The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, July 23, 2019, Page A7, Image 7

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    A7
THE ASTORIAN • TUESDAY, JULY 23, 2019
OBITUARIES
SPORTS
Cedric George Simpson
Seahawks: Still plenty to sort out
Astoria
Jan. 27, 1940 — July 7, 2019
Continued from Page A8
Cedric George Simpson was born Jan. 27, continued to work as a mechanic off and on to
1940, in Riverdale, California, and passed supplement their income, he began to work as
away July 7, 2019, in Astoria, Oregon.
a millwright at Crown Zellerbach, and did so
He was the youngest of Myr-
until his retirement.
tle and William Simpson’s six chil-
They went on to have fi ve chil-
dren, and was preceded in death by
dren. He was preceded in death
his parents and his siblings Earl,
by Michele Louise Ann Simpson
Robert, Barbara and Louise, and
Drake (Warren); and is survived by
is survived by his brother, William
Michael (Carla), Daniel, Nancy and
Simpson.
Mark (Heather); 15 grandchildren,
His childhood was spent in Cal-
Christopher, Cassie, Ty, Erich, Brit-
ifornia, outside of Los Angeles, and
tney, Jesse, Jake, Justin, Olivia, Sha-
from an early age he worked on the
mus, Isaiah, Emily, Alexa, Jasmine
surrounding farms and attended
and Lily; and three great-grandchil-
Cedric George
school. As a teen, his passion for
dren, Adelyn, James and Rosie. One
Simpson
anything mechanical and having to
grandchild, Krista, preceded him in
do with cars, trucks, motorcycles,
death.
engines, motors and tools became obvious,
Actions speak louder than words is the epit-
and the faster the better.
ome of George’s (Papa George) life. He was a
He began as a teen frequenting junk yards man of few words, but when he spoke, you lis-
and building vehicles and selling them for tened. H e was a man who demanded respect,
profi t, not only as a means to earn much- and had no tolerance for anything other than
needed money, but also as a way for his pas- that.
sion for anything mechanical to grow. In
There was never a time you wouldn’t fi nd
his own words, “I had more cars and trucks George with tools in hand, body half-buried
as a young teen than most people have in a under the hood of some car or truck, or with
lifetime.”
only his feet sticking out from underneath
At age 16, he already had a vision of what some vehicle. If he wasn’t at work he could
he wanted for his future, and the foresight of be found in a short-sleeve shirt, in true Navy
what he needed to do to make that vision come fashion, with the sleeves rolled up, and hold-
to life. Without a word to anyone, he dropped ing his perpetual cup of black coffee, smoking
out of school, and took himself to the recruit- a cigarette, and working on someone’s vehi-
ing offi ce, and signed up and joined the Navy, cle, or building motorcycles while listening to
where he knew he would receive the educa- Johnny Cash and Willy Nelson.
tion, training and experience as the fi rst step
His work ethic was unsurpassable; he
toward his life vision.
didn’t talk about his dreams and goals, he was
During that era you were allowed to join a visionary who made them happen with that
the Navy at 17, and serve three years; in true mustache smirk on his face, and mischievous
George fashion, somehow he made that hap- twinkle in his eye, with always the goal of pro-
pen at 16.
viding for his family.
He met Jessie — his late wife of 55 years
His battles against fi ve different cancers
— during that period while in port in Asto- attest to the amazing strength of this quiet man,
ria, Oregon. They initially made their home and exemplifi es that Simpson stubbornness
in Astoria, living in a tiny rental house, and and determination that each of us has inherited
George worked as a mechanic after his service in one form or another. You are missed, Dad.
in the Navy was completed.
“He will wipe away every tear from their
He had successfully met the fi rst part of his eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall
life vision, working as a mechanic, and con- there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain any-
tinued to achieve the next life goals. Now with more, the former things have passed away.”
two children and a growing family, he again, Revelation 21:4
without a word to even his wife, Jessie, pur-
In lieu of fl owers, donations to the Amer-
chased a house in the country with plenty of ican Cancer Society would be greatly
acres for raising their family. Even though he appreciated.
