Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, January 02, 1905, PART THREE, Page 30, Image 30

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    THE MORNING OEEGONIAN, 3OOTATj JANUARY 1905.
'crops mentioned, but fruit and beets
OREGON FARMERS ARE GROWING RICH
WHEAT, HAY AND BEETS EAST, HOPS AND IN
TENSIFIED FARMING WEST OF THE CASCADES .
yield well. The state's entire crop of
beets was grown in Grand Rondo "Vfilley,
which also yielded fruit to the amount of
J22L90O in 1904. South of the Columbia,
from the Cascades east to the Blue Moun
tains, Irrigation is necessary to grow
fruit and alfalfa, and the same condition
prevails in the extreme east, along Snake
River. As 'one moves southward In East
ern Oregon the proportion ot. moisture
decreases, so that in the central part
irrigation is necessary for all crops, but
under its influence the soil is most pro
lific The southern tier of counties Is al
most entirely given up to grazing on the
open range, but Irrigation Is making great
inroads In the valleys, which produce
vast quantities of hay for Winter feed.
"Wheat farms range In area from 300
acres up. of which allttle over half Is un
der cultivation at any one time, the rest
Newill Rlverview Academy
A BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL
FOR BOYS AND YOUNG MEN
MILITARY AND MANUAL TRAINING
v GRI CULTURE Is a close rival of highly valuable crop, both in proportion principal city. Portland. Is the largest due. In' short, probably 100,000 people
J lumberlne for the first place among to acreage and In the aggregate. -wheatshlpplng port, at least In proportion engaged in ftfnnlng not only produce
-Oregon industries. From the very A few figures will suffice to prove that to population. If "not absolutely. The enough to feed the urban population of
nature of the case it is impossible to Oregon, in proportion to- population and state also stands among the first as a the slate, but to ship vast quantities of
gauge the amount of its products as close- improved acreage, is the most' prolific producer of wool, livestock, fruit, dairy wheat hops, oats, sugar beet and other
ly as those of the forests. The only crops producing state in the Union. Its land f products, potatoes and other farm pro- farm produce to 'other states and foreign
----------------------- V - -
OREGON'S OUTPUT OF BREAD AND BUTTER.
If the entire wlie&t crop of Oregon In 1004, namely 1I.950.0M buabelt,
were ground into flour and that floor made Into one loaf of bread of the same
proportions as the ordinary one-pound loaf. It would be .259 feet 7 Inches
long. 123 feet 1 Inch wide, and 260 feet 7 lnchea high.
Its proportions are shown by the picture of the Portland Hotel, which It
200 feet square and over 100 feet high to the tops of the chimneys.
The butter production of Oregon in the year 1B04 would make 4,250,000
bricks measuring SrSrB 2-3 inches, or 60 cubic inches.
In the TCelnhard building, which is 200 feet square and 82 feet high, 4,000,
000 bricks were used, measuring 2ttx3ttxS Inches, or 63 cubic inches.
The bricks of butter would suffice to erect a building of the same slse
and leave 60,000 bricks to spare. ' (-
of which the value can be even approxi
mated are grain, hops and sugar beets,
leaving hay, root crops and vegetables to
'guesswork. Wheat, oats and barley show
i average yield per acre higher than any
other state, the aggregate returns for
area is 60.515,400 acres, and of this only
about 3,000,000 acres are under cultiva
tion or in enclosed pasture. Tho state
has a present population of about 625,000,
of which over one-fourth is in the City
of Portland, and over 36 per cent of the
FACTS ABOUT OREGON'S HOP CROP.
Acreage : 18,000 to 19.000
Crop per acre, 1904, pounds 50
Crop per acre, average of ten years, pounds - BM
Price per pound, 1904, 10c to 32c: average 25c
Cost of production, per pound, 8c to , 10c
Prollt per pound, 1S04 15c
Total production in 1004, bales. 82,500; pounds 16,000.000
Total value J4.000.000
Total profit , 2.500,000
these three being 510,342,276. This leaves
out of consideration several counties, of
which the yield of oats and barley Is en
tirely consumed at home. The year's
hop crop Is worth about 54,000,000. Sugar
beets in Union County alone yielded over
(209,000. Alfalfa hay Is known to be a
remainder, or 140,000, is In other cities
and towns. This leaves only 250,000 en
gaged in agriculture, horticulture, stock
raising, mining and lumbering the rural
occupations. Despite this fact. Oregon
is the largest producer of hops, salmon
and mohair In the United States. Its
HOW TO MAKE MONEY ON EASTERN OREGON WHEAT FARM.
What a Settler, Who Has $5000 and Knows Farming, Can Do on
320 Acres.
INVESTMENT.
Land, fenced, with house, within one day's haul -of railroad, at 520 an
acre, balance at 6 per cent 53,200.00
Houses, Implements and outfit 951.50
Two .COWS ; 60.00
Ten sows 200.00
Two dozen chickens 6.00
Furniture and current expenses till first crop Is harvested S62.50
Seed peas for 1C0 acres .. 320.00
Total .55,000.00
ANNUAL. YIELD.
