Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, July 02, 1912, Page 14, Image 14

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    THE MORNING OREGONIA1V, TUESDAY, JULY 2, 191fe.
14
ROCHESTER 10 BID
FOR ELKS' MEETING
Eastern Order Is Sending 25
Delegates Here to Claim
Next Grand Lodge.
$200,000 CHECK HUNG UP
Visitors Will Back Their Invitation
With Promise to Spend Big Sum
on Entertainment Business
Men Want Convention.
pnmrsTKR N. Y- July 1. (Spe
cial.) Twenty-live determined Elks
are on their way from Rochester. .
Y to the Elks" grand lodge, which
opens in Portland on July 8. They
will make a bid to entertain the grand
lodge" in 1913. They have the complete
support of the Rochester lodge, the
city administration, the Chamber of
Commerce, the Hotel Managers' Asso
ciation and of the whole city, which,
from the number and Bize of the con
ventions which it has entertained, has
won the title of the Convention City.
The Rochester delegates will carry a
check for 200,000, which the lodge is
willing to spend upon the entertain
ment'of the grand lodge.
Of Rochester's 225,00i population,
more than 1600 are Elk3. Rochester
claims the finest lodgeroom in the
country. As New York stands second
in proportion of number of Elks to
population, and as Pennsylvania, its
neighboring state, stands first, Roch
ester is situated near the center of the
Elk population of the country.
These points the delegates from
Rochester will advance as arguments
In their claim for the next grand
lodge. The lodge has sent is exalt
ed ruler. Dr. Richard P. Decker, and
its secretary, Frank A. Flora, in ad
vance of the main body, who, reaching
Portland Tuesday and Wednesday, re
spectively, will do all in their power
to persuade the grand lodge before
the other 25 men arrive. In -company
with them comes a representative of
the Rochester Chamber of Commerce,
who will extend an invitation on be
half of the business men of the city.
The Rochester delegates expect the
support, not only of the New York
State delegates, but of the Pennsyl
vania delegates, the New England men,
and, in fact, all those as far west as
Chicago. They believe their city, from
the' experience gained in entertaining
the Grand Army, the Shrine and other
big conventions, is well fitted to care
Xor the Elks' grand lodge.
They carry a communication from
the Rochester Hotel Managers' Asso
ciation guaranteeing that the rates
will not be raised, and urging that the
Elks "make themselves to hum" in
Rochester in 1913. Rochester has seven
large first-class hotels.
Rochester, a city of beautiful homes
and of beautiful parks, situated on
Lake Ontario, near numerous watering
places, equipped with facilities which
enabled it to handle the Grand Army
of the Republic National encampment,
the Shrine convention and many oth
ers, is, the Rochester delegates be
lieve, a suitable place for the Elks to
meet. They will be sure to receive a
warm welcome if they decide in Roch
ester's favor, for not only do the Elks
themselves want the grand lodge, but
the business men of the city want the
convention, the Chamber of Commerce
wants it and Mayor Edgerton has is
sued an invitation on behalf of the
city.
IMEEGATIOX DUE TOMORROW
Iecturing Knight and Other Elks
Speeding1 to Portland.
Among the first of the grand lodge
officers to arrive will be James I
. King, of Topeka, Kan., esteemed lec
turing knight, wno was appointed to
fill the vacancy caused y the sudden
death early last month of Frank L.
Kingsley, of Kansas City, Kan. King
already is on his way to Portland,
having left hisnome with the Inten
tion of arriving here tomorrow even
ing. ,
On the same train probably will
come Cary L. Applegate, of Salt Lake
City, grand trustee, together with Mrs.
Applegate and their daughter. Mr. and
Mrs. Perry A. Clay, of Denver, also
will arrive here over the O.-W. R. & N.
line "Wednesday night. Mr. Clay Is a
grand trustee. It is probable that Im
mediately following . the arrival on
Wednesday morning of Thomas B.
Mills, Superior, Wla., chairman of the
board of grand lodge trustees, a meet
t Ing of the board will be held. Alfred
T. Hollwy, of Hackensack, N. J., sec
retary of the board, will be here be
fore the end of the week. Charles C.
Schmidt. Mayor of Wheeling, W. Va,
the fifth member, may not be able to
attend the reunion this year, official
business keeping him at home.
. Members of the grand lodge creden
tials committee will open headquarters
at the .Multnomah Hotel Thursday
morning. E. P. Strong, of Cleveland,
O, a member of the committee, has
been in Portland for three weeks. He
will be Joined here Thursday by James
A. Finlen. of Streator, I1L, and. John
T. Shea, of Hartford, Conn. A. C.
Crowder, of Jackson, Miss., chairman
of the committee, probably will not ar
rive until Thursday evening. T. J.
Fitxpatrick, of Dubuque. Iowa, is the
fifth member, recently having been ap
pointed to the position to succeed Law
rence H. Sullivan; of Boston.
