Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, August 07, 1919, Page 6, Image 6

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    6
THE MOnXING OKEGONTAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1919.
HIGHWAY WORK "ID
BE DONE PIECEMEAL
Projects to Be Completed
5 Instead of 2 Years.
in
DISPUTED ROUTES SETTLED
Klamath Falls AVork Will Be Put
ITp First and Trucks Are to Be
Xent to All Counties.
STATE HIGH WAV COMMISSION'S
!D01.GS.
Awarded road contracts acrgre-
gating $831,930. representing
$319.605 for 17.9 miles of paving;
T $400,362 for 45.9 miles grading
I and macadam; $31,963 for bridges.
I Decided government co-opera-
tlve programme can be retained
f by extending over five-year pe
J riod.
I Projects to be rushed from
4 Klamath Falls to Dairy, Klamath
t Falls to Olene, Lakeview to point
near Paisley, Camas to north
fork of Coquille.
t Located Low pass route in Lane
county; new route at ewberg;
selected route through Yamhill
town; Fourth street at The Lalles,
along railroad to old railroad
grade for Columbia highway.
Decided to lend indefinitely two
trucks to every .county.
Declined to narrow road in
Ochoco canyon. Crook county.
By spreading the co-operative pro
jects over a period of years, instead
of finishing them up in the next twro
years, as had been hoped, the state
highway commission decided yesterday,
in consultation with Mr. Cecil, govern
ment representative, that money will
be available to carry out the original
programme. It was calculated that
enough resources will be available for
the state to hold up its end, and there
is hope that congress will make new
appropriations to take care of the
government end.
Revision of estimates disclosed that
more money is needed on all projects
than was first supposed. C. H. Pur
cell explained to the commissioners
that estimates had been guesses, and
That only recently had the surveys
been completed and official estimates
made. For instance, he explained, be
cause originally suggested that the
Mount Hood loop could be built for
$514,000, whereas when the govern
ment completed the suryey and es
timate recently it disclosed thatit will
cost $900,000. It will be 1922 before
htis loop is finished. The entire co
operative programme will require a
longer period than anticipated to allow
time for revenues to come in.
Klamath Work to Be Started.
To expedite sections on co-operative
work. Commissioner Booth moved that
the Klamath Falls-Dairy section be put
up as a project as son as possible, and
that the same action be taken with
the Klamath Falls-Olene section, and
the Lakeview north section, which will
extend about 30 miles. Once these
projects get under way, the commission
plans to follow them up with other
sections, such as on the Silver Lake.
On the Roseburg-Coos Bay road the
estimate is $1,050,500. Mr. Booth
moved that the section from Camas
west to the north fork of the Coquille
river, approximately 14 miles, and the
worst part of this road, be put up as
a project first, and that Douglas and
Coos counties be asked to aid.
Bids on the Hayes hill section of the
Grants Pass- Crescent City road a co
operative project, exceeded the estimate
to such an extent that the commission
decided to let this improvement drop
unless the county is willing to make
up the difference.
Lane Ia Decided On.
A matter which has been long in
controversy between Chairman Benson
and Comissmioner Booth was settled
by the vote of Commissioner Thompson.
This was the location of the road de
Bcribed in the law as "a point in Lane
county and a point in Coos county,'
commonly referred to as the Eugene
Florence road. Mr. Benson has in
sisted on the selection of the high pa
road and Mr. Booth has advocated the
low pass route.
To bring the matter to an Issue, Mr.
Booth made the motion that the road
ne located rrom Deaawood east via
Lake creek, Blanchy, the low pass,
Cheshire to the Pacific highway. Mr.
Thompson, who went over the two
routes this week, seconded the motion,
with the information jhat he will file
a statement with the secretary giving
his reason. Chairman Benson declared
the motion carried, and said he, too,
will file a statement telling why be
objects.
Crosniiiff Ranse Kxprnnive.
