Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, May 28, 1918, Image 1

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    VOL. LVIII. XO. 17,943.
rORTLAXD, OK EG ON,
TUESDAY, MAY"
18, 1918.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GERMANY TO HAVE.
SHOELESS DAYS
ALL RAIL RATES OP,
JUMP BIGGEST EVER
1 1 U. S. OFFICERS,
4 MEN DECORATED
GREAT BRITAIN AWARDS HER
MILITARY" CROSS.
WILSON ASKS HEW
WAR TAX LEVIES
SUBMARINE OFF
VIRGINIA CAPES
BRITISH SHIP ENGAGES DIVKR
150 MILKS OCT AT St.
IEUT0IIS CHECKED
iii lira DRIVE
GENERAL WOOD HOT
TO FIGHT IH FRANCE
Senior Officer in Army
Ordered to Garrison.
UNOFFICIAL. NOTICE SERVED ON"
PUBLIC TO GO BAREFOOT.
French Fling Hordes of
Grown Prince Back.
ATTACK ROLLS 01 TO NORTH
Berlin Asserts Germans Have
Driven Past Chemin des
Dames to Aisne.
BRITISH LINE FORCED BACK
Use of Gas Shells and Tanks
Causes Withdrawal in Sec
tor of Berry-au-Bac.
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN
FRANCE, May 27. (By the Asso
ciated Press.) Launching a heavy of
fensive at dawn today against the
French in the Locre-Voormezeele
sector, the Germans failed of their
objectives at virtually all points.
At some points the defending pa
trols were driven in, but in vigorous
attacks threw the Germans back at
most places. Virtually the entire
French line was re-established.
North Center of Storm.
Hard fighting at this hour still con
tinues on the northern part of the
battlefront. Just south of Dickebusch
Lake the Germans forced their way
into the French line for a distance of
800 yards and also got into the front
line system at another point in this
region.
In both these places the enemy was
clinging desperately to his newly ac
quired positions, but the French were
dealing with the situation, which ap
peared to be satisfactory at the latest
reports. One hundred prisoners al
ready have been sent back to the
French cages.
Today's attack was perhaps pre
liminary to larger operations and ap
parently has been undertaken for the
purpose of regaining the high ground
which the French wrested from the
enemy. May 20.
BERLIN, via London, May 27. the
battle for possession of Chemin des
Dames has been raging since early
morning.
Germans Reach Aisne.
Troops of the German Crown Prince
have taken the ridge by storm along
the whole of itc extension, and now
are fighting on the Aisne, according
to the official statement issued by
the War Office tonight.
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN
FRANCE, May 27. (By the Asso
ciated Press.) Von Hindenburg's
troops thus far have met with failure
virtually at all points in their attack
against the French in the Locre sector.
"On the Locre-Voormezeele front
the French troops repulsed the enemy
with great loss."
This announcement was contained
in Field Marshal Haig's official re
port tonight.
Teutons Employ Tanks.
The attack against the sector of
Berry-au-Bac, held by the British, was
partly successful by reaso:i of an in
tense bombardment of gas shells and
the use of tanks, and afte. heavy
fighting the British on the left were
pressed back to prepared positions
constituting the second line.
LONDON. May 27. The Reuter eorre
spondent at headquarters in France
describes the German bombardment as
scarcely less violent than that which
heralded the German offensive on
March 21.
" Gas shells were employed in great
niiantities and the bombardment and
infantry attack between Soissons and
Kheims were on a more formidable
scale than in Flanders.
Miu Attacks Ised.
The Germans, according to this cor
respondent, employed their familiar
formations of dene waves of infantry
following: closely in the wake of a. lift
ing barrage and thc- pushed fresh
troops UP with characteristic reckless
ncss.
"Amohjr the signs of resumption of
the grand offensive are that the enemy
is heavily shelling our far-back area
with high velocity E-ans and also his
airmen are unusually venturesome.
continues the dispatch. A note of con
dence comes in the reports from the
battlefront."