A large delegation of embryo Elks
residing at McMinnville will attend the
convention to Impress upon the grand
lodge the fact that a charter for the
institution' of a new lodge at McMinn
ville should be granted at once. A
dispensation for organising a lodge' at
McMinnville recently was granted by
the grand exalted ruler, the city show
ing a population of 6000 or more at a
special municipal census. The Mc
Minnville lodge will be No. 1283. If the
charter is granted, and it is almost
certain it will be.
The Meier A Frank Company has set
aside a space 80 by 80 feet on the fifth
floor of its store building for the use
of visiting women during Elk week.
The rooms will be equipped with desks
and writing material and will be made
comfortable and convenient. Maids
will be in attendance.
Invitations have been issued to the
Elks to participate on Tuesday after
noon in the opening of the new Terwil
liger boulevard, in South Portland.
Automobiles will be provided to vislt
orm who avail themselves of this prlv-
""secretary McAllister, of the conven
tion commission, is trying to secure a
dosen rooms for the use of Governor
John K. Tener, of Pennsylvania, and
members of his party, who will arrive
in Portland at 9:10 Monday morning
after selecting the slto for the Penn
- sylvania building at the Panama-Pacific
Exposition In San Franclsoo.
The battleship Oregon will leave Ta
coma on Friday night and is due to ar
rive at the mouth of the river early
Saturday, rjrobablv arriving "here "Sat'
urday night. ' She will anchor north of
the Harrimart bridge. -
ASTORIA, TOO, MAKES SHOWING
More Than 1500 Visitors ' Expected
Here to See Elks Parade.
More than 1S00 residents of Astoria
are expected in Portland for the Elks'
parade July 11. This is the estimate
of G. B. Johnson, general agent of the
North Bank Railroad at Astoria, wno
was In Portland yesterday. Arrange
ments have been made to bring the
nmrnlonliti here on a special train.
whirh will arrive in Portland at 8:30
A. leaving Astoria at 6:30 A. M.,
and remaining In Portland until 11:30
P. M.
otw vitr. T n .1 rv a nf A ctnrln baa fl.r
ranged to make a good showing in the
parade, 200 of the herd to appear in
unique uniforms, .
MAYOR'S IRE IS RAISED
COBB OP SCHAW-BATCHER COM
PANY CAUSE OF CLASH.
Claim for $98,000 for Extras in
Bull Run River Pipe Wne Work
May Go Into the Courts.
A clash between Mayor Rushlight
and Edward S. Cobb, representing the
SrhRi-.Riitrhr Comnanv. occurred at
the meeting of the Water Board at the
City Hall late yesterday afternoon, ai
thniich' no nersonalitles were indulged
in, it was very evident that Mr. Cobb
had raised the Mayor's ire.
His criticism of D. D. Clark, engineer
of the Water Board, waa the cause of
the Mayor's heated remark.
, "I want you to understand, Mr. Cobb,"
said the Mayor, "that Mr. Clark is not
the agent of the Schaw-Batcher Com
pany. The reason your bill is not be
fore this Board is because you didn't
file it. I may talk as fast as you can,
and if you want to get into the courts
you just go and get there. I have
told you the best thing for you and
the Schaw-Batcher Company to do is to
present your claim properly to this
Board.
"It isn't Mr. Clark's business to bring
this bill In here. It is your business.
So far as I am concerned you can go
to the courts, and put in as big a claim
as you like. But you can't bluff this
Board."
t- ri.hk tioH en M that "the Ecliaw-
Batcher people will take this matter
into court unless tne city win uvuu
to arbitration.
ttrrv. .111 nnt pnHlll'A tV 1 . bill ft
single dollar. I presented this bill
to Mr. Clark ana ne ougui. iu
It here. He may have his own reason's
for not bringing it."
At this Mr. Clark bolted out the door,
and in two mluntes brought the bill,
which proved to be a carbon copy.
ntt.. ., .l.lm im for extras
1 IIC uuiiipauj o -
said to have been furnished in laying
the new Bull Run pipeline, lor wmwu
this company had the contract. The
V. 1 1 1 . i va.tonHnv WflH for S98.000.
while a previous bill called for 8129.000.
Consideration of the matter was post
poned until alter tne .cias
tion. ' '
oia. Ti-ivitlnr and concreting
a 200.000-gallon reservoir in North
Mount Tabor were opened, and ranged
from 87102.66 to $9920.66, the lowest
v.i j.i v.i.. m..h(h Xr janlln. and the
U1UUDI VCIIIfi v..Wfcr.w.- '
highest the Municipal Contracting C om
pany. They were reierreo w
missioners Winn and AinBWorth -with
power to act.
Seven ulOi on ouu caauruu kic mu-.o
A frnrr. f13f.f. tO S4278. HCSSG
tr..i. Trxvi taTm-It wn the lowest
;uai viu j v .
bidder, and A. L. Maeder Company the
highest. These bios were reu ....
th TCnirineer and Messrs. Winn and
McKay, with power to act. .
Since January i mo "''
ment has laid 34.16 miles of new water
. 10 nll.a halnir 1M last month.
mums, v.io - -
The Burlingame standpipe is half
finished, and will be in operation
July 16.
