Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, May 27, 1910, Page 15, Image 15

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    15
IBIGSOH' CHARGES .
BIG CONSPIRACY
TITE MORNING OEEGONIAX, FRIDAY. MAY 27, 1910.
lJawii ' grfe g l l ..iri cd
lase, Which Has Baffled All
Attempts to Clear, Yet
Deep Mystery.
WOMEN SAW MRS. SMITH
Witnesses Say They Know Woman
Entered and Left Erleson's Vn
dertaking Office on May 8.
Third Witness Corroborates.
Contradictory evidence for and against
Eric E. Ericson. the local undertaker who
has become entangled in the mysterious
disappearance of Mrs. Hannah Smith, was
the feature of yesterday's developments
in the case -which has baffled all attempts
to clear. Two witnesses have been found
who say that they saw Mrs. Smith enter
and leave Erleson's office on the night
of May 8.
Charges that a conspiracy has been in
progress against Ericson were made by
Charles Schnabel, attorney for the under
taker, last night. Mr. Schnabel denounced
the manner in which the investigation
has been carried on so far, and said that
prominent people are concerned in an at
tempt to "fan the flames" against Erie
son. The attorney also maintains that
his client is innocont of any wrong do
ing in the Spokane matter which has
been published. . .
Officials Laugh at Allegations.
Officials last night laughed at the
allegations of Attorney Schnabel, saying
that if any conspiracy existed, it was in
spired by Erleson's actions in arranging
for the "fake" message to be sent to
Mrs. Ajina Harper, assuring her that the
missing woman was safe and well in Los
Angeles.
Mrs. Clara Edmunds, who lives at 401
Alder etreet, just across from Erleson's
undertaking establishment, told the de
tectives last night that she was positive
she saw the missing woman leave Erlc
Bon's office shortly after S o'clock Sun
day evening. May S. Mrs. Smith, she
jays, started up the street towards Elev
enth, stopping for a moment in front of
the chapel, and then continuing on her
way.
Corroborating this statement Is that
made by Mrs. Agnes Cullins, who rooms
it Mrs. Edmunds house, and who was
nith her landlady on the evening " in
ju-'stion. The women were at first un
:ertain as to the date, this being the rea
son they assign for not having made
public their statements before.
Man SaV Mrs. Smith on May 8.
Luke Edmunds, husband of Mrs.
Clara Edmunds, also told last night
of seeing Mrs. Smith enter Erleson's
office on the night of May 8. He did
not. however, see her leave. He was
formerly in the employ of Ericson,
having worked as a driver. He said
:hat on tills evening he left his house
to go to a Washington-street store for
:!ftars. He saw Dr. Twitchell sitting
with Ericson in front of the under
taking parlors, and saw Mrs. Smith,
unaccompanied, come down the street
and go inside, with Ericson. He did
not see the woman nor Ericson on his
return.
Mrs. Edmunds was sitting on the
grass in front of her house at the time
her husband left the place, and she
also saw Mrs. Smith enter with Eric
son and about 20 minutes later come
out. At this time Mrs. Agnes Cullins
was near, and to her Mrs. Edmunds
says she remarked:
"Why, there's that old lady whose
business "affairs Ericson takes care of."
Mrs. Nelson Freeman, who lives at
407 Alder street, the next house to
Erleson's establishment, related last
night what she knew of the affair on
the evening of May 8.
Mrs. Smith Seen, in Office. ,
"I had occasion to use the telephone,"
laid Mrs. Freeman last night, "and, al
though I did not know Mr. Ericson, I
tvent in his office and requested per
mission to call up a friend. When I
snteredthe room I noticed that there
tvas an old lady present with whom
Ericson was conversing in a strange
language (Swedish). When I had fin
ished my telephone conversation, I
thanked Mr. Ericson and turned to
leave the room.
"Just as I was1 passing through the
ioor, I remembereddoor, I remembered
mother person with whom I wished to
talk over the telephone, but did not
jvant to intrude on Mr. Ericson and the
lady who was there, so I wenf around
to Washington street. There I tele
phoned and, having finished, I started.
Back home. In front of the undertak
ing place I noticed Mr. Ericson sitting
in his office reading his newspaper. I
aid not see the old lady leave his of
fice. It does not seem to me, however,
that she could have been made away
with in such short time I was gone
aot over 20 minutes with Ericson ap
pearing so composed when I last saw
Dim."
Ericson went before the grand jury
yesterday afternoon, and. it is believed,
told in substance the same story re
garding his peculiar actions which has
heretofore been related. Mrs. O. Boden,
Mrs. Ockwig, Mrs. A. Nelson and Mrs.
Augusta Ober, all intimate friends of
the missing woman, were also before
the inquisitorial body. These women
contradict Erleson's statement that he
never borrowed any money from Mrs.
Smith.
