The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, July 20, 2019, Page A7, Image 7

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    A7
THE ASTORIAN • SATuRdAy, July 20, 2019
ICE: Hearing set for October
OBITUARIES
Dewey Deane Johnson
Continued from Page A1
“We need to start sup-
porting ICE in their efforts
of when people are here ille-
gally,” the sheriff said. “This
isn’t a game. These people are
here illegally and if ICE has
a detainer for them or a war-
rant then they need to abide
by the laws in the state and
the United States of Amer-
ica. I’m sorry, that’s how it is.
That’s how it should be.”
Bergin said the people
who surrounded Zamora-Ro-
driguez were interfering.
“I’m sorry, but if they have
a warrant and the guy needs
to go into custody, then he
needs to go into custody,”
the sheriff said. “But when
these protesters or what-
ever they were, these people
that wanted to make sure he
didn’t go to jail surrounded
him, they’re interfering with
a police officer.”
Shaken
Hours afterward, Andrea
Gonzalez, a program coordi-
nator with the Lower Colum-
bia Hispanic Council, she said
was still shaken by the phys-
ical nature of the encounter
and that it took place inside
the courthouse.
“People don’t have rights
all of a sudden?” said Gon-
zalez, who was sprayed. “I
don’t know. It just feels ... it
feels wrong.”
Under Oregon’s sanctu-
ary law, sheriff’s deputies and
others in state and local law
enforcement are prohibited
from enforcing federal immi-
gration law if the suspect’s
only crime is being in the
country illegally. Last year,
Bergin wrote a letter signed
by 15 other county sheriffs
supporting a ballot measure
that would have repealed the
sanctuary law. Voters rejected
the measure in November.
The video shows sheriff’s
deputies in the hallway at the
courthouse on Thursday, but
they did not appear to par-
ticipate in or seek to stop the
detention.
“I’m not surprised. Tom
Bergin is the sheriff and I
know his stance,” Gonzalez
said. “And I’m not saying all
sheriffs are bad. But I mean
clearly they are cooperat-
ing with them and they were
Warrenton
Feb. 27, 1957 — July 11th, 2019
Maria Senaida Perez
Immigration agents took a man into custody at the Clatsop
County Courthouse on Thursday.
what, OK with people who
are just trying to escort some-
one out being hurt by these
officials? People from their
community? That’s disturb-
ing to me for sure.”
Judge Paula Brownhill, the
presiding judge of the Circuit
Court, could not immediately
be reached for comment.
Earlier this year, after a
man was detained by ICE
outside the courthouse in
December, the judge echoed
complaints from many judges
and civil liberties’ advocates
nationally. “Not only criminal
defendants, but civil litigants,
crime victims, and witnesses
may be reluctant to come to
court for fear of encountering
ICE,” she said.
District Attorney Ron
Brown said ICE’s local action
was legal. He said that people
inside the courthouse could
detect the pepper spray hours
after it was released.
“It’s not something we
like to see at all, but it does
happen,” Brown said.
Roman, the ICE spokes-
woman, said civil immigra-
tion enforcement actions
taken inside courthouses can
reduce safety risks to the pub-
lic. “Arrests that take place
inside courthouses are under-
taken in coordination with
courthouse security leader-
ship with the same level of
professionalism and respect
that ICE officers and agents
are committed to practicing
every day,” she said.
“ICE does not make civil
immigration arrests inside
courthouses
indiscrimi-
nately. As with all other fed-
eral agency planned enforce-
ment actions, ICE arrests at
courthouses are the result of
targeted enforcement actions
against specific, targeted
aliens.”
Roman said, in years
past, “most of these individ-
uals would have been turned
over to ICE by local author-
ities upon their release from
jail based on ICE detainers.
Now that some cities do not
honor ICE detainers, these
individuals, who often have
significant criminal histories,
are released onto the street,
presenting a potential public
safety threat.”
He was able to provide
testimony to the state during
the open public comment
period on the operations
plan, but asked the county to
help stop the sale.
