The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, August 10, 2019, WEEKEND EDITION, Page 6, Image 6

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    A6
THE ASTORIAN • SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 2019
Regatta: ‘I’m on top of the world right now’
Continued from Page A1
The Regatta is a fam-
ily tradition that traces back
generations.
Dowaliby’s
great-great-grandmother,
Louise Tallant, was the 1900
Regatta queen. Her great-
great-aunt, Harriet Hunter
Tallant, was Regatta queen
in 1907.
“It’s such an honor think-
ing back to my great-great-
grandmother,” she said. “I
never got to meet her, of
course, but I’m carrying on
what she started in our fam-
ily, which is amazing. It
means the world.”
The Dowaliby family still
lives in the house in Warren-
ton that Eben Carruthers,
Louise Tallant’s son, built
decades ago.
Dowaliby’s older sis-
ter, Kim Louise Dowaliby,
was crowned Regatta queen
in 2013. In fact, each of the
four Dowaliby sisters were
featured on a local court.
Mara, the youngest of the
girls, shares her great-great-
aunt’s crown and her middle
name.
“I look in the mirror with
the crown on and I see my
sister Kim,” Dowaliby said.
“I feel like I look just like
Kim and I’m carrying on
what she built up and so it’s
really, really special.”
Dowaliby, a senior at
Warrenton High School,
was crowned on Wednesday
night at the Queen’s Corona-
tion at the Liberty Theatre.
“I’m on top of the world
right now,” she said as her
arms overfl owed with fl ow-
ers and a gold crown bal-
anced on her head . “It
doesn’t even feel real.”
Dowaliby shared the
stage with Regatta prin-
cesses Kayla Helligso, Cait-
lin Hillman and Serena
Moha. She was crowned by
last year’s queen, Catherine
Tapales.
“I’m proud of Mara,”
Helligso said. “She’s so
deserving.”
Throughout the year, the
Regatta C ourt made appear-
ances, marched in parades
and met with leaders across
Clatsop County. Their efforts
culminated at the corona-
tion, where each girl gave a
speech on the region’s his-
tory before judges selected
the queen.
Dowaliby focused on
Clatsop County businesses
in the 1890s.
“Regatta has always been
a working man’s festival,”
she said in her speech. “We
are proud of what this city
has become.”
The four-day celebration
wraps up Saturday with a
handful of signature events,
including the Grand Land
Parade and the Highwater
Boat Parade . City Councilor
Joan Herman, who came to
Astoria more than 30 years
ago, will ride in the fi re
chief’s vehicle at the Grand
Land Parade.
“I’m very excited,” Her-
man said. “It’s a wonderful
parade.”
The Regatta’s milestone
anniversary drew national
attention. U.S. Rep. Suzanne
Bonamici presented a s tate-
ment for the Congressional
Record honoring the 125th
Astoria Regatta to the court
and the C ity C ouncil on
Thursday afternoon.
“This is a joyous mile-
stone for one of the oldest
festivals west of the Rocky
Mountains and an important
moment to pause and refl ect
on the signifi cance of the
Regatta to our region,” the
Oregon Democrat said.
“Through the Royal
Court, the Regatta helps
develop the leadership skills
of young women.”
Dowaliby has personally
watched the festival shape
leaders.
“I saw how much my
sisters grew from the pro-
gram,” she said. “It wasn’t
just about wearing the
dresses and the crowns, it
was about growing into a
young woman who has all
these new talents and skills.”
Dowaliby’s father, Todd
Dowaliby, escorted his
youngest daughter at the
coronation.
“I loved it,” he said. “It
was an honor to be a part
of.”
Two of Dowaliby’s sis-
ters traveled from out of
Brownhill: ‘I really feel
honored to have this position
for so long and have the
voters have confi dence in me’
Continued from Page A1
Brownhill chose a
retirement option which
requires her to work 35
days a year for fi ve years.
She will fi ll in for judges
in the county and around
the state .
She is looking forward
to staying involved in law
while also visiting differ-
ent parts of the state .
“The people I’m able to
interact with in the court-
room and in meetings, in
the community — that’s
the best part about the job,”
Brownhill said. “There’s
so many people we inter-
act with frequently and
I like them all and I will
miss that interaction with
them as well, but I’ll enjoy
being retired.”
Clatsop County District
Attorney Ron Brown said
Brownhill’s retirement is
“well-deserved after a dis-
tinguished career.”
Brownhill became the
presiding judge after Judge
Philip Nelson retired after
his term ended in 2016.
Judge Cindee Matyas and
Judge Dawn McIntosh
also serve on the court.
Brownhill just received
the Oregon State Bar’s
Wallace P. Carson Jr.
Award for Judicial Excel-
lence for 2019, which hon-
ors a member of the state’s
judiciary for making sig-
nifi cant contributions to
the judicial system and
who is “a model of pro-
fessionalism, integrity and
judicial independence.”
Brownhill said the
award was unexpected and
that she felt honored.
“I’ve learned a great
deal, ” she said. “It’s been
a good job and I really feel
honored to have this posi-
tion for so long and have
the voters have confi dence
in me.”
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Mara Dowaliby gave a speech on the history of Astoria at the Liberty Theatre.
state for the Regatta.
“I wouldn’t miss any-
thing to support her,” Kim
Dowaliby said.
The sisters were joined
in the audience at the Lib-
erty Theatre by their mother,
Dixie, a cousin from Idaho,
both grandmothers and more
extended family.
Dowaliby’s grandmother,
Betty Cunningham, was part
of the Anchor Club in the
early 1970s. She wore her
navy Anchor jacket to the
coronation, decorated with a
Regatta pin.
“It’s a big deal,” Cun-
ningham said. “This is Asto-
ria. It’s our history.”
Dowaliby’s aunt, Nancy
Kennell, is one of the festi-
val’s board members. She
has been involved with
Regatta for more than 20
years.
“She’s always smil-
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aliby after she was crowned.
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