Samuel Olson, a local attorney, who
has formerly handled business matters
for Ericson, said last night that he per
sonally cave the abstract for the prop
erty which Mrs. Smith was about to
purchase to Mrs. Crofts and Mrs. Boden.
It was believed for some time that
Ericson had retained the abstract, in
order to keep it from Mrs. Smith and
prevent her from purchasing the prop
erty, but this was denied by Olson.
Detectives Sloan and Endicott yester
day visited tvery cemetery on the out
skirts of Portland, loktng up newly-made
graves and attempting to secure soma
rlew of the mit-sing woman. They found
nothing suspicious in any of the grave
yards. The grand jury today will examine
more witnesses among them being
Charles Hansen, exton of the Greenwood
Demetery. Ericson probably will also
testify before the grand jury again to
day, and will have with him a record of
all the funerals he has handled-and all
the deaths which have been reported to
him.
The Swedish Consul in this city will
notify Mrs. anlth's relatives in Sweden
If the woman is not located. Mrs. Smith
had a sister named Beda Andres, living
at Dyrenos Tostare, BJorkoryp, Sweden,
and another relative named Andres
Enirelbretson, l'ving at the same place.
She also is known to have had a friend
named Carl Olsdet, whose residence is
supposed to have been at Ridgefleld,
Wash. He has-not been located as yet.
Attorney Charles Schnabel last night
said that bis investigations since he has
v torjc.
Supreme conditions of
perfection make competi
tion impossible.
Knox Straws
establish the Model for in
ferior imitations.
Gentlrasca's iicta
Buffum & Pendleton
Ladle- Hats I
Olds, Vortman & King
been retained have unearthed a con
spiracy to drive Ericson out of business.
Mrs. Smith Not In Oregon City.
One significant feature of yesterday's
developments was the investigation of
the letter written by Miss Maybelle
Maxwell to Mrs. Anna Harper by Dep
uty District Attorney Garland and De
tective Carpenter, who went to Oregon
City in the morning. There is no doubt
but that the people who saw a strange
woman on the streets of that city a
short time ago were mistaken in their
identification of her as Mrs. Smith. Miss
Maxwell, Dorothy Hedges, Mamie Long
and Nellie Caiifield, all of Oregon City,
were questioned by the men, and fac
tors were brought out which establish
definitely that the missing woman was
not the one with whom they had con
versation. Mrs. Smith was accustomed to wear
a short gold chain around her neck, to
which her watch was attached while
the woman seen in Oregon City wore a
very long chain. Nellie Caufield said
that the woman could not have been
over 45 or 50 years of age, while Mrs.
Smith was nearly 65, and looked every
bit of it. Other things, were learned
which established the fact that the
women could not have been Mrs. Smith.
o Steamship Ticket Purchased.
Valdemar Lidell, Swedish Consul for
this city, has followed the case keenly
from the time it was first exploited,
and has conducted a line of investiga
tion of his own. The theory was ad
vanced that Mrs. Smith might have de
cided suddenly to go to oweden, as she
was evidently a woman of ecce-itrie
ways. This supposition was not borne
out, however, in the investigation con
ducted by Mr. Lidell, who visited every
ticket office in town where transporta
tion is sold to Europe. In none of
tlieic offices has a ticket been sold to
Mrs. Smith or any one answering her
description. Therefore, if Mrs. Smith
did make up her mind suddenly to leave
for the old country, she went to some
other city to purchase her transporta
tion. One man who has followed the de
velopments of the case closely, but who
did not wish his name mentioned at this
time, advanced the theory that Under
taker Ericson might have Mrs. Smith
Imprisoned in some remote place of the
city. In support of this theory is the
fact that Ericson was known to have
not been well fixed financially, nor did
he bear generally a good business repu
tation among the Swedish citizens of
Portland.
Charles Hansen, sexton at the Green
wood Cemetery, related a peculiar story
to the detectives the other day, which
bears on Ericson's manner of uoing
business. It seems that Hansen had
saved up the sum of $4800, and Erie
son learned of this fact. Ericson ap
proached the sexton with a proposition
that the latter invest his savings in the
undertaking business, saying, according
to Hansen, that he could get a half in
terest for $4800. Hansen finally agreed
to the proposition, giving Ericson the
money.
Shady Deal Charged to Ericson.
Afterwards, Hansen says, he learned
that Ericson only owned a one-quarter
interest in the business, and with the
$4800 he had secured from Hansen he
purchased the shares which were held
by his other partners. In the first
place, Ericson had represented to Han
sen that he owned a half interest, two
other men owning a quarter interest
each. However, instead of giving the
sexton bu per cent of the shares, Han
sen having paid for, as a matter of fact,
75 per cent of the business Ericson re
talntd 51 shares for himself and gave
Hansen the remaining 49 shares. Eric
son did this, according to Hansen, m
oruer mai ne migni retain a controlling
interest in the undertaking establish
ment. Hansen further claims that he has
never received a ent from the busi
l ness,- and says that he had given up
nope or ever realizing on his invest-
the
! ment. Hansen has been before
n vuuuct.ijuu wiLii tuts mys
terious nearse which he saw coming in
from the country some time ago, and it
Is probable that he will be examined
again today by the inquisitorial body
and given an opportunity to tell every
thing regarding his relations with the
undertaker who is now under suspicion.
