Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, March 26, 1919, Page 2, Image 2

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    THE 3IOIIXING bltEGOXIAX, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20. 1919.
PEACE HEADS POTTER
A3
mm
Probability of Huns Balking at
Treaty Terms Grows Daily.
FRENCH PRESS IS BITTER
.Narrow -Minded Clique llails Loudlj
Hungary, J'ailinir to Glimpse
Onrushlng Danger of lleds.
at
BT HERBERT BAYARD SWOPE.
ICopjrlght by the Saw Vork World. Pub
lished by Arrangement.)
PARIS. March 15. (Special Cable.)
Kfforts were made yesterday by the
upreme war council to lock the Hun
carian stable door after the Bolshevist
had stolen the horse.
Vluite solemnly methods of cure were
debated, although heretofore measures
of prevention had been ignored. The
Hungarian debacle comes as a new
demonstration cf the bankruptcy of
statesmanship and inability to deal
with world disorders.
French officials and newspapers,
neither of whom can escape a large
share of the responsibility, assume an
air of astonishment and injury, aa If
the development had not been or would
not have been the inevitable result of
the do-nothing policy which has been
consistently pursued since bolshevism
manifested its first strength.
L'ntll yesterday the news from Hun
gary had been played down over here
as if suppression of the facts would
avert the evil. Today the all-absorbing
subject is Hungary's fall and
writers give free rein to criticism, al
though against whom is not plain, e x--rpt
for the undercurrent of implica
tion in the Paris papers that America
and I'resident Wilson are responsible.
Ceafereaee1 Prepares Plaaa,
With Hungary irretrievably lost and
Jioumania almost certain to go with
the Ukraine and other Russian border
lands awakening and thinly concealed
symptoms of bolshevism appearing
countries so much nearer Paris, the
conference yesterday began to plan to
discuss methods of preparing a pro
Kramme whereby the subject would be
referred to a sub-committee to suggest
steps leading to the consideration of
action at some unnamed time.
Lest it be thought that the foregoing
is merely the opinion of the writer it
should be said that it represents pre
ise!y the views men of all nationalities
i'.ich in the peace sittings, each of
M-hom. while caustic and disgusted
with the trend of events, is quite sure
the fault does not lie with him or his
country.
It may be as President Wilson thinks
that the Hungarian menace is a bless
ing in disguise, in that it will speed up
peace making. Others join in the view,
but say the speed process should show
first on the league of nations.
w However they may differ as to where
improvement should be made, all are
for the moment agreed that something
should be done and that something may
eventuate from the two main lines of
action that were analyzed last night.
Plaaa Are Coaaldrrea'.
The first is the outright recognition
of bolshevism. combined with efforts
to control and direct it. converting to
general use such virtues as the move
ment may contain and eradicating its
evils.
The second is to assume that the bol-
lievists have committed an act of war
in leaguing themselves with the en
tente's enemy (Hungary) and that a
declaration of war is justifiable. Which
of the two courses will be followed no
body can say, but the odds just now
favor the former. Germany may be
ieadtng toward the same end. for the
dispatches from Berlin indicate that
Kadzaw is talking of an alliance with
Moscow and that there may be a new
front by those two elements.
In any event the new situation has
pravely afTet-ted the pressure that can
be put on iVrmany to make her sign
the treaty of peace, which becomes a
diminishing probability each day.
Perhaps no better irlea can be given
cf the narrowness of view held in cer
tain quarters of the world-wide con
vulsion that bolsherfsm has become
than to quot a French oTicial. who
and to me: 'Hungary has played us a
crty trick. She slips into bolshevism
to escape paying reparations to us."
That is all that the new manifestation
rf the strength of the Russian revolu
tion means to him and to many of his
fallows, who prefer to regard the men
ace as a local irritation instead of a
world disease.
finance corporation, since the law pro-
' vlito. that IkA fnmnmtinn mav make
loans direct to exporters only if loans
cannot be obtained through regular
banking channels at reasonable terms.
Foreign exporters doing business in
the United States also have undertaken
informal negotiations with the corpor-
i ation to ascertain whether they may
share in the government's credit ar
rangements. They have been told that
means probably can be worked out by
which they can obtain advances from
an American bank, which In turn can
transfer the loan to the corporation.
