Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, December 29, 1917, Page 18, Image 18

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    -THE MORNING OREGONIAN. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19. 1917.
BRIGHT SPOTS III
WAR DAYS PLANNED
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO FITTING MISSES AND CHILDREN'S CORSETS TOD A Y IN OUR CORSET SHOP, THIRD FLOOR
r
United States
Thrift Stamps
and U. S. War Savings Certificates on
sale . at our Accommodation Bureau,"
Basement, . Sixth Street. Sixteen 25c
Thrift Stamps and 12c buys a War Sav
ings Certificate worth $5.00 January'
1, 1923.
A Join the Red
Cross Today
Help bring Portland's quota up to the
desired hundred thousand. All you need,
is a heart and a dollar. Memberships in
all classes issued at our Red Cross Booth,
Main Floor, Sixth Street.
All Charge
Purchases
Today and Balance of Month
Go on January AccountMade
Payable Feb. 1st
THERE ARE BIANY
EQUALLY WORTHY
Unadvertised jS
Move Started in Interest of
Social Life of Men in
' Service.
jtner Qjjuu.ity'.Stokj? op poivund
OFFERINGS ALL
OVER THE STORE
18
$75,000 FUND REQUIRED
enthusiastic Meeting Held In This
"7ity and Campaign Planned to
Raise Money to Be Expended in
Cause of Soldier Recreation.
While the various auxiliaries are
orovidinz sweaters, wristlets, band-
iees. supplies and many other differ
ent articles for the comfort and care of
the men enlisted under the colors, their
social life is not forgotten. Yesterday
in the interest of ths important factor
primarily, one of the most enthusiastic
meetings of the year was new in tne
ilultnomah Hotel.
L. C. Oilman presided and general
plans were made for the establishment
of Army and Navy recreation centers,
for the strengthening of the work of
the Women's War Council and lor the
aiding of the Young Women's Chris
tian Association in its local and war
camo work.
'As a result of their deliberations and
discussions, committees and officers
were named and it was decided to
launch a campaign for $75,000. The
dates set for the acquiring of this
sum are January 7 to 12.
Prompt Response Expected.
The leaders believe that the wide
ccope and stirring appeal of the cam
paign will meet with instantaneous re
sponse.
L. C. Gilman will be general chair
man; C. H. Davis, treasurer, and the
management of the campaign will be
in the hands of Miss Ida V. Jonts and
Charles F. Berg. Mrs. Guy Webster
Talbot and W. E. Coman were appoint
ed colonels, and there will be 20 cap
tains who will take charge of 20 dif
ferent districts of the city.
Among those who -will serve as cap
tains will be Mrs. W. C. Alvord, Mrs.
Kverett Ames, Mrs. Louis C. Oerlinger,
Mrs. Max Hirsch, Mrs. J. A. Bell, Mrs.
:. D. Brunn, James A. Cranston, Thomas
Kerr, W. B. Van Dusen, Aarpn Frank,
W. J. Hofmann, F. S. Doernbecher, A.
C, Spencer, S. P. Lockwood and others.
In addition to the officers the fol
lowing are members of the executive
committee:
Mrs. W. C. Alvord, Mrs. W. B. Ayer,
Mayor George L. Baker, W. J. Burns,
Mrs. C. A. Dolph, Miss Carrie A. Hol
lirook, William MacMaster, Mrs. Mac
Master. John McCourt, iMrs. W. H. Mar
shall, Emery Olmstead. Mrs. Guy W.
Talbot and Mrs. Helen Ladd Corbett.
Community Fuud to Get 25,OO0. .
The war camp community fund, will
be assigned 125.000 of the sum to be
raised. With this money a recreation
Renter' will be maintained ' in Portland
as a. clubhouse for enlisted- men where
they can meet and smoke and read and
have a good time and social life.
The Y. W. C. A. will further its war
work and the ''work of the hostess
houses that are proving a successful
venture in all the Army camps where
. they are established.