The insuring of all property of the
Water Department with a blanket in-
ii i km trltxl. Mavor
surance pun.; - -
Rushlight suggesting this would give
a lower premium rate. .
The Irvington Club's petition for
. - .lAniMl. hut a meter is
11 wave. iw - -- -
to be Installed so as to allow free watnr
for the bubbling fountain recently in
stalled. HOFF IS BACK FROM EAST
State Labor Commissioner Tells of
Visit to Two Conventions.
r t- Tinff KtnA Tjihnr Commissioner.
has returned from a trip to Washing
ton, D. C. where he attended the in
ternational convention of factory in
spectors. May 28. and the international
convention of Labor Commissioners in
June, to both of which he was a dele
gate from this state.
The purpose or inese cwnvouuuiiB,
said Mr. Hoff last night, "was to learn
i . ."U . .,,. n a wara Hnlnff- in the
WllftL Ullici " - "
gatherng of statistics, in guarding ma
chinery ana regarmog "-"
factories. Addresses were delivered
i..in mTnhr nf the medical pro
fession as well as working experts on
ventilation and sanitary Devices. a
Oregon has credit for bringing before
the United States Supreme Court the
first case to test the right of the state
to regulate the worn or women, x was
asked to deliver an address before the
- .f fn(.nrv InirnArtnra on
Lull v eiiiiuu - - j
'Lews For the Protection of the Work
ing Women.
"On my return trip I stopped at Chi
cago for a few days and Inspected the
method for regulating office work and
the system ot raciory inspection m
force. It was all instructive and ln
. .i .... . t mi n il that nearlv all
ieroiui6i I. .
of the approved methods are now in
force In Oregon.
"It was remarkable how many things
the persons I met knew about Oregon."
JETTY FUNDS REQUIRED
Major Mclndoe Asks Washington for
Specific Instructions.
Facing a shutdown of operations on
.nnth l.ttv at the mouth Of the
ni.lmhi. tmvat iinlean Consrress nasses
on pending appropriations, and being
compelled througn iaca oi finances iu
begin pruning today by. discharging a
nf th force on the letty. Major
Mclndoe, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A,
wired General uixDy. cniei oi engi
neers, yesterday and he hourly expects
a reply that will direct his course.
It was reported that Congress has
adopted a resolution extending appro
priations tnrougn Juiy, pui meronM
n nffipifti nnticA received to that ef
fect and all departments at the Cus-tom-House
are out of funds. The jetty
situation Is viewed as the most serious,
as there is about one full season's
t. ..molntnir n.Yt v.ur'd ODerations
being expected to consist of finishing
details, and to aisorganne ine lorce
now will prove costly.
i. V. Beach Improving.
j. v. Beach, a member of the Board
of Education, who has been seriously
ill, suffering from stomach trouble. Is
reported to be improving and an early
recovery Is looked for.
MONEY BACK' WINS
Divorced Woman Travels Far
to Wed and Loses.
SEPARATION TOO RECENT
Though Sister Had Taken Oath Rel
ative to Divorce Period, $4 for
Marriage License Returned
"on Demand" at Vancouver,
VANCOUVER. Wash., July .(Spe
cial.) A precedent of . "your money
back for a marriage license if you do
not satisfy the requirement of the min
ister" has been established by William
N. Marshall. County Auditor of Clark
County. And while the disconcerted
couple secured a return of the 14 paid
for the license, they were bitterly dis
appointed, as the woman had come all
the way from San Francisco to marry.
The couple, Ralph I Atkinson and
Elisabeth Hurley, of San Francisco, ap
plied for a license In due form, and.
when Alice M. Palmer, a sister of the
would-be bride, was asked if she would
take oath that neither one had been
divorced within six months, she said
Yes. The license was Issued and
the trio, happy in the thought of early
marriage, hastened to the parsonage
of Rev. J. M. Canse, of the First Meth
odist Church. . .
The minister was calling on the sick,
but Mrs. Canse was there, and she re
ceived them and learned their mission,
that they desired to be married so as
to catch a 6:37 o'clock train.
Another to Rescue.
While waiting for the minister to
return she filled out the necessary
blanks and telephoned for her husband.
Failing to find him she succeeded in
having Rev. C. R. G. Poole, Baptist,
go to the assistance of the lovelorn.
While waiting for him to arrive and
when filling out the papers, Mrs. Canse
asked if either party had ever been
married. The woman said she had and
produced a decree of divorce, dated
June 28, 1912. Mrs. Canse was stunned,
as it is required that those securing di
vorces remain Bingle six months. Mrs.
Canse said that the ceremony coukl not
proceed, though the minister had ar
rived. There was walling and disap
pointment, but finally the trio returned
to the Auditor's office and demanded
their money back for the marriage li
cense.
When Marshall learned why, he cold
ly informed them that the witness had
been guilty of perjury and that they
were liable to arrest and a jail sen
tence for' perjury. This somewhat
frightened them, and finally Marshall
relented and returned the 14 and tore
up the license. It is not likely that
this couple will return to Vancouver
when the six months is up, Mr. Mar
shall said.