Mr. Booth explained that it will be
an expensive road to finish and that;
ne aoes not want to crowd in lor funds,
but in view of the urgent need of
crossing the mountain, he asked that
a 50-50 proposition be put up to the
county for the four or five miles across
the mountain range. He fants the
work on this section done this and next
year. Mr. Thompson agreed after
few technicalities were straightened
out, and Mr. Benson voiced his objec
tion, but declared the motion carried
The high pass road is 20 miles and
the low pass 27 miles. The estimate
on the former is $311,000 and on the
latter $423,600. but since, the estimate
was made, rock has been found on the
low pass, which would make the cost
of macadamizing each road the same
Commissioner Thompson said that the
low pass is an all-year road and serves
more people than the high pass route
On the section to be advanced. Lan
county is to pay 50 per cent; the state
1'5 per sent and the government the
same. I
Having disposed of this long contro- i
verted subject, the commission plunged
in to settle other disputes. The road
in Yamhill was located through the
town, instead of taking a proposed
new location.
West Side Route t hofM-n.
Next the commission selected the
west side route at Newberg, agreeing
that it was the right thing to do not
withstanding the strong demand that
this route be not taken. The costs on
the new location will be less than
on the old. Commissioner Thompson
moved that the Columbia river high
way be located from Fourth street, in
The Dalles, west along the railroad
right-of-way, to the old railroad grade.
Mr. Thompson had formerly opposed
this route and Mr. Benson had advo
cated it.
The Dalles-Chen owith paving con
trac twas declared cancelled, having
been let when the highway was lo
cate! between those points instead of
along the railroad, at the county farm.
The $15,000 which Wasco county had
set aside for co-operation on t he
Chenowith route can be used as the
county sees fit on the balance.
Regarding the appeal of the board
of conciliation to the commission that
the highway body use its influence
on paving contractors having a dis
pute with rollermen to submit to
arbitration the highway commission
came to this decision: The highway!
commission favors the principle of
arbitration, but there are other state
boards to adjust differences, and the
matter is not within the jurisdiction
of the commission.
Bidn Are Called For.
That stretch between Scappoose and
McBride's crossing is the only piece
on the Columbia river highway, be
tween Hood River and Astoria, not
under conract for paving. The com
mission ordered it advertised for the
next meeting. But for the rejection
of the bid on the Astoria-Seaside sec
tion the Scappoose-McBride section
would be the only part between Hood
River and the Pacific ocean not con
tracted for paving.
On the Baker-Cornucopia road. 7.9
miles, the commission decided to gravel
for a width of 10 feet instead of 16
feet, as a matter of economy. Also on
the economical end. the engineer was
instructed to reduce the cost of sur
veys as much as possible on new lo
cations where there is no immediate
work in prospect.
At the September meeting the com
mission will sell $1,000,000 of the 4
per cent bonds. The highway work is
now progressing- at the rate of about
$50,000 a day.
Contracts awarded yesterday by the
commission were as follows:
Baker county, old Orefon trail. Baker
Haines section. 0.7 miles, grading and ma
cadam. F. C. Ox man. $90,044.35.
Union, county, old Oregon trail. Lone Pine
Hot lake section, 3.i mftea, macadam.
Warren Construction company, $3S.630.'
Marion county, Pacific highway Salem
Brooks section, 4.1 miles, paving, Blake
Compton company, $92,445.80.
Josephine county, Pacific highway Stage
road pass section, 4.5 miles, macadam. War
ren Construction company, $40,175.
Pacific Highway Work, $97,820.
Douglas county. Pacific highway Ton
calla section, H.5 miles, grading and ma
cadam. A. Anderaon, 97,81:0.
Xiouglas county. Pacific highway Can-yonviile-Myrtle
Creek section, 9.8 miles grad
ing, H. J. Bildeburn, $S6.U50.
Wheeler county, John Day highway
Butte creek section, 9.5 miles, grading, J. F.
Clarkson & Co., $47,743.
Va&co county. Columbia river highway
The Dalles-Three-Mile creek section, two
miles paving. United Contract company,
40.1S8.75.
Umatilla county, Oregon-Washington high
way Athena-Milton section, 11.8 miles pav
ing. Warren Construction company, $260,970.
Iter erred to engineers:
Columbia county Columbia river high
way. Rainier city section, fill.