Miss Ida V. Jontz, general secretary
of the association, explained the need
of the women's work. She said that
the Y. W. C. A. now has 23 secretaries
in France and eight in Russia doing
relief work; that there are 17, hostess
houses in operation in Army canton
ments and 36 more are under construc
tion, and that work in befriending,
sheltering and housing the girls who
work in munition and other factories
is taking a vast amount of money and
Is doing a great amount of good.
In Portland the Y. W. C. A. is work
ing among the women who are taking
the places vacated by the men. The
work is educational in a large number
of branches.
Hcrjr Makes Good Snftgrestlons. .
Charles Berg, gave an inspiring talk
with many practical and businesslike
suggestions. He said that the general
plans for carrying on this campaign
will be to follow that outlined by John
R. Mott. . -.
John McCourt explained the efforts
the men of the country are making
in their organizations to provide recre
ation centers for the soldiers. He spoke
particularly of the Fosdick commis
sion and how Portland's participation
in this campaign will once more dem
onstrate its loyalty in a Nation-wide
movement for a good cause.
A meeting for the committee and all
the captains and workers will be on
January 4 in the Portland Hotel. At
that time W. J. Reid, of the Fosdick
commission, of San Francisco, will be
present and outline in detail the work
which the Army and Navy Departments
have requested and authorized to be
done inside and outside of the canton
ments. Portland Last to Act.
At all of the larger concentration
camps work for the moral and physical
welfare of soldiers is well under way
and "Portland happens to be the last
large city near a barracks to provide
a clubhouse for soldiers at leisure. For
this purpose $25,000 has already been
pledged by Mayor Baker on behalf it
'this -city. This sum is included in the
budget which Is to be submitted td
subscribers.
George C. Altnow, of Seattle, publi
city manager of the Northwest . War
Council work, will be In Portland to
confer with the local workers. Com-?
mittees in charge of the work being
conducted Nationally under the super
vision of the Fosdick commission, which
recently visited here, and the recrea
tional places outside of the camps under
the supervision of the local division of
the Young Women's Christian Associa
tion, which directs the hostess houses
at Vancouver and Camp Lewis, have
effected a consolidation of these move
ments. The result here was the organization
of the committee yesterday and the plan
for the campaign for $75,000.
MASONIC RECEPTION SET
y
Scottish Rite Bodies Will Be Hosts
Xew Year's Bay. .
One of the big events of the holiday
reason is the annual reception on New
Year's day to all Blue Lodge Masons
by the Ancient' and Accepted Scottish
Rite bodies, comprising Masons of the
fourth to the thirty-second degrees.
This is the only occasion during the
year when the beautiful Scottish Rite
Cathedral, at Lownsdale and Morrison
streets, is open to others than mem
bers of the order and. all blue lodgfc
members are invited to take advantage
of the occasion.
Tbe entire building will be open for
Inspection. and-'a lunch will be served.
The Cathedral Guards will have
charge of the building and will se
that- all visitors have a good time.
Last year several hundred Blue Lodge
Masons visited the cathedral during
the afternoon. The reception will be
held from 2 to 6 o'clock on New Year's
day.
Last Day of Our YEAR END 1 DAY SALE Willi Many Added
J Good Values for Saturday Shoppers at Meier & Frank's
Famous $1.50 Shirts $1.15
f3
!
And every shirt in this great assort
ment is well worth every cent of $1.50.
In fact we don't know of any place out
side of Meier & Frank's where such
. shirts can be bought today for $1.50. A
man, or woman buying for a man, should
'lot be satisfied with less than two at this
sale price of $1.15.
-Plenty of those finely serviceable Bax
ter repps in a good heavy weight and our
own special make in corded and crepe
madras, percales and' other desirable
weaves. Neat, conservative patterns and
all the latest shades and combinations in
demand with the more advanced dressers.
Soft and laundered cuff styles.
Our Felt Hats at $2
are a tribute to our furnishings chief's fore
sight and initiative. When - other stores
have either discarded utterly their $2 hat
lines or have been forced to sacrifice the
quality in order to. maintain the price our
$2 hat stock is in its heyday. We-have lots
of hats good hats new hats to sell at this
price. And we have styles and colorings to
please every man, including the new
"Trooper" shape, both smooth and scratch finishes,
And remember the price two dollars.