ON THK FRENCH FRONT IN
FRANCK. May 27. (By the Associated
Press.) The uncanny silence along the
entire French battlefront iu the last
few days was merely a prelude to a
most violent attack today by the Ger-
(Concluded on Fas -. Column S.
New Leather Conservation Move
ment Intended to Affect Old
as Well as Young.
AMSTERDAM, May 27. "Go barefoot
this Summer and help the fatherland
is the latest patriotic catchword to be
placarded in Germany.
"In view of the alarming scarcity of
leather, rich and poor alike should dis
pense with boots and shoes." says an
explanation of the placard in the Rhein-
ich Westfalische Zeitung of Essen. The
old are urged to set an exemple for
the young.
PARIS. May 27. Workmen arriving
in Switzerland from Germany, says a
dispatch from Berne to the Paris Matin,
assert that the Germans are having
great difficulty in obtaining raw mate
rial for the manufacture of munitions.
Several German newspapers daily
publish ordinances commandeering ma
terial and ordering the melting of mon
uments and household objects contain
ing metal, even handles on doors and
windows being- specified.
BOYS BARRED FROM YARDS
Tacoraa Shipbuilders Not to Employ
Lads Needed In Fields.
TACOMA. Wash., May 27. (Special.)
Tacoma shipyards will not entice boys
away from the fields this Summer, for
they will not hire lads between the
ages of 13 and 17.
In a letter to Ralph Metcalf. head of
the United States Boys" Working Re
serve In Tacoma. the shipyard mana
gers say that they have no use for
boye and believe It better for the young
sters to work In the fields In the Sum
mer. The labor In the yards is heavy
and dangerous, they say, and only suit
ed to men of brawn.
Many boys had failed to enroll in the
reserve because they looked for big
money in the shipyards during the va
cation period.
LOYALTY IS APPRECIATED
Patriotic Action of Coast Workers
Pleases President.
WASHINGTON. May 27. Congratu
lations were telegrapned by President
Wilson and the Shipping Board today
to the Shipwrights' and Joiners' Union,
of Seattle, upon receipt of notice from
the union that its members would
waive the customary Saturday half
holiday during June, 'July and August
and also waive double pay for those
hours, in order to speed the work of
shipbuilding.
The Portland, Or., Metal Trades
Council previously had taken similar
action.
NORTHWEST GALE HEAVY
Concrete Ship Faith Buffeted by
Seas Off Cape Flattery.
A wireless message received here this
afternoon announces the position of the
concrete steamship Faith as 40 miles
south of Cape Flattery and bucking an
80-mile northwest gale, against which
she is making about four miles per
hour.
Captain Charles Smith, master of the
steamship Admiral Schley, which ar
rived late last night, asserts that the
northwest gale Is the heaviest he has
experienced off the Washington coast
in years.
133 MILLION MERCY FUND
Rod Cross Over-Subscription Answer
of V. S. to Hun Challenge.
WASHINGTON, May 27. Germany's
challenge of frishtfulness in France
has been answered by- the American
people with an outpouring of $133,
306,630 for the second war mercy fund
of the Red Cross.
This was an over-subscription of
$33,306,630, with returns still coming
in from some districts late tonight.
CLYDE RIVETERS IN LEAD
William Smith Taps Home 6 7 83
Rivets in Nine-Hour Day.
LONDON, May 27. The British riv
eting record has returned to the Clyde,
according to a dispatch to the Daily
Mail from Glasgow. ,
William Smith, of Scotstoun, on
Saturday, lit the yards of John Brown
& Co., at Clyde Bank, hammered in
67S3 rivets in nine hours.
McADOO WILL TAKE REST
Secretary to Spend Week at White
Sulphur Springs.
WASHINGTON. May "27. Secretary
McAdoo plans to leave Washington to
night for a week's rest at White Sul
phur Springs, W. V.
Since a recent attack of tonsilitis
Mr. McAdoo's throat has not entirely
recovered and his physician ordered
him to abandon conferences necessitat
ing use of his voice.
BIG GUNS TRY IT ONCE MORE
Atctntpt to Scare Paris Populace
Resumed by Germans.