Florence Joan (Wood) Truax
Buckley, Washington
July 11, 1937 — June 7, 2019
Florence Joan (Wood) Truax passed into the which allowed Flo to focus on raising four kids
arms of her s avior on June 7, 2019.
and upgrading the fl owers, fruits and vegeta-
Florence was born on July 11, 1937, in Aber- bles on the farm. Meanwhile she continued to
deen, Washington, to George Ogden
substitute teach occasionally in local
Wood and Violet Ida (Rinta). She
schools. Together, they spent almost
was the third daughter among fi ve
40 years doing various remodels on
children, and now joins her parents
the old house to bring it to its present
and older sister, Sharon (Hardy), in
day splendor.
the hereafter. She is survived by her
Flo had several true loves in her
oldest sister, Donna, and younger
life. First was her love for Jesus and
brothers, James and Emerson Wood.
his word. She did a daily devotional,
Florie grew up playing with fam-
taught Sunday s chool for many
ily and friends at Finch playground
years and frequently sent Bible
in Aberdeen. Their favorite addi-
verses written on decorated note-
Florence Truax
tion to any game was to yell “Finch
cards to her family (especially when
Playground Rules!” and then cheat
she knew they were going through a
in any way imaginable! This tradition contin- diffi cult time).
ues in the family today.
A close second was her love for her hus-
Florie attended Aberdeen High School, band, Roger, for 62 years. Third was her fam-
and then proceeded to Linfi eld College for her ily, and fourth was The Farm that they shared
teaching and home economics degree. At Lin- for almost 50 years. She also loved to host
fi eld she met A. Roger Truax, and successfully company, and to share laughter with their
chased off his other suitors. They were married many friends!
on Aug. 25, 1957, following his sophomore
In March 2015, health issues forced Roger
and her junior year. Ten months later, they had and Flo to leave The Farm and take up resi-
a baby girl.
dency at Heritage House assisted living in
Over the next nine years, Flo taught and Buckley, Washington. Their family is grate-
subbed at various schools, and Roger roofed ful for all the loving care received while there.
with his dad in Seaside, Oregon, then went Roger continues to reside at Heritage House.
to work at Wauna paper mill near Clatskanie,
A celebration of Flo’s life was held at The
Oregon.
Farm on July 6. Around 200 people shared
In 1965, they bought a very neglected house their favorite dishes seasoned with stories and
and 18-acre farm on the bank of the Colum- friendships.
bia River, about 10 miles upstream from Asto-
Florence is also survived by Roger, their
ria. Soon afterwards, Roger began a long and four children, Robyn, Tony, Chris and Melissa
successful career with State Farm Insurance, (Reid), as well as six grandchildren.
SEVENDAY FORECAST FOR ASTORIA
TODAY
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
While the Seahawks
made a heavy investment
in the receiving corps in the
draft, using three of their 11
picks on the position includ-
ing DK Metcalf in the sec-
ond round and Gary Jen-
nings in the fourth, the
guess here is that Seattle
will start the season lean-
ing on the the veteran trio
of Lockett, David Moore
and Jaron Brown while they
groom the younger players,
getting some of them on the
fi eld regularly but, at least to
start, relying on the vets.
A three-receiver set,
recall, was Seattle’s primary
offensive formation a year
ago. According to NFL stat
maven Warren Sharp, Seat-
tle lined up in a three-re-
ceiver formation 73 percent
of the time a year ago, ahead
of the NFL average of 65.
That would seem to
mean using Lockett more in
the slot to replace since-re-
tired Baldwin.
But it’s likewise worth
remembering that won’t
really be a new thing for
Lockett as he got plenty of
use last year in the slot as it
was — 457 snaps, accord-
ing to Pro Football Focus,
compared to 496 outside.
Lockett was equally effi -
cient playing inside or out,
but was targeted more often
when outside — accord-
ing to PFF he was targeted
on just 12.4 percent of his
slot snaps, the seventh-low-
est-percentage among all
receivers.
That may indicate that
while the Seahawks will
need Lockett to play more
in the slot this year, they’d
be wise to still take advan-
tage of his big-play ability
when lined up outside.
