Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, July 01, 1913, Page 12, Image 12

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T1TP rm?VTVn nufrnxT t xt ihtttot. i t wrT-- . .
fVlUNiCIPAL SLATE
STUDENTS WAITING FOR TICKETS TO ATTEND HOWE'S TRAVEL FESTIVAL AS GUESTS OF THE OREGON! AN.
HOTELS AJNT) SUMMER RESORTS.
WIPED GLEAN TODAY
ANNEX HOTEL
Washington Street. Corner 12th, POItTLAXD, Or. Charles II. Howley. Mgr.
Auto bus meets trains and boats. 150 rooms. Fireproof. Modern. Flrst
Class. Both Telephones. Room rate per day, with bath privilege, $1, $1.50,
2; with private bath, $1.50, $2. $2.50, $3.
SPECIAL RATES PER WEEK OR MONTH
. lt iff
More Than Two Score Em
ployes Go Out of Office at
9 o'clock This Morning.
THE MULTNOMAH
PORTLAND'S
CBASDEST BOTE!.
FIVE WILL GOVERN CITY
4 , , lis
IT - - ". w f A ;;:::..-:... .'v:-: ........... 9
L it I - ' LH'i
Absolutely Fireproof
100 rooms ............ .$1. BO per day
200 rooms (with bath)$2.00 per day
100 rooms (with bath)$2.H per day
Add Sl.oo per day to above pries
when two occupy one room.
VERT ATTRACTIVE P BICE 3
FOR PERMANENT QUESTS
R. C. riOWEHS, Manager.
GAINER THIGPEX, Asa't Hk.
Portland Starts Anew Now and Will
Operate Tnder Distinctly Com
plete Charter Old Form of
Affairs Pass to History.
5 - r
With the entire municipal slate wiped
clean, Portland will take up today the
new commlsslson form of government
adopted by the people May 3.
At 9 A. M. the present system of
Councllmanlc ward representation will
so out of existence, carrying: with It
Mayor A. G. Rushlight. 15 members of
the Council. 10 members of the Execu
tive Board, 80 members of other boards
and commlsslsons and the entire char
ter under which the city has operated
since 1903.'
In place of Mayor Rushlight will be
Mayor H. R. Albee. In place of the
Council and boards and commissions
will be four Commissioners Will H.
Daly, Robert G. Dieck, C. A. Bigelow
and W. I Brewster, each of whom
will have a department of the city gov
ernment to handle, with direct super
vision and management. The city will
operate under a distinctly new and
complete charter.
The old slate was wiped clean yes
terday when the members of all the
boards and commisssions sent their
resignations to Mayor Rushlight, who
accepted them. Not a single board is
left as a reminder of the old form of
ijffairs.
Sen Men in Office Today.
The new officials will take the oath
of office at 9 o'clock this morning. The
new government will start In with all
charter appointments with the excep
tion of City Engineer made, all sal
aries settled and all details of super
vision and transaction of business
worked out.
The new Mayor and Commissioners
will be escorted to the City Hall by
the police and fire department bands.
Representatives of those organizations
yesterday appeared before the new of
ficials and asked leave to be escorts.
The iayor-elect had no ambitions to
take part in a parade, but after being
urged by the delegation to enter office
in this way he consented. The Com
missioners will meet in the office of
Mr. Albee at 8:45, and will be called
for by the bands and automobiles of the
police and fire departments.
The procession will move through
the business section to the Fifth-street
entrance to the City Hall. The offl
cjals will assemble In the Council
chamber on tho second floor and will
be sworn in by City Auditor Barbur.
Immediately after this formality they
will hold a legislative session and pass
the ordinances which are necessary for
the beginning of the new government.
Measures to Be Passed.
Among the measures will be those
making transfers of funds so as to
provide money to pay the salaries of
the Commissioners and all other em
ployes: ordinances prescribing the du
ties of each Commissioner and ordi
nances putting the new charter Into
effect. With this work over the entire
new form of government will be estab
lished and the work of transacting the
city business will be taken up whefe
the old officials left off.
All the formal business to be trans
acted at today's session was settled
definitely yesterday afternoon at a
meeting of the Commissioners with
Mayor-elect Albee at the City Hall. At
this session all the salaries were fixed
by ordinance, appointment problems
were settled, an administrative code to
govern the meetings of the Commis
sioners and the conduct of their de
partments was adopted and all other
details of affairs, such as the accept
ing and approving of bonds, were ad
justed. Commissioner Dieck will for the pres
ent assumes control of the city engi
neer's department, deferring the ap
pointment of City Engineer until such
time as he becomes acquainted with the
needs of the office. He announced this
definitely at the close of the meeting.