All sizes of course.
-Main Floor, Fifth Street.
No. Let-Up 'in the Extraordinary Series
of Value-Giving E v e n t s for Which
Our Women's Glove Shop Is Famous
Women's $ 2 . 0 0-$ 2 . 2 5-$ 2 . 5 0
Real French Kid and Finest Imported Lambskin
Gloves
The 'price ' speaks 'for itself.
And it Awill speak' .well sfor the
good judgment of every .woman
who profits . by this sale of real
French kid and the very finest
' quality : of imported lambskin
gloves. : . . -
These; are. all SHORT gloves in one and two-clasp styles.
Black, white and fashionable colors. Many, are elaborately
embroidered in self or contrasting stitchings. EVERY PAIR
PERFECT. And all sizes from 514 to -712, inclusive.
Because of the extremely low price today we will be unable
to fill phone orders. No gloves sent on approval. None C. O. D.
Glove Shpp, Main Floor.
Parents Who Want to Buy for Their Boy
the Utmost in Style and Looks and Service
Will Get Him One of These Fine New
Two-Pants Norfolk
Suits $10
And as an added assurance that all of
the above desirable qualities AND
MORE, will be found in these suits we
wish to emphasize the point that these
are
All-Wbol Suits
Medium and double-weight fabrics
sturdy tweeds and homespuns. Gray,
brown, tan and green mixtures. Coats
made with pinch back, yoke and pleats
or plain back with loose belt all around.
Some in the new military models with
four pleated patch or bellows pockets.
Each suit has two pairs of knickerbocker
pants.
Very unusual suits at the price $10.
Sole Agents Boys' Sampeck Clothes
Boys' Clothing Shop, Third Floor.
I
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Here's Some Timely and Important
News for the Girls
MISSES' DRESSES
Dresses for juniors and email
women. Excellent qualities of navy
sergft'in fancy and tailored styles.
Prices range from $18 to $42.50.
CHILD'S COATS
Children's coats of velours, cloths
and mixtures in medium and heavy
weights. Desirable colors. Belted
styles. Many have fur collars.
Sizes 2 to 6 years, $4.50 to $24.75.
Sizes 6 to 14 years, $10 to $50.
RAINCOATS
Children's heavy r u b b e r i z e d
tweed raincoats in tan and black
mixtures. With belts and pockets.
Hats to match. Sizes 8 to 14 years.
Priced $5.86.
PARTY DRESSES
Navy and rose colored silk and
net party dresses in sizes from 5
to 12 years. Priced from $8 to $25.-
CHILD'S DRESSES
Children's dresses of serge in
many styles and colors, but not
every style in every size. Sizes 4
to 14 years. Priced $3.95 to $13.50.
CHILDREN'S FANCY
WASH DRESSES
Fancy wash dresses for . little
tots from 2 to 6 years. Made of
.high-grade gingham and chambray.
Many have smocking and feather
stitching trim. Priced $1.25 to
$5.95.
NEW SWEATERS
Misses' and children's lynx and
machine knit sweaters. High and
ruff neck styles, Iso models'with
sailor collars. With and . without
belts. Many colors and color com-;
binations. Sizes 1 to 14 years,"
$1.25 to $12. ' - , -
1 ROMPERS
Baby creepers and rompers in a'
good assortment of dark arid light1
colors. . Both fancy and tailored
styles. Moderately priced from
59c to $3.50.
Children's Shop, Second Floor.
Share in These Splendid Saturday Savings on
Women's Neckwear
sSATIN COLLARS
AND SETS -59
New tailored satin collars" and
sets in sailor and roll styles. These
are very specially priced Saturday
at 59c.
SATIN COLLARS
AND SETS 95
Tailored satin collars and sets in
roll, Tuxedo and sailor models.
Plain and embroidered styles. Good
values.