Tl corporation cannot lend directly to
a loreign business interest, however.
The rate of interest to be charged
is determined largely by the legal pro
vision that it must be at least 1 per
cent more than the prevailing discount
rate on 90-cay commercial paper.
prise nt 4 per cent. This would make
the minimum rate of the corporation
per cent. Fifty million dollars is
the maximum which the corporation
may advance to any single business
organization.
Kighty export organizations, consist
ing of groups of manufacturers, have
notified the federal trade commission
of their intention to operate under
provisions of the Webb act.
Among the principal commodities re
ported in the export associations al
ready developing are steel, copper, lum
ber of various kinds, textiles, auto
mobiles, machinery of various styles.
raw cotton, sugar, magnesia, paper, tan
ning materials, phosphate, oil and muni
tions. Ono association would limit its
foreign trade to clothespins.
COMMITTEE WORK IS DONE
.Crnf lnud Krom First Par.)
for the riKht of "just treatment, and
is likely to be accepted.
A French amendment providing for
the maintenance of a general military
ntaff hafl been proposed, but thus far
it has not been accepted.
ALLIES SHOULD ACT
Spread of Bolshevism Causes
Grave Apprehension.
PARIS DIPLOMATS WORRY
Dispatches Indicate Peacemakers
Are Frightened Over Aspect of
Affairs ia Eastern Europe.
EXPORT TRADE IS BOOSTED
Pr-T flm-fl Fnjn F"- -r Pit r .
goods would cost foreign purchasers
much more than their value In dollars
at this time if purchasers were forced
to pay cash. As a result. American ex
porters must sell on credit If they are
to sell in the quantities needed abroad,
and the war finance corporation's fund
will provide a means of pooling these
txpet credits under government su
pervision. Basks HrlaJraa to Art.
Third American banks have r.ot been
ao; ustomed to financing export trans
actions, and cannot legally advance
:i larfe sums as may be needed to
finance large export operations. Nor
(in they ordinarily make advances for
r.iore than SO days, whereaa for most
foreign trade transactions a year or 18
months ire needed on credits.
It is the last condition which has
driven export organisations to the war
PEACE CONFEREXCE BLAMED
London Press Unanimous in Laying
Fault for Hungarian Debacle.
LONDON. March 25. Morning news
papers unanimously charge the Paris
peace conference with responsibility
for Hungary's embracing bolshevism.
and the general dissatisfaction over the
delay of peace. While treating the
Hungarian episode more lightly than
others, because it does not believe the
whole country will become bolshevik.
the Post accuses the conference of de
laying peace, avnne Its Idealists are
"following the will-o'-the-wisp called
the league of nations.
The newspaper suggests that in deal
ing with the situatio.. supreme direc
tion lie given Premier C lemenceau so
that "probable failure arising from di
vided councils may be avoided."
The Chronicle thinks Hungary has
given a healthy shock to public opin
ion and that if the council of ten re
sponds it may prove a blessing in dis
guise.
"Conferences, delays and a refusal to
face the Russian problem are directly
responsible for the present disquieting
situation, says the Mail. While the
conference talks e bolsheviki acts.
.The Daily News deduces that the
league of nations has been an obstacle
to the conclusion of peace.
The newspaper also cond -mns the re
fusal of the peace conference to rec
ognize and make terms with the Rus
sian bolshevik government.
FREXCn AXGRY AT SECRECY
Press Rails at Peace Conference
Clamping Lid on Proceedings.
PARIS. March ZS. The decision of
the supreme council of the peace con
ference to allow nothing to be pub
lished regarding its proceedings but the
official communique has aroused the
indignation of the Paris press. Ray
mond Kecoly, for instance, writes in
the Figaro:
When the situation is so disquieting
at a moment when the allied govern
ments who, having left no blunder un
made, are more than ever in need of
the support of public opinion, they raise
regular Chinese wall between the
public and themselves."
