Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, June 08, 1910, Page 2, Image 2

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    YFTE 3IORXIXG OREGOXIAN, WEDNESDAY, JCSE 8, llth
TUFT TURNS DOWN
POINDEXTER AGAIN
Fiaht Over Kennewick Post-
mastership Disastrous to
Insurgent.
PERRY LOSES TO WHEATON
Administration. Deals Severely flth
Spokane Representative, Who
Would Block Programme.
More Such Treatment.
OREGONTAK NEWS BUREAU. Wash
ington, June 7. Representative Poin
dexter, insurgent, of Spokane, was to
day again turned down' by President
Taft when he nominated Arthur H.
Wheaton to be Postmaster at Kenne
wick, succeeding: James N. Scott, re
signed. Poindexter recommended the appoint
ment of Joseph C. Perry -to succeed
Bcott but the President set aside Poln
dexter's man and named Wheaton, who
is indorsed by regular Republicans of
Kastern Washington.
Heretofore notice has been served
that men indorsed by Poindexter can
not be appointed to Federal office in
Washington, and Poindexter's indorse
ment Is all that prevented Perry's
nomination, for he is a man of good
standing and qualified.
The Administration proposes to treat
all other Poindexter men in the same
fashion. fc
VALE MATTER IS BEFORE TAFT
President Discusses Situation With
Cabinet Members.
OREGONIAN NEWS BUREAU, Wash
ington, June 7. President Taft today
discussed with the Cabinet the fight
that has arisen between Senator
Bourne and Representative Ellis over
the selection of register and receiver
for the Vale Land Office, and after
hearing the views of his advisers, he
took the matter under advisement, and
will announce his decision later in the
week. It was made plain at the Cabi
net meeting that Representative Ellis
is neither claiming nor demanding the
right to select these two officers, but
merely insisting that the citizens of
Oregon, and preferably citizens of the
new land district, be appointed.
No charges are made against either
Kester or Guild, recommended by Sen
ator Bourne, and they are assailed only
on the ground that they are non-residents.
Representative Ellis today received
a telegram from O. N. McArthur, sec
retary of the Republican state central
committee in Oregon, urging the ap
pointment of McKnight and Hurley, of
Vale, as register and receiver respect
ively of the Vale land office. He bases
his recommendation on the fact that
both are old residents of Oregon and
of the new land district, and protests
against giving these offices to out
siders. Ellis filed the telegram with
At a Cabinet meeting today Secre
tary Balllnger brought up Senator
Bourne's Vale Land Office recommend
ations, and laid before the Cabinet a
protest by Representative Ellis against
Kester and Guild, on the ground that
they are not residents of the new dis
trict. The matter and all records were
left with the President, who will de
termine the case in a few days.
INDIANS TO PAY BIG FEE
Commission of $90,000 Asked for
Sale of Colvllle Reserves.
OREGONIAN NEWS BUREAU. Wash
ington, June 7. Senator Jones intro
duced a bill today authorizing the Sec
retary of the Treasury to pay attorneys
who performed services' for the Col
ville Indians not to exceed $90,000 out
of the Indian fund. The services were
rendered in promoting the claim of
SI. 500. 000 which ultimately was paid
for the north half of the Colvllle res
ervation. Senator Piles Introduced a bill today
permitting the Vancouver, Columbia A.
Camas Railroad Company to build its
road across the Vancouver military reservation.
Postmasters' Salaries Advanced.
OREGONIAN NEWS BUREAU, Wash
ington, June 7. On July 1 the postoffice
at St. Helens, Or., will be advanced to the
Presidential grade and the postmaster's
polary fixed at $1100. The salary of the
Toledo postmaster is advanced to $1000.
AGAINST NEGRO REGIMENT
Continued From ylrat Paire.
that a black battalion had been ordered
here from the Philippines a protest was
made by the people of Interbay to Secre
tary of War Dickinson, who in reply
pent a letter saying that there need be
no fear of the negro soldiers misbe
having. The colored soldiers have given no
trouble to the downtown people. They
arc men of fine physique, spotless In
their dress, and not given to frequenting
the downtown saloons. The officers gave
the men to understand that they must
be on their good behavior and live down
the prejudice against them.
First Complaint in 1909.
On February 11, 1909, the first com
plaint was made against tlve soldiers,
when Mrs. C B. Aizada reported that
she had been attacked by a uniformed
negro In the neighborhood of the fort.
General Rnlph W. Hoyt made a thorough
Investigation and exonerated the negro
troops.