Of more concern may be
who can successfully take
over Baldwin’s red-zone
prowess.
While Lockett scored
twice as many TDs last
year as Baldwin — 10 to 5
— it was Baldwin to whom
Wilson still looked most
often when in the red zone.
Baldwin had 14 targets in
the red zone last year (six
more than anyone else on
the team), scoring on three,
while Lockett had six tar-
APPLIANCE
PACKAGE DEALS
APPLIANCE
AND HOME
FURNISHINGS
529 SE MARLIN, WARRENTON
503-861-0929
Over
30 RS
IN
YEA TSOP
C LA NTY
C OU
SUNDAY
Mattresses, Furniture
& More!
MONDAY
Variable
cloudiness
71 56
73 58
Mostly sunny
and nice
Sunny and
pleasant
72 59
70 58
Pleasant with
Mostly cloudy
some sun
70 57
Mostly sunny
70 54
Mostly sunny
REGIONAL FORECAST
Aberdeen
Olympia
68/56
74/57
Wenatchee
Tacoma
Moses
Lake
UNDER THE SKY
TODAY'S TIDES
Astoria through Sunday
Tonight’s Sky: Hercules, the
Hero, nearly overhead.
Astoria / Port Docks
Temperatures
High/low ................................ 70/53
Normal high/low .................. 68/54
Record high .................. 88 in 1928
Record low .................... 44 in 1966
Precipitation
Sunday ..................................... 0.00”
Month to date ........................ 1.51”
Normal month to date ......... 0.78”
Year to date .......................... 24.38”
Normal year to date ........... 36.69”
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
Time
5:44 a.m.
6:35 p.m.
6.0 12:08 a.m. 2.1
6.8 12:03 p.m. 0.8
Cape Disappointment
5:18 a.m.
6:24 p.m.
Source: Jim Todd, OMSI
Hammond
SUN AND MOON
Sunrise today .................. 5:47 a.m.
Sunset tonight ............... 8:57 p.m.
Moonrise today ........... 12:02 a.m.
Moonset today ............ 12:26 p.m.
Last
New
First
Full
5:34 a.m.
6:29 p.m.
Warrenton
5:39 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
Knappa
6:21 a.m.
7:12 p.m.
Depoe Bay
July 24 July 31 Aug 7 Aug 15
4:34 a.m.
5:39 p.m.
5.7 11:32 a.m. 0.8
6.4
none
6.3 11:45 a.m. 0.9
7.1
none
6.4 11:47 a.m. 0.9
7.2
none
6.3 1:09 a.m.
7.1 1:04 p.m.
1.8
0.7
6.1 10:57 a.m. 1.1
6.9 11:56 p.m. 2.4
City
Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Honolulu
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
New York City
Phoenix
San Francisco
Wash., DC
Today
Hi/Lo/W
79/65/t
72/67/r
82/61/s
89/68/s
89/62/pc
89/77/pc
90/69/t
89/71/s
90/78/t
75/66/sh
106/86/pc
72/56/pc
78/66/sh
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
83/67/pc
80/66/pc
84/63/s
88/67/s
93/63/pc
90/78/pc
90/67/s
92/69/s
91/78/t
80/68/s
107/89/t
75/56/pc
83/66/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow fl urries, sn-snow, i-ice.
92/55
Kennewick Walla Walla
96/62 Lewiston
99/59
98/66
Hermiston
The Dalles 99/60
Enterprise
Pendleton 92/50
95/58
85/60
La Grande
94/54
79/52
NATIONAL CITIES
High (ft.) Time Low (ft.)
Pullman
96/53
74/56
Salem
93/57
Yakima 97/60
Longview
68/54 Portland
79/58
Spokane
91/62
74/53
75/52
Astoria
ALMANAC
HOURS OPEN: MON-FRI 8-6 * SATURDAY * SUNDAY 10-4
We Service What We Sell
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
Seattle
68 54
wouldn’t solve the issue of
who rushes the passer.
Who will play safety?