The Matin says of the decision:
The nature of the 'Pertinax' article
in the Kcho de Paris may be suffi
ciently described by its caption, which
reads:
" The council of ten goes under
ground.' ".
l,e Journal says:
"The conference has made a heroic
resolution. It has decided to drape its
wounded dignity in the most absolute
mystery."
HAMr GIMPS WILL BE SOLD
WASHINGTON", March 25. Reports
of an increasing seriousness of the sit
uation in Hungary led to an opinion
expressed today by an official of the
state department that "the time had
come for the allied national represented
at Paris to take a definite and firm
stand against bolshevism." Little news
of an official nature was received at
the state department during the day.
but dispatches from Pans indicated
that grave apprehension was felt there
as well as in Washington over the
situation.
i Representatives of the t'nlted States
In Vienna reported today that the food
administration had one or two agents
In Budapest and it was Btated that
there might be other Americans there.
These advices said there was no ill
feeling toward Americans or British in
Budapest, but a strong feeling of hos
tility was being manifested against
the French. This, it is believed here,
is due to the occupation by French
troops of the neutral zones between
Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary and Ruma
nia and Hungary. It is believed here
that probably the French members of
the inter-allied mission in Budapest
have been interned as has been re
ported in news dispatchs from Vienna,
but doubt was expressed as to the in
clusion of Americans or British in the
internment order.
It was said by officials that if the
Hungarians actually have declared war
upon the entente powers, as was
threatened in state department advices
made public yesterday, it would be a
natural move for the Hungarians to
attempt to reach the Adriatic and re
cover a portion of the Austrian navy
now in the hands of the Jugo-Slavs.
The question as to whether Hun
gary'i acceptance of bolshevism had its
inspiration from German sources ii
considered doubtful by state depart
ment officials.
Advices to the department indicated
that the peasantry of Hungary thus
far had not accepted the new regime
to any great extent but it was point
ed out that in no case has bolshevism
got its start by a general rising of the
proletariat. Rather it has been started
by a small clique of officials and grad
ually has spread and been instilled into
the minds of the proletariat. Such was
the case in Russia, it was said, and
undoubtedly is the way in which the
"disease." as it is called by one offi
cial today, may spread throughout
Hungary.
part of the Adriatic coast which they
controlled before the downfall of Aus
tria. The Hungarians are credited with
aiming to seize the portion of the for
mer Austrian fleet held by the Jugoslavs.
GENERAL MACR1CE IMPATIEXT
Britisher Is Disappointed at Small
Progress of Peacemakers.
WASHINGTON. March 25 General
Sir Frederick Maurice, former director
of British military operations, who is
here on a lecture tour, declared today
that while he thought peace should be
completed speedily, he did not believe
extensive military operations would re
suit from the bolshevik movement in
Hungary and elsewhere. Europe, he
said, is so exhausted that a war of
magnitude within the next ten years
is impossible.
The Hungarian situation, in the opin
ion of General Maurice, is "a movement
of despair dictated by hunger at pres
ent and uncertainty for the future."
"There must be a stable and power
ful government established in Ger
many." he said "else the terms we will
be able to get in the settlement of
peace conditions will not be worth hav
lag.
"I must confess that I am keenly dis
appointed to find so little progress has
been made (on the peace treaty)."
General Maurice also stated that he
was surprised to find so much Amer
ican opposition to the league of na
tions, which he believed would be
amended and should be adopted in some
form.
nm
is
IICNGARIAXS OBJECT TO TER
RITORY BEIXG DIVIDED.
Cause of Unrest Said to J.ie in the
Recommendations of Peace
Conference Commission.
HIGHWAY TO BE OPENED
BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED FXTIL
APRIL 15.
INK OF THE
MONEY YOU CAN
SAVE ON SHOES
Clarence J. Bloenker of St. Louis.
Missouri, writes, "I have a pair of
shoes with Neolin Soles and have used
them for two years. I think they will
last another six months."
Mr. Bloenker also recommends
Neolin Soles for their comfort and
waterproofness.
It is a remarkable fact that Neolin
Soles cost no more than others that
give only ordinary wear. You can
let thera on new shoes in many styles
for men. women, and children and
they are available everywhere for re
soling, too.