Mr. Hurlburt, the present City Engi
neer, will resume his civil service
status as Deputy City Engineer.
Wood Get S.10O Monthly.
The salary of Purchasing Agent
Wood was fixed at $300 a month by
vote of the entire Commission. His
bond was fixed at $25,000. Under the
administrative code as It has been
worked out he will be one of the most
Important city employes and will have
a, great deal of responsibility.
The salaries of all other employes
win remain for the present as
they were under the old char
ter. These are City Attorney.
1200 a month; Municipal Judge, $150 a
month; City Treasurer, $200 a month;
private secretaries to Commissioners
will be given $125 a month and V. H.
Warren, private secretary to Albee,
will receive $150 a. month. Deputy
City Attorneys Tomlinson and Latou
rette will receive $185 a month each
and Deputies Haas, Myers and Stadter
$125 a month each.
It was explained that these salaries
will hold for the first few months un
til a revision can be made and officials
deserving more pay can be granted in
creases. Economy was the principal
consideration at yesterday's meeting
because of the fact that the city is In a
bad way financially owing to large ex
penditures by the outgoing administra
tion. Mayor-elect Albee, In addition to
having a private secretary, will have
a stenographer to handle routine office
affairs. Heretofore the Mayor and his
wecretary have handled all this work
themselves, thereby using much time
which should have been given to other
more important duties. It is probable,
also, taht there will be one stenog
rapher for the four Commissioners to
handle the writing of letters and other
routine duties.
The - last part of the old form of
government to pass out of existence
was the Rushlight Executive Board,
which met yesterday afternoon at 4
o'clock, and after transacting all un
finished work adjourned Rlne die, ex
tending thanks to Rushlight for his
courtesies. At the close of the meet
ing the Mayor was presented with a
beautiful loving cup by the members
of tho board. It Is f sterling silver,
12 Inches long. On the outside 13 en
graved: "Presented to Mayor A. G.
Rushlight by members of his Executive
Board." The names of the members are
engraved.
Whites Itefnse to Work AVtth Negroes
BLOOM TNGTOX, 111.. June 30. Sev
eral liundrfa employes of the Chicago
& Alton car shops struck today when
the company placed four negroes at
work as laborers. Inability to obtain
white men forced the officials to em
ploy the colored men, they say.
POLICE JUDGE HAS
REFORMS li! MIND
John H. Stevenson Will Hold
Sessions of Municipal Court
From 8:30 to. 5.
RESCUE WORK CONSIDERED
Some Method of Dealing Willi Hope
less Irunkard3 la to Be Put in
Force, Possibly by Means of
Insanity Proceedings. .-.
Extensive reforms, looking to in
creased efficiency and more substantial
Justice, will be Introduced from the
start by Municipal Judg John H.
Stevenson, who will take office this
morning. Experience as a newspaper
man, lawyer and member of the Vice
Commission will be brought to bear by
the new magistrate upon problems
which he expects to face.
Preparatory to taking office. Judge
Stevenson was in court yesterday and
was accorded the courtesy of the bench
by George Tazwell. the retiring magis.
trate.
Municipal Court will be in session
dally from 8:30 A. M. to 6 P. M. and
between those hours the Judge will be
on th bench for as much of the time
as the business requires. Prom time
Immemorial the custom has been to
hold court only until the docket was
exhausted, and this usually came
about before noon, though Increase of
the business often has compelled Judge
Tazwell to hold afternon sessions.
Judge Stevenson expects, through the
longer hours, to take up many cases
summarily as they arrive at the station
and while all the parties are together.
He also will fix all bail during office
hours.
Probation Extension Considered.
Extension of the probation system
is being considered by Judge Steven
son, who expects to make use of part
of his time In checking up on persons
who have received leniency. He was an
Interested listener yesterday to the
case of a young man, arrested for steal-,
ing 100 cigars. The youth frankly con
fessed his fault and said, "I don't know
why I did it." His frankness won him
a suspended sentence.
"I would have such a boy as that 're-
port to me every week or so," said
Judge Stevenson, "and would talk over
his affairs with him. He is penitent
now, .but the impression will wear "off,
whereas the knowledge that someone
was watching his progress would act
as a spur to his good Intentions."
The plan Is to set aside such time
as is necessary, at which time those
who have been placed on probation will
report to the court and discuss with
hint privately their affairs.
Drunkards to Be Dealt With.
Less arresting and imposition of ball
is another project that the new magis
trate will endeavor to bring about.
