The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, June 20, 2017, Page 2A, Image 2

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    2A
THE DAILY ASTORIAN • TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2017
Advance Astoria a road map for economic development
‘Northwest Oregon, like much of the Pacifi c
Northwest, is experiencing a prolonged
decline in resource-based employment.’
Plan promotes
economic
diversifi cation
—the Advance Astoria plan
By KATIE FRANKOWICZ
The Daily Astorian
The Astoria City Coun-
cil took its fi rst step toward
approving a new fi ve-year eco-
nomic development strategy
that hopes to create 200 high
wage jobs by 2021.
City councilors unani-
mously approved a fi rst read-
ing of the Advance Astoria
plan following a public hear-
ing Monday night.
Advance Astoria, spear-
headed by the city’s Commu-
nity Development Department,
defi nes high-wage jobs as jobs
that employ a person at $17.50
or more an hour. The plan aims
to “expand economic oppor-
tunities and prosperity for all
Astorians,” giving the city a
road map for economic devel-
opment desires into the future.
It is a document informed by
Astoria’s many industries and
communities, from seafood
processors and breweries to
Columbia Memorial Hospi-
tal and Clatsop Community
College.
The city, with a grant and
matching funds from the Astor
West Urban Renewal District,
began developing the plan last
year, a process that involved
open houses, committee meet-
ings, surveys and community
meetings, said Community
Development Director Kevin
Cronin.
“We are on time, on budget
to present this project tonight,”
he said.
Patrick Wingard, regional
representative for the Oregon
Department of Land Conser-
vation and Development and
an Astoria resident, called
Advance Astoria a “very well-
crafted” plan that benefi ted
from a wealth of community
involvement . His department
provided a representative to
the plan’s technical advisory
committee.
“It really provides a founda-
tion for you, for the city of Asto-
ria to move forward,” Wingard
said. “Not blindly, not just tak-
ing whatever proposal might
come in the next day but hav-
ing a targeted industry strategy
so that when you look at these,
in particular, your water depen-
dent lands, your lands that are
along the shoreline — the super
valuable properties — that you
have a vision in mind and an
opportunity to implement it.”
“Northwest Oregon, like
much of the Pacifi c Northwest,
is experiencing a prolonged
decline in resource-based
employment,” the Advance
Astoria p lan states. “Some of
these industries, such as sea-
food processing, are likely to
maintain a strong presence in
Astoria into the future, while
others may subside.”
“New economic drivers
will emerge,” the plan con-
tinues, “especially as result of
cross-pollination from larger
metros like Portland.”
The plan pulled heav-
ily from a state-required e co-
nomic o pportunities a naly-
sis which looked closely at
Astoria’s socio-economic data
and economic development
as well as available develop-
able and re-developable sites
in Astoria.
The fi nal plan looks at
housing, workforce devel-
opment, branding and iden-
tity questions, development
and permitting, available land
and infrastructure and partner-
ships, among other things. It
outlines strategies and actions
the city could take in each
area.
It also examines fi ve indus-
try “batches,” industry groups
that already exist in Asto-
ria in one form or another but
that could expand and evolve.
These include the craft bever-
age and fermentation indus-
try — Astoria’s slew of brew-
FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR ASTORIA
TONIGHT
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
64
50
50
ALMANAC
Mostly sunny; record-
tying temperatures
First
Full
June 30
Newport
49/62
Coos Bay
52/66
Last
July 8
Astoria
Dec. 18, 1929 — June 15, 2017
Diane Sistaire Beeston, born Dec. 18, 1929, paintings from the photos, adding abstraction
in Semarang, Batavia, Java, to Louise Bullock to their beauty.
In the late 1980s, she tired of the pace of San
Beeston and Francis Henry Beeston, passed
Francisco and moved to the quieter lifestyle of
away June 15, 2017.
Astoria. She enthusiastically joined
Diane grew up in San Francisco
the community, made many lasting
and graduated from the University of
friends, and made Astoria her home.