This may be even big-
ger question than receiver
since Seattle would proba-
bly like to be able to settle
on a set two-man combina-
tion as it enters its fi rst year
of the Carroll era knowing
it won’t have at least one of
Earl Thomas or Kam Chan-
cellor as a starter.
What’s certain is that
veteran Bradley McDou-
gald will play either free or
strong, with the Seahawks
picking one of, most logi-
cally, three players to fi ll the
other spot — Tedric Thomp-
son, Lano Hill or Marquise
Blair.
Blair, though, was put
on the PUP list this week,
apparently still bothered
by a hamstring issue, while
Hill didn’t practice during
the offseason program
while recovering from hip
surgery.
Lots to sort out yet.
But the Seahawks seemed
intrigued by the pairing
they saw late last season of
McDougald at free safety
and Hill at strong, and they
may prefer to go that route
to start, especially if Blair
misses any signifi cant time
in training camp.
Who may be the most
intriguing players to
watch and why?
WR DK Metcalf: The
hype machine hit overdrive
following his rookie mini-
camp performance. Now
to see what he does once
the pads go on and he goes
against veterans every day.
LB Shaquem Griffi n:
The team is altering his role
some to get him used more
as a pass rusher and in cov-
erage, lining up at both
weakside and strongside
linebacker. But can he make
enough of that role in train-
ing camp to earn playing
time in a crowded and com-
petitive linebacker group?
RB C.J. Prosise: The
2016 third-round pick has
one more shot to fulfi ll the
team’s faith in him after
missing 32 of 48 games
due to injury so far. But
if healthy, the open role
of
third-down/two-min-
ute back may be his for the
taking.
gets, also scoring on three.
Of Lockett’s 23 career
touchdown receptions, just
six have come inside the red
zone. Baldwin, meanwhile,
caught 28 of his 49 TDs
inside the red zone.
Expect Lockett to get
more targets in the red
zone, but other players are
also going to have to step
up there, with the 6-3, 229-
pound Metcalf the most log-
ical of the rookies to con-
tribute heavily.
Will Ziggy Ansah be
ready for the start of the
regular season?
This one is impossible
to answer from the outside
just yet, though we’ll know
far more this week once the
Seahawks open camp.
It’s likely Ansah will
start out on the PUP (Phys-
ically Unable to Perform)
list as the team plays it
safe while he continues to
recover from shoulder sur-
gery — players can be taken
off the preseason PUP list at
any time (and don’t be sur-
prised if tight end Will Dis-
sly, recovering from patellar
tendon surgery, also starts
out on PUP).
While the team is opti-
mistic Ansah — signed to a
contract that could pay him
up to $9 million with the
hope he can replace much
of the production lost in
the trade of Frank Clark —
will be ready, Carroll also
hedged when asked that
question in June.
“Well, we’ll see,” Carroll
said. “We’re going to wait
... we’ll just see when camp
comes. We’ll take the camp
to get it done though, I’m
sure. I don’t think we’ll rush
him when there won’t be a
need to start him up right
out of the chutes and we’ll
see how it goes in the weeks
to follow.”
The Seahawks covered
themselves some fi nancially
in regards to Ansah’s health
— a third of his salary, $3
million, is in the form of
per-week bonuses for being
on the 53-man and 46-man
rosters (or, $93,750 per
week for each).
But while that might
assure the Seahawks don’t
get completely taken to the
bank if Ansah isn’t ready
for the start of the season, it
Corvallis
78/51
Albany
79/52
John Day
Eugene
Bend
82/51
88/45
97/54
Ontario
99/69
Caldwell
Burns
95/51
98/65
Medford
89/58
Klamath Falls
88/48
City
Baker City
Brookings
Ilwaco
Newberg
Newport
Today
Hi/Lo/W
96/53/s
66/52/pc
66/57/c
79/52/c
65/50/pc
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
82/44/s
74/56/s
68/57/pc
81/54/s
67/53/pc
City
North Bend
Roseburg
Seaside
Springfi eld
Vancouver
Today
Hi/Lo/W
68/54/pc
81/55/pc
67/55/c
81/51/pc
77/55/c
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
71/55/s
87/58/s
70/55/s
83/53/s
80/54/pc