Some sane method of dealing with
the score or more of bopeless drunk
ards who are before the court time
after time will be sought. It may take
the form of insanity proceedings, if
ine county officials can be made to see
that such men really are suffering from
that malady.
More simple record systems, with an
adequate index, are to be installed In
the office.
Immediately upon the sitting of the
Commissioners this morning, an ordin
ance will be passed appointing Judge
Stevenson and the other officers, and he
will hold court at once thereafter.
SIX POLICEMEN APPOINTED
Elxecutive Board Also Names Matron
to Fill Vacancy.
The last official act of the police
committee of the Executive Board yes
terday was the appointment of six new
policemen and a new matron for the
City Jail. All appointments were from
the eligible list of the Civil Service
Commission. No reason was given for
the hasty action in making the ap
pointments the day before the new
Commission takes charge of the city's
affairs. '
Idella Patterson was appointed po
lice matron to take the place of Isa
bella Simmons, who was discharged by
the police committee and the Execu
tive Board last week. The policemen
appointed, are: Charles A. Tennant,
Henry R. Fair, Eugene Schiller, Armie
Yllfeesen, Robert R. Bailey and Robert
Sneddon.
Converting city garbage and street sweep
ings into coal with more than the aver
ago heat units Is the scheme of F, A. Cha
ney for the solution of the garbage question
of San Jose. Cal.
I Is u- r. ThisMne J. . i- ,J4
ABOVE. UXE ON AR "TRBET, WHRE TICKETS FOR YESTERDAY'S
LOW, BOX OtFICE MAX FROM HEILIG THEATER HAD
TICKETS GIVEN OUT
Students at The Oregonian
Building Block Traffic.
300 SERVED IN 25 MINUTES
In Addition - to Those Entitled to
Share In Theater Party to See
Lyman IT. Howe Pictures,
Cnrlons Crowd Gathers.
Patiently awaiting their turn, lines
of High School pupils edged both sides
of the sidewalk in front of The Ore
gonian building, . from an early hour
yesterday morning, the line extending
at times well back toward Seventh
street. The occasion was the distribu
tion by Tho - Oregonian, of 1000 free
tickets to the Helllg Theater, where
the Lyman H. Howe travel pictures
are on exhibition.
All classes cf educational institutions
and many races were represented in the
strings of eager boys and girls, each
carrying prominently displayed, his or
her record card, which was the cre
dentials required from each applicant.
Beside the public High Schools, various
denominational Institutions and private
schools sent students.
Line Starts Before 8 A. M.
Before 8 o'clock the young people be
gan arriving. The first boy In line was
Roy Sunstedt. of the Trades School, and
the first girl was Martha McLeod, of
Washington High.
"How long have you been waiting?"
was asked of young Sundstedt.
"Don't know; seems like a year," he
replied.
Promptly at 9 o'clock, box-office men
from the Hellig 'took their places at
tables on the sidewalk and the stream
began to advance. In the first 25 min
utes after 9 o'clock; S00 . tickets . were
issued. After that the distribution went
by fits and starts but the men at the
tables were kept reasonably busy until
after noon, when the last of the 1000
tickets was given out.
By themselves a considerable crowd.
the students were augmented by crowds
of curious spectators, and three police
men kept' traffic moving as best they
could.
Good Nature Prevails.
Many of the young people came in
groups and asked to have adjacent
seats, and all such were accommodated.
"The best cards get the best seats."
announced one of the box-office men.
Jocularly.
"Me for the gallery," said one" red
headed youth. It was Just the ticket
man's little Joke, however, for all the
seats were the best In the house and
were distributed on the first come first
served principle. -
The Heilig Theater has probably
never had more delighted audiences
than those who took the picture tour
yesterday afternoon and evening. The
Oregonian's guests occupied nearly the
mil-. -'
entire lower floor at each perfarmance
and they demonstrated their approval
of the remarkable moving picture re
productions with enthusiastic applause.
The boys and girls found many of the
travel scenes identical with points de
scribed In their school books and the
comments of the youngsters made the
theater parties seem like a kind of
classroom experience. The comedy
subjects brought plenty of laughter
and the thrills of riding In a flying
machine and plunging down the Swiss
Alps on a runaway train prompted a
roar that the passerby at Eleventh and
Morrison must have mistaken for a
baseball crowd.
Nearly 200 teachers attended the ex
hibition last night-.
! JOINT HOSTS
FAIRBANKS DLVXEK TO BE XOX.
POLITICAIi.
Price , Set at Popular Figure of $1
and Heavy Advance Sale
Already Reported.