He argued that the state
“moved forward without
notice to the people who are
dramatically impacted and
it makes me feel helpless in
the face of a government that
doesn’t listen to the people.”
The Norriston Heights
timber sale is bordered on
two sides by industrial tim-
berland, but is adjacent to
old growth tree stands and
a pocket of known marbled
murrelet habitat. Marbled
murrelets, small seabirds
that nest in old-growth for-
ests, are considered threat-
ened in Oregon.
After hearing peoples’
concerns, a majority of
county commissioners sup-
ported sending a letter to the
state.
“I think we have been
getting a lot of (timber) rev-
enue which is great, but it
should be balanced … and
the Board of Commissioners
at this time does take a bal-
anced approach,” said Sarah
Nebeker, the commission’s
chairwoman. “I don’t see
why a letter to the Depart-
ment of Forestry … asking
them to further consider will
be harmful to our county.”
Commissioner
Mark
Kujala was the only com-
missioner opposed to send-
ing a letter.
“I think you can have for-
est management and you can
SEVENDAY FORECAST FOR ASTORIA
TODAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
Walk: ‘I think it’s more a perception issue’
Continued from Page A1
Online activity
Zamora-Rodriguez was
arrested in February after the
sheriff’s office said he showed
up at a local park for what he
believed was going to be a
sexual rendezvous with an
11-year-old boy. Online, dep-
uties had been posing as the
boy and the boy’s 40-year-old
babysitter.
He has pleaded not guilty
to encouraging child sex-
ual abuse and other felony
charges. At the hearing Thurs-
day, a case management hear-
ing was set for October.
Timber: State modified some details
Continued from Page A1
Dewey Deane Johnson Jr., 62, of Warren- successfully harvested the elk himself.
ton, Oregon, passed away peacefully to meet
Dewey is survived by his mother, Bev-
his Heavenly Father on July 11, 2019 sur- erly Jackson-Shumaker, of Warrenton; his
rounded by his beloved family.
sister, Sheri (Mike) Posey; and
his brothers, Todd (Angela) John-
Dewey was born in Salem,
son, Daniel (Susan) Jackson and
Oregon, to Dewey Sr. and Bev-
erly. He spent part of his child-
Carl (Sandy) Jackson, as well as
hood in Aumsville and then
numerous step-siblings and nieces
moved to the Astoria area when
and nephews. He is survived by his
he was 9. Dewey joined the Army
son, Brendan (Miranda) Johnson;
daughter, Emily (Richard) Shel-
in 1976 and was stationed at Fort
don and daughter, Katie (Mitch)
Bliss. After his military service, he
Brown. He was Grandpa “Dew-
returned to Clatsop County, where
dee” to eight grandchildren, Ken-
he worked in the logging industry.
Dewey Deane
nedy, Sawyer, Gracelyn, Harper,
Dewey married Suzanne
Johnson Jr.
Colby, Jonah, Asher and Rhys.
McBride in 1980 in Astoria, Ore-
gon. Together they had three chil-
He is also survived by his ex-wife,
dren. On Aug. 2, 1986 Dewey was paralyzed Suzanne Johnson.
Dewey is preceded in death by his father;
in an accident while fishing. As a quadriple-
gic, Dewey persevered with equal amounts two stepfathers, Robert Jackson and Jack
of bravery and stubbornness. He earned an Shumaker; his in-laws, Chuck and Marian
associate’s segree in business administration McBride; his sister, Barbara Ann; and his
and a certificate in computer aided drafting granddaughter, Lucy.
Over the years, Dewey was cared for by
design from Clatsop Community College,
all while raising his children. Dewey then many amazing caregivers. In recent years,
worked for Ag-Bag International and Autio his caregivers became like family and cannot
be thanked enough for the time and love they
Co.
Dewey’s hobbies included fishing, cutting dedicated to him. Dewey was also supported
wood, hunting, collecting music and movies by the Seattle VA Spinal Cord Unit and the
and sunbathing in his yard. He was an avid Paralyzed Veterans of America. Many neigh-
Portland Trail Blazers fan and didn’t miss bors and friends made up Dewey’s village
and his family is so appreciative.
watching a single game.