ERICSOX IX TROUBLE BEFORE
I'ndertaker Discharged From Spo
kane Position Eive Years Ago
SPOKANE, May 26. E. E. Ericson
left Spokane about five years ago. He
was in the employ of Smith & Company,
undertakers, but was discharged on ac
count of neglecting work while in
charge during the night and running
around the city. He was also sus
pected of taking $95 in cash from the
till. He is said to have neglected his
wife and children. Just before his dis
charge Smith & Company arranged to
send his wife and children to their old
home in East Et. Paul or Minneapolis
and gave Ericson $15 to give them. He
tailed to turn over the money but the
train was late atid upon learning that
he had not given the money to his wife
fmlth took It from him practically by
force and gave it to the woman.
Ericson returned here several months
later to attend his mother's funeral and
has not been heard of here since.
NATIVES GET FEW SEALS
Japanese, However; With Muffled
Power Craft, Make Haul.
JUNEAU. Alaska, May 26 The total
catch of fur seals by natives in the oren
sea off the Alaska coast this season will
not be more than 125 pelts. In . former
years the Indians have always made
good catches.
Japanese sealers using muffled power
boats are expected to reap a fat harv
est. Eight of these vessels are now
following the seal herds north to the
rookeries.
Larsro asbestos deposits exist In what 1s
practically an enexplored region aroun'l Lake
Chlbogamo, and in other parts of Quebec
province nono or me au Lawreocd uver.
W ft & m '
OUR
SALE
THIS
Tailors
IN ORDER TO CLOSE OUT ALL THIS SEASON'S GOODS BEFORE THE FIRST OF THE MONTH, WE WILL GIVE
YOU YOUR CHOICE OF OUR MEDIUM AND LIGHT WEIGHTS, GOODS THAT WE SELL FOR $30, $35, $40, $50 A
SUIT OR OVERCOAT AT ONE PRICE, ANY OF THESE MADE TO YOUR MEASURE AT $20.00 A SUIT, OR OVER
COAT, OR TOPCOAT, SILK OR SATIN LINED. WE ALSO WILL LINE THESE WITH SERGE, ALPACA, VENETIAN
OR ITALIAN CLOTH, MAKE THEM UP IN A NO. 1 STYLE, FIT YOU PERFECTLY. OUR GUARANTEE SHOULD
LINING OR ANY PART OF GARMENT NOT WEAR SATISFACTORILY, WE WILL RENEW SAME FREE OF CHARGE.
OUR LIMIT ON THIS SALE IS (100) ONE HUNDRED (100) SUITS OR OVERCOATS TO ANY ONE STORE WE OWN.
AS WE CONTROL 25 STORES FROM COAST TO COAST, WE ARE COMPELLED TO PUT A LIMIT ON EACH STORE.
COME EARLY, SELECT THE BEST, AS YOU CANNOT DUPLICATE THESE VALUES ANYWHERE. WE CARRY THE
FINEST LINE OF MERCHANDISE WEST OF CHICAGO. EVERY YARD OF GOODS IS GUARANTEED PURE WOOL,
FAST COLORS. IF YOU ARE NOT SATISFIED YOUR MONEY BACK, IS OUR MOTTO. WE ONLY WANT SATISFIED
CUSTOMERS; THAT IS WHY WE DO SUCH VOLUME OF TAILORING BUSINESS. AFTER SATURDAY YOU CAN'T
BUY ONE OF THESE SUITS FOR DOUBLE OUR SALE PRICE,
Any Suit Made
to Order for . .
WE DESIGN ALL OUR OWN PATTERNS, TRY ON EACH GARMENT IN THE BASTINGS. IT WILL PAY YOU TO
CALL AT OUR SALESROOM AND EXAMINE OUR GOODS; THE VALUES ARE WORTH THREE TIMES OUR SALE
PRICE. BROWNS, TWEEDS AND WORSTEDS, LATEST PATTERNS GRAYS, TWEEDS AND WORSTEDS, BLUE AND
BLACK SERGES, BLACK CLAY WORSTEDS, BLACK IMPORTED BROADCLOTH AND DOESKIN; IN FACT, WE
SHOW 2500 DIFFERENT STYLES OF CLOTH IN ALL THEIR LATEST DESIGNS.
EXCLUSIVE PATTERNS CARRIED BY US.