Douglas county Canyonvllle - Galesville
section or .racmc nignway, lx mile ma
cadam.
Douglas county Divide section, 1.36 miles
macadam.
Bids rejected:
Astoria-Seaside section of Columbia high'
ay, paving, work to be readvertised.
Iind-Jeff erson county line section of The
Dalles-California highway. 23.9 miles grad
ng.
Koseburg-wilber section of Pacific high
way in Douglas county.
Wheeler county Bridge across John Day
river to J. F. Clarknon c Co.. J17.855.
Jackson county Three bridges over Neil
creek. Frank Jordan, 114. OiS.
Bid for bridges across Molalla river, Pa-
if ic highway, by Pacific Bridge company,
47,7f.'l, referred to engineer. Three bridges
and four culverts In Polk and Yamhill
counties to be readvertised.
RECORDS BELIE MYERS
POSTMASTER TAKES CREDIT
FOR RISES IiAW REQUIRES.
Statement That Many Begged for
Exemption Also Refuted, as Most
- Employes Enlisted.
Although Postmaster Myers gives
himself credit for having- granted in
creases to returned service men, sec
tion of the posiuifice appropriation
act, passed by congress, reveals the
fact that all postal employes who en
tered mfHtary or naval service were to
te reassie-ned to their positions follow
ing their honorable discharge, at the
salary to which they would have been
increased automatically had they re
mained in the postal service.
In the statements issued by Postmas
ter Myers in the controversy between
himself and Mayor Baker, much stress
was laid upon the fact that the re
turned service men had been re
employed at increased salaries, with
the credit for such increases reflect
ing upon the postmaster.
Postmaster Mirers, in his last state
ment, contended that the complaints
now arising from returned service men
ere due to his obdurate refusal to al
low exemptions, even to the extent of
refusing men who, ha claimed, came
to hs office in tears and befjped that
his power De exertea to exempt them
from military service.
But service records at the poRtofftce
hardly tend to bear out these conten
tions of the postmaster, as it is said
that out of 37 postal clerks who left
the Portland postof f ice to enter mili
tary service. 28 voluntarily enlisted and
but nine were taken through selective
service channels.
Captain James O. Convill, chairman
of the employment committee of Port
land Post No. 1, American Legion, said
yesterday that his investigation of the
charges preferred against the postmas
ter bv returned soldiers had begun, but
that he had nothing in connection with
the investigation, to make public at
this time.
Investigation of charges that Post
master Myers has been unfair and
discriminatory in his treatment of over
seas men who hav-e returned to the
postal service has been ordered by
Scout Young post of the United
Spanish war veterans.
The veterans named a committee
composed of L. E. Beach, H. V. Reed
and James Reushall, to institute a
thorough investigation at once and to
report their findings at the next meet
ing of the camp, which will be held at
the courthouse, August 12.
CABLE DEFENDS WHEELER
Physician in Charge of War Bii'
reau Replies to Legion Charges.
Dr.- E. E. Cable, who is in charge
of the district comprising: Oregon,
Washington and Idaho for the war
risk insurance bureau of the United
States public health service, yesterday
issued a statement defending Lr. C. H.
Wheeler, who has been characterized
in resolutions adopted by the American
lesrion as having- been "roxigh and in
suiting" in caring for disabled ex
service men in making examinations.
In his statement Dr. Cable points out
that his assistant has been in gov
ernment service for 25 years and was
employed because of that fact. Men
who ..saw military service and who
make examinations are Lieutenant
Colonel R. C. Yenny, Lieutenant-Colonel
G. C. Strohm. Captain L. Wolf and Dr
Lupton. It is said by Dr. Cable that
Dr. Wheeler has no part in conduct
ing - examinations.
GRANGE PROGRAMME SET
State Master and School Snperin
ten-dent to Speak at La Center.
VANCOUVER. Wash.. Aug. . (Spe
cial.! Josephine Corliss Preston, state
superintendent of schools, and William
Bouck, master of the state grange, will
be among the speakers at the regula
meeting of Pomona grange to be held
at La Center August 13-14. Mr. Bouck
will address the meeting Wednesday
and Mrs. Preston Thursday.