It is paid, however, that in the last
six weeks there have been a number
of complaints that the colored soldiers
have insulted women.
Private Pledser was turned over to the
Si-attic police today, by Colonel Miller, af
ter having been identified as the man
who forced his way into the home of
Mrs. Redding Saturday night. The seven
negro soldiers who were absent from the
post Saturday were marched under heavy
guard today to tho home of Mrs. Redding.
31ie at once picked out Bledser from the
seven as her nssailant. Kleven-year-old
Ethel Redding, daughter of the injured
woman, picked Bledser from the set-en.
She had identified him yesterday. Pri- '
vatest Ford and Thomas, who were among
the men absent from the post Saturday
nlght. are the ones Mil! in the guard
house, but it is officially mated that
their offense Is purely military. It is
believed they gave false testimony re
garding KJedser's whereabouts on Satur
day night. After Bledser's arrest he
waxed his mustache and changed his
appearance thereby, but Colonel Miller
ordered the wax removed.
Bledser Remains Silent.
Bledser has betrayed no anxiety
throughout the ordeal and has made no
statement. x
To a delegation of citizens of Fort Law
ton district who urged him to assist in
obtaining the removal of negro troops
from the Army post. Mayor Gill said yes
terday: "The negro troops should be removed.
With a hundred policemen the city could
not guard the Fort Lawton district
against depredations. There is between
10 and 12 miles of territory, heavily
wooded and with scarcely any streets or
lights at present, and it is out of the
question, for the city to attempt to police
such a district against prowlers such as
have been causing the trouble. They are
situated in Seattle in such e. place that
it is out of the question for the city gov
ernment to afford ample protection to
women and children against prowling
men of desperate character."
DR.GOLDWiN SMITH DIES
NOTED REFORMER AXD WRITER
PASSES IX TORONTO.
In Civil War He Sided With North,
and Advocated Union of Canada
With United States.
TORONTO. June 7. Professor Gold
win Smith died this afternoon, aged 87.
Since the death of his wife last. Sum
mer, the infirmities of old age had
been creeping rapidly on Dr. Smith,
and several months ago he gave up
all his literary work. On February 2
he was walking through the hall of
his home when he tripped and fell,
fracturing his thigh bone. On account
of the patient's advanced age the bones
would not knit.
Anything that savored of reform in
terested Professor Smith. His first
work in making conditions better was
in the way of university reform, when
he was connected with the Oxford
Commission, in the early 60s. This
brought about numerous changes in
the university system. He was born
in 1823 and graduated from Oxford in
1845.
During the Civil War Professor
Smith, then reglus professor of modern
history in Oxford, turned his attention
to reformation politically. He was a
warm champion of the North, and in
the Daily News conducted a vigorous
campaign against the pro-Southern
tendencies of the Times.
In 1868 he came to the newly-organized
Cornell University as professor
of English and constitutional history.
He resigned three years later, but re
tained a non-resident professorship.
After he left Cornell, Professor Smith
went to Toronto, making his home
there for the remainder of his life.
Here he carried on his work in the in
terests of reform, giving forth volumi
nous writings on a diversity of sub
jects. . He believed in the ultimate
union of Canada and the United States.
As part of his historical work he shed
much light on the relations Between
England and Ireland, asserting that
the struggle of the Irish is simply an
attempt to regain the land of which
they had been deprived. In later
years Professor Smith turned his at-
tention to questions of civic reform.
NOTION DEFEATS LAW
PIBLIC SENTIMENT GREATER
THAN STATUTE, SAYS JUDGE.
Though Saloonkeeper Violated Sun
day Closing, It Does ' Not
Affect Naturalization.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., June 7. (Spe
cial.) Judge J. V. Quaries declares
that public sentiment is greater than
law, for in an opinion handed down
today in the case of Albert P. Hopp,
a saloonkeeper, who was admitted to
citizenship, although it was shown
that he transgressed the law in that
he kept his place open on Sundays,
the court said:
"The Roman maxim that the voice
of the people is the voice of God, is
just as true today as it was then. Any
Legislature that establishes police reg
ulations in defiance of public senti
ment must suffer the humiliation of
seeing their mandate disregarded."
The court pointed to the fact that 75
per cent of the people of Milwaukee
are foreign born, and that a majority
of its '350,000 Inhabitants are of Ger
man extraction. He said that in Mil
waukee there are 2000 saloons, and
that, although the Sunday closing law
had been on the books for 40 years,
no attempt has been made to en
force it.
American Girl Wins at London.
