmot is dtffrratl. It
docs not claim to be a 'cure-air
simply a soothxtg, healing
ointment, free from all harsh
drugs, that physicians prescribe
widely in jast such cases asyasrs.
D ret a jar today I "
Xwl OhaMkaUtTalinam
Charging mat tne local longshore
man s union had put Mm out or their
oiganization because he did his duty
as a special deputy game warden in
reporting two union members for kill
ing deer out of season, L. D. Payne
Tuesday filed a protest with the atate
f:sh and game commission.
Payne had been commissioned a spe
cial deputy, according to his protest,
and while fishing in the Nehalem sec
tion met two fellow members carrying
what he believed to be Illegitimate
game. He reported the fact to the of
ficers and the men were arrested and
fined 3S each for having killed a deer
out of season.
Payne declares this action was re
ported to the local union and that
Monday a walking delegate informed
him either to give up his 'commission
or his union affiliations. An attempt
will be made by the fish anu game
commission officials to arrange an am
icable settlement.
SEATTLE, Wash., Aug. 20. (Special.)
War against the profiteer was de
clared and plans for his downfall made
at the mayors' conference held here
Tuesday at the New Washington hotel
and attended by the executives of Port
land, Tacoma, Spokane and Seattle. The
mayors declared against the exporta
tion of food to European countries now
producing foodstuffs; protesting against
what they termed "American prices
made In Europe" and formulated plans
for a co-operative system of price
checking in all parts of the northwest.
The meeting was called by George L.
Baker, mayor of Portland.
"We will lend every facility to the
national government for the prosecu
tion of profiteers and food hoarders,"
declared Mayor Baker, speaking for
the other executives after the meeting.
Police to Get Evidence.
"The police department of Portland
has a complete check of almost every
warehouse in the city and I have pre
sented the United States attorney with
positive proof of huge supplies of beans.
coffee, esres and cereals in ruruana
warehouses. We favor publicity which
will present the price differences In
every city in the northwest and which
will show weekly or monthly the cost
of livintr in each city and which will
suggest remedies for excessive cost."
Mayor Baker said he nopea to rau
meeting of all mayors in tne uniteo.
States.
Mayor Ole Hanson will use, ne saio.
tonight, policemen in plain clothes,
health and sanitation department in
spectors and port -commission em
ployes if possible, in the obtaining of
evidence against food hoarders.
Exportation la Opposed.
'Huge quantities of fish are being
concealed in warehouses In the city,"
he declared. "I do not know whether
they are legally held or not. but given
the Information, 1 will see mat tne
government obtains it and receives full
co-oneration in prosecuting prouteers.
in Dart. a. proclamation of the
mayors said:
"We stand ready to co-operate with
the federal government to the fullest
extent in curbing profiteering in the
essentials of lite and in the establlsh
mtnt of fictitious prices.
"It is manifestly unfair to over
charge the industrious people of our
country in order to supply the volun
tarily idle of foreign lonas.'
our dead, to perpetuate the memory of
those who well on the field of honor. A
committee has been formed for the
erection of a commemorative marker
the public square. Thirty names have
been Inscribed thereon, but we believe
it is our duty to preserve their names
for future generations.
"A public subscription is opened in
our commune and all donors will be
entitled to inscribe their names in a
book of gold, which we shall preserve
in our archives.
"We feel very much honored, gentle
men, if you will permit us to inscribe
the name of your city and in sending
an offering, no matter how modest. It
will be a matter for Just pride that you
have Joined us again in the glorifiva
tion of our dead.
"Please do accept. Mr. Mayor and
gentlemen of the council, our best
wishes for a perfect confraternite.
THE PRESIDENT.
"THE VICE-PRESIDENTS.
"THE SECRETARY.
"THE JOINT SECRETARY."
Before the war Flace-les-Macon had
a population of 650. Thirty of her men
were killed and many wounded, which
shows the tremendous cost paid by
trance in the defense of her land.
It is said Macon is a Freich name.
with the accent on the first syllable.
The Macons in the United States were
named in honor of Nathaniel Macon, a
natea soldier and statesman of North
Carolina, who had a powerful influence
in shaping the political affairs of the
country in the early past of the last
century. He died on his North Caro
line plantation June 29, 1837.
There are 12 Macons in the United
btates, the largest being in Georgia.
Macon. N, C, is a village of the fourth
class. The other Macons are in the
following states: Arkansas. Illinois.
n-entucity, Missouri ft Michigan, Missis
sippi, iveDraska, Ohio, Tennessee and
Virginia.
SOLDIER ACHES DETAILED
VIVID PICTURE DRAWN BY DR.
BROUGHER IN LECTURE.
Longing for Home Nearly Unbear
able by Doughboys Who Were
Overseas After Armistice.
CAPTAIN CGRBETT RETURNS
Portland Man Crosses Continent in
12 Days With Auto.
After nearly two years scent In the
artillery service of the United States
army in France. Captain Hamilton F.
Corbett arrived in Portland Tuesday
by automobile, driving from .Portland.
Me., to Portland, Or., in 12 days.