For the first time since they have
been granted the right of suffrage the
women of Oregon will share with the
men in entertaining when a compli
mentary dinner Is tendered to Charles
W. Fairbanks, ex-Vice-President of the
United States, who now Is in Portland.
While women have attended previous
functions - given In honor of distin
guished citizens of the . country they
always have been Included among the
guests. Now they share with the men
the duties and responsibilities of enter
taining. The affair tonight, however, will not
be of a political nature. It will be
under the auspices of the Convnercial
Club. " But inasmuch as Mr. Fairbanks,
on his present speaking tour through
the Northwest, has talked unhesitat
ingly on political subjects, it is expect
ed that he willat least touch' on the
present political situation In his ad
dress tonight.
Men and women ' of all ' political
parties have been invited to attend to
night's function. " A heavy advance sale
of tickets was reported yesterday. The
dinner -will be Informal andthe price
has been set at the popular figure of Jl.
Colonel James Jackaorr Is chairman
of the committee in charge of arrange
ments. . Mr, Fairbanks himself .will be
tho principal speaker. The other ad
dresses, it is announced, will be brief.
Ex-Senator C. W. Fulton will welcome
the ex-Vice-President.
Ex-Governor T. T. Geer and C. A.
Johns will follow Mr. Fairbanks. C. b!
Moores-will preside.
Whitman Crop Prospects Good. -COLFAX,
Wash.. June 30. (Spe
cial.) The weather condition in Whit
man County for the grain crop never
was better at this time of year, say
farmers. The acreage of wheat, oats
and barley, is . close to that of last
y.ear. Western Whitman County has
the best prospect, the crops' being well
advanced. In Eastern Whitman Coun
ty the north hill slopes were smothered
and the stand Is light and weedy. The
yield "in Western Whitman County is
estimated to be at least five bushels
more to the acre than last year.
...
MATINEE WERE DISTRIBUTED; BE.
A BUSY MOUX1XG.
ACTIVITY IS
Marked Gains Noted in Re
ceipts of Livestock.
BANK CLEARINGS INCREASE
Postoffice Income $6000 More Than
In June, 1912, 'While Building
Permits and Eeal Estate Trans
fers Also Are Greater.
Trade statistics for the month of
June show that prosperity was present
In Portland during the last 30 days
with a capital P.
Month, by month for the last few
years Portland has been advancing
gradually as the livestock center and
the financial center of the Northwest
The records for the month of June and
for the fiscal year ended yesterday
prove that Portland's place in this
classification is established. It always
has been the grain exporting center
and the lumber shipping center f the
Pacific Coast.
Bank clearings showed a gain of
nearly 16,000,000 over the correspond
ing month of last year. The aggre
gate was $49,345,903.36, compared with
$43,678,657.05 for June, 1912, an increase
of more than 12 per cent.
June showed an increase in postal
receipts of more than 16000. The
figures. Including yesterday's sales
approximated $90,600. June. 1912. wit
nessed the sale of a little more than
$83,000 worth of supplies.
Savings Deposits Grow.
Deposits in the-postal savings bank
likewise forged ahead.
Building permits for the month ag
gregated nearly $1,000,000, which vir
tually equals the record for June, 1912.
Permits for the six months ended
yesterday aggregated $6,800,000, more
than half of which sum represents new
residence construction. June was an
exceptionally good month for residence
permits, 135 new homes having been
authorized. This ; is an increase of
more than 30 residences over June
19.
Real estate transfers for the month
exceeded those of June, 1912, by more
than $500,000. The aggregate was
$1,789,766, compared with $1,241,439 in
the corresponding month a year ago. !
Few Institutions In the Northwest
have made such gains in the past six
months as the Portland Union Stock
yards. Total receipts of stock in that
period have been 276,378 head, or 72,563
head more than were received in the
same period last year. The most re
markable increase was In the hog de
partment,' where the run was over
twice as large as in the first half of
1912. Altogether 9S.3S5 head of hogs
were unloaded at the yards In the last
six months.
Livestock Movement Shows).
Receipts of-sheep were the largest
'Kf'''
r- o"mtiZi cry? .
$ 1 1 s 1
The Shelburne
NORTH BEACH.
Modern improvements, beautiful
dining-room. Now one of the larg
est hotels on North Beach: with
large airy and sunny rooms. We
raise our own poultry. Reasonable
rates, and special rates by the week
for families. Make reservations by
mail or wire. Long distance phone
in hotel.
Bay tickets to Shelburne Station
Trains stop right at door.
Address
SEAVIEW, WASH., T. J. HO A RE.
PKOP,
"The Hackney Cottage"
Beautiful surroundings and the
most pleasant spot on North Beach.