“You are not what happened to you. You
He also loved watching his kids’ and
grandkids’ sporting events and was involved are what you choose to become.”
Dewey now WALKS in heaven.
in Warrenton Kids Inc. In his later years,
A celebration of life will be held at the
Dewey loved cruising around town with his
much-loved sidekick, “Holly.” Holly was his Warrenton Baptist Church on Monday July
trained companion dog that he obtained from 29th, at 2pm with a reception to follow. In
Freedom Tails in Aberdeen, Washington. lieu of flowers, please consider donating to
Dewey also was able to rekindle his love of Freedom Tails/PAWS and Warrenton Kids
hunting with the help of many friends. Dewey Inc. in Dewey’s name.
have healthy watersheds,”
he said. “These things are
not necessarily mutually
exclusive and I think that
(the Department of For-
estry) has had their process,
they’ve had public com-
ment, they’ve had an oppor-
tunity to pull things off and
modify the sale.
“I just don’t feel com-
fortable intervening at the
last minute and saying that
we don’t think that they
understood.”
The state did modify
some details of the proposed
timber sale after hearing
from the public, said Jason
Cox, a spokesman for the
Department of Forestry. The
state increased tree buffers
around streams and will not
allow harvest on the wind-
ward side of the property.
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
While the number of
calls officers respond to that
are related to homelessness
remain high, the calls are for
what Spalding describes as
“quality of life crimes.”
“We’re not necessarily
seeing crime against peo-
ple walking down the Riv-
erwalk, being attacked or
assaulted,” he said. “Typi-
cally, it’s just loud or bellig-
erent behavior, intoxicated
behavior.”
Remove homelessness
from the equation and there
doesn’t seem to be anything
else to cause people con-
cern, the chief said.
“It’s not like we’ve had
an increase in juvenile activ-
ity or alcohol issues,” Spald-
ing said. “I think it is more a
perception issue.”
Reid hopes the organized
walks will develop a life of
their own and provide peo-
ple with both an outlet to
socialize and help make
downtown a livelier place in
the evening.
Reid drew inspiration for
the organized walk Wednes-
day from a similar campaign
City Councilor Roger Rocka
launched in the 1990s to
assuage fears about down-
town when Rocka was the
chamber director.
But where Reid is mostly
addressing perceptions of
safety, Rocka said down-
town Astoria in the 1980s
and ‘90s was an unsavory
place. There was a triangle
of three rough bars, includ-
ing one strip club, where
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
Katie Frankowicz/The Astorian
David Reid, executive director for the Astoria-Warrenton
Area Chamber of Commerce, coordinates with a small group
that included city leaders and downtown business owners
ahead of a walk down the Astoria Riverwalk and through
downtown Wednesday evening.
REGIONAL FORECAST
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
Seattle
72 57
72 57
71 58
Sunshine and Nice with some Periods of sun;
pleasant
sun
nice
70 57
71 56
72 57
Clouds and sun;
Partly sunny
nice
Sunshine
72 59
Mostly sunny
Aberdeen
Olympia
75/54
78/58
Wenatchee
Tacoma
Moses
Lake
UNDER THE SKY
TODAY'S TIDES
Astoria through Thursday
Tonight’s Sky: Summer Triangle
visible above the eastern horizon
at midnight.
Astoria / Port Docks
Temperatures
High/low ................................ 68/54
Normal high/low .................. 68/53
Record high .................. 91 in 1913
Record low .................... 43 in 1986
Precipitation
Thursday ................................. 0.00”
Month to date ........................ 1.51”
Normal month to date ......... 0.70”
Year to date .......................... 24.38”
Normal year to date ........... 36.61”
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019
Time
High (ft.) Time Low (ft.)
3:33 a.m.
4:57 p.m.
7.4 10:29 a.m. -0.4
6.8 10:42 p.m. 2.3
Cape Disappointment
3:10 a.m.
4:36 p.m.
Source: Jim Todd, OMSI
Hammond
SUN AND MOON
Sunrise today .................. 5:44 a.m.