At this session of the grange among
the important matters to be considered
will be the question of the affiliation of
the granges with the labor unions ana
consideration of the boys and girls
clubs.
MEDICAL MONOPOLY
SEEN BY DRUGGISTS
Limiting of Alcohol" Content
Blamed on Doctors.
BILLS WILL BE ATTACKED
Association Says Measures Would
Result in Rifling of Pocket of
Poor Man by Physician.
Charges that the Volstead bill and
other proposed legislation before con
gress would establish a medical monop
oly in the United States, enslave the
working man and the man of small
means to the physician and destroy the
egitimate drug business, were made by
Portland and northwest druggists gath
ered at the assembly hall of the Mult
nomah hotel for the annual session
under the auspices of the Oregon State
Pharmaceutical association yesterday.
They went on record as condemning the
Volstead bill and similar bills and urg
ing Oregon members of congress to
oppose them.
The Volstead bill would prevent the
sale of all medicines and drugs con
taining more than one-half of one per
cent of alcohol except upon a doctor's
prescription. The druggists declared
yesterday that this bill is a blow
against the poor man, that it would
make him patronize a doctor and would
place beyond his reach, except through
physician, such household drugs as
spirits of camphor, spirits of nitre.
iodine tincture, etc. A similar bill was
up before the Oregon legislature ai
the last session, but was defeated.
Union to Start Trouble
The "alcohol" bill was the only mat
ter considered at the session yesterday,
and the remaining questions to come
before the meeting will be taken up at
the business sessions today. Some
warm discussion is expected, especially
while the question of recognition of the
recently organized Drug Clerks' union
is considered.
Several other questions s.re up for
consideration today, among them the
"venereal bill" passed by the last ses
sion of the legislature. The druggist
are expected to make a strong fight
for the repeal of this measure.
The resolution adopted yesterday
condemning the proposed Volstead bill
was as follows:
Resolution, against unfair legislation tend
insr towards destruction of Iegitl
mate drug- business through fanatical, senti
mental and competitive sources, sucn bj
unbalanced sentiment, prohibition en
thusiasm and the American Medlca.1 asso
ciation DTOOaranda. leading to bills which
create a monopoly in the sale of drugs
for the medical profession, by the Oregon
State Pharmaceutical association:
Medical Trust Discovered.
"Whereas, the Volstead bill is one of those
bills backed by one and all of the above
classifications in its first appearance with
the direct attack for the purpose of de
stroying the legitimate drug business: and
for destroying the opportunity of the public
for determining whether they should use
or not use any drugs whatsoever, that con
tains over one-half of 1 per cent of alcohol
without paying tribute to the medical pro
fe.ion :
Whereas, we all fully realize that this
means a direct attack on the poor man and
his readv-tnade medicine by compelling him
to patronize a doctor - before he would be
allowed to purchase the simplest of medi
cines that happened to be liquids containing
over one-half of one per cent of alcohol:
Be it resolved by the members of the Ore
gon Pharmaceutical association that we con
aider it our national duty and right to pro
test against this proposed law which leads in
reality to a medical monopoly against the
interests of not omy the drug business, as
a bufineFS, but the pocket book of our best
friend, the working man, or the man with
small means.
Be it further resolved, that we not only
go on record before our congressmen
Washington for the protection of the work
ing man, and the man of small means,
against a medical monopoly, but that we
also ko on record that each and every one
of the members of the Oregon State Pharma
ceutical association snail. Individually and
in convention, begin a campaign with the
people by conversation, by advertising and
other methods as to the full meaning and
intent of this vicious law broupht up
produce th most vlclou monopoly."
JAMES M'CAIN IS DUD
ATTORNEY AXD PIONEER OF
1848 PASSES AT M'MIN'NVILLE.
Prominent Place 'Won in Profession
After Trip Across Plains In Ox
cart to Oregon 'Posts.
McMIICNVILLE, Or., Aug. 6. (Spe
cial.) Half a century s activity aa a
practicing attorney in Yamhill county
s recalled by the death of James Mc
Cain at his home in this city yesterday.
Mr. McCain wafl born in Indiana,
March 31, 1844. and crossed the plains
by ox team with his parents in 1848.
He received his education in the public
schools, and at McMinnville college and
Willamette university, later studying
aw with P. C. Sullivan at Dallas, Or.
He was admitted to the bar in 1868 and
was engaged in his profession at La
fayette and McMinnville since that
date, being at the time of his death
senior member of the law firm of Mc
Cain & Vinton. He was elected and
served as district attorney for the 3d
judicial district for two terms, from
1892 to 1896, and was appointed post'
master at McMinnville by President
McKinley in 1898. serving one term.
Mr. McCain at Dallas in 187 0 mar
rled Miss Electa C. Sullivan, who died
August 1, 1908. Three daughters sur
vive him Mrs. Mabel Parker of Mc
Minnville, Mrs. Ethel Palmer of Tuala
tin, and Mrs. Ivalene Wells of Los An
geles. CaL In addition to their own
family Mr. and Mrs. McCain were foster
parents to Miss Belle Sullivan and P. C
Sullivan.
The Elks and Knights of Pythias will
probably officiate at the funeral, which
will be held Friday.
BEAN PICKERS IN DEMAND
300
WOMEN' AXD GIRLS
FEKED GOOD WAGES.
OF-
Company at Clatskanie Will Provide
Good Camping and Has Swim
ming Pool Planned.
Three hundred bean pickers are
wanted by the women's department of
the United States employment bureau.
A call was sent out yesterday for this
number of workers in Delta gardens,
comprising 150 acres owned by the Co
lumbia Agricultural company, and lo
cated near Clatskanie, Or. Tents or
houses will be supplied, with stoves,
fuel at cost and groceries will be sold
on the grounds at prices prevailing
in the city. Pickers will be required
to furnish their own bedding and camp-
irtfnsrqsulpment aslde frora ck,nrlipiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH
The bean crop is f & variety and
quality that growers say will enable
an aauii piCKer to matce irom to o
per day, and It is estimated the picking
will last from four to six weeks.
A swimming pool has been arranged
for and all women and girls desiring
to work must register through Mrs.
Scott, director of the women's depart
ment. After registration, pickers are
asked to keep In touch with Mrs. Scott,
as it is expected harvesting will be
gin about August 15. The steamer
Beaver, leaving here at 5 P. M.. will
carry the party and a fare of $1.65, in
cluding berth, has been made. The
landing piece adjoins the camping site.
Mrs. W. S. Delghton, experienced su
pervisor, will be in charge of the camp,
and will be at room 209 Lewis build
ing Friday, Saturday. Monday and Tues
day for registration of pickers.
MURDER CHARGE IS FILED
MARTIN CLAKK HAS PRELIMI
NARY HEARING TODAY.
Authorities at Eugene Still Are
Seeking Evidence Regarding
Death of Charles Taylor.
EUGENE, Or., Aug. 6. (Special.)
District Attorney L. I. Ray filed a
charge of second degree murder today
against Martin Clark, road worker of
McKenzie Bridge, who accompanied
Charles Taylor, road supervisor,- on the
hunt at the time the latter was killed
by a gunshot wound over a week ago.
Preliminary hearing in the case will be
held tomorrow morning.
So far only circumstantial evidence
has been secured by the authorities, al
though they have been diligently work
ing on every clew which would throw
light on the case. The rifles and
cartridges used by Clark and Taylor
are being examined by Sheriff Fred
Stickles to determine if possible which
gun fired the bullet from the shell
picked up at the scene of the tragedy.
Opinion, generally, seems to favor
the supposition that who ever fired the
shot saw only the head of an animal
carried on Taylor's shoulders. No foot
prints were found near the scene and.
it is believed that upon realizing his
mistake, the slayer left the spot.
Clark is held at the county jail and
still maintains his Innocence. He does
not vary from the story which he told
the authorities at the outset.
AD CLUB GREETS BUYERS
VISITING DELEGATES
GET
PRIZES FOR TALKS.
W. F.
Isipman Observes Active Buy
ing; by Public Despite
High Prices.