LONDON. June 7-The second day of
the International Horse Show drew a
good attendance. The first American
winning in the judging was Miss
Loula Long, of Kansas City, whose
horse, the King, won second honors
in class 1 for novice single light har
ness horses.
Charge Filed Against Perry.
SALEM.vOr., June 7. (Special.) Dis
trict Attorney McNary today filed a
complaint against Frank Perry, charg
ing him with attempted attack on
Hattie Prill. 8 years old. A preliminary
examination will be held in a day or
two. and the prisoner will be bound
over for trial at the next term of Cir
cuit Court.
-S3- ku?Jgd
v
TAKE THIS CAB FOR
LAURELHURSJ
PORTLAND'S MOST BEAUTIFUL
RESIDENCE PARK.
DR. BLACK HAS COUP
Bomb Is Hurled Into Camp of,
Dalzell, in Pittsburg.
DISTRICT HELD ILLEGAL
Defeated Congressional Candidate
Says Victorious Opponent Won
by Votes Which Do Not Belong
in "the Thirteenth."
PITTSBURG. Pa.. June 7. (Special.)
Dr. Robert J. " Black, hitherto noted
as the defeated candidate for the Re
publican Congressional nomination in
the Thirtieth district, sprang a sen
sation in the County Commissioner's of
fice, by charging that a large part of
the territory in which votes were cast
in Saturday's primaries did not belong
to the district.
He declared that even if it is finally
shown that John Dalzell, his closest
opponent, received a plurality of votes,
Dalzell cannot be the nominee. He says
the disputed territory, which is south
of the Youghiogheny River in Alle
gheny County, is not entitled to Con
gressional representation and that Dal
zell carried this territory, according to
the unofficial returns, by a plurality of
640. He also states that Dalzell's plur
ality for. the whole Congressional dis
trict was only 218. By wiping out the
disputed territory. Black claims a plur
ality of 250.
The controversy is the result of an
act reapportioning the Congressional
districts passed and signed by the Gov
ernor at the 1909 session of the Legis
lature. Through Rn error, one of the
amendments was not certified to the
printer, and a portion of the territory
lies within the boundaries of two dis
tricts. Dr. Black' says he has had detec
tives at work and- that they can prove
fraud in many voting districts through
out the district He says the fight has
just started and that Dalzell cannot be
seated.
CHILD'S DEATH MYSTERY
Toddler Found With Skull Fractured
on Lawn of Home.
TACOMA. Wash.. June 7. Lying un
conscious on the lawn only a few feet
from the side porch, the body of Theo
dore Campion, the 3-year-old child of
H. J. Campion, a prominent dry goods
merchant, was found about noon yester
day at the home on Pacific avenue, near
Parker street. His skull was fractured
Whether he had climbed an apple tree
or been kicked by a. horse could not be
determined, but the skull was dented
from a hard blow.
An operation failed to give relief and
the child died early this morning. He
had been in the house, where his mother
was- engaged, only about ten minutes be
fore the accident.
MOTHER'S LETTER IS CLEW
Appeal to Boy Leads to His Arrest
for Burglary.
NORTH YAKIMA, Wash.. June 7.
(Special.) Portions of a mother's letter
to a wayward son. picked up by the
police in the rear of a Front-street store,
constituted the clew which led to the
arrest of B. F. Callahan today on a
charge . of burglarizing the store last
Friday night.
In the letter the mother urged her boy
"not to listen to boys who don't plan
the Tight, thing." Callahan was caught
with the goods which he had stolen.
1 ted men Go as Delegates.
VANCOUVER. Wash., June 7. (Spe
cial.) As delegates to the state grand
council of Red Men, which will be held in
Walla Walla, July 19, J. A. Padden, J.
C. Ernst. J. J. Sexton and E. M. Scan
lon have been chosen by the local camp.
MAKE THIS
A REAL
FESTIVAL WEEK
xv4L' CfiocoloLT
, WILL MAKE IT 1 HE SWEETER
Sold Where they Sell the Best ,
We are giving away a five-pound
box of "Societe Chocolats" -for the
best display in the flower show.
IMPERIAL CANDY
Makers of Quality Candy
The delegates will Invite the grand coun
cil to meet here next year.
ODDFELLOWS HONOR LEE
Grand Lodge of Washington Holds
Big Parade in North Yakima.
NORTH YAKIMA, Wash., June 7.