$1.50 'STOCKS AND
JABOTS, EACH 95
Stocks and jabots of net com
bined with hand embroidery and
good imitation Filet lace. $1.50
values 95c
REAL FILET
COLLARS VA OFF
A special Saturday sale of real
Filet flat, collars in medium and
large models. Regularly . $7.50 to
$12.50.
$2.79 FIBER SILK SCARFS $1.98
Fiber silk scarfs in plain colors and combination striped effects for
sports wear. These have tied fringed ends. Splendid $2.79 fiber 6ilk
scarfs on special sale Saturday at $1.98.
M
Ask' ANY MAN Who Has
Purchased in This Sale
9
ens
$.35..
Strits
26
$30.00,
0, $40
at
85
what he thinks of the values and he will tell
you that it is the best buy he ever made. And
you have our' word for it that sueh clothing
values are rare enough to warrant every man,
however well stocked his wardrobe, in purchas
ing a new suit at Meier & Frank's in this sale.
There is a saving of all the way from $3.15 to
$13.15 to make choosing a particularly pleasur
able act today. v ,
All are the famous "Society Brand" make you know
; their slogan J"For Young Men and Men , Who Stay
Young" and there's youth .and" life and - activity, in
every line of these garments!. Hand tailored through-'
out. . Some fulllined, others siik skeleton lined.
Fabrics of highest quality. Double and single
breasted coats .with patch and regular pockets. All
around belted models. Beautiful patterns and shades.
Every suit made to retain its shape.
For present wear for Spring choose from this fine
assortment of, $30.00 $35.00 $40.00 suits today at
$26.85. . .
Men's Clothing- Shop, Third Floor.
Women's Coats Reduced
A CO A T TO PLEASE EVER Y TASTE
A PRICE TO SUIT EVERY PURSE
The materials are kersey, zibeline and wool plush. The
colors are nav, green, browrij taupe and black. The styles
and trimming features those now in high favor. The prices
all substantially lowered for this sale. 400 of these fine gar
ments for women and misses.
125 Coats at $10.00
100 Coats at $14.85
75 Coats at $18.75
50 Coats at $22.65
50 Coats at $26.45
W A
aecKwear shop, Main Floor. - '4 Apparel Shop, Fourth Floor. M -'I Veiling Shop, Main Floor.
Our Great Annual
Sale of Women's'
Suits, Coats
and Dresses
continues today. It's the
banner apparel sale of the
year!
For Quick Disposal
BOX OF THREE
WOMEN'S GOOD
'Kerchief s
15 c
All women's fancy box handker
chiefs. White and colored bordered
handkerchiefs. Box of three ker
chiefs 25c values box 15c.
10c-124cBOXOF2
'Kerchiefs 4c ,
Children's fancy box handker
chiefs in assorted styles. 10c to
12 Ygc values, box 4c.
Handkerchief Shop, Main Floor.
Stationery
50c M. & F. special stationery, 48
sheets paper and 48 envelopes to
box, 33.
35c correspondence cards, 24
cards and 24 envelopes to box, 29.
35c llaylawn package paper, 84
sheets paper to the box, 28.
Envelopes to match paper, two
packages 25
1918 calendars, various sizes and
styles, marked at
Odds and ends in stationery and
brass desk pieces at substantial re
ductions. . Stationery Shop, Main Floor.
A Fine Sale of
Yeiliiig
Plain hexagon mesh veiling iiA
black, brown, taupe, navy and pur-,
pie. The regular prices and reduc--tions
follow: ,
35c Values 25c
25c Values 19c
Another Special!
65c-75c-85c
Veiling 59c
Plain and novelty mesh veiling
in black, brown, taupe and navy.
Also bordered and scroll effects.
Regularly 65c, 75c and 85c on spe
cial sale Saturday only, yard 59c.
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SEVERAL WILLS DRAWN
THOMAS STRONG TESTIFIES AS TO
MRS. VAMNG'S CONDITION.
Wltnesa Admits Writing; Letter to For.
mcr Conntr Clerk Relative to'
Woman's Pecnllar Slsnatare.