PARIS. May 27. After a long inter
val the Germans again began to bom
bard Paris with long range guns at
6:30 o'clock this morning.
New Revenue Will Be
Oyer $800,000,000.
FREIGHTS 'SOAR 25 PERCENT
Passenger Fares Increased to
Three Cents a Mile.
McADOO ORDERS ADVANCES
Interstate Commerce Commission
Gives Approval to History-Making
Proceeding Without
Formality of Hearing.
WASHINGTON, May 27. To meet
wage increases just announced, and
higher costs of coal and other supplies
this year, Director-General McAdoo
today ordered railroad freight rates
in the United States raised 25 per cent
and passenger fares increased to three
cents a mile from the present basis of
about 2Vz cents.
It is estimated that the programme
will bring between $800,000,000 and
$900,000,000 more revenues to the rail
roads within the next year. It repre
sents far the biggest rate increase in
the history of railroads.
State CommlNfflons Notified.
Director-General McAdoo telegraphed
chairmen of sate railroad com
missions, notifying them of the in
creased rates and asking them to co.
operate by suggesting readjustments
or charges. The director-general does
not expect state authorities to over
rule any of his rate orders, however.
Mr. McAdoo explained that the rail
road act does not permit him to "share
with the state commissions the re
sponsibility which rests upon the rail
road administration for the financing
results to the United States Govern
ment of the operation of the railroads."
Advances Promptly Approved.
The Interstate Commerce Commission
ordered increased railroad rates, an
nounced today by Director-General Mc
Adoo, approved without hearing, and
at the same time modified all outstand
ing previous commission orders which
might interfere with the establishment
of the new rates.
The new freight charges, which cover
both class and commodity rates, be-,
comes effective June 25 and the pas
senger' increase will go into effect
June 10.
Issued under authority granted by
the railroad act to President Wilson,
acting through the director-general, the
order wipes out all intrastate lower
rates effective on either freight or pas
senger traffic.
Pullman Rates Stand.
Travelers in standard sleeping and
parlor cars are required to pay 34
cents a mile, in addition to Pullman
fares, and in tourist sleeping cars 34
cents. Pullman rates stand unchanged.
Commutation and other suburban
(Concluded on Page B. Column 1.)
m.-zm . .wL&mr. mm. wm '-m n
Galhintry of Genera! Carey's Force
in Defense of Luce Valley
Is Recognized.
HEADQUARTERS OF THE AMERI
CAN TROOPS WITH THE BRITISH
ARMY IN FRANCE. May 27. (By the
Associated Press.) The British milli
tary cross has been- awarded to 11
American officers and four men.
Most of the officers took part in the
defense of the Luce Valley during the
great German attack in March, being
incorporated in the improvised army of
Major-General Carey, which held back
the Germans for six days after they
had broken through the British line In
the region of St. Quentin.
The four privates are cited for heroic
condifct on the night of February 23.
At great risk they removed a burning
car of munitions from an ammunition
dump and placed it under a standpipe,
flooding the car and extinguishing the
flames.
Those cited are Colonel J. N. Hodges,
who commanded - the American engi
neers with Major-General Carey; Cap
tain Henry C. Ualster, Lieutenants
Daniel R. Berney, Frank A. Evans,
Percy G. E. Hamlin, William A. Jacques.
Cornelius T. MacCarthy, Roy R. Mc-
Henry, John W. Sherrick, William
Augustus Williams and William A.
Williams: Privates Thomas L. Arbuckle,
Richard Parkinson, Jr., Raymond Gib
son Rlcketts and Arthur P. Terrell.
Colonel Hodges had previously been
decorated with the distinguished serv
ice order.
GAS SCENTED IN KLAMATH
Promoters Announce Intention to
Sink Well in Near Future.
KLAMATH FALLS. Or.. May 27.
(Special.) In the belief that oil and
gas are to be found by drilling in the
Klamath Basin. N'eill Campbell and
Fred Weston, experienced oil men. are
here from Alaska to begin sinking a
well in the near future. It is their in
tention to bring in a drill and bore to
a depth of 3000 to 4000 feet.