Sunset tonight ............... 9:00 p.m.
Moonrise today ........... 11:18 p.m.
Moonset today ............... 9:22 a.m.
Last
New
First
Full
3:25 a.m.
4:45 p.m.
Warrenton
3:28 a.m.
4:52 p.m.
Knappa
4:10 a.m.
5:34 p.m.
Depoe Bay
July 24 July 31 Aug 7 Aug 15
2:23 a.m.
3:51 p.m.
7.2 9:43 a.m. -0.6
6.3 9:52 p.m. 2.4
7.8 9:59 a.m. -0.5
7.0 10:13 p.m. 2.5
7.8 10:13 a.m. -0.3
7.2 10:26 p.m. 2.4
7.7 11:30 a.m. -0.3
7.1 11:43 p.m. 2.0
7.7 9:12 a.m. -0.5
6.9 9:21 p.m. 2.9
City
Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Honolulu
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
New York City
Phoenix
San Francisco
Wash., DC
89/72/t
98/80/s
98/74/t
97/76/s
82/58/t
89/78/s
92/77/s
77/61/pc
91/80/pc
98/83/s
108/85/pc
73/57/pc
100/81/s
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
89/74/pc
100/77/pc
80/63/t
98/77/s
75/57/t
90/78/pc
91/76/t
81/62/pc
90/78/pc
98/79/s
109/88/pc
73/56/pc
100/78/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow fl urries, sn-snow, i-ice.
80/49
Kennewick Walla Walla
87/59 Lewiston
88/52
86/55
Hermiston
The Dalles 90/54
Enterprise
Pendleton 78/48
86/55
90/57
La Grande
82/49
87/56
NATIONAL CITIES
Today
Hi/Lo/W
Pullman
85/53
82/54
Salem
79/53
Yakima 86/56
Longview
72/57 Portland
87/61
Spokane
83/61
79/53
80/56
Astoria
ALMANAC
have a very different vibe
and live alongside restau-
rants, boutiques, antique
stores and other shops. City
sidewalks fill up for events
like the Second Saturday Art
Walk.
“This is by no means a
parallel situation, but it is a
situation where we’re hear-
ing people are feeling a little
uneasy,” Rocka said.
Since it appears to be the
homeless that people are
afraid of now, the walks Reid
is jump-starting could give
people a chance to find out
more about someone’s situ-
ation and see what services
that person might need.
“It can be a learning expe-
rience for us and the com-
munity,” Rocka said, add-
ing, “We always fear things
we don’t understand and
sometimes our fear is not
fact-based and I don’t know
that it’s really that threaten-
ing downtown.”
restaurants like the Silver
Salmon Grille and Fulio’s
are located now.
“What you had in the eve-
ning was downtown streets
were kind of filled with
these guys shuffling around,
some of them appearing to
be inebriated, some of them
appearing to be on drugs and
people were just uncom-
fortable going down there,”
Rocka said.
Rocka organized a group
of men and women who
would go downtown on cer-
tain evenings, walk around,
maybe order a Coke or a
beer at one of the bars.
“It had an interesting
effect on some of the deni-
zens of the area at the time,”
Rocka said. “It was sort of
like their mom had come to
watch them and a lot of them
would just scatter.”
Fast forward to present
day. Bars still dot the his-
toric downtown district, but
Corvallis
86/53
Albany
86/54
John Day
Eugene
Bend
87/54
83/49
85/53
Ontario
91/56
Caldwell
Burns
85/49
88/54
Medford
92/61
Klamath Falls
88/49
City
Baker City
Brookings
Ilwaco
Newberg
Newport
Today
Hi/Lo/W
83/41/s
71/53/s
70/59/s
86/55/s
67/55/s
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
94/55/s
68/54/s
70/58/pc
90/55/s
66/54/pc
City
North Bend
Roseburg
Seaside
Springfi eld
Vancouver
Today
Hi/Lo/W
70/56/s
89/58/s
72/58/s
86/53/s
85/58/s
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
69/56/pc
90/59/pc
71/56/pc
89/54/s
89/58/s