Names Not Similar.
The decree of divorce was made out
to Elizabeth Long, . which must have
been her maiden name, but she gave
the name of Elizabeth Hurley when ap
plying for the license.
Another case where the man was di
vorced last week was discovered when
John W. Farleigh, of Springfield, Or.,
applied for a license to marry Sarah
Alderson, of La Grande, Or.
Those successful in getting married
here today were: Paul Stelter, of
Brush Prairie, and Lulu Raper, of
Chelatchie Prairie, Wash; Caspar
Schnidhuber, of St. Louis, Mo., and
Lizzie Reusser, of Akron, O.. witnessed
by Mrs. Ida Anderson: A. M. Schrader
and Sophia Junno, of Brush Prairie,
Wash.; and William H. Turner, oi 'ine
Dalles, Or., and Jessie C. Hanson, of
Vancouver, B. C, witnessed by Mrs.
R. W. Glascock.
PRALL'S WORK LAUDED
CONGRATULATIONS ON ROADS
PETITIONS POUR IN.
Signatures to Harmony Bills Are
Sufficient, but Fight by Grange
Is Expected.
Congratulations poured in to C. T.
Prall yesterday, following the an
nouncement of the successful culmina
tion of the campaign he directed to
initiate the six good roads bills framed
by Governor West's harmony commit
tee. Mr. Prall left last night for Sa
lem. He will file the petitions with the
Secretary of State today. Mr. Prll said
before leaving that he has several hun
dred signatures more than was neces
sary to put the measure on the ballot.
The road of the harmony .bills was
filled with obstacles. For a while it
was thought that the effort to initiate
them would meet with failure, owing to
over-confidence on the part of scores of
their supporters, who neglected to turn
in the" signed petitions. The main credit
for the success is due Mr. Prall, declare
good roads enthusiasts, as it was un
der his personal direction as president
of the Oregon Association for Highway
Improvement that the work was car
ried on. For the past month Mr. Prall
devoted his time exclusively to the
work of getting names to the petitions.
Another set of good roads bills,
backed by the Grangers, will be put on
tho ballot in opposition to the harmony
bills. The main difference in the two
sets is that one provides for state aid
in the construction and maintenance of
roads and the other does not. The
Grange men are emphatically against
state aid.
As a result of the conflicting bills,
the opinion among good roads men is
that neither set will pass muster. Each
faction Is waging resentless war on the
other's bills, with the result that or
ganised opposition is in store for both.
PARKS' NAMES CHANGED
TITLES OF BEAUTY SPOTS TO BE
DESCRIPTIVE.
City, Ladd and Williams Become
Washington, Laurelhurst and Mt,
Tabor by Order of Board.
The names of the City Park, Ladd
Park and Williams Park were changed
to Washington Park, Laurelhurst Park
and Mount Tabor Park, respectively, by
the Park Board at its meeting yester
day afternoon. The question was raised
whether this action must be confirmed
by ordinance of the Council, and an
opinion is to be obtained from City At
torney Grant.
The rule was adopted that hereafter
when properties are secured by the
Board by gift or bequest the . names
shall be descriptive of the landscape
or historic features of the locality. It
also was decided that so far as possi
ble points of vantage, roads and drive
ways be named after the flora of the
section, and special sections, tracts and
areas after historical events or per
sons In some way connected with them.
- Representatives of the Social Service
Council asked that at the City Park
a rest oottage of three or four rooms
for the convenience of women and chil
dren be built, that an attendant be
placed in charge, and one room be fit
ted up in such a way that the place
could be used for an emergency hospi
tal for those who visit the park. Com
plaint was made that many of the com
fort stations, particularly those at the
City Park, are not sanitary and are
dark.
Bids for the grading of 8000 feet of
the Terwilliger boulevard and the con
struction of two 21-inch concrete cul
verts were opened and referred to a
committee with power to act. The bias
range from J63.710 to J87.880. The
lowest bid was by Gleblsch & Joplin
and the highest by Harry Howard.
Carter Bros, put in the second highest
bid, the amount being $70,900. There
were seven bids.
Bids for a shelter and comfort sta
tion at Kenllworth Park were opened.
there being eight, ranging from 16435
that' by W. C. Arthur & Sons, to that
by John Moore. J7667.
Rhododendrons are to be secured
from Mount Hood and several carloads
of them transplanted in Ladd Park. A
lighting system will be Installed in
Brooklyn and Peninsula Parks.
Members of the Board will visit the
Terwilliger boulevard at 2 P.- M. to
morrow to determine whether to ac
cept the offer of L. O. Ralston to sell
part of his property to the city for
$7500.
HARVEST HANDS NEEDED
WOMEN COOKS, TOO, WANTED
IN SHERMAN COUNTY.
Farmers With Rich Yields in Fields
Threaten to Kidnap Travelers.
Vast Crops in Sight.
"With their bolos and machetes
turned into sickles the Moros of Sher
man County are preparing for an out
break that will make history for Ore
gon," said Mark Woodruff, yesterday.
