The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, August 18, 2015, Image 3

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    NORTH COAST
THE DAILY ASTORIAN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2015
3A
Seaside man
Party planned for City will remind
sentenced for rape Boy Scouts who consumers to
rode across country conserve water
and third-degree rape from
incidents that occurred in
August 2014. The first-de-
A 19-year-old Seaside gree rape charge, which was
man was sentenced to five dropped as part Stricklin’s
years
probation
plea agreement,
after
pleading
claimed the girl
guilty to raping a
was “incapable of
girl under the age
consent by reason
of 16.
of mental incapac-
Devlin Diego
itation.´
Stricklin pleaded
Mental
inca-
guilty last week
pacitation includes
in Clatsop County
mental
illness,
Circuit Court to
being under an-
third-degree rape,
esthesia, or more
a class C felony.
commonly, being
Devlin Diego
In addition to
intoxicated
by
Stricklin
probation, Strick-
drugs or alcohol,
lin was sentenced
according to the
to 120 days in jail with District Attorney’s 2ffice.
credit for time already
The Clatsop County
served and ordered to have Sheriff’s 2ffice arrested
no contact with the victim Stricklin on the charges in
or minors.
April, and he was held in
He must also register as custody on $500,000 bail.
a sex offender, complete
Stricklin, who was rep-
sex offender treatment and resented by defense lawyer
pay a $1,000 compensatory Kirk Wintermute, appeared
fine.
in court Friday to enter his
In April, Stricklin was guilty plea and accept his
indicted on charges of first sentence.
By KYLE SPURR
The Daily Astorian
College library taps
Kralik as new director
The Daily Astorian
Luke Kralik is the new
director and head librarian
of the Dora Badollet Library
on Clatsop Community Col-
lege’s main campus.
Kralik, who started Aug.
3, replaces Candice Watkins,
who recently became direc-
tor of Tacoma Community
College’s library. Kralik has
served as library director and
librarian at Tillamook Bay
Community College since
January 2011. He has also
been a reference librarian at
Tillamook County Library,
school librarian at Sacred
Heart School in Medford and
a reference librarian at the
Jackson County Library.
He holds a bachelor’s of
¿ne arts from Southern 2re-
gon University and a master’s
of library science from Empo-
ria State University in Kansas.
Kralik, who maintains his in-
terest in ¿ne arts and painting,
will relocate to Astoria with
his wife and three daughters.
Kralik is responsible for
all functions of the library and
adjacent Learning Commons,
including information liter-
The Daily Astorian
American Legion Post
12 will hold a welcome
home party at 2 p.m.
Saturday for Bike Trip
America, the fundraiser
started by Astoria High
School student Bryce
Nurding for 2peration
Comfort Warriors.
Nurding and fel-
low Boy Scouts 5yan
Tallman and Jonathan
Williams, along with
70-year-old
Vietnam
veteran Don Child, left
Clatsop Community College photo
acy, collections services and
open educational resource de-
velopment, which he said is a
key focus.
“Integration of (open ed-
ucational resources) into the
curriculum will be a great ben-
e¿t to our students,´ Kralik
said. “They will have access
to a wider range of resources
at a much lower cost. 2E5
can help eliminate the need
for e[pensive te[tbooks.´
Kralik said he intends to
devote time to getting a sense
of need from students, faculty
and the community, and is ex-
cited to be in a larger institu-
tion yet still be able to devel-
op personal connections with
library constituents.
The Daily Astorian
Consumers will get a re-
minder on their water bills
to conserve water.
The city will also take
out an ad in The Daily As-
torian outlining sugges-
tions to reduce consump-
tion.
Earlier this month, the
City Council unanimously
approved voluntary wa-
ter conservation recom-
mendations after weather
forecasters predicted lit-
tle rain until the end of
2ctober.
The city’s Public Works
Department has said wa-
ter storage volume is at 95
percent of average for this
time of year.
But if the lack of rain-
fall persists for a few more
months, the city might
have to impose mandatory
water restrictions.
The voluntary rec-
ommendations
include
checking
faucets
and
pipes for leaks, only us-
ing dishwashers and wash-
ing machines with full
loads, and not watering
lawns.
Workshops offered on government contracts
The Daily Astorian
Federal, state, and local gov-
ernment agencies spend millions
of dollars every year purchasing
goods and services from the pri-
vate sector.