And look at the money you save
because you reed fewer pairs of shoes
with Neolin Soles. Remember these
sos are made by Science to be espe
cially tough and durable. They are
manufactured by The Goodyear Tire
S; IvubbcrCo. of Akron. OhioJ who also
make Winpfoot Heels guaranteed to
outwear any other heels.
Jleolin Soles
IrM Miri ciru. CJ.
Mate Governments Are Expected to
Buy Sites for Xational Gnard
Training- Camps.
WASHINGTON, March 25. Thirteen
army camps to be abandoned by the
-ar department. Including buildings,
railroad tracks, sewage systems and
other facilities, are to be sold to the
highest bidders, and April 15 has been
fixed as the date for receiving bids.
The plan id to sell entire camps for
lump sums.
In some case. state governments are
expected to bid for the camps for use
as national guard training centers. Such
bids will be given preference.
Division storehouses and the utilities
serving the storehouse area are except
ed from sale, and for the present the
government will retain the right to
withhold from sale the base hospital
and the remount station at each camp.
Bidders are advised, therefore, to sub
mit alternate bids taking into consid
eration the possibility of these excep
tions. Construction placed by chari
table organizations also is withdrawn
from the pale.
Bidders will be required -to assume
all land and property damage claims
and must pive the government satis
factory proof within one year that
these claims have been met. Substan
tial bond will be required for perform
ance of contracts. The government will
continue all leases for five months after
date of sale In order that the purchaser
may have this time to remove buildings
and debris.
Snow in Snoqualmie Pass to Be
Cleared Away by May 1.
SEATTLE. Wash.. March 23. (Spe
cial.) The Sunset highway section over
the Snoqualmie Pass on the summit of
the Cascade mountains will be cleared
of snow and ready for travel by May 1.
This was promised today by County
Engineer Samuel J. Humes, after in
structions were given by the county
commissioners to Immediately send
equipment to clear the snow from the
King county section of the snowbound
summit road. These instructions were
given by the commissioners after reso
lutions urging such action were sub
mitted by President A. J. Rhodes of the
chamber of commerce and commercial
club, and other prominent citizens.
These resolutions were compiled oy
the chamber of commerce and commer
cial club, automobile club of western
Washington and representatives of the
cities of North Bend, Snoqualmie. Falls
Cltv. Issaauah. Redmond, Renton and
Kirkland.
This action the county commissioners
believe will bring considerable trave
to Seattle from the eastern part of th
state, Idaho and Montana much earlier
than usual.
PARIS, March 25. (By the Associ
ated Press.) The proclamation of the
Hungarian revolutionists declares that
the action of the peace conference is
one of the chief causes of unrest. Thus
far the conference has taken no specific
action regarding Hungary, but the
recomemndations of the commission
clearly foreshadow the dismemberment
of old Hungary, with a circle of small
new states surrounding what remains
of the old territory.
This, while- not j et approved by the
conference, doubtless reached the Hun
garian leaders and gave impetus to the
overthrow of the Karolyi government
One of the officials who is taking:
chief part in the readjustment of terri
tory in that quarter of Europe has ex
plained the situation as follows: '
"Bohemia has been detached from the
northwest of old Huijgary. The ad
joining country of the Slovaks has also
been detached. The Bohemians are
Czechs, and, with the Slovaks, form the
new Czecho-Slovak nation, both parts
being detached from Hungary. The
Ruthenians form the wedge next to the
Slovaks and this territory has also been
taken from Hungary.
"Next to the Ruthenians comes Tran
sylvania, which likewise has been de
tached from old Hungary and given to
Rumania. 'Next to Transylvania comes
the Banat region, which has been de
tached from Austria and given, to Ru
mania nearly to the Temes river, the
remainder of Banat going to Serbia.
"Further west the new Jugo-Slav
state receives that part of old Hun
gary up to the river Drave. These
changes form an almost complete cir
cle, leaving new Hungary only a com
pact center occupying the rich Danub
ian plain."
All the foregoing resolutions, it Is
pointed out, were justified by the prin
ciple of nationality and self-determination
as enunciated by President Wilson.