Captain Corbett received severe wounds
while in France and for gallantry in
action was promoted from the rank of
lieutenant to that of captain.
Captain Corbett loua. the officers'
training course at the Presidio and
afterwards received his commission as a
lieutenant, being later sent to France
in the artillery service.
The automobile trip ac. oss the conti
nent taken by Captain Corbett on his
way home is said to set a new record.
He covered considerably more than 3000
miles. The longest run made in any
one day was 602 miles.
50-GALLON STILL IS SEIZED
Joe Sagala and Outfit Are Taken
by Two Inspectors.
A still capable of making SO gallons
of corn whisky daily was seized Tues
day at SS5 Elliott avenue by Inspectors
Russell and Van Deusen. who also ar
rested Joe Sagala on a charge of violat
ing the prohibition law. Police say the
still was in full operation when they
found It. The copper kettles were still
hot when taken to headquarters.
Police also seized five barrels of corn
mash, which they will take to head
quarters today and several gallons of
newly-made whisky. The still is one
of the largest ever seized in the city.
In search for' sources of phosphate
fertiliser in the Netherlands phosphor
ite, fields have been discovered in two
provinces.
TOWNS TO HONOR TOWNS
Macon, France, to Erect .Monument
and Put Names in Book.
MASON. Mo. The municipal beads of
Macon, France, have thought up tne
hinDv idea of representing an tne
towns of Macon, in' the United States,
on a monument or marker to be erected
In the public square oi tne f rencn
town. It is assumed that the Macons
of this country have all contributed
men for the American expeditionary
force that saved the soil of France
from the Hun invaders, and when the
translation of the letter from the
French town was read to the Macon
city council this week, a resolution in
recognition of the honor was passed
unanimously, together with a liberal
appropriation to entitle Macon, Mo., to
representation in a record book of gold
In Macon. France.
1ne letter from France follows:
"Flace-les-Macon, le 20 May, 1919.
The commune of Flace-les-Macon
(Saone and Loire) to the city of Macon,
Missouri, United States of America:
The Honorable Mayor and Gentlemen
of the Council. Gentlemen The little
village of Flace-les-Macon, situated in
the county of Saone and Loire, has in
the neighborhood of 650 inhabitants. It
is, after a fashion, a suburb of the city
of Macon, which lies to the north. We
are proud and happy in the thought
that but a thousand leagues separate
us from other Maconltes. We have
been sincely touched by the news that
people of this region spring from the
same stock as those who founded your
important city. These bonds which
unite us have been sealed by those who
poured out their blood in order to as
sure the triumph of that cause of right
and justice. Your disinterestedness and
your valor have asserted themselves
on the fields of France, where you ex
tended the hand of succor.
"The horrible is finished and in
Flace-les-Macon we propose to honor
GRUDGE LEADS TO JAIL
Revolver Snapped, but Cartridges
Fail to Explode.
Robert Leeman, 46, was arrested
Tuesday night by Patrolmen Scott and
Norene and charged with carrying con
cealed weapons and with drawing a re
volver on Charles L. Gnasier of Flower
and Macadam streets. Bail for each
charge was fixed at $500, which the
prisoner had not furnished at an early
hour today.
Police said Leeman admitted snapping
his revolver at Mr. Gnasier twice last
week, but failed to injure him because
the cartridges did not explode. Lee
man is alleged to have borne a grudge
against Mr. Gnasier "on account of the
stories the prisoners said were told
about him. The arrest was made in Mr.
Gnasier's back yard.
Trials and tribulations of the dough
boys in France after the armistice was
signed, when they were fairly sick with
the desire to get back across the ocean
to the homefolks. were Pictured Tues-
aay nignt by Kev. J. Whitcomb Brough
er, former Portland pastor, in an ad
dress to an audience which taxed the
capacity of the White temple. Dr.
Brougher's lecture was distinctly "dif
ferent. He did not touch upon the
war or upon the destruction in France
in a general way, but filled his address
tun or human interest by a running
fire of descriptions and anecdotes of
the boys themselves.
Dr. Brougher was formerly pastor of
the White temple in this city and now
occupies the pulpit of the Temple
church of Los Angeles. The receipts
of the lecture are to go to the Daugh
ters of the Temple, one of the young
women's organizations of the church.
Dr. Brougher was sent to . ranee
under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A.
and traveled over a large part of the
battle area addressing the soldiers, and
he also went into Germany to aid in
entertaining and cheering up the men
with the army of occupation. In his
address last night he carried his audi
ence with him from one camp to an
other, telling many amusing incidents.
But the address was not without its
serious portions, and - r. Brougher
spoke a strong word for the work of
the Y. M. C. A. in France. He told of
the sightseeing tours conducted in
Paris of which 1,500,000 soldiers took
advantage and of the river trips on the
Rhine carried out without a penny of
cost to the doughboys.
"The American army in France was
the finest, most magnificent body of
men ever brought together," he de
clared. "SThe Germans, makers of dyes,
found out that there were three Amer
ican colors that would not run, the red,
the white and the blue. But after the
armistice was signed the men became
homesick and it was a tremendous job
to try to grip them and to keep them
from becoming downhearted.