Clatsop Economic Devel-
opment 5esources will host up-
coming workshops taught by the
Government Contract Assistance
Program on helping businesses
snag some of that business.
The workshops will teach
small business owners:
‡ The certi¿cations and reg-
istrations necessary to sell to the
federal, state, and local govern-
ments.
• How the government pro-
cures goods and services.
• How to assess the govern-
ment marketplace and ¿nd con-
tracting opportunities.
• About resources to help
businesses throughout the pro-
cess, from market assessment
to pursuing opportunities, and
contract award, performance
and payment.
The workshop runs from 9 to
11 a.m. Aug. 27 on the college’s
main campus at 1651 Lexington
Ave. in Columbia Hall 5oom 219.
From 1 to 3 p.m. Aug. 27 in
the same location, the contact
assistance program will provide
step-by-step training on how to
use government websites to ¿nd
which agencies are buying prod-
ucts and services.
To schedule a 30-minute,
one-on-one counseling session
with a procurement counselor
at the Government Contract As-
sistance Program, contact Car-
ley Dirks at 503-344-6618 or
cdirks@gcap.org2
Judge Brownhill presented with lifetime achievement award
The Daily Astorian
Luke Kralik is the new di-
rector of the Dora Badollet
Library.
the Peter Iredale ship-
wreck June 18 and
dipped their tires in New
<ork’s Hudson 5iver
Saturday.
Along
the
way,
they
raised
nearly
$20,000 for the Amer-
ican Legion’s 2pera-
tion Comfort Warriors,
an organization aiding
veterans.
The party, which is
free and open to the pub-
lic, will be at American
Legion Post 12, located
at 1132 Exchange St.
Clatsop County Circuit
Court Judge Paula Brownhill
was presented with the Chief
Justice Juvenile Court Cham-
pion Lifetime Achievement
Award last week at a meeting of
the state’s juvenile court judges.
2regon Chief Justice Thom-
as Balmer presented Brownhill
with the award, which is given
annually to a judicial of¿cer in
recognition of lifetime contri-
butions in juvenile dependency
and child welfare issues.
Brownhill, who has served
Clatsop County and the state for
more than 20 years, has been a
longtime advocate for children
appearing in court so that they
can be heard in an age-appropri-
ate manner.
appointment to the
Not only has she
bench in November
been a strong voice
1994.
for children and
In 2002, Brown-
families at both the
hill was recognized
county and state lev-
as a Juvenile Court
el, she has also been
Champion by for-
a caring, clear, and
mer Chief Justice
compassionate judge
Wally Carson. She
with deep knowledge
is the primary judge
Judge Paula
and respect for the
for dependency cas-
Brownhill
rule of law, Balmer
es and the judge of
noted during the state
the Clatsop County
juvenile court judge’s Aug. 10 Family Treatment Court, which
meeting.
she helped to establish in 2006.
Brownhill received her Juris
In addition, she is a part of
Doctor degree from the Univer- the Clatsop County Dependency
sity of 2regon School of Law Team, Clatsop County Domes-
and was admitted to the 2regon tic Violence Council and serves
State Bar in 1981. She worked on the executive committee of
as an attorney with a family and the Juvenile Engagement and
juvenile law practice until her Leadership Institute, a statewide
initiative for juvenile court judg-
es.
In 2003, former Chief Justice
Wally Carson appointed Judge
Brownhill chair of the State
Family Law Advisory Com-
mittee. When budget cuts elim-
inated all staff support in 2009,
Brownhill and other committee
members kept it going without
staff for six years.
Since then, the state court
administrator has restored staff,
and the committee continues to
identify family law issues that
need to be addressed and to offer
innovative approaches to family
law in 2regon.
Brownhill was the 2regon
Circuit Court Judges Associ-
ation president from 2013 to
2014.
W A NTED
Alder and Maple Saw Logs & Standing Timber
N orth w es t H a rdw oods • Lon gview , W A
PERFORMING
ARTS
PRESCHOOL
Contact: Steve Axtell • 360-430-0885 or John Anderson • 360-269-2500
Gu ess w hat d ay it is!
It’s Hump’s Day!!!
CLASSES
START
SEPTEMBER
8 TH
AT HUMP’S RESTAURANT
EV ERY W ED N ESD AY 5 -8 PM
14 OUN CE N EW Y ORK
STEAK & BAK ED POTATