Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, May 27, 1919, Page 2, Image 2

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THE 3IORNTXO ORECOXIAX, TUESDAY; MAY 27, 1919.
HUSTR0-HUHGA1F1
PROBLEM TAKEN UP
New States' Envoys Heard at
Peace Conference.
HUGE WAR DEBTS PENDING
Disposition of Enormous Burden Is
Proving Difficult Task Some
Exemptions Probable.
the council of four at Paris has reached
a full understanding by which the
United States will retain the 700.000
tons of German shipping seized in !
American ports when this country en
tered the war.
Great Britain had proposed that this
tonnage as well as German ships seized
in other countries be placed In a com
mon pool and allotted on the basis of
tonnage lost through action of enemy
submarines. The United States has
steadfastly refused to accede to this
plan.
ANTI-RED ELEMENT
TO BE RECOGNIZED
BERRIES WILL BE SCARCE
Russians Fighting Bolsheviki
to Accept Covenant.
So
PARIS, May 26. (By the Associated
Fress.) Representatives of the new
Etates carved out of- the former HapB
burg monarchy were given a hearing
today before the reparations committee
to present their objections to the pro
posed solution of the Austro-Hungarlan
financial problem under which they
would be held responsible for their
share of the pre-war debt, the war
debt, the war issue of currency and
reparations and would be required to
compensate Austria and. Hungary as
they will be constituted in the future
for the value of the public buildings
and property inside their limits.
The protests against this great bur
den were met sympathetically by the
council of four, which sent the ques
tion to the reparations sub-commission
for a rehearing. This submission will
be supplemented by Franco-British rep
resentatives, who are understood to be
opposed to any change.
The belief is held here that a new re
port will be made, exempting the new
etates from any payments on account
of reparation for public property taken
over.
The prime factor in the negotiations
heretofore has been the fact that about
3.000,000,000 francs of the Austrian pre
war debt is held in France and the
French government has promised . to
secure repayment to its nationals.
Hence it has been anxious to distribute
the financial burden, in order to pre
vent the bankruptcy of the new Austria
and Hungary.
PARIS, May 26. (By the Associated
Press.) Premier Clemenceau, as presi
dent of the peace conference, today
Teceived a communication from Karl
Renner, head of the Austrian delegation,
complaining that the Austrian gov
ernment is in financal straits and that
the heavy expense of maintaining the
delegation at St. Germain-en-Laye is
creating a "regretabie strain."
BASLE, May 26. Dr. Karl Renner,
Austrian chancellor, has made an ap
peal to Premier Clemenceau for ex
pediting of peace negotiations with
Austria, according to a Vienna dis
patch today. The chancellor expressed
fear that internal disorders might re
sult from continued delay.
PARIS, May 26. The French govern
ment has received from the German
peace delegation the assurance that it
will ask no further extension of time
for consideration of the peace terms.
The extension granted last week ex
pires Thursday.
PARIS, May 26. (French Wireless
Service.) Appointment of a. new com
mission on reparations was announced
today by the peace conference. The
members of the new commission are:
Norman Davis, Thomas W. Lamont,
Vance McCormick and A. W. Dulles ol
the United States.
Lord Cunliffe, General Jan Chris
tian Smuts, John M. Keynes and Mr.
Bmutter of Great Britain.
Finance Minister Klotz, Captain
Andre Tardieu. Louis Loucheur and M
Jouseset of France.
Signor Crispi and Signor Damaglio
cr Italy.
PARIS, May 26. The German peace
tieiegation today sent three new notes
to the secretariat of the. peace confer
ence. The notes deal respectively with
reparation and responsibility; with
Oerman property in allied countries'
and German religious missions abroad.
BERLIN, May 25. (By the" Asso
ciated Press.) Information has been
received irom an unimpeachable source
that the counter-proposals to be made
by Germany to the peace conference
will declare in favor of military dis
armament, saying that Germany is
ready to reduce her forces to 350,000
within two months after the conclu
sion of peace, and by the expiration
of another year to cut the size of the
- army down to 200,000 men.
It will be declared that in spite of
Internal disorders and the necessity for
defending her frontiers, Germany thus
agrees to disarm ahead of all other
powers.
PARIS, May 26. (By the Associated
Press.) The president of China has
notified the Chinese delegation by cable
that a meeting of the Chinese cabinet
and the speakers of both houses au
thorized the delegation to sign th
peace treaty with reservations regard
ing tonantung.
WASHINGTON, May 26. Presiden
Wilson has informed officials here that
POSLAM BRINGS
JOY OF CLEAR
HEALTHY SKIN
To skin that once was eruptional
and unsightly Poslam brings again the
glow ot health tor many. And what
relief when blemishes long tolerated
are at last disposed of. A highly concen
trated healing power qualifies Poslam
for this work. Like a pacifying balm
to burning, irritated surfaces. You
should not suffer should not allow
any skin disorder to remain in evl
ience one day longer without finding
uui jiim w j i li. L xuiam can ao tor 1 .
Sold everywhere. For free sample
write to Emergency Laboratories, 243
West 47th St.. New York City.
Poslam Soap, medicated with Poslam
brightens, beautifies complexions. Adv.
Offers of Washington Canners
High Market Is Cleared.
TACOMA, Wash.. May 26. (Special.)
Washington canneries are offering
high prices for strawberries, and be
cause of the demand from this direc
tion dealers and growers in the Puyal-
lup valley do not believe that prices
will drop very low this season. Can
ners stand ready to take all the ber
ries offered at $2 a crate. At 10 cents
a pound the grower stands to make
as much as shipping to the commission
houses, where berries must bring about
$3 a crate retail.
Production throughout the state has
been cut down somewhat, as many
fields have been plowed under to get
rid of the root maggot. Growers eay
it costs $1.22 to produce berries, which
would make the canners' quotation
equal to that of the open market.
ASSEMBLY IS TO BE CALLED
Policy Adopted Will Enable Allies
Co-operate in Struggle
Against Soviet Rule.
to
PARIS, May 26. The council of four
of the peace conference has decided
conditionally to recognize the anti-bolshevik
governments of Admiral Kol
chak and General Denekine, according
to Reuter"s Agency here.
The conditions for the recognition are
that, regarding the future of Russia,
these eovernmenta asree to convoke
SLIT SKIRT' IS APPROVED and accePt verdict of a genuine
leasriiA nf nalinti") covenant and its con-
California Officials Refuse to Bar sequences as affecting the boundaries
democratic senatorial , nomination in IO
920 for the nomination against Wesley
L. Jones, a campaign in which it is be
lieved Mayor Ole Hanson of Seattle
will contest the nomination with Jonef
the republican ticket and possibly
cause a noticeable split In the repub
lican ranks.
In this event It Is believed Judge
Chadwick would find an opportunity
for possibly successful exercise of his
faculty for getting votes even in a re
publican state.
There is little expectation now that
Governor Lister will figure as a sena
torial candidate in 1920 on the demo
cratic ticket, as he was expected to do
before his health failed.
ABERDEEN. Wash.. May 26. (Spe
cial.) J. B. Bridges, who has been
offfered Justice Chadwick's place on
the state supreme bench, is senior
member of the firm of Bridges &
Bruener. Mr. Bridges was in Olympia
today to confer with Governor Hart,
and at his offices it was said that
nothing was known of his intentions.
It is expected, however, that he will
accept the appointment. Justice Chad
wick's term will expire in 1920.
Mr. Bridges, who has lived here many
years, is one of the most widely known
lawyers of southwest Washington. He
has been repeatedly honored by mem
bers of his profession. He has not
sought public office, however, and was
in no sense a candidate for the supreme
court post, the offer" of which comes to
him entirely unsolicited.
Girl, in Spite of Protest.
SACRAMENTO, May 26. Although
Will C. Wood, state superintendent of
public instruction, in response to a re
quest from a teacher in the Yreka high
school, ruled that the slit skirt was
immodest and should not be worn in
the schoolroom," this type of apparel
may still be worn in the Yreka school
by the girl pupils.
Wood said the trustees of the school
could enact regulations and exclude
pupil until she applied for admission
properly clad, but the trustees declined
to expel the girl whose apparel was the
subject of the decision, according to in
formation received today by Wood.
'Their decision is final so far as this
office is concerned," Wood said.
WAGE INCREASE PROTESTED
Inland Empire Bond Holders Oppose
Grant to Employes.
SPOKANE, May 26. Attorneys rep
resenting bondholders of the Spokane
& Inland Empire railway today made
objection before a master in chancery.
tn federal court here, to granting to
employes of the road, which is in the
hands of a receiver, of wage advances
ordered by the federal railroad admin
istration.
Attorneys for employes of the road
offered testimony to show that offi
cials of the company had made agree
ments to grant increased wages.
MASSACRES OF JEWS TOLD
to
Conditions in Europe Presented
State Department.
WASHINGTON, May 26. Information
regarding numerous Jewish massacres
in central and eastern Europe during
last March -and April, forwarded by
special representatives of the Jewish
relief organization, was presented to
the state department today by Repre
eentative Siegel -of New York. Names
of 54 Jewt who were massacred were
given In the reports, which said many
hundreds more about whom no definite
information could be obtained were
killed.
Conditions in Poland were described
as being worse than in any other sec'
tion.
NEW SHIPPING RECORD SET
Consignment of Silk Carried From
Japan to Sew York in 18 Days.
SEATTLE, May 26. From the shores
of Japan to the central freight station
in New York in 18 days is the record
just eet in the trans-shipment of
$5,000,000 cargo of silk. The Nippon
Kaisha steamer Katori Maru brought
the silk, consisting of 4725 bales of
raw material and S14 cases of silk
goods.
The liner left Yokohama May 4. A
special train took the precious cargo
from here to New York, arriving there
May 22.
of the former empire are accepted.
The constituent assembly is to deter
mine the future form of government for
Russia-
Aid la Made Possible.
The policy adopted. It is added, will
enable the allies to recognize and
sist any force in Russia co-operating in
the struggle against soviet rule because
such recognition will be in force only
until such time as the censtituent as
sembly decides upon the permanent
form of government. The regional gov
ernments will then expire automatic
ally.
The allies will not furnish Admiral
Kolchak and General Denekine with
troops but will supply them with arms,
munitions, money 'and food on a larger
scale than hitherto. It is stipulated
that there will be no interference with
the races of non-Russian states recently
erected from old Russian territory.
BASEL, May Z6. iFrencn wireless
Service.) Polish troops are ' reported
from Warsaw to have made further
progress against the Ukrainians in
eastern Galicia, taking Kamionkahole,
40 kilometers from Lemberg.
Vkrainlan Army Broken.
The Warsaw message adds that the
Ukrainian army has become completely
disorganized.
PARIS, May 26. (French Wireless
Service.) The Polish diet, according to
a report from Warsaw, on the initiative
of Deputy Sharbek, has unanimously
adopted the principle of autonomy for
eastern Galicia, a province whose popu
lation is half Polish and half Ruthen
ian.
The decision, says the message.
reached after the complete victory won
in Galicia by the Polish forces, has been
enthusiastically received by the powers
concerned, "as a proof of the liberal
feelings which animate the new Polish
republic
LONDdN, May 25. While there is no
confirmation that Nikolai Lenine, bol
shevik premier, has proposed an armis
tice to Admiral Kolchak. head of the
all-Russian government at Omsk, ther
are indications that the bolsheviki are
anxious over the fate of Fetrograd and
Moscow. -
Women Volunteer Sontkt
A wireless dispatch states that the
defense committee of Moscow is appeal
ing for women volunteers for military
service, and admits that non-bolshevik
troops are fighting in the outskirts of
Riga.
According to a dispatch from th
Reuter correspondent, there is no doubt
that Petrograd can be taken but he
says its capture would be useless,
owing to the allies inability to feed
the population.
LONDON, May 26. Esthonian troops
have captured the important -railway
junction of Pskov, between Riga an
Petrograd, according to reports from
Helsingfors received in Copenhagen an
transmitted by the Exchange Telegraph
company.
WASHINGTON, May 25. v ithd. iwa
of the American forces from Archangel
is actually under way, according to
cable advices to the war department
today, which stated that all members
of the 339th infantry were awaiting
evacuation.
30E30C
IOC
IOC
GEMS' FINDER REWARDED
DAUGHTER OF 'LtCKT' BALDWIN
LIBERAL TO ESTATE MANAGER.
"THE STORE THAT UNDERSELLS BECAUSE IT SELLS FOR CASH"
A Wonderfu lly A ttractive Lot of
WOMEN'S SAMPLE SKIRTS
AT ONE-FOURTH OFF
Style Favorites In Summer Skirts For Sport and Separate
Wear. No Two Are Alike, so Come Early for First Choice.
These beautiful skirts are simply irresistible in their attractiveness
of style and low pricinp;. They represent the very latest models for
sport and street wear. The materials are fine Tricolette, Fantase,
Satins, Crepes de Chine, White Wool Serge, White Cotton Gabar
dines, etc More than a hundred different models, colors and pat
terns to select from; no two alike. They come in fashionable
lengths and with 26 or 28-inch waists. It goes without saying that
every woman's wardrobe should include one or more of these
beautiful skirts.
Prices Range From $4 Up to $30. At This Sale You Pay
One-Quarter Less Than These Figures.
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Asked if $200 a Month Would Not I
Have Been Enough, Woman Says
It Wouldn't Pay for Cigarettes.
LOS ANGELES. May 26. Mrs. Clara
Baldwin Stocker rewarded her estate
manager, Walter T. McGinley, with
$50,000 for recovering diamonds alleged
to have been stolen from her, accord
ing to her testimony in the supreme
court in the proceedings brought by
her son, Albert E. Snyder of San Fran-
c'sco. Mr. Snyder asks to have hia
mother declared incompetent to handle
the 110.000.000 estate left her by her
father, the late E. J. ("Lucky") Bald
win, California turfman, and a trustee
appointed for her properties.
"Wasn't that rather liberal?" Attor
ney Leroy Edwards of Snyder's counsel
asked Mrs. Stocker.
"I don't think so," ehe replied. "My
diamonds were worth $200,000."
Mrs. Stocker testified that before
giving Mr. McGinley the $50,000 she
had been considering presenting him
with Los Angeles property for his serv
ices in the diamond recovery. The in
come irom mis property was -00 a
month, she said.
"Wouldn't $200 a month have been
enough of a reward?" Mrs. Stocker was
asked.
"Certainly not," she answered, "that
wouldn't buy Walter's cigarettes."
The plaintiffs counsel brought out
this testimony, they said, in an effort
to prove that Mrs. Stocker had evi
denced her incompetency by giving Mr.
McGinley more than $1,000,000 in money
ana property.
A telegram Mrs. Stocker sent from
her Arcadia home near here last
August to Mr. McGinley in New Tork
also was touched on. This read:
I was told today you are married
and have been for five years, and took
your wife east with you. Is this so?"
"Why did you send that telegram?"
Mrs. stocker was asked.
"Because I wanted to know."
"Why did you want to know?"
"Oh. I Just wanted to know. I didn't
care if . he had 40 wives."
I
OFFICERS' DEATH PLANNED
Continued From First Page.)
I. W. W. at Spokane in June of 1918,
with no intention of respecting the
pledge he signed as a member.
Officers to Be Killed.
"I Just went in on orders to investi
gate them," the witness told the Jury.
"I was present one day when some of
the I. W. W. asked me to donate to
collection, the proceeds of which were
to be used to hire some one to kill
army intelligence officers who were
hot on their traiL,"
Allison did not reBent Vanderveer's
accusation that he was a "stool pigeon.
but contented himself with cautiously
telling the jury what he termed a part
of the I. W. W. killing programme.
Small Pill
Small Dose
Small Price
CARTERS
r?ITTLE
IVER
PILLS
For Constipation
Carter's Little
Liver Pills
will set you right
over night.
Purely Vegetable
Drain Schools End Year.
DRAIN, Or, May 26. (Special.) The
Drain public schools will close June
6. There are four in the graduation
class, all girls. They are Bertha Rush.
Ella Stocker. Lela Morningstar and
Herma Carter. On May 31, at 8:30 P.
M.. at the I. O. O. F. hall, the seniors
will give their play, "The Witch of
Fairy Dell." On Sunday, June 1, the
baccalaureate sermon will be delivered
by the Rev. Mr. Downs at the Meth
odist Episcopal church. On June 6 the
commencement exercises take place at
the high school assembly ball.
2 ESCAPE PENDLETON JAIL
Bars of Window Are Sawed While
Sheriff Is Away.
PENDLETON. Or., -May 26. (Spe
cial.) Taking advantage of a brief
absence from the building of all the
force of the sheriff's office, two pris
oners confined in the county Jail yes
terday broke Jail by sawing their way
through the bars of a back window.
Their absence waa discovered when
the daughter of the Jailer living near
by recognized one of the men on the
street. The men were Manuel iierrera.
held on a -charge of robbery of the
postoffice at Palmer Junction, and
Charles Conners, alias Charles Buoke,
held on a charge of passing bad checks.
Herrera was captured a mile east
of town. Conners is: still at liberty.
WILSON'S ACTION OPPOSED
Mount Tabor Methodist Church
Would Keep Ban on Liquor.
A strong protest against President
Wilson's action in regard to lifting the
ban on the national liquor question was
voiced in a resolution sent to the Ore
gon delegation at Washington yester
day by the Mount Tabor Methodist
church.
Rev. E. Olin Eld ridge, pastor, said:
'President Wilson has made the mis-
take of his life, as bad as when he
tried to force us to have a democratic
congress. The moral forces of this
nation will rise against him. Our plea
that our representatives and senators
let him know our attitude is similar to
that being sent by leading churches all
over the country."
Tempting Low Pnaz
Laces and
Em bro ideries
A showing that far surpasses any previous
season Styles and patterns to suit all tastes
and purposes and all most moderately priced
Your immediate inspection is invited.
Zion Laces at 5c to
lOca Yard
An unlimited assortment of these popular Wash
Laces both sets and edges in round thread, French
and filet patterns.
Imit. Crochet Laces
12V2C to 25c Yard
Both Bands and Edges in a splendid assortment of
patterns in widths from 1 to 5 inches most excep
tional values.
Imitation Cluny Laces at 5c
-to 25c a Yard
An extensive showing in White and Ecru Edges and
Bands in 1 to 5-inch widths. . All new goods.
Imit. Filet Laces, SO to 95c Yard.
Patterns and widths especially desirable for neck
wear and dress trimmings both dainty and elab
orate patterns.
Special Sale of
10,000 Yards
of Colored
Wash Goods
At
25c
Yard
Ginghams
In All Styles and Colors.
Stripes, Checks, Plaids and
Plain Colors.
Percales
Light and Dark Colored
Patterns 36-Inch Width.
Jap Crepes
In Stripe Styles
Batistes
and
Voiles
In Checks, Stripes, Flowers
and Figures.
Choice From the Entire As
sortment this sale
At 25C Yard
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Store Opens
at 8:30 A.M.
Saturday
at 9 A.M.
The Most in Value The Best in Quality
Store Closes
at 5 :30 P.M.
Saturday
at 6 P.M.
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Republicans Lead in Hood River.
HOOD RIVER, Or.. May 26. (Spe
cial.) Registration for the special
election of June 3 has reached a total
of 2502, according to Deputy County
Clerk Shoemaker. The respective party
segregations of men and women regis
trants are as follows: Republicans, 1027
and 609: democrats, 359 and 253; proh1
bltion. 27 ana 4ti; socialist, 61 and 27
miscellaneous, 60 and 3D.
Pendleton to Issne Call.
PENDLETON, Or., May 26. (Spe
cial.) A call will be made immediate
ly for water bonds of the city of Pen
dleton for 1899. In July the city water
commission will retire $45,000 of these
bonds, on which the minimum time
limit will then have expired. They are
40-year bonds, optional at 20 years.
Plans have been completed for finish
ing the Chaplish springs extension of
the city system before the dry season.
Irive Opens Saturday.
- BEND. Or.. May 26. (Special. 1 Th
Salvation Army drive in central Ore
gon will officially open in Bend Satur
day. May 31. when Dr. Charles T.
Wheeler, Just returned from active
service in the battle' area in France,
will speak here, it was announced this
afternoon. The combined quota of
Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson coun
ties is $3000.
JUSTICE CHADWICK 'TO QUIT
(Continued From Flmt Pge.)
States senator and now it is believed
certain that he will make the race.
By his own written decision in tne
Black case, which gave the gubernato
rial nomination to Krnest leister in
1912. Chief Justice Chadwick is In
eligible tor governor at the next elec
tion, as the supreme court term to
which he was elected does not end
until 1921, the date a new governor
takes office, and the Black decision
rules out a Judge as candidate ror any
other office where the campaign falls
within the judicial term to wmcn ne
was elected.
Webster Action Recalled.
Under a more recent supreme court
decision by which Judge J. Stanley
Webster left the bench to become
representative in the present session
from the 5th district, there Is no such
constitutional bar to a Judge becoming
a candidate for federal office, which.
it is believed, leaves the way clear for
Chief Justice Chadwick to file for the
Sheridan Depot Robbed.
SHERIDAN. Or., May 26. (Spe
cial.) The Southern Pacific depot in
this city was entered and robbed some
time last evening, only a small amount.
however, being taken, as the currency
Is deposited at closing time each even-
In?. The thieves made their way
through a window which they broke
with a rock, and broke open the till
in the ticket office, also breaking open
several express packages in the bag-
srage room. The safe was unlocked
and the robber.- finding nothing valua
ble, left.
Tax Regulation Explained.
WALLACE. Idaho, May 26. (Spe
cial.) In the tax statements filed with
the county assesso- mining companies
are not permited, in arriving at their
'net profits for the past year, to de
duct as a part of their expense of op
eration the sums paid to the federal
government as income, excess profits
and war profits taxes, according
County Attorney II. J. Hull.
to
While a husband and wife of Mount
Sterling, Pa., were attending revival
services two men entered the home and
carried off a 100-pound safe w hich con
tained $125 In cash. $100 in liberty
bonds and other securities. The neigh
bors eaw them go boldly into the
house and bring out the safe, but sup
posed it was all right.
Rood River youth May Recover.
HOOD RIVER, Or.; May 26. (Spe
cial.) Fred Ward, 18-year-old youth
whose skull was fractured when he
was run over by his runaway team,
following an operation at the Cottage
hospital last night, has regained con
sciousness and it is believed that he
will recover. One of the horses planted
a foot squarely in the young man's
forehead, causing a bad fracture.
There's
something
about them
you'll like-
J&JhT Twenty to
( evt 55 rs s3
f& M An B
'
(Trademark KesUiw
J?l
d W:
THE SIGN OF PERFECT f)
(f (Jye carefully examined y)
fand properly tit tea ivun
vi glasses without the use of
a drugs by skilled specialists, g.
V Complete lens grinding VI
factory on the premises.
The Best Prescription
TT
"The Jrink that fits"
It's the thirst quencher, the snappy appetizer -beverage
with the .ngf and taste.
Your favorite fourjftain, or cafe, has. it.
In Bottles On Draught
the
Portland Brewing Co.
SAVE YOUR EYES
OPTICAL INSTITUTE
(
c
9
Portland's Laixeiit, Mont Modern. Best
equipped. Exclusive upueat
Kstabllfthment.
'S0O-2I0-U CORBKTT BLDG
2 bince lfH8.
nJ3i 5$ -.5-ij
WOMEN SHOULD PROMOTE
A BEAUTIFUL COMPLEXION
6 Bell-ans'
Hot water ,
Sure Relief
ELL-AN S
FOR INDIGESTION
Your Hair
Should Never
Become Gray!
You Can Prevent It!
AN att
fl assured to women who use Santi
septlc Lotion. No matter how much
you expose your face to sun or wind
no matter how often you motor or go
on week-end outings or hiking trips
Santiseptic will keep your skin as clear
and as free from blemish as if you had
not ventured outdoors. It will afford
absolute protection from tan, freckles,
sunburn and vt-indburn. A delightful
feature of Santiseptic is that it is nei
ther eticky norjgreaay. Santiseptic also
gives instant atd permanent relief from
the bites and atins of insects, as well
as from Infection and irritation caused
by poison oak or poison ivy. Women,
and men, too, always should keep a bot
tle of Santiseptic on their dressing ta
bles: it should be included in the ne
cessities taken on outing or motoring
trips. Santiseptic is prepared either
plain or perfumed, as preferred, in tints
of white, flesh, brunette and cream.
Santiseptic may be procured at most
drug and department stores. If your
druggist cannot supply it. send SO cents,
with his name, to the Bsbencolt Labo
ratories, Fortland, Or., for a fuU-aize
bottle, postpaid. Adv.
A prominent hair and scalp specialist
of Chicago has discovered the secret. .
The result, sought through 40 long
years of scientific study and labora-
I tory research, is certain.
Co-Lo Hair Restorer will restore the
I natural color to your hair, no matter
how gray it has oecome.
Harmless to hair and scalp, it con
tains neither lead nor sulphur. Will
not wash or rub off has no eediment
and is as clear as water. A pleasing
and simple remedy to apply.
A6 For black and all dark ehades
of brown.
A7 Extra strong, for Jet black hair
only.
A8 For all medium brown shades.
A9 For all very light brown, drab
and auburn shades.
Co-Lo Hair Restorer is on sale at all
stores ot The Owl Drue Co.
Phone your want ads to The Orefo-1
nian. Phone Main 7070. A 609a. J
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