The promoters are attempting to se
cure leases on 2000 acres of land for
drilling purposes only, offering the
owners 10 per cent of the oil or gas
that may be discovered.
DE ULLIN 20 TIMES VICTOR
French Aviator Makes Great Record
In Bringing Down Er.etiij- Planes.
PARIS. May 27. Captain de Ullin.
it is announced, has won his 20th aerial
victory. The Captain' was a partner of
the late Captain Oulnemer, the famous
French Ace.
Lieutenant Kiss, reputed to be the
leading Austrian aviator, has been
killed in an aerial battle, according to a
dispatch from Berne.
ASTORIA WANTS BUILDING
McAdoo Ask-s Money for Additional
Federal Structures.
WASHINGTON, May 27. Continued
congestion of Federal buildings in 45
cities named is given by Secretary
McAdoo as reason for asking additional
structures.
The cities needing new buildings and
the amounts asked for each include:
Butte. Mont., $275,000; Astoria. Or.,
$160,000.
PLENTY OF BIG GAME IN THE COUNTRY.
Congress Greets Plea
- With Cheers.
SOLEMN CALL TO DUTY ISSUED
Special Message Delivered as
German Attack Starts.
LEGISLATORS TO GET BUSY
President Intimates That War Profi
teers Mast Pay Up and Sounds
Warning AgainM
Lobbying.
WASHINGTON. May 27. President
Wilson today ended discussion over
whether Congress shall remain in ses
sion this Summer to enact new revenue
legislation by appearing ' before the
House and Senate in joint session and
calling upon members to put aside poli
tics and all other considerations to pro
vide money for growing war expenses
and to advise the country in 'advance
of the tax burdens it must meet.
As the President was leaving for the
Capitol, word came that the German
drive against the west front had been
renewed. He gave his visit a dramatic
touch by announcing this news as he
concluded his prepared speech, saying
it strengthened the purpose he had
tried to express.
Instant Response Made.
The demand that with the war at its
"peak and crisis" Congress do its duty
at home, as the soldiers are doing their
duty in the trenches overseas, brought
inetant acquiecsence.
There still was reluctance in some
quarters, to believe immediate legisla
tion imperative, but plans for mid
Summer adjournments were abandoned
and both Democratic and Republican
leaders expressed their determination
to go at the task of passing a revenue
bill with a will.
A suggestion by the President that
most of the new taxes probably would
fall upon incomes, excess profits and
luxuries and that profiteers could be
reached in this way, was greeted with
cheers, and Congressional leaders said
later the money needed would come
from those sources.
Hearings to Start Soon.
To Initiate the bill. It was announced
that public hearings would be begun
early in June by the House ways and
means committee, to be followed by
co-operation In its drafting with the
Senate finance committee. Presenta
tion of the measure to the House in
July was regarded as assured.
Although the President made no
specific recommendation in his ad
dress for apportionment of bonds and
taxes, it was learned authoritatively
that in the proposal he recently ad
vanced as the basis for an agreement
to postpone legislation the President
(Concluded on Pace "1. Column 1.)
11 in
J"' i A a.
Five Sliot-, Fired at Vnder-sea Craft;
Derelicts ReiHtrted to Have
Been Sighted Recently.
NEWPORT NEWS. V May 27. It
was learned here today that the mas
ter of a British stenier, which came
into port last Wednesday, reported that
his vessel had fired five shots at a
submarine 150 miles off the Virginia
Capes.
WASHINGTON. May 27 Navy De
partment officials said tonight there
was nothing to indicate the presence
of enemy submarines on this side of
the Atlantic.
They thought the British ship which
reported at Newport News firing at
submarine l."V0 miles off the Vir
ginia Capes had probably sighted a
bit of wreckage or some other float
ing object.
WASHINGTON. May 27. The pres
ence of derelicts off the Virginia coast
was reported to the Navy Department
today. Navy officials are of the opin
ion that no enemy warships are operat
ing on this side of the Atlantic and
that the ships were wrecked by storms.