Home comforts and spring water
to drink, and the house is electri
fied. Make reservations by mail or
wire. Sea View, WrjMh.
JAMES HACKSiEV.
Ho! for Cascadia
Best mountain resort'on Coast: best
medicinal water, scenery, hunting and
rishlng; nature's own conservatory of
health. Auto or stage from Lebanon or
Brownsville.
Write or phone.
C M. CEISEXDORFER,
Cascadia. Oregon
for any half year since the local yards
were established.
The arrivals of the different classes
of stock in June of this and last year
compare as follows:
June, June,
" 6.11.-5 6.M0
Calves ,jrtfi 2U
IS.S'O 6,835
f,heeP 27.1S7 20,i;.2
Horses anl mulea 74 i9
Total.- 62,802 33,280
Total receipts for the first six months
of 1913 and 1912 were as follows:
June. June,
... 1913- 1!12.
Cattle 40.S21 40,321
Calves 1.949 1-3.j4
tioea 9S.3M5 4S.3K0
hheP 134.4X 112.SNS
Horses and mulea 1,035 1.207
Total 27J,378 203.S15
Grain receipts at Portland in the
cereal year just ended broke all records
for this port. The total receipts ot"
wheat were 22.862,900 bushels, a gain
na
GREATEST. AQUATIC CARNIVAL
IN THE WEST
Astoria, July 3, 4, 5
SPLENDID EVENTS EACH DAY
The fastest motor, sailing and rowing races in Pacific waters.
Amateur swimming and diving contests. !
Columbia River championship log rolling tournament.
Championship net throwing contests.
Life saving exhibition drills.
Tilting boat matches, water polo, tub and obstacle races.
Deep-sea diving by Miss De Rock.
DAILY CONCERTS BY CAMPBELL'S AMER
ICAN BAND
Limited Trains Leave Portland 9 :00 A. M. Daily and 2 :00 P. M.
Saturday. Evening Train at 6:30.
Admiral's Special ZSiVSS&i'ft. S:
This train will arrive Astoria 7:00 P. M. and you arc invited
to join it.
Details Will Be Supplied at Offices ,
CITY TICKET OFFICE, FIFTH AND STARK STREETS
NORTH BANK STATION, TENTH AND H0YT STREETS
JMNMHI
Portland Famous Hotel
noted for the Excellence
?f lis Cuisine. European plarj
HOTEL OREGON
A BSOLUTELY FIREFROOR
Portland's Newest and Most Magnificent Hostelry.
Opened March 4th. 1911.
Five hundred elegantly furnished rooms, nearly all
with private baths: 100 specially equipped sample-rooms
for the commercial trade. Located on Broadway rlgbt
in the heart of the city.
WBICHT-DKTKIXSOV HOTEL CO.
When In Seattle Stop at the Hotel Seattle.
Mote! Moore
OVERI.OOKI.VG THE OCEAN!
CLATSOP BEACH
SEASIDE, OREGON.
Opened Jnne 1, With Complete Summer
Crev.
Many new and modern improvements.
Electric lighted. Rooms with or with
out bath. Hot salt baths and surf
bathing. Recreation pier for fishinsr.
Steam heat and running water. Sea
food a specialty. Grill connections.
DA. J. MOORE, Proprietor.
Sol Due Hot
Springs Hotel
In the Heart of the Olympics.
For descriptive literature, address
the Manager. Sol Iuc Clallam County.
Washington.
Enderly
HOOD RIVER. OREUOJV.
A Modern Country Home Open for Sura.
mer Guests.
Children Under Twelve Years Not Taken.
RATES f.2.00 PER DA V.
References "Requested.
of 5,312,900 bushels as compared T-ith
the figures of the year preceding. The
total arrivals oi all cereals, flour and
hay were 26,485 cars, as against 20,847
cars received in the season of 1911-12.
For the month of June good gains
were shown over 1912, as follows:
Wheat. 230 cars; barley, 120 cars;
oats, 49 cars; flour, 93 cars, and hay.
55 cars.
Aged Minister Hurt at Gate.
CHEHALIS, Wash., June 30. (Spe
cial.) Rev. J. M. Haskell, an aged
Baptist minister of this city, who is
well known in Southwest Washington,
was injured severely at Gate today,
when a Northern Pacific train collided
with his buggy. The vehicle was de
molished and the horse unhurt. Mr.
Haskell was brought to Chehalis. He .
received severe bruises on the body
and a dangerous blow on the head.
I
$3 Round Trip
to ASTORIA
July 2, 3, 4 Return Limit
July 7
m ran