(Special.) The 33d annual state encamp
ment of the grand lodge of the Oddfel
lows elected the following officers in ses
sion this morning: Grand Master, Robert
E. Lee. Colville; deputy grand master, N.
K. Staley, Bellingham; grand warden, W.
E. McCroskey, Palouse; grand secretary,
Louis F. Hart, Tacoma; grand treas
urer, H. E. Holmes, Seattle: grand rep
resentatives, J. M. Ralston. Port Towns
end, and L. J. Birdseye, Spokane.
The grand lodge degree was conferred
on a class of 234 members. Following a
parade tonight. In which over 1000 Odd
fellows and Rebekahs took part, a recep
tion was held in the pavilion at the State
Fairgrounds. The drills for the prizes
offered by the state and local lodges
have been set for Wednesday and Thurs
day. Many of the delegates will remain In
the city for the convention of the Spanish
War veterans, Friday and Saturday.
Bachelor Ieaves Bank Deposit.
VANCOUVER, Wash., June 7. (Spe
cial.) W. O. Gorman, a bachelor, who
died In Portland, May 24, left a certificate
of deposit for $1040, in the Commercial
Bank of this city. He left no direct
heirs, but he had two brothers, John H.
and Charles Gorman, and a sister. Mrs.
Maria McCormick. in Buffalo, N. Y. A.
L. Miller has applied to the court to be
appointed administrator. J. H. Gorman
is a captain on the Buffalo police force.
Charles Gorman has been a patrolman
there for la years.
White Salmon Church Dedicated.
WHITE SALMON. Wash., June 7.
(Speclla.) With more than- 400 in at
tendance the First Methodist Church of
this place was dedicated on Sunday.
The morning service was in charge of
Dn T. B. Ford, of Hood River. Seven
other preachers assisted. The music was
conducted by P. B. Stout, All joined in
a basket dinner on the Hotel Washing
ton lawn. At the morning services
$1700 was raised and at night $80 was
contributed toward the purchase of a
bell.
Railway Company Sited.
OREGON CITY, Or., June 7. (Special.)
Roscoe D. Morris this afternoon filed a
suit for $1807 damages against the Port
land Railway, Light & Power. Company
for alleged da-mages sustained by being
SPECIAL BARGAINS
IN LADIES'
NECKWEAR,
GLOVES.
SUNSHADES,
HANDBAGS AND
UNDEBMT7SLINS
Eretiro Bldg.. Cor. Fourth aurad Morrison
SPECIAL BARGAINS
IN LADIES
NECKWEAR,
' GLOVES.
SUNSHADES.
HANDBAGS AND
UNDERMUSLINS
CAR
NIVAL
SPECIALS
Some Very Interesting Bargains, Briefly Mentioned,
That You Should Take Advantage Of.
Washable Dresses, $4.50 Values at $2.49
A splendid lot of Washable Dresses made of ginghams and linene
in a variety of pleasing stylefc, white and colors. Exceptional values
Waists
$2.00 Values 98c
Lingerie' and plain-tailored
styles of good quality materials
and well-made. A choice va
riety of styles.
Trimmed Hats
Wednesday the last day to se
cure our beautiful trimmed hats
at Half Price
Do not" miss the opportunity
INVITATION Visitors are requested to take advantage of all the
J. 11 V X -V Vll special bargains we are offering. You are cordially
invited to visit our store as often as possible, whether purchasing or not.
Furs at Summer Prices
"We offer to all of our patrons for the Rose Carnival week a great reduction, which means a
saving of over one-half thejr actual values for the coming season.
Buy Your Furs Now
From the largest Fur manufacturer of the West. All Silverfield Furs 'made under our own roof
and tinder direct siipervision of our Mr. Silverfield. which guarantees the best quality and cor
rectness of style. Now is the time to remodel your Furs at Summer prices. All the new styles
are here now. Furs stored at reduced rates. All Furs remodeled or purchased durinjr the Sum
mer months stored free of charge until wanted. A small deposit will hold Furs until Fall. Our
messenger will call for your Furs. Call M 1295, A-1295.
struck by a Green Polnt-Canemah elec
tric car In this city a few weeks ago.
Morris was driving at the time of the
accident and the car demolished his
vehicle. He declares he was severely
Injured about the head and that three
ribs were broken. '
MRS. AOKI SEEKS DIVORCE
Failure to Provide Alleged in Suit
Filed in Xevada.