That he had made out a number of
wills for tbe late Xarifa Jane Faliflg;
and had never been named a one of the
beneficiaries until the making- of her
last will in 1915. was testimony given
yesterday by Thomas N. Strong, one of
the chief beneficiaries' of the $600,000
estate now under contest by W. Tyler
Smith, of Sheridan. Or.
Mr. Strong said that he had made
out a will for Mrs. Falingr in 1911 and
another one in 1914. but in neither
was he made a legatee.
Attorneys for Dr. Smith 'again yes
terday examined the witness as to Mrs.
Fallng's alleged mental incapacity. He
was asked if it was not a fact that
while Mrs. Faling was living in Sell
wood Hn 1914 she was found hurrying
down the street insufficiently clad and
remarked that aha. was looking for an
undertaker.
The witness admitted writing a let
ter to a former Coviaty Clef k in 1911. in
which he had to guarantee the genu
ineness of Mr Faling's signature to
some legal paper. He said this was
necessary because of her nervous con
dition, which made her writing appear
unnatural.
Yesterday was the seventh day in
which Mr. Strong has occupied the
stand. He probably will be called to
testify at least two more days on cross
examination. -V
-' .
Phone your want ads to The Oresro
nlan. Main 7070, A 6095.
STATE'S CASE ATTACKED
CHIN JUNG HIN . MURDER TRIAL
WILL CLOSE MONDAY.
Wong See and Other Defense Witnesses
Give Testimony Relative to Hln's
Connection With Tonga. -
Further attacks against the testi
mony given by Wong Wah and Chin
Gee Hoy, Chinese informants against
the allied "Hop and Suey Sing tongs,
were made yesterday by numerous wit
nesses for the defense in the trial of
Cliin Jung Hin, president of the.'Suey
Sing tone, charged with complicity in
the murder of Chin Hong, on June 2,
last. . '
That Chin Gee Hoy was expelled from
the Suey Sing tong at Los Angeles five
years ago and shortly after joined? the
Bing ICung tong was the testimony
given by Won. See, who was brought
here from Los Angeles to assist the
defense. "Chin Gee Hoy previously had
testified that he is still a member of
Ithe Suey Sing tong and had attended
the murder meetingr of the Hops and
t5ueys on May 28, as one of the Suey
ing gunmen.
Won See brought with him a copy
of the alleged tong record, wherein it
was shown that Chin Gee Hoy had
been officially expelled from the tong,
but -this record was not permitted in
evidence as an exhibit. Deputy District
Attorney Collier charged that he would
prove the record to be spurious.
Patrolman Wellbrook, of Ihe Port
land police force, testified that ex
Police Chief Clark had eent him to
Chin Hong, the murdered Chinese, some
months before the killing, with the
order for mm to "cut out the rough
stuff." Chin Hong Indicated, said the
witness, that he was not ready to call
it quits with the rival tongs because
he was not satisfied.
The defense announced "last night
that its case would te concluded by
Monday evening.
social diseases are quarantined and
treated.
DETENTION HOME PROPOSED
Claussen & Clausscn to Prepare
Plans for Permanent Buildings.
To Claussen & Claussen, architects,
is to-be granted the contract for pre
paring plans for a permanent detention
home for women. An ordinance will
be before the City Council Wednesday
providing for the immediate prepara
tion of the plans.
The detention home is to be erected
next year on property purchased by the
city several years ago near Troutdale.
It will take the place of the present
detention home quarters at Kelly
Butte, where - women, suffering- Xrom
C0U HATHAWAY INSTALLED
New Collector of Customs for Hono
lulu Readies Post.
HONOLULU. T. H.. Dec. 19. (Spe
cial.) Colonel Howard Hathaway, of
Everett, Wash., recently appointed col
lector of customs for Honolulu, arrived
in the city today. The new official
came direct from Washington, D. C,
and one of his first acts was to de
clare that he never sought the office.
The Colonel admitted that he had
been recommended for the position by
the Democratic state central committee
of Washington. Honolulu people gen
erally held that the office should have
been given to Ralph S. Johnston, deputy
collector, who had been in that posi
tion for the past IS years.
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