More than 500 buyers week visitors
to Portland were entertained at the
noon luncheon of the Portland Ad club
at the municipal auditorium yesterday
and were greeted by about 200 Ad club
members. Campbell's band played. Vis
iting delegates grave one-minute talks
on their home towns. The award of
nine prizes to the speakers whose
talks were deemed especially merito
rious was a feature.
Will F. Lipman said that notwith
standing the advance in poods the pub
lic is buying more than ever before.
E. A. Dinsmore, sales manager of
OWs, Wortman & King, urged the re
tailers to keep well advised of market
conditions.
FUND TRANSFER OPPOSED
McXary and McArthnr Want Forest
Road Money Left Alooo.
SALEM. Or., Aujr. 6. (Special.) Sen
ator Charles McXary and Representa
tive McArthur have written letters to
Governor Olcott indicating: that they
are opposed to transferring $1,000,000
from the national forest road fund to
the Interior department for use on
roads in the national parks, as pro
posed in a bill prepared by Senator
Smoot Representative McArthur de
clares the opposition seems to be gen
eral among1 members of both houses
at Washington, vid he has no fear that
the measure will pass.
Senator McXary informs the governor
that he has heard nothing of the bill,
but will oppose its passage in the event
it comes up for consideration.
LEAGUE ELECTS OFFICERS
J. E. Beach President of Hydro-
Electric Industry Organization.
At the regular meeting of the Co
lumbia Hydro-Electric Industrial league
held Monday night in tle public library
building, the following officers were
chosen: J. E. Beach, president; George
I. Cleaver and L. B. Seeley, vice-presidents;
Captain William T. Carroll, sec
retary. The office of treasurer will
be filled at a later meeting. An ad
dress on hydro-power was delivered
by Mr. Morrison, who explained various
methods for serving interests of tr
state and promoting manufacturing
The object of the organization is mu
nicipal and state betterment through
use of water power In developing elec
tric heat and energy.
SALEM TO GREET EDITORS
State Institutions Will Be Inspected
- by National Party.
SALEM. Or.. A"ug. 6. (Special.) Ad
dresses of welcome by Governor Olcott,
Resinol
will heal those
mosquito bites
A touch of Resinol take the
itch and smart right out of mosquito-bites,
and soothes and cools
sun-burned, wind-burned skin.
This gentle healing ointment
seems to get right at the root of
skin-troubles like eczema, ivy
poisoning, heat-rash, and hives,
clearing them away in a sur
prisingly short time. Resinol is
sold by ail druggists.
Lr i i
my If oisir Clothe:
Your Furnishings
and Hats NOW
Prices are going" to be much higher for the fall season and
you want your dollar to buy all possible, so we repeat, buy all
you can afford to buy now and save the dollars.
Through our profit-sharing plan you save half the margin
of profit charged by other stores if you buy at Gray's, and you
can do it every day in the year.
Compare Gray's
$30 Suits
with Suits sold by
other stores for
$35 and $40
7 Saving on Furnishings and Hats
We give 7 discount on furnishings and hats when pur
chase amounts to $4 or more, contract goods excepted.
M
lll!iil!lili!l!lllllIl!lli!Illl!lllHM
inspection of the state institutions and
a luncheon In Wilson park are among
the chief entertainment features pro
vided for the members of the National
Kditorial association, who will spend
three hours in Salem Sunday.
The visitors will arrive at 6:30 o'clock
and will be met at the depot by a com
mittee of citizens. They will first be
taken to luncheon, after which & trip
will be made to the various institu
tions. The party will leave here at
about 9:30 o'clock and will be accom
panied as far as Crater lake by Gov
ernor and Airs. Olcott.
WATER RADIO IS SUCCESS
REVOLUTIONIZING OF TRANS
MISSIONS PREDICTED.
Message From Annapolis Informing
British Admiralty or Sighting of
F-3 4 Is First Proof.
SAN' DIEGO, CaL, Aug. 6. As a re
sult of discoveries at a little experi
mental station on a barge unnoticed
for the past two months in San Diego
bay. radiography will be revolution
ized by transmissions through the
earth and water, inBtea'd jf the air, ac
cording to an announcement made here
today by Lieutenant R. A. Morton, of
the navy radio laboratory at Mare
island, who has conducted the experi
ments. First proof of the success of the
under water radio in trans-continental
transmission through tnd earth, it was
revealed, was when the United States
navy department sent a message from
the Annapolis station to the British ad
miralty that the great dirigible F-34
had been sighted off the American
coast. Lieutenant Morton was at his
Instruments, heard the message and
copied it in its entirety.
Additional advantage of the earth
and water transmission is declared to
be in that the underwater cables can
be pointed like a gun toward any sta
tion desired to communicate with and
so single out such a one, whereas
aerial antennae are equally affected
by waves from all directions. At the
station in the bay there are 10,000 feet
of very heavily insulated cable laid on
the bottom, these cables extended in
different directions. By turning
switch, instruments can be connected
with any one desired.
American Consul Resigns
MEXICO CITY. Aug. 6. George A.
Chamberlain, American consul-genera
here, presented his resignation to the
state department before leaving for the
United- States a few days ago, accord
ing to information received from an
authoritative source,
Motor Car Company Formed.
SALEM, Or.. Aug. 6. (Special.) The
Sayers Pacific Motor Car company of
Portland has filed articles of incor
poration in Salem. The incorporators
are Aaron Cohn, H. W. Denis and Ora
H. Porter, and the capital stock ' is
sis.or.o.
-BUYERS' GUIDE AND REFERENCE DIRECTORY OF-
Wholesalers
BOOKS AM) HOLIDAY GOODS.
THE J. K. GILL. CO.
Third and .lder Sta. Main 85O0. Jl BOSS
CHAIRS. REFD Als'D RATTAN
FlRJSlTUItE.
HETWOOD BROS. & WAKEFIELD CO.
148-154 North Tenth St. Opposite Nnrtl
Bank r.pat- Broadway SU6L A 255s.
CIGARS. PIPKS AXD TOBACCO.
COAST CIGAR CO
123 First St. Main 730.
M. A. GUN ST Ik CO.
84 North Flft St. Broadway 2800.
DEPENDABLE CO PTE E, TEAS AND
SPICES.
D WIGHT EDWARDS CO.
32 North Front St. Broadway 134L
DRCGS.
CLARKE. 'WOODWARD DRUG CO.
Aldsr at West . Park St. Marshall 470O.
GLASS, MIRRORS. 8AH AND DOORS.
CENTRAL DOOR & LUMBER CO.
Thirteenth and Glisan SU. Broadway 1105.
GROCERS WHOLESALE.
T. W- JENKINS & CO-
front and Fins Sta,' Mi in 601.
T?.
srr
Compare Gray's
$40 Suits
with Suits sold by
'other stores for
$45 and $50
GRAY'S VALUES WILL TELL
GRAY
HONS TO GET OREGON FOOD
RELIEF COMMITTEE BEGINS TO
COLLECT SUPPLIES.
$3000 Raised in Multnomah County
to Buy Products; Vessel to
Be Chartered.
To charter a vessel In Portland and
ship a large quantity of foodstuffs col
lected In this region directly to Ger
many for relief of German and Aus
trian women and children is the ambi
tion of the relief committee recently or
ganized in Portland, which has begun
work of collecting food and clothing.
We hope to have on hand between
300 and S00 tons of food before long."
declared Ernest Kroner, chairman of
the committee, yesterday, "and when
we have secured the provisions we will
endeavor to charter a ship and load
everything right here in Portland har
bor direct for Germany."
The committee already has sent 150
packages of lard, bacon, condensed milk
and other staple foodstuffs to Ger
many,. and has sent out letters to over
8000 persons in this section informing
them of the general purpose of the
committee.
The sum of $3000 in cash has been
taken in already In Portland and vicin
ity, it is reported, and $10,000 is the es
timate for the northwest. The Port
land relief organisation has general
charge of the work throughout the en
tire northwest district. A committee
has been formed to investigate buying
opportunities in the northwest and the
-'y Lootrthe Steaming Cup
fl WE EXCEl-CfTI
Me.olTic.Kcts i3 eLl
SS2 for522 . K .