California, Berkeley, in 1950, where
Diane continued her art, along with
she studied photography. Diane
staying busy in Astoria, by starting
worked at the University of Cali-
an ice cream shop, partnering in an
fornia, San Francisco, as a surgery
art gallery and driving the Astoria
photographer while doing children’s
Riverfront T rolley.
portraits in her free time. In the early
Diane loved to sell her art and
1960s, she started her own business
meet people at the Astoria Sunday
as the premier yachting photographer
Market. Diane volunteered her time
on San Francisco Bay. Diane could
take very dramatic action photos of Diane Beeston at the Columbia River Maritime
Museum on the board as president.
yacht races on the bay, which gained
Diane’s art is displayed at a variety of
her recognition as the best photogra-
restaurants, hotels and businesses around town
pher on the San Francisco Bay.
Diane was always busy developing her and at Columbia Memorial Hospital. Diane
own prints, managing the effects and quality. even painted a dumpster to beautify Astoria.
Her dearest, most special friend was Sue
Diane’s work was featured on many covers
of various yachting magazines. Diane, always Collins, who enjoyed Diane’s spirit and com-
entrepreneurial, produced a yachting calendar, pany for many years and helped her through
and published a book of her yachting photo- her last days. Diane is survived by her nephew,
graphs titled “Of Wind, Fog and Sail: Sailing Robert Beeston, his wife Kathy, and their chil-
dren Elizabeth and Matthew.
on San Francisco Bay.”
Diane requested no services, and her wish
Diane’s interest began to change to oil paint-
ing and sculpture. She loved to scout different was to have her ashes spread in San Francisco
scenes, photograph them, then produce her Bay.
Seaside
May 10, 1990 — June 10, 2017
July 16
John Day
50/80
La Grande
50/77
Baker
46/76
Ontario
62/88
Bend
46/80
Burns
45/83
Roseburg
54/82
Brookings
58/81
Klamath Falls
52/88
Lakeview
55/87
Ashland
60/86
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
Source: Jim Todd, OMSI
TOMORROW'S TIDES
Astoria / Port Docks
Time
5:59 a.m.
5:41 p.m.
Low
-0.5 ft.
1.9 ft.
REGIONAL CITIES
City
Baker City
Bend
Brookings
Eugene
Ilwaco
Klamath Falls
Medford
Newberg
Newport
North Bend
Hi
84
83
69
79
61
90
89
76
63
67
Today
Lo
46
46
57
47
52
52
61
48
49
53
W
s
s
s
pc
pc
s
s
pc
pc
pc
Hi
76
80
77
77
61
88
89
76
62
66
Wed.
Lo
39
46
57
48
53
49
56
49
47
53
W
s
s
s
s
c
s
s
s
pc
s
City
Olympia
Pendleton
Portland
Roseburg
Salem
Seaside
Spokane
Springfi eld
Vancouver
Yakima
Hi
73
85
74
82
78
62
85
79
73
90
Today
Lo
45
53
51
54
48
51
52
48
49
52
W
c
s
pc
pc
c
r
s
pc
pc
s
Hi
73
81
75
82
78
62
77
78
74
85
Wed.
Lo
46
49
52
54
50
51
50
47
50
49
W
pc
s
pc
s
s
c
s
s
pc
s
TOMORROW'S NATIONAL WEATHER
NATIONAL CITIES
Today
Hi Lo
77 69
83 65
78 59
95 64
91 63
77 56
102 77
69 53
85 73
83 64
92 69
116 89
87 66
90 70
89 80
88 67
78 75
84 69
93 66
86 68
90 72
101 71
75 56
71 51
87 70
Prineville
44/83
Lebanon
46/79
Medford
61/89
Tonight's Sky: Summer will arrive at 9:24 p.m.,
which is the moment of the summer solstice here in
the Northern Hemisphere.
High
7.1 ft.