"Failing in theif efforts to secure vol
untary assistance and co-operation.
in furthering their plans to devastate
the' surrounding country, these outlaws
of the wheat belt contemplate conceal
ing parties of men, armed with prun
ing hooks, in the grain fields border
ing the highways of Sherman and
Wasco counties and kidnaping every
traveler. The men are wanted as har
vefit hands and the women for cooks.
"It has been five years since the
Moro. Wasco and Pleasant Valley peo
pie created any serious disturbance in
the wheat district. During most oi
that time they have built, homes, dug
wells, turned hot and cold water into
their homes, imported a few brood sows
and otherwise prepared to withstand a
siege. But this year these brawny
sons of the original warriors oi ox
cart fame expect to decorate the land
scape with automobiles and a few
knick-knacks that pertain to the dis
credited rich.
"There will be enough money in
Sherman' County this year to buy the
available gasoline supply of the world,
and use it for irrigation purposes. It
will come from 200,000 acres of the
finest-looking wheat that ever swung
in the wind, and the grain-buyer wno
offers less than 75 cents as a starter
had better have his airship ready ror
instant departure. That means 4,000,-
000 bushels of wheat in snerman
County, or that $3,000,000 will be in cir
culation as soon aa tne crop is moveo.
"Aeeordlnsr to the books of the As
sessor for Sherman County the total
tillable land is 271.000 acres. This sea
son. 116,967 acres are in Fall wheat,
SB KftO acres in Spring wheat and n,6i
acres in other crops. And for the six
months receding April 1 the women
of Sherman County carried $9000 in
hntter and esrers to the country stores.
To keep business moving while the
wheat was maturing tne larmers lasi
year shipped horses, cattle, sheep, hogs,
wool, butter and cream to the value
of $129,780. The hog shipments alone
were valued at $70,000. Just $63,000
more than In any previous year.
"Whizzing through the miles of grain
flolila in Sherman County one is struck
with the scarcity of dwellings. The
facts are that of the 365 lana owners
claiming their homes in Sherman
County, only 262 actually maintain
their homes on farms, while 103 lease
their holdings. There are 302 non
resident owners of land, 71 of them
being retired farmers who make their
homes in Portland.
"It was to bring about a change oi
these conditions that Sherman County
purchased, in 1909, an experimental
farm of 400 acres immediately adjoin
ing the town of Moro, where R. H.
Stevens, an expert from the United
States Department of Agriculture, is
demonstrating the value of Intensive
tillage of soils." -
DECISION IS IMPORTANT
MARSHFIELD STIRRED OVER
BAINES-RAILROAD CASE.
Permanent Injunction Issued in Ac
tion Which Involved Tramway
Used by Smith Mill.
MARSHFIELD. Or., July 1. (Spe
cial ) The Supreme Court has handed
down a decision which is highly im
portant to all the persons concerned
who reside in this city..
The case was that of James Balnes. a
property ownerr against the Marsh
field Suburban Railroad. The latter Is
the name of the railroad or tramway
operated by the C. A. Smith Company
between the lumber mill outside the
city and the retail lumber yards and
fuel yards in the center of the city.
It is a small tramway with narrow
track extending on one side of the
streets over which it runs. Mr. Baines
owns property on Second street oyer
which the road runs and he started
suit for an injunction on the grounds
that the railway was a nuisance and
asked to have It removed. In the Cir
cuit Court a temporary injunction was
granted and was suspended pending
the fighting out of the question in the
courts. Now .the Supreme Court has
" -.?m.n.nt lnlunction. Just
what the effect will be the lawyers
are not able to say, as io y
i- - franchise fi r the
tne emim j 7- , .
road. Small cars carrying lumber and
fuel wood are nauiea over mo
with horses. . .
. . . . 1 cm th PnmnftTiv started
Wim nie oi"1" r
their mill building and other improve
ments in Marsnneio. iour j-e
which 4ave since run into the millions,
..nJitinni thn r.nmnanv asked
of the people of the city was that a
b rid pre De dumi " v.w
ana in- mc. a - . , . .
the tramway down on certain streets.
If these requests were granted the
company agreed to build the large mill
ir. TWarshneld. which was done under the
conditions named.
Coos Bay Boys Benefited.
MADSHli'IKT.TI Or. Julv 1. Sdc-
cial.) Tho members of the Marsh:
3
on1' Wanrt nr rUviainnn of the Oregon
Naval Militia, Just returned from their
annual cruise on the Maryland, were
high in their praises of the treatment
they received at the hands of the reg
ulars and derived much benefit from
the practical . training that they re
ceived on the war vessel. Twenty-five
boys were on the cruise from Coos
County. . They left the Maryland at
Astoria and returned home on the
steamer Breakwater with Captain Mae
genn, who Is commander of the 'Marsh
field division.
DAILY METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
PORTLAND. July 1. Maximum tempera
ture, 69 degrees; minimum. 63 degrees. River
reading, 8 A. M.. l.6 feet; change In last
24 hours. 0.4 toot fall. Total rainfall. 6 P.