CARSON,Nev., June 7. A formal ap
plication for divorce on the grounds
of alleged desertion and failure to sup
port was filed in the District Court
here yesterday by Mrs. Helen Gladys
Aoki agaist her husband. Guhjiro
Aoki, a Japanese, who was formerly
epiployed as a servant In the home of
the wife's parents. Mrs. Aoki is the
daughter of Archdeacon Emery, of the
Episcopal Church, residing at Corte
Madera, Cal. Her marriage to the Jap-
COLUMBI
A RIVER
AND
CASCADE
MOUNTAIN OUTINGS
Low Daily, Week-End and Sunday Round -Trip Ticket
HEALTH
RESORTS
TROUT
FISHING
Resort Hotels and Health Springs
Low Round-Trip Rates From Portland
Tickets on sale Saturday and
Sunday, limit Monday following
Tickets on sale Sunday onlyN
limited to date of sale. - -
Camas : .$1.00
Butler .$1.70
Stevenson (Stevenson Hot Springs) .$2.15
Ash (Shipherd's Mineral Springs) . .$2.30
Collins (Collins Hot Springs) $2.50
White Salmon (Jewett Farm Resort) .$3.00
Mt. Pleasant '. . . . . $1.25
Cruzatt ..... . . $1.25
Butler $1.30
Cascades . . . . . . $1.50
Mountain Streams and Picnic Grounds
THREE TRAINS DAILY
Leav -Portland 9:00 A. M., .4:30 P. M., 7:00
Arrive Portland 7:30 A. at, 12:25 P. M., 8:15
P.
P.
M.
M.
Passenger Station 1 1th and Hoyt Streets
trir TICKET OFFICES
Third and Morrison Streets
122 Third Street
anese at Seattle in March, 1909, had
been bitterly opposed by residents of
various places where unsuccessful at
tempts were made to have the cere
mony performed. Following their mar
riage the couple lived in Seattle for
several months and there a child was
born to them.
VJryjbWUtfYKa-
!a
The American Institute of
Architect! awarded Mi
Cold Medal lo
Marshall ft Vox
Architect and Designer! of
THE BLACKSTONB
for following reasons
let Convenience of a r ran ce
ment for comfort of
Cnesta.
24 Perfectly planned for
service.
3d Excellence of exterior
treatment.
4tk Interior difnitr com
bined with homelikenea.
Stli Step in advance of any
other hotel.
THE
BLACKSTONE
Chicago
Newest, Latest
Michigan Boulevard Hotel
npHEmost beautifully equipped and
homelike hotel in the world.
Single Rooms with Lavatory. $2.50 and up.
Single Rooms with Bath, $3.50 and up.
Large Double Rooms with Bath, (two beds)
$5.00 and up.
Parlor. Reception Hall. Bed Room and
Bath. $10.00 and op.
Every room is an outside room.
Every bath room has an outside window.
rpHE restaurants are
not excelled by any of
the famous eating places
of the old world; yet the
restaurant prices are no
higher than those of any
other first-class hotel.
The windows over
look Lake Michigan.
Ownm as Maaararo
The Drake Hotel Co.
Tracy C. Drake. Pre. John B. Drake. Vice-Pras.
B. E. Walker. I.L.D., President.
A. Lnird, General Maaaa-er.
Establishes 1867.
The Canadian Bank of Commerce
HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO.
London Office,
2 Lombard Street. B. C
New York Office,
16 Exchange Place.
Branches Throughout the Dominion of Canada; Also at San Francisco.
Seattle and Skagway.
Canadian Collections.
This bank, having over 180 branches, distributed throughout the Do
minion, is enabled to offer unsurpassed facilities for making collections
In any part of Canada.
Pertland Branch, Cor. Second and Start: Streets, F. C. Malpaa, Manaa-er.
E. BURNHAIVTS' KALOS-OZONE
TOILET REQUISITES
50c
E. BURN HAM'S KALOS-OZONE MASSAGE CREAM
Gre eleaa and el refreahms delicacr: efaaooeara anznaiateir. lo
ins the akn aoh mod dear. Alao delightful ahex ahaviog. Price.
E. BURNHAM'S KALOS CREMOZONE
AUan sM irritaaca ai lb aki; should be in lh kit ei tnwrf (n
rues jut
E. BURNHAM'S KALOS LIUOZONE
Hand wUlissi. idivnckpfc Pric
Copynsl 1908
Noce uiuiDft witiboat trade
nurk. AT ALL DEALERS
C dree! arpoQ raH4 ef prjoaj
E. BURNHAM'S KALOS TALCOZONE
Superior t&lcina; perfmed wuk ibe rnfrn of Ls FauK
fncM
E. BURNHAM'S KALOS POUDROZONE
lanaabie tace powder, inapalpabie. adheene. P-
E. BURNHAM, Chicago
Dept. C-8S
25c
25c
$1.00