9.5 ft.
Pendleton
53/81
Salem
48/78
UNDER THE SKY
W
t
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
sh
pc
pc
s
s
pc
s
pc
s
r
s
s
s
t
t
pc
sh
s
Wed.
Hi Lo
78 71
81 63
81 66
94 63
91 70
80 63
104 77
73 50
87 73
87 68
92 71
116 87
87 66
89 73
90 80
90 69
83 78
82 65
94 67
85 68
94 75
97 66
78 60
71 51
88 72
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
W
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
s
pc
pc
t
s
r
pc
s
pc
s
s
pc
pc
pc
DUII
• At 1:39 a.m. Saturday,
Franklin Dare Kemp, 70, of
Astoria, was arrested by the
Astoria Police Department on
June 19, 2017
GARNETT, Walter L. III,
74, of Astoria, died in Asto-
the 200 block of West Kens-
ington Avenue for driving
under the infl uence of intoxi-
cants. His blood alcohol con-
tent was 0.17 percent.
ria. Ocean View Funeral &
Cremation Service of Astoria is
in charge of the arrangements.
PUBLIC MEETINGS
PACKAGE DEALS
APPLIANCE
AND HOME
FURNISHINGS
529 SE MARLIN, WARRENTON
503-861-0929
O VER
Mattresses, Furniture
3 A 0
RS
TSOP
C LA U
Y
C O NT
LOTTERIES
DEATH
APPLIANCE
IN
Kayla Lynn Weber was tragically killed
Kayla is survived by her mother, Lorelei
on June 10, 2017, in Gearhart, by a suspected “Lori” Weber of Seaside; grandmother Betty;
uncles Barry, Steve and Lonny; aunts Gail
drunken driver.
She was born on May 10, 1990, in Port- (Daniel) Swagger and Karen (Rainer) Davis;
great-aunt Diane Morris; numerous
land. She lived in Arizona for six
cousins; and many friends across
years before returning to the Port-
the U.S. She also leaves behind her
land area. With her mother, Kayla
cats, Bentley and Mercedes. She
moved to Seaside in 2006 and
will be missed by all who knew and
attended Seaside High School.
loved her.
In 2011, she attended Job Corps
She was preceded in death by her
in Astoria and then in San Jose, Cal-
father, Gerald Dohaney.
ifornia. She later became a residen-
In lieu of fl owers, please con-
tial advisor at Tongue Point Job
sider making a donation in Kayla’s
Corps Center in Astoria. It was a job
name to the Clatsop County Animal
she loved. She really enjoyed work-
Kayla Weber
Shelter, 1315 S.E. 19th St., Warren-
ing with the students, even tutoring
ton, OR 97146.
them in math.
A celebration of life will be
Kayla had a passion for life and
loved music, photography, astronomy and art. from 3 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, July 9, 2017,
From the time she was a little girl, she had a at the Bob Chisholm Community Center,
passion for animals, even volunteering and 1225 Avenue A in Seaside. All family and
fostering cats for an animal rescue for the six friends are invited to come and celebrate
Kayla.
years she lived in Arizona.
Funeral arrangements are being handled
Kayla had the ability to make people smile.
Her giggle was well known to her family and by Hughes-Ransom Mortuary, Astoria/Sea-
friends. She loved rainbows, fl ying kites and tak- side. View the online tribute and guest book
ing photos of the amazing Oregon C oast sunsets. at www.hughes-ransom.com
ON THE RECORD
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy,
sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow fl urries,
sn-snow, i-ice.
YE
Diane Sistaire Beeston
Kayla Lynn Weber
The Dalles
55/83
Portland
51/75
Eugene
47/77
Sunset tonight ........................... 9:10 p.m.
Sunrise Wednesday .................... 5:24 a.m.
Moonrise today ........................... 3:08 a.m.
Moonset today ........................... 5:06 p.m.