M. to 5 P. M., 0.03 inch; total rainfall tnce
September 1, 1911. 34.74 iqchel: normal.
44.98 incnea; uenciency, iiw.-im
sunshine, none: possible, is nours i minutes.
Barometer (reduced to sea leveu ai o sr. ja.
30.04 inches.
THE WEATHER.
Wind
State of
STATIONS.
Weather
Baker ........
Boise .........
Boston .......
Calgary ......
Chicago .......
Colfax
Ienvr
Dea Moinei ...
Duluth
Eureka
Galveston
Helena
Jacksonville . .
Kansas City ..
Klamath Falls
Laurier
Los Angeles ..
Marsh fie Id, ....
Med ford ......
Montreal
New Orleans ..
New York
North Head . .
North Yakima
Pendleton . . .
Phoenix ......
Pocatello
Portland
Roseburg:
Sacramento .
St. Louis
St. Paul
Salt Lake
San Francisco
Spokane
T acorn a
Tatoosh Island
Walla Walla ..
Washington ...
Welser
Wenatchee
Winnipeg
Rain
Pt. cloudy
uiouay
Clear
Rain
mimiriv
Cloudy
Clear
Pt- clou
udy
iD A V'TTirinnHv
ZZ Z J." 7'
Clear
Hazy
Rain
Clear
8SW
Pt. cloudy
0O(16SW
Clear
Cloudy
Clear
Cloudy
Cloudy
Icioudy
lnitAr
llf 2!SW
Cloudy
Cloudv
PL filflu
udy
Pt. loiid
ay
Pt. cloudy
Cloudy
Clear
"Pt r.loiidv
calm (Cloudy
1 X'TC IKsIn
4ISW
IClear
6 SW Cloudy
48
Clear
calm Cloudy
KIV flrtllrtV
0016SE ciear
WEATHER CONDITION'S.
Except over the Appalachian Highland,
thpr has bean a decided decrease ot pres
sure throughout the United States within the
last 12 hours. The pressure still remains
high east ot the Mississippi River, but only
a sugnt nign-pressure neta cpniero wu
rsortn facmc coast, iwo quue wen ww
vAlnn.tl disturbances are central this even
ing over Arizona and Western North Da
kota, respectively. Light rains have fallen
within the last 13 nours in ionneru -ro-
trnn Wa.hlne-IAII Montana. WvOminK. COlO
rado, Minnesota and Iowa, moderately heavy
rains in Northern Idaho, tne uaaotas. lyouisi
ana, Kentucky, Tennessee and North Caro
tin. nri h.avv rains In Oklahoma. Thun
derstorms occurred In many states between
the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The
wMihr l. warmer In Western Washington,
Southwestern Oregon, Interior California,
the Central Plateau States and portions of
tne Boutnern plains aiuie., mm m
..it Tt t. miifh cooler in Northern Idaho,
Northeastern Oregon, Northern Utah, the
Dakotas and Eastern Tennessee. Tempera
tures are below the normal in nearly all
sections or the uniteo. states.
Tha onndltlons are still unsettled through
out the Pacific Northwest, and showers are
indicated tor Tuesday in most portions of
this district. Temperature changes will be
unimportant and generally westerly winds
will obtain.
FORECASTS.
Portland and vicinity Showers; south
westerly winds.
Oregon and Washington Showers; south
westerly winds.
Idaho Showers.
THEODORE F. DRAKE.
Acting District Forecaster.
Oxfords, Hair Price.
Men's and ladies' Oxfords half -price
at our clearance sale now going on.
Goodyear Shoe Company. 146 Fourth.
' DIED.
MINOGUE In this city, at her late resi
dence, 12th and Columbia sts., Helen
" Mlnogue, aged 34 years. Remains at the
establishment of J. P. Finley & Son. Fu
neral notice will appear in a subsequent
Issue. . . .
LITTLE July 1, H. Wallace Little, aged .16
years. Remains at Dunning ,& McEntee I
cnapei. notice or imici' t.pi.
IX'NEKAL NOTICES.
WILLIAMS The funeral services of the late
Daniel W. Williams, who passed away at
the residence of his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. George H. Williams, in e-uia .u,
T,.a on u.iti .clUa nlare at the above-
named residence today (Tuesday), at 1:30
P. M. Interment at tne u. A. J, pioi.
Greenwood cemetery. nenas r
spectfully Invited to attend.
,-, DDPT T A. Qnlf TjlVn CltV. June 21.
Leila Swlgert Campbell, beloved wife of
H C Campbell. 1 ne lunerai servii-e win
be held at the family residence. 20th and
Carter streets, on Tuesday, 2d Inst., at
2:30. Interment at Rlverview Cemetery.
The service at the grave will be private.
No flowers, by request.
WILLIS In this city, at the late residence,
mo ipaat 9ftth Mt. North. JoseDhlne Willis.
..ui -n i-.nr 2 month, and U days. ne
funeral services will take place at Flnley's
chapel tomorrow (Wednesday) at 1:30
o'clock P. M. Friends respectfully invited
to attend.