Wheat, 25 bushels an acre on 1C0 acres, at 63. cents a bushel, less 35
cents a bushel, cost of growing, including reasonable Interest on
purchase price and taxes on whole farm 51.130.00
One hundred hogs at 510 each . 1.000.00
Chickens and eggs 100.00
Profit, 44.44 per cent .52,220.00
mi
rnn mi n i nun
mini ii n mmi
jjmn n n ii""1
Mill! tt
Jill-
KTLK PRODUCTION OF OREGON IX IBM
would nut. Tins can.
In making: the butter product In Oregon
In 1904, there were used S4.104.S50 rallom ot
milk.
An ordinary ten-trallon milk can is 12 H
Inches in diameter and 18 Inches deep, and
contain 2310 cubic lnches.or one and one
third qpblc feet.
The quantity of milk in question would
occupy 7,232.762 cubic feet
It would fill a milk can 183 feet In diam
eter, and 274.5 feet high, cf the same snaps
as a ten-gallon can.
Its cubic contents would be more than five
times those of The Oresonlan building",
which Is 100 feet square and 120 feet high,
exclusive of the tower, which Is 189 feet
above the street.
INTERIOR OF TX),RESTKV BUILDING, LEWS AND CLASS FAR.
countries. It is probable that no other
state in the Union, if indeed any country
GRAIN CROPS OF OREGON, 1904
' Wheat.
Acres 636.054
TIeld. bushels 12.S5O.O0O
Value 5S.SO6.00O
Yield per acre, bushels 20.36
Oats.
Acres '. 103,625
Yield, bushels 3.221,774
Value 51.224.704
Yield per acre 30.33
Barley.
Acres -l 25,553
Yield, bushels 639.373
Value 5311.573
Yield per acre, bushels 24.5
' Aggregates.
Acres 767,643
Yield, bushels 16.811.152
Value 510.342.276
being used for grazing. Great results are
attained "by grazing hogs on the fallow
land, and the only restraint on the exten
tion of this business Is the lack, of enough
packing-bouses to create a home market.
"With such is. market. Eastern Oregon
could double Its production in one year.
The fertility of the soil is evident from
the fact that the average wheat crop in
1504 was over 20 bushels an acre, exceed
ing that of tho famous wheat belt of
Western Canada, while the average for
the United States is only 13.6 bushels.
Barley gives crops of 25 Jo 30 bushels, al-
HOW TO MAKE MONEY ON A WILLAMETTE VALLEY FARM.'
What a Settler Can Do on 100 Acres, Provided He Has Small CapN
, tal, Skill and Industry.
INVESTMENT.
Land, improved, with house, barn and growing. orchard, at 530 an acre,
half cash, balance In two years, at 6 j?cr cent interest 51.C0O.00
Wagon, team and harness 200.00
Tlfty sheep 150.00
Fifty goats 200.00
Five cows 150.00
Five 2-year-olds 100.00
Five yearlings 60.00
Three sows .'. 30.00
Two dozen chickens 6.00
Implements and tools I 79.50
Household furniture IS0.00
k
Total ..; 52.655.50
EXPENSES, PER YEAR.
Seed wheat for 30 acres , 5 13.75
Seed oats for SO acres 27.00
Seed peas for flvo acres..; '. 10.00
Seed rape for five acres 8.00
Seed vetch for three acres 3.00
Seed barley for ten acres 8.25
Wages, one hired man for six months at 526 a month 156.00
Wages, one extra man for two months at 5150 a day 78.00
Taxes 16.50
Insurance - ., s.CO
Interest at 6 per cent on 51500 deferred payment so.CO
Total 5436.50
ANNUAL YIELD IN SALES OR INCREASED VALUE.
Five 2-year-old cows, grown to maturity. Increased value 5260 00
Five yearlings, grown to 2-year-olds. Increased value 40.00
Separated cream from ten cows at 56 a month each; 360 00
Wool from 50 sheep 50.00
Mohair from 50 goats es CO
Twenty shoata at 510 each 200 00
Eggs and chickens lOoioo
Fifty lambs . 73.00
Forty kids gQf.OO
Ten calves .. ; 60.00
Wheat. 300 bushels at 75 cents 225 00
Oats, 350 bushels at 45 cents 157.50
Total .51.672.50
Profit, 46.5 per cent, on 52655.50 ; 1.236.00
in the world, can show such a small pro
portion of agricultural population to that
engaged In other occupations, with so
large a surplus for salo In the world's
markets.
TWO FAEiHNG SECTIONS.
West Adapted to Intensive Farms and
Dairying, East to Grain.