City
Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC
Pleasant with brilliant
sunshine
Tillamook
47/65
SUN AND MOON
Time
12:12 p.m.
11:47 p.m.
Sunshine; breezy in the
afternoon
79
58
& More!
high that major work on the
road could trigger the active
landslide that closed that sec-
tion down in 2007 and has
restricted it to one-way traffi c
ever since. Recently, they saw
more movement than usual in
the landslide, he said.
“We decided it would not
be prudent to take the risk to
do that project this year,” Har-
rington said.
The city will continue
working on bid documents in
the hopes of putting the proj-
ect out to bid by next spring.
OBITUARIES
Shown is tomorrow's weather. Temperatures are tonight's lows and tomorrow's highs.
ASTORIA
50/64
Precipitation
Monday ............................................ Trace
Month to date ................................... 2.42"
Normal month to date ....................... 1.83"
Year to date .................................... 49.55"
Normal year to date ........................ 35.19"
June 23
SATURDAY
70
56
eries as well as a distillery
and cidery; the maritime and
seafood processing indus-
tries; education, medicine and
research development indus-
tries; and micro enterprise.
City Councilor Bruce
REGIONAL WEATHER
Astoria through Monday.
Temperatures
High/low ....................................... 73°/58°
Normal high/low ........................... 64°/50°
Record high ............................ 76° in 1946
Record low ............................. 38° in 1955
New
FRIDAY
65
51
Areas of low clouds;
breezy in the p.m.
Partly cloudy
Jones praised the plan as an
“ongoing process” responsive
to “emerging opportunities”
and shifting environments.
In other business Monday:
• Work on Bond Street to
turn a one-way section back
into a two-lane road is on hold
until next year.
City Engineer Jeff Har-
rington had planned to ask the
city to approve a bid package
on Monday, but the city expe-
rienced 150 percent of nor-
mal rainfall this winter and
spring. Now the risk is too
HOURS OPEN: MON-FRI 8-6 • SATURDAY 9-5 • SUNDAY 10-4
We Service What We Sell
TUESDAY
Sunset Empire Parks and Rec
District, 4 p.m., 1225 Ave. A,
Seaside.
Clatsop County Human
Services Advisory Council, 4
to 5:30 p.m., 800 Exchange St.,
Room 430.
Seaside School District, 6
p.m., 1810 S. Franklin, Seaside.
Port of Astoria Commission,
6 p.m., budget hearing, regular
meeting following, 10 Pier 1,
Suite 209.
Shoreline Sanitary District
Board, 7 p.m., Gearhart Hertig
Station, 33496 West Lake Lane,
Warrenton.
Seaside Planning Commis-
sion, 7 p.m., 989 Broadway.
WEDNESDAY
Seaside Tourism Advisory
Committee, 3 p.m., 989 Broad-
way.
The Daily Astorian
Established July 1, 1873
(USPS 035-000)
Published daily, except Saturday and Sunday, by EO Media Group,
949 Exchange St., PO Box 210, Astoria, OR 97103 Telephone 503-
325-3211, 800-781-3211 or Fax 503-325-6573. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to The Daily Astorian, PO Box 210, Astoria,
OR 97103-0210
www.dailyastorian.com
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OREGON
Monday’s Pick 4:
1 p.m.: 7-5-8-6
4 p.m.: 4-4-4-0
7 p.m.: 6-9-1-8
10 p.m.: 2-5-6-9
Monday’s Megabucks: 3-8-
12-15-29-36
Estimated jackpot: $1.8
million
WASHINGTON
Monday’s Daily Game:
1-9-0
Monday’s Hit 5: 08-12-18-
19-24
Estimated jackpot: $120,000
Monday’s Keno: 08-11-12-
14-16-18-19-21-22-33-38-
40-43-44-45-51-60-61-62-75
Monday’s Lotto: 04-11-23-
34-37-49
Estimated jackpot: $8.6
million
Monday’s Match 4: 07-10-
17-20
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