The Bohemians, Slovaks, Ruthenians
and Slovenes, as well as the inhabitants
of Banat, are practically Slavic or Ru
manian and have no ethnological con
nection with the Hungarians, who have
held the circle of surrounding territory
only through the powerful political in
fluence of the Hungarian Magyars. j
V
THEO. KARLE
The Great American Tenor
LWILL USE THE
41
BUSH & LANE
PIANO
March 28tluat the
AUDITORIUM
IN CONCERT
WITH THE SINGING CLUB
COLUMBIA
FIFTY MALE VOICES
CHARLES SWENSON,
CONDUCTOR
Tickets for Sale at Bush & Lane Piano Company,
Broadway at Alder
DANIELS DEFENDS BREST
SECRETARY PIXDS CAMP COX
DITIOXS EXCELLENT.
HUNGARY CALLS TROOPS
(Continued From First Page.)
indicate the existence of a threatenin
state of affairs there.
Bolshevik Army Advancing-.
One of these agents who has jus
come from Vienna reports that eve
the date has been fixed for some tim
in April for the transformation of the
existing government into a soviet gov
ernment which will co-operate
merge with the government of the
Hungarian soviet.
BERNE. March 24. The bolshevik
army, which is on its way to Hungary,
has reached Brody, according to new
received here.
Brody is about 50 miles east of Lem
berg.
PLANE FALLS: TWO KILLED
Lieutenant and Cadet Die Instantly
in Oklahoma AY heat Field.
LAWTON. Okla.. March 25. Lieuten
ant Hiley C. Hyde of Columbia, Mo
and Cadet William M. Crabtree of
Jamestown, X. D., wire instantly killed
here today when the airplane in which
they were flying fell into a wheat field
half a mile south of Lawton.
A board of investigators was called
at Post field to determine If possible
the cause of the accident.
REDS ARE BCSr IX DALMATIA
Allies to Land Troops at Spalato to
" Check Disorders.
PARIS. March 25. Reports have
reached the peace conference that inter
allied troops will be landed at Spalato
on the Dalmatian coast because of dis
orders that have occurred there and
for fear graver troubles may arise
The Hungarians are reported to be
trying to spread bolshevism to that
Quinine Teat bocs Hot Affect Bead
Because of Its tonic and ta.xs.tlv effect.
LAXATIVU BROMO QUININE Tableia)
caa ba taken by anyooa without causing
nervousness or ringing In the head. There la
only on "Bromo Wuinlne." K. W. GKuVaf'a
aisnalur on th box. Sue Adv.
Seasoned siaowooa ana Inside woo a.
green stamps, for cash. Holmas Sti!
Co.. Main la. A Adv.
"Let There Be Light"
Such is the foundation on which the
SMITH LONG DENTAL SERVICE
is based. The average patient ia not
aware of" the dangers of Pyorrhea and
the unsanitary conditions of the mouth.
THE SMITH LONG DENTAL SERVICE
instructs the patient in the care of the
TEETH during treatments, and it is in
this manner that he gains valuable
knowledge without any undue effort.
The average person's teeth are only
S per cent clean. How about YOURS?
Have your Teeth examined today.
Examination is free and all Dental
work moderate.
jG OLDftN RULE 1
Hl'SII A I.AE DIII,DIG
Broadway and Alder
PENNSYLVAN1ANS TO FIGHT
Brewers Vote to Make 2 Per Cent
Beer in Plants.
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., March 25.
Members of the Pennsylvania State
Brewers' association voted today to
make 2 per cent beer and to fight any
legal steps that may be taken by the
government to prevent them from oper
ating their breweries.
Snlriiers Declared to Be Protected
Against Cold and Well Provided
for Generally.
PARIS, March 25. Josephus Daniels,
the American secretary of the navy,
ii nnrtv reached Paris this morn
ir.g. Mr. Daniels aeciarea inai no
fnunri more reason to praise the Amer
ican embarkation camp at Brest than
any he had visited In America.
sretr Daniels was accompanied
to Paris by Rear-Admiral Long and his
tff and Captain ramara ot tne
French ministry of marine, who met
him at Brest. Lieutenant Josephus
Dnniels. son of the secretary, joined
the uarty at Brest and came to Paris
with them.