Official War Reports.
French.
PARI;'. May 27. Over the front be
tween the forest of Pinon and Rheims
the Germans launched an attack this
morning, the War Office announces.
The French and British troops are re
sisting with their habitual valiance.
The statement follows:
"In the latter part of the night the
Germans opened a very violent bom
bardment all along the front between
the forest of Pinon and Rheims. This
morning an enemy attack is in prog
ress along the very extended front be
tween these two points.
"Franco-British troops are resisting
the German thrust with their habitual
valiance. The battle is continuing.
"In the Champagne on the right bank
of the Meuse, Verdun front, in Apre
mont forest and in the Woevre there
was active artillery fighting. During
the night the Germans delivered local
attacks in the Apremont forest but
were repulsed in spirited fighting la
which the Germans sustained losses.
Two other efforts in the region of
Liiraey, northeast of Badonviller, also
were repulsed. The French took pris
oners." British.
LONDON, May 27. The War Office
statement reads:
"Strong hostile attacks preceded by
a bombardment of great intensity de
veloped early this morning on a wide
front against the British and Krench
troops on the line between Rheims and
Soissons and against French troops be
tween Locre and Voormezeele,
"There was considerable hostile ar
tillery activity yesterday and last night
on the British front."
German.
BERLIN, via London. May 27. The
text of the War Office statement reads:
"In the battle regions of Flanders, on
the Lys battlefields and on both sides of
the Sorame and the Avre artillery fight
ing has become more Intense.
"South of Laon the battle for pos
session of the Chemin-des-Dames has
been raging since early morning. The
troops of the Crown Prince have taken
the ridge by storm along the whole of
its extension and now are fighting on
the Aisne."
American.
WASHINGTON. May 27. General
Pershing's communique, issued tonight
by the War Department, follows:
"In Picardy. after violent artillery
preparation, hostile infantry detach
ments succeeded in penetrating our ad
vanced positions in two points. Our
troops counter-attacked, completely ex
pelling the enemy and entering his
lines.
"In the Woevre a strong hostile raid
ing party was repulsed (with losses)
in killed in wounded.
"In Lorraine hostile gas-shell bom
bardments of some intensity occurred.
They day was quiet in the other sectors
occupied by our troops.
"In the course of air combats this
morning our aviators shot down a hos
tile machine."
INDEX OF TODAY'S NEWS
The TVeatner.
YESTERDAY'S Maximum temperature. 74
decrMs; minimum. 47 degrees.
TODAY'S Pair; northwesterly winds.
War.
Germans sain slightly in new offensive.
Pace 1.
Korrisjn.
Unofficial notice served on German civilians
to bo barefoot. Page 1.
Eleven 17. 8. officers and four men deco
rated by Great Britain. Pare 1.
Great Britain as well as Germany has bis;
submarine cruisers. Page 'J..
Ukraine statesman absconds with fivo mil
lion roubles. Page 3.
American woman Involved in sensational
libel suit at Berlin. Pif 4.
Mexico increases Its exactions on American
miners. Pace 4.
National.
President calls on Congress for war revanua
legislation. Pare 1.
McAdoo orders record-breaking advances In
all rail rates. Page 1.
General Leonard Wood, desiring to fight In
France, ordered to Jamison duty. Page X.
Domestic.
Non-partisan I. W. W. deal exposed at Chi
cago trial. Page 4.
K port a.
Future of league- hangs In balance. Page ft.
White Sox defeat Boston. 6-4. Page 8.
Seattle defeats Portland. 11-10. Page 8.
Pacific Northwest.
Washington man start dortw? -arive
across continent. Page 1.
Kelso slayer gets life term In jenltentiarv.
Pago 7.
Mormons refute claims of Non-Partisan
leacue. Page .
Land for returning soldiers urged by Pro-
feasor Young of Oregon University.
Page 7.
Dr. George Peters Joins party of astrono
mers at Baker. Page 6.
Commercial and Marine.
Coast member to be chosen for Grain Cor
poration Advisory Board. Page 17.