TIATURE has divided the state Into
1 1 two sections by the Cascade Moun
tains. Western Oregon, with Its abund
ant moisture, rich alluvial soil and mild'
climate, is adapted to intensive farming.
fruitgrowing, dairying, and the breeding
of blooded stock. Close and constant at
tention and large yield per acre make
the small farm relatively more profitable
than the large one. Hence the pioneer
farms of 040 acres are rapidly being split
into smaller ones, of which the largest
promises soon to be only 160 acres, and the
general average Is likely to be nearer 100
acres. Exceptions may be dairy farms,
which are fast Increasing in number, as
the virtues of Western Oregon grasses,
which with the grains won the. grand
prize at the St Louis Exposition, be
come known. As regards hops, this sec
tion already leads the world for acreage,
economic production, average yield and
aggregate crop, and contains enough ad
ditional land adapted to the purpose to
grow the entire world's consumption of
that commodity. In early years the Wil
lamette Valley was a great wheatgrowing
country, but this crop has given place to
fruit, hops and grass, as these have
been found highly profitable.
Eastern Oregon, in direct contrast with
the western section, is an open country
of broad valleys and rolling hills, with
a dry climate and a soil composed main
ly of decomposed lava and volcanic ash.
In Its natural condition the land is cov
ered with sagebrush and greasewood, and
appears to the uninitiated a hopeless des
ert. But the sagebrush, which does most
to give it a dreary aspect, is the strongest
evidence of its fertility. The country
sloping northward to tho Columbia River
grows larger crops of wheat than any
other part of North America, and ether
grains and hay flourish equally. In the
northeastern corner of the state are the
Blue Mountains, among which are broad,
well-watered valleys, where not only the
falfa hay six to ten tons. It Is a land
where mortgages are almost unknown.
WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF
HOPS. 1904.
Bales.
Oregon S2.500
Washington 30.000
California 60,000
New York 65.000
Total. United States 237.E00
England 171,853
Continental Europe 334.782
Total Europe 506.635
and every farmer has a bahk account and
could afford to take a trip to the World's
Fair.
VALUE AND YIELD OF FARM
LAND OREGON AND MID
DLE STATES COM
PARED. Value of Land Per Acre.
Oregon. Willamette Valley
Wheat and hay 525 to 5 60
Hops 550 to 5150
Fruit , 550 to 5150
Eastern Oregon Wheat... 513 to 5 45
Irrigated 540 to 5150
Iowa wheat and corn 560 to 5 73
Illinois Wheat and corn..520 to 5123
Indiana Wheat and corn.. 540 to 5125
Ohio Wheat and corn 533
Missouri Wheat and corn.525 to 5 75
JCeb'ska Wheat and corn. 5 to 5 75
Kansas Wheat and corn.. 523
Average Yield Per Acre.
Oregon. Willamette Valley
Wheat, bushels 30
Hay. tons 3
Hops, pounds S50
Eastern Oregon Wheat, bushels. 23
Com, bushels 25
Beets 54
Irrigated, alfalfa, tons 6
Irrigated, strawberries, crates. .150
Iowa Corn, bushels 31
Wheat, bushels 13
Indiana Corn, bushels 23
Wheat, bushels 15
Ohio Corn, bushels 31
Wheat, bushels 15
Apples, bushels 35
Missouri Corn, bushels..... 30
'Wheat, bushels 9
Kansas Corn, bushels..., 30
Wheat, bushels 13
Lewis and Clark
Exposition
AT PORTLAND", OREGON
Will Be Open Continuously
From June 11905, to October 15, 1905
One Hundred and Thirty-Seven Days
Location at the Corner of Corbett and Thomas Streets
x The uSr car passes its doors every eight minutes
SCHOOL RE-ASSEMBLES JANUARY 5, 1905
Pupils may enter at any time
LOCATION AND REPUTATION UNEXCELLED
Let us make a "man" out of "your boy'
Apply to A. C. INEWILL, Principal and Proprietor
Moline Bain Co.
PORTLAND, OR.
SPOKANE, WASH.
"Flying Dutchman" :Plows ,
Bain Wagons '
Monitor Drills ; .
Henney Buggies
"Common Sense"Sleds
These Goods Have Been Leaders - on the
Pacific Coast Since the Country Was Settled
THE PRICES ARE NOT OUT OF
YOUR REACH
NEVILLE BAG COMPANY
FLOUR, GRAIN AND
ORE BAGS
BURLAPS, HOPCLOTH, TWINES, TENTS AND DUCK
49 TO S3 FIFTH STREET, NORTH
PORTLAND, OREGON
This Building Was Erected by Robert Wakefield
INDUSTRIAL. AND LIBERAL ARTS PALACE.
PORTLAND BRIDGE AND BUILDING COMPANY
ROBERT "WAKEFIELD. Present- A. C U. BERRY", Secretary.
Eatflaeer.t aad General Centra-ctors th
Structural Ires aad Steel Wrk a Specialty
Seem 67 Worcester BalHIsr.
Portlaad, Oresoa.