BREST. Monday. March 24. Secre
tary of the Navy Daniels, after his
Investigation of camp conditions at
V!rest. crave the Asociated Press the
following statement:
"I have spent a portion or me two
rainy days in the camp at .Pontanezen
ar.d it rains 330 days out of the year
here. I iiave seen more than 60,000
American troops encamped here wait
ing for embarkation home and have
conferred with scores of officers and
many men just from the front.
"This morning I walked for miles on
a solid board walk rrom tent to tent in
which the marines are quartered and
in the wooden barracks where the sol
diers sleep. I visited the modern kitch
ens and dining rooms and saw where
dinner for 6000 marines was prepared
in one of the 12 kitchens. This number
A
Piano House
Which Seives
When It Sells
When you come to Sherman, Clay & Co.
we prefer to consider your requirements
first, for there are all grades of Pianos,
and what would be the proper instrument
for the living-room may not be the best
for the children's piano lessons. Take us
into your confidence and we know we can
fill your every requirement as to price,
terms, style, tone, etc. We will serve you
to our best ability and the transaction will
be mutually satisfactory.
Dealers in Sfeajnxn? and Other Pianos, Pianolas
and Duo Art Pianos, V iclr olas and Records,
Player Music, Music Cabinets, Piano Lamps, Etc.
Sheman.Jpay & Go.
Sixth and Morrison Streets, Portland
(Opposite Postoffice)
SEATTLE TACOMA SPOKANE
is fed in 40 minutes and just as many
are fed in the 11 other kitchens.
"I sat -upon the beds of the soldiers
and I ate my midday meal with them.
The meal was well cooked, palatable
and plentiful.
"The bigness of Pontanezen camp is
hard to understand until you see the
tented and barracks covered city.
naltini- rf tents. I went into a score
of them. Not a drop of water'can fall
into any of them. The tents are well
drained and each one has a stove and
Is warm and comfortable."
Soldier Rioter Sentenced.
LONDON. March 25. James Ross
Campbell, an American-born private of
a Scotch regiment, was sentenced to
six months' hard labor in the Bow
street court today for his participation
in the riot in the Strand March 9.
Campbell was accused of striking a
policeman.
Draft Board to Disband.
VANCOUVER, Wash., March 25.
(Special.) The work of the Clarke
county draft board is now about com
pleted and certain records will be
shipped to Washington, D. C, and tiie
furniture used will be sold to the high
est bidder and those bidding must ac-
the bid in the form of a certified check.
Ta fu,;"iture may be S)!en "mil March
28 at 607 West Eleventh street jut
across the street from the countv
courthouse Captain Irwin W. Ziegaus
mil hnve charge of the sale.
SYNOPSIS OF THE ANNUAL STATEMENT
OF THE
Occidental Life Insurance
Company
of Io Angeles, in the State ot California,
on the 31st day of December. 1918, made
to the Insurance commissioner of the State
of Oregon, pursuant to law;
Capital.
Amount of capital paid up $ 250.000.00
Income.
Life department
Premiums received durinff the
year $
Interest, dividends and rents re
ceived during? the year
Income from other sources re
ceived during the year
Accident department
Premiums received durinff the
vear
Policy fees
Income from other sources re
ceived during the year
606,964.55
109,440.49
108,339.17
22ft.ft01.8r,
46,540.00
108.86
Total income 1.150,194.43
DiAburaementB.
Life department
Paid for losses, endowments, an
nuities ana surrender vaiues.-s .33.-00.01
Dividends and coupons paid pol-
irv holders dunne tne year ,oo.i
Com Missions and salaries paid
during the year i.-o,u.
Taxes, licenses and fees paid
durinr the year 17,241.65
A mmtnr nf nil fithiT exnendi-
tureS Dl,S4..
AHdent denartment
Losses paid during the year, in-
rinninir An uiri inpn l eiueiihua.
-te . " 93.414.fW
Policy fees retained by agents... 46,535.00
rnrnmitcmn ana salaries oaia
during the year ux.ooa.ou
Tn yj licenses and fees naid
during the year 8,718.45
Amount of ail other expendi
tures
Total expenditures $
Assets.