Cattle and hogs higher at local stock yard a
Psge 17.
Wall Street market breaks as re" - Pres
ident's speech. Page IT.
Two big ships launched at Portland ship
yards yesterday. Page 14.
MORE ACTIVE DUTY DESIRED
Friend of Roosevelt Will Be
Sent to San Francisco.
BAKER REFUSES COMMENT,
VucMioii RaNril Wltrllicr Homier
KoiirIi Rider Is Condemned to
Stay at Home Throuch
Pcrsliinjr s Yi-.h.
WASHINGTON". May 27. Saying that
it was "not the custom of the depart
ment to explain orders to officers.'"
Secretary Baker tonight refused to
comment on the order issued today de
taching: Major-General Leonard Wood
from command of the 89th National
Army Division.
Major-General Wood L senior offi
cer in the regular Army, and the or
der issued today means that he will
not lead the division, stationed at Camp
Funston. to France.
It was learned that Major-General
Wood is slated to command the "West"
em Army department, with headquar.
ters at San Francisco, but no official
announcement of the change of orders
was made.
Active Duty Denirrd.
The General was at the department
during: the day conferring: with Sec
retary Baker and other officials, and
it is understood he urged strongly that
if he must stay at home he at least
be given an assignment promising more
active duty than a command in the
West.
Up to a day or two ago there was
nothing to indicate that the depart
ment had any other purpose than to
send the General to the front when
his division went. On the contrary,
there is every reason to believe that
he was fully expected to go over when'
that time came.
Physical Testa Faaaed.
He submitted to a physical examina
tion on his return from France, where
he was wounded by the bursting of a
French gun, passed all tests, and it was
believed that the only obstacle to his
being sent to the front in command of
his division had been removed.
Secretary Baker declined to comment
upon suggestions that the latest de
velopment might be construed as a
manifestation of the disfavor with
which it has been publicly alleged the
Administration looks upon the officer.
Wood Friend .f RooaevrM.
General Wood's close association with
Former President Roosevelt, among the
most unsparing critics of the Adminis
tration and particularly of the War
Department has led to assertions wiht
regard to his assignments before.
There have been instances In the past
where officers assigned by the War
Department to ommand large units due
to go overseas have been relieved on
recommendations from General Pereh
ing, whose choie of officers to serve
under him has never been questioned
by the department.
No official would say whether Gen
eral Wood had encountered such an
obstacle.
WHOLE CLASS JOINS ARMY
Grandview High School Graduates
Enlist In U. S. Service.
YAKIMA. Wash., May 27. (Special.)
Every boy In the graduating class of
the Grandview High School, located Jn
the lower valley, yesterday enlisted in
the United States Army. The four lads,
Donald W. Chambers. Newell M. Stone,
Frederick W. Norgard and John E.
Parchen are all 1 years of age. They
will remain in school till graduation
night.
The boys are buying a liberty bond
as their class gift to the school and.
after it has been presented, will make
the further offer of their lives to their
country. They enlisted through the
Takima recruiting office.
DEFICIENCY BILL PASSES
Measure Carrying 0 Million. Ap
proved by House. Goes to Senate.
WASHINGTON. May 27. The urgent
deficiency bill, carrying direct appro
priations of $90,674, 906.25 and contract
authorizations of $33,000,000. was
passed by the House today without
amendment and now goes to the
Senate.
The chief item carried In the blU
is $60. 000.000 for the housing of work
ers. $10,000,000 of which is to be spent
to relieve congestion in the city of
Washington.
tYinesap Favorite Apple.
TAKIMA. Wash.. May 27. (Special.)
A Yakima County fruit tree census,
completed today by the county horti
cultural department, shows that the
county now has 2.050.181 apple trees.
494. US pear trees. 304.315 peach trees.
72.291 plum and prune trees. 38.103
cherry trees, 902 apricots and 7378 mis
cellaneous trees, the grand total beinc
2.97i,411. Winesaps are the favorite
apple, there being 750,311 of those trees
to 490.317 Jonathans, the nearest competitor.