DILLEY The funeral services of the late
Charles R. Ullley, wno passeu
this city, June 2. will take place at Fin
ley's Chapel today (Tuesday) at 2
o'clock P. M. Interment will be had at
Multnomah cemetery. rntuui mo
spectfully invited to attend.
oci-n .t thA famllv residence. 715 Ev-
...ii at .iniv i. i rmi ItB dOIUIUO ncou,
aged 07 'years 1 month 10 days. Funeral
services wm dc hwiu i no
Ame. at p. M. tomorrow. July 3. In
terment Rlverview Cemetery. Services at
the grave private.
CLUSTER June 29. Adolphus Cluster, aged
27 years, r unerai service, win ue uom
Dunning McEntee's chapel today. 2 P.
M Friends invited. Interment hose City
Cemetery.
CUSTER A. B. Custer, husband of Sophia.
Interment rtooe ..ity i am vn.ci j .
services will be neia at jjunnmg s mo
Entee's. 7th and Pine, at 2 P. M. tomor
row.
MdKrMENTB Otto Schumann Marble
Works. East Sd and Fine St.. Kast 74 i
oeral director aim ajiucrini., v
cor. Baimon. Atuy ooi.
7th and rine. Fhone Main 430. Lady at-
Phone rant mop, v ivoo. wit
...... . ' . C-. . 0 .1 n .1 U n...n
- . . . Til II . 1KDQ
luy Hwuwih - " -
AB1 P1W6 r o"""'
in r . a - " """. , .
J AMm mA
ir-vc. '1T-Li-ZLJI
KHRnrKH COMPANY. Sd and Clay. Main
4182. A XUtl. m"y wjmiii-
CEMETERY
Beautiful
MOUNT SCOTT PARK
LARGE, PERMAXEXT,
MODERN, FOR T
LAKD'S OSLT MODERN
CEMETERY WITH
PERPETUAL. CAHK
of all burial plots without extra
charge. Provided with a perma
nent Irreducible Maintenance
Fund. Location ideal; Just out
side the city limits on north
and west slopes of Mount Scott,
containing 335 acres, equipped
with every modern convenience.
PRICES TO SUIT ALL.,
SERVICE THE BEST.
ONE MILE SOUTH OK
LENTS. REGULAR
AUTOMOBILE SERV
ICE FREE BETWEEN
LENTS AND THE
' CEMETERY. II II IS
CITY OFFICE, 920-921 YEON
BUILDING. M AIN 225, A 70SS.
CEMETERY OFFICE. TABOR
1-468; HOME PHONE KING B
6111. THEN CALL. LOCAL 4301.
HOTELS AND
HOTEL OREGON,
Portland, Or.,
Wright-Dickinson Hotel Co Props.
HOTEL SEATTLE,
Seattle, Wash.
VVright-EHckinson Hotel Co., Props.
I C iiinrnn-n-" - ruTmii nmnmrf
jjjff
The PORTLAND
G. J. KAUFMAN N, Manager
A homelike hotel, pleasantly
located in the heart of the
city. All outside rooms. Con
cert by Symphony Orchestra
In courtyard every evening.
Unl.l mn.nr. m.At all trains
and steamers. European.
(1.60 upwards. fi -
HOTEL CORNELIUS
House of Welcome Portland, Or.
Out 14-passenger electric 1us meets all trains. A
high-class, modern hotel in the heart of the theater
and shopping district. One block from any carlinew
tl Der day and tn. European plan.
HOTEL CORNELIUS fO Proprietor.
J. W. Blatn, Pres. Fielder Jones, VIce-Prra.
HOTEL MOORE
OVERLOOKING THE OCEAN.
OPENED JUNE 1, WITH COMPLETE SUMMER CREW.
Many new and modern improvements. Electric lighted. Rooms with or
without bath. Hot salt baths and surf bathing; pier for fishing. Steam heat
trid running water. Sea foods a specialty. The dining-room and kitchen will
te in charge of John Lehner, who Is well known through his connection with
the Arlington Club for past six years.
CLATSOP BEACH, SEASIDE, OR. DAN J. MOORE, Prop.
HOTEL MULTNOMAH
FUENISHED TENTS AT
COLUMBIA BEACH
ON THE PACIFIC
Each tent is equipped with beds, bedding, stove, table, cooking utensils,
etc. You will have the free use of shower baths, water, swings, tennis
courts and boats. Good board may be secured at 35 cents per weal or
$1 per day. Make your reservations at Western Oregon Trust Co., 272
Stark Street, or write Frank E. Roberts, Manager, care Columbia Beach
Hotel, Columbia Beach, via Warrenton, Oregon.
AUCTION SALES TODAY,
-r.-, .1 hn. IRB-lfiS Psrk
St. Lrge quantity ot gooa iu'-".
pets, etc., lor positive .m.'