Book value of real estate 9
Loans on mortgages ana collat
eral, etc
Policy loan 4
United States war securities....
Rnnri a
Cash in banks and on hand
Net uncollected ana aeierrea
nrmfnms. life deDartment. . .
Admitted premiums in course of
collection, acciaenr, aepan-
Interest due and accrued
Other assets
VICTR0LAS
andRECORDS
Here you will find Vic
trolas and records
music will add to your
home life. It quiets the
restless brain after the
day of toil and care.
It cheers the spirit and
gives new courage for
the task of tomorrow.
The Victor record cata
logue is the most com
plete in the world. Visit our store
the store of courteous service.
Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention
G.F.JOHKSOHPIAHOCO.
149 Sixth, Bet. Alder and Morrison
Pianos Phonographs Records
V B t ttJ 5i &g$l
881,538.97
68,670.47
1.3SS.105.2:
120.493.4
46.618.2:
86,577.39
49,021.41
1,894.!4
S7.21ll.b8
17,004.19
Total assets admitted In Ore-
gon
Liabilities.
t 2.112,996.92
T if Biwptment
Net reserve $ l.JqJ 405.55
All other liabilities 190,814.65
a irfoni H-nartment
aross claims for losses unpaid. 26,246.70
imminf nf unearned nremiums
on all outstanding risks 7,714.53
rv m hpcome due for com-
miMinn and brokerage 1,252.41
All other liabilities 7,854.87
Total liabilities 1,836,288.21
TAtoi tncurnnre in force Decem
ber 31. 1918. life department. $20,825,256.37
Total premiums in rorce uecem
k si 1Q1R fli-cldent deoart-
ment ' 23.586.89
Business In Oregon for the Tear.
Life department .
Total insurance written during
the year $ 744,500.00
Gross premiums received during
the year . . . . 48,160.38
Premiums returned during the
year, including surrender val
ues and dividends paid 4,742.17
Losses paid during the year. . . . 10,500.00
Total amount of insurance
outstanding in Oregon, De
cember 31. 1918 $ 1,565,382.60
A..Maiit department
Gross premiums received during
the year
Premiums returned during the
vpar 1 78.85
Losses paid during the year 10.921.23
OCCIDENTAL T.TFH INSURANCE
COMPANY.
I By JOSEPH BURKHARD, President.
Statutory general agent and attorney for
service: I. C. CUNNINGHAM,
Portland, Or.
THOMPSON'S
Deep Curve lenses
Are Better.
(Trademark Registered
9
THE SIGN OF PERFECT A)
SERVICE w
Vv I Eyes carefully examined
f&and properly fitted with
glasses without the use of
. J L L. TIJ ' 7'
A urugs VdKUlCU SfCtlUllSld.
VV I Complete lens grinding f )
a factory on the premises.
. SI
(I SAVE YOUR EYES jfl
(Stuamdoatu 9
9
9
OPTICAL INSTITUTE
Portland's Larffext, Mont Modern, lSest 1
Equipped, f.xciiiHtve upticai
etabliMhment.
200-210-11 CORBKTT BLDG,,
FIFTH AND MORKlSON
jut r"iw iwvot . v
9 r v v s m 9 3
KVEItY KVENIN'G
MUSIC AND DANCING
From 6 to 7:30, 9:30 tn 12:30 V. M.
CORNER
nd
(upbtair-b)
Hear "OerryV
Oriental Jarc
Band. the bt
Jazz Band in tbe
Northwest.
Our largo dlninff
room and dance
floor are Just ono
Might upstairs,
where the ventila
tion is perfect. .No
stuffy atmosphere
itation our
m
W. J.
Young:
Mgr.
Open
11 A. M
to 2
mottc
TRY OCR TAILV
I.tNCH
11 A.M. to 8 P.M.
25c, SOc, 55c
40c to 75c, Inr lud
Injr oup, viret
bleti. drinktt,
de&ftcrt.
Atnerlran anil
Chinese lihes
Served All Hours
All kinds of soft
drinks.
SPECIAL SUN
DAY CHICKEN
DINNt.K