OVER 500 DIFFERENT STYLES OF
I AILOI
EXPERT CUTTERS, FITTERS AND DESIGNERS,
OPPOSITE OLDS, WORTMAN & KING NEW BUILDING. 367 MORRISON STREET, PORTLAND, OREGON
O'iBIcIEN,
QUARREL DRAWS CROWD
OWNERSHIP OF NEWSSTAND
DISTURBS FAMILY.
Philip Polsky, of Financial Baron
Tendencies, Acquires Possession
Through Brother's Debt.
The spectacle of ' a 17-year-old boy
pitted In wordy combat against his
mother, father and older brother was
witnessed at Sixth and Washington
streets yesterday afternon by a large
crowd of passers-by. The squabble final
ly ended In the arrest of Abraham
Polsky, his wife and 20-year-old son,
Fred Polsky.
Philip Polsky, a younger son. is in
directly the complainant against them,
causing their arrest by Constable Wag
ner on a charge of disturbing the peace.
The case will be aired in Justice Court
this afternoon, the trio having been re
leased on their own recognizance.
American dollars, it is said, caused the
trouble resulting in a division in the
house of Polsky, now at 208 Caruthers
street, removed less than a score of
years from Russda.
Possessed of the ordinary business
acumen of the class of immigrants to
which he belongs, with little education
and able to speak little English. Philip
Polsky before he is out of his teens is
possessed of a bank account, two news
stands and equities in smaller property
investments. Though his face is dirty,
his hair unkempt and his clothing bears
the unmistakable brand of the second
hand store, young Polsky has succeeded
in rearing for himsalf a high position in
local newsboy circles.
It was over possession of one of the
newsstands, located at Sixth and Wash
ington streets, that yesterday's trouble
started. The traditional paternal love
for the less industrious of its progeny
also figured. Up until six weeks ago
Philip claimed title only to the stand
at Fifth and Washington streets, near
the Perkins Hotel. His brother Fred
owned the one at Sixth and Washing
ton but became deeply involved in debt.
He then appealed to the younger brother
for aid.
Philip Polsky is a business man a
modern captain of one of the world's in
dustries and the word aid is not frequent
in his lexicon. He would take over the
stand and liquidate its liabilities. That
was all. This was agreed to and after
paying off the $365 owed, he became its
owner and through one of his half dozen
lieutenants, its manager.
Fred sought new fields for operation in
Canada, but without success, returning
to Portland and his father's roof two
days ago. Prior to his withdrawal from
the stand his mother had acquired an
interest in it, he says and he demanded
it back of his brother on that account.
His demands were backed up by both the
father and mother.
In anticipation of this, Philip made out
a bill of sale for the property to one of
his lieutenants, M. N. Clemenger, a youth
five years older than himself.
When the mother, father and son ar
rived at the stand yesterday afternoon
they found Clemenger and Philip in
charge. Clemenger exhibited the bill of
sale and Philip confirmed its genuineness.
This did not satisfy the older couple,
however, and they proceeded to take
charge. This precipitated a rather heated
argument, lasting more than an hour
and attracting a large crowd, which
almost blocked the stret. A call was
sent in for the police and the crowd
was dispersed.
It was then that the younger Polsky
bethought himself of another strategem.
He took Clemenger to the District At
torney's office and there an Information
against his mother, father and brother,
was signed by Clemenger and the three
were arrested.
Last night Philip was in peaceful pos
session of the two establishments.
R0ADBD0STERSENTHU5E
EX-JUDGE WEBSTER AND GOV
ERXMEXT EXPERT RETURN.
Eldrldge, who is considered the Federal
Government's most expert man on im
proved highways.
"We visited 10 counties in Eastern Ore
gon, and In every one of them there now
exists a county good roads association,
which Is affiliated with the State Associ
ation." said Judge Webster. "That Is
the work we are trying to accompliiih
Just now. Each county in the state will
be organized before we get through and
then sentiment will be canvassed as to
how is the best way to proceed as to
legislation."
One of the bl- Brazilian railroads haa
Just completed a plan by which it will send
four of its mechanics to the United States
every six months and ztut them at work in
some of our big railroad shops, so that they
may become familiar with American
methods.
Both Will Speak at Meeting Here, to
Arouse Interest In Campaign
for Better Highways.
Dust-stained, but smiling and exultant
in the success of their eorts, Lionel R.
Webster, ex-Judge of Multnomah County,
and M. E. Eldridge, good roads expert of
the Department of Agriculture, arrived in
Portland last evening after 10 days of
"good roads" campaigning in Eastern
Oregon.
Both will speak here Saturday night, at
the special meeting of the Oregon State
Good Roads Association, to be held in
the Masonic Temple.
"Everywhere we were received with
open arms," said Judge Webster. "The
people are awakened to the necessity of
good roads as never before."
This sentiment was echoed by Professor
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