"Three -Ap petixirxj Places
r owg 1 1" 'frnw i r" i
Manufacturers Jobbers
-BUYERS' WEEK AUGUST 4
MAN I F AfTI RFRS OF TRUNKS. 6CIT-
CASES, TELESCOPES. ETC.
MTLTNOMAH TRUNK & BAG CO.
80 E. "Water St.. corner 6tark. East 24.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS ALL KINDS.
SHERMAN. CLAY CO.
Sixth and Morrison. Main 8645.
MOHAWK TIRES. LEATHER BELTING.
ROOF. FfRE DEPARTMENT SUPPL1KS.
UUXNELL & 6HERKILL.
40 First St. Broadway 1488.
NECKWEAR AND SUSPENDERS.
ADRIAN NECKWEAR CO.
6O3-605 Worcester Bids. Main 2858. -OFFICE
FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES.
"EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICK."
KILHAM STATIONERY A PRINTING CO.
FlXta and Oak sis. Marsnail 60S0.
OILS. PAINTS AND GLASS.
RA8MCSSEN & CO,
N. E. Cor. Second A Taylor. Main 1771,
A 6o31.
OVERALLS AND FURNISHINGS.
ELOESSEK-HivYNEXANN CO..
29 Fifth st. North. Phone Broadway 69.
Portland, Oregon.
PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS.
W. P. FULLER CO..
Front and Uaaitoa. ItAla
Compare Gray's s
$50 Suits
with Suits sold by
other stores for
$55 and $60
366 WASHINGTON
AT WEST PARK
money raised will be used to purchase
such staple foods as flour, dried beans
and vegetables, lard, bacon, etc. Ware
house accommodations will be secured
in the near future and the stores will
be collected here to await the charter
ing of a vessel.
The committee has arranged for open
meetings each second and fourth Fri
day of the month in Swiss hall.
BEND MAN STILL MISSING
Uncle Believes Walter Beesley Is
on His Way to Portland.
BEND, Or., Aug. 6. (Special.) That
Walter Beesley, who disappeared from
his home in Bend last week, may be on
his way to Portland, is the belief of his
uncle, W. L. Moody of The Dalles, who
has been heading the searchers and
who left today for the Willamette val
ley to continue the hunt.
This theory, however, is at variance
with information received by Sheriff
Roberts, who learned today that Bees-'
ley had been seen more than 30 miles
frcm Bend, heading for the Cascade
mountains, and carrying no equipment
of any sort.
Officials in the Cascade forest have
been ordered to watch for the missing
Aircraft Company Formed.
SALEM. Or.. Aug. 6. (Special.) B.
F. Brownlow, A. L. Inman, Dan Greco,
Thomas Sketchley and George Love
are incorporators of the Ace Aircraft
company of Portland, according to
articles filed in Salem today. The
capital stock is $20,000. The company
will deal in aircraft and conduct a
general aerial transportation business.
TO 9-
PLUMBING. MILL AVD STEAM SUPPLIES
M L. KLINE,
8-6-SI-69 First St. Main 61T, A 251T.
ROOFING MANUFACTURERS.
DURABLE ROOFING MFG. CO,
Kenton Station. Woodlawn 318S.
SASH. DOORS AND GLASS.
W. P. FI LLER & CO..
Front and Morrison. Main (HtX
SOAPS AND WASHING POWDER.
MT. HOOD SOAP CO,
Fourth and Gllan sta. Broadway 457.
STOVE AND RANGE MANUFACTURERS.
PORTLAND STOVE WORKS,
Kenton. TeL Woodlawn 2803.
TYPEWRITERS AND SUPPIOES.
E. W. PEASE CO, 110 Sixth St.
Corona Fortab'.e typewriter.
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
MASON. EH R M AN at CO,
74 North Fi.'th si Broadway 485.
WOMEN'S AND MISSES SUITS. CO A IS.
WAISTS. DRESSES.
WEINSTEIN BRO,
lion an bids. Marshall 5727.