MEETING NOTICES. -
PORTLAND CHAPTER, NO. 97. O.
land Chapter. No. 7. O. E. S. will
be held this (Tuesday), evening In
n -n, U.1I U'U Rll.MPlI St. BV
order of the W. am sec
ftni?(mtf "-f-lT'NTCT T . -ROTA
ARCANUM, meets at the new
hall. Royal bide., formerly Tull
& Glbbs, the llrst and third
Tuesdays ot eacn monm, t. c
p M. Visitors cordially wel
comed. O. O. HAI.L, Sec.
Care Honeyman Hardware Co,
MT. TABOR LODGE, NO. 42.
A F. A 1 A. XL. Dmi : '
0 WeSt MOB ACiliio.
. -in. I, In. hr.thren Invited
to attend. By oroer ot tne w. .
to auena. w R SPAULDINO. Secretary.
. - , r c V
Samaritan lAiwc ... ., ,; ; v. 11
All members are requested to meet t hall
of Mount Scott Loace, no. y. v "-;"; -(Tuesday)
evening at 8 o'clock P
tnat loago "'"" -- - , -.di.
third decree on a. ' " 1 -'
dates. Take Mount bcoij c.r.
ORIENT ' W,V.
.t- Trt it t r o V
Visitor. Invito. W. W. TERRY. S-c
Ta.in. Tniinir: iiinistiiaiiuu --
MEW
HOTEL
OIROFUN
PERKINS
BATH.
portiand.ore:
$iFf R DAY UP
' -IMTHt HEART Of Ttitmi
BmtOUTWTH$!S3UP
Ho! for Cascadia
resort on Coast: best
medicinal water, scenery, hunting and
fishing; nature's own conservatory of
health Auto or stage from Lebanon or
Brownsville.
Write or pnone
G. M. GEISENDORFER,
Cascadia, Oregon.
Sea Croft and Annex
SKAVIEW, WASHINGTON.
Snlandld location, faetine: the ocean:
electric lights among the trees; large
sitting rooms with fireplaces. Best of
meals served In Seacroft's dining-room.
Housekeeping apartments in the Annex.
Mrs, W. E. Hutchinson, Manager.
SUMMER RESORTS.
Both hotels
centrally located,
modern in every
respect, and
conducted on thd
European plan.
lf KastPopolir-
i J Hotel
ftfL MnSCtWftiJOHS, fops.
A Crtiose. Mgr.
PORTLAND
OREGON
In size, appointments, servlcs
and fireproof quality of the
building the leading hotel in
Portland, the Multnomah, offers
to the discriminating traveler
every comfort and convenience
found only in the best hotels of
the EaBt. Nine stories of stoel
and concrete, with 725 rooms
and suites, palatlally furnished,
with rates from 1.B0 to ti per
day, European plan. Motor
'busses meet all trains and
steamers.
H. C BOWERS, Manager.
J. M. BROWN ELL, Aas't Mgr.
0v
SOL DUC HOT
SPRINGS HOTEL
In the Heart of the Olympics.
"The
Carlsbad of
America."
Magnificent 165-room hotel,
thoroughly modern; meals and
-service unsurpassed.
Hot mineral water specific in
the cure of rheumatism, lter,
Uomach, kidney, blood, skin and
lervous disorders.
Altitude 1760 feet. Mountain
:llmbing and all sorts of a. use
ments. Finest fishing. Modern
sanatorium. ,
Boats leave the Colman dock,
Seattle, daily except Sunday, H
A. M. Round-trip tickets. Day
light ' lp.
For descriptive literature, ad
dress Dr. William W. Earles,
medical superintendent, Sol Due,
Wash.
Pck-Judah free information
bureaus.
The SHELBURNE, North Beach
Completely remodeled. Modem Improve
ments, including bath. Enlarged capacity,
beautiful dinln. room. Now one of tile larg
est hotels on North Beach. Shady porrhes
and playgrounds for children. Croquet lawn.
Rooms large, airy and sunny. We raise our
own poultry. Reasonable rates and special
rates by the week for families. Make reser
vations by mall or wire.
Address Seavlew, Wash., T. i. Hoare, Prop.
THE HACKNEY COTTAGE
Enlarged Dlnlns; - Hoora Capacity and
Electrified House.
Beautiful Surroundings and
MOST PLEASANT SPOT ON NORTH
BEACH.
Hnm comforts. Special rates by the
week. Make reservations by mall or wire.
Address, SEAVIEW. WASH.
DAILY AUTO STAGE
FOR MOUNT HOOD RESORTS.
Welche'R, Mauldlns; and Rhododendron.
Leaves 8 A. M. baiuraay only z r M.
Fare Ki.50. Hound Trip f.sl.50.
For Reservations, Tickets, Etc., Phone
Main 6956, A 3811, or Call
ROUTLEDGE SEED A FLORAL CO.
169 Second Street,
Between Morrison and Vnmlll.
OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY
- OFFICE 175 MADISON STREET.
Phone. Main 60S, A 7589.
Horse Ambulance Phone Marshall 00.
Refer All Casea of Cruelty to This
Office. Open Day and Might.
msm.
tnUUlSHSSEOit,'