After viewing the horrible devasta
tion of France it made one sick at
heart to see Germany without an out
ward sign of war. During that trying
time prior to the signing of peace the
American and the French and the Brit
ish soldiers were hoping that the Ger
mans would not sign and were ready to
spring forward to complete the work
that was halted by the armistice."
Praise for the religious and moral
attitude of the American soldiers was
given by Dr. Brougher, who declared
that over one-third of the men whom
he met did not drink and that those
who say that the army in France would
have voted overwhelmingly against
prohibition are mistaken.
Rebel Strongholds Reported Cleared.
MEXICO CITY. General Francisco
Murguia, in charge of federal forces in
the states of Tamaulipas, Coahuila and
Nenvo Leon have been cleared and the
country pacified. He declared the
towns of lturbide, Zaragosa, Aramberri
and Noreiga, which have been held for
some time by the rebels, are now in
bis possession. The reconstruction of
railroad, telegraph and telephone lines
is now in progress, he reported.
NEWS WRITERS ON STRIKE
Omaha Reporters Walk Out and Or
ganize Union.
OMAHA. Neb., Aug. 20. Twenty
members of the staff of the Omaha Bee
went on strike yesterday, demanding
an increase in pay and shorter working
hours. After walking out the report
era met at the labor temple and organ
ized the American News Writers' union.
affiliating themselves with the Ameri
can Federation of Labor. They have
applied for a charter and are going to
attempt to call out tne otner craits on
the paper in a sympathetic strike.
Overtures are to be made to the news
writers of the other two papers here
to join the union.
Striking reporters will call on the
publisher tomorrow morning ror an
other conference on their demands.
Alaska to Try. Goat Raising.
FAIRBANKS, Alaska. Experiments
raising Swiss milk goats of the
Saanen-Toggenburg strain are to be
Dont Experiment With Catarrh;
It Often Leads to Serious Trouble
You Will Never Be Cured by
Local Treatment With
Sprays.
Catarrh is a condition of the blood
and cannot be cured by local applica
tions of sprays and douches; this has
been proven by the thousands who have
vainly resorted to this method of treat
ment. Catarrh should not be neglected or
experimented with. The wrong treat
ment is valuable time lost, during which
tbe disease is getting a firmer hold
upon its victim, and making It more
difficult for even the proper treatment
to accomplish results.
Though Catarrh makes Its first ap
pearance in the nostrils, throat and air
passages, (he dise&se becomes more and
more aggravated and finally reaches
down into the lungs, and everyone rec
ognizes the alarming conditions that
result when the lungs are affected.
Thus Catarrh may be the forerunner of
that most dreaded and hopeless of all
diseases, consumption.
No local treatment affords permanent
relief. Experience has taught that S.
S. S. is the one remedy which attacks
the disease at its source, the blood, and
produces satisfactory results in even
the worst cases. Catarrh sufferers are
urged to give S. S. S. a thorough trial.
It is sold by all druggists. You are in
vited to write to the Medical Depart
ment for expert advice as to how to
treat your own case. Address Swift
Specific Co.. 254 Swift Laboratory, At
lanta, Ga. Adv.
LJI
1
Lmi I Li Tin aaai
00 , -LL
E3 D Hj D DEE. QE1 L J
STARTS SATURDAY
FREE Matinee-Women Only
" , 10 A. M. SATURDAY
The ' First S00 Women at the Doors Saturday,
10 A. M Star Theater, Admitted Free.
CJTasl1
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1 GO SEE IT 1
E23 THE YOUNG GIRL "WHO oTtTq I
CSS FORGETS HER MOD- CALjLiCS ff'l
jj ESTY JUST ONCE, IS A SPADE Lfj
rwi LIKELY NEVER TO RE- . ,
jjifj 1 I MEMREK IT AGAIN. J A SPADE
.M8jVwiiii!i 1 jui inaw wii. in 111 1.1 i 1 1 1 ii mi ur. , 1 n ,., ,,,,
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' This picture is sponsored by the United 3
States Government, Public Health Serv-
ice and they request everybody over 16 MM
in the United States to see it It's well
worth your while.
XA
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TH B AT E R
25c 25c
Li i
V7J2
J
rrrvua
attempted at the government farm
near here. Sheep raising also will be
experimented with at the farm.
Hawaiian Sugar Crop 600,000 Tons.
HONOLULU. T H. Estimates by the
Sugar Factors company place the 1919
Hawaiian sugar crop at 600,000 tons,
exceeded only in the years 1914, 1915
and 1917.
The dendrograph is an instrument
that has been invented for recording
growth and other variations in the di
mensions of trees.
STOPPING
SATURDAY
MIDNIGHT
Sunday
WM. FARNUM
in
"The Lone Star
Ranger."
TODAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Dofoflwr
A Great Big Story of
the Frozen North.
Of Lawless Men and
a Homeless Girl.
As Gripping, Thrilling
and Intense as
"Hell Morgan's Girl.
PATHE REVIEW
MUTT AND JEFF
MURTAGH
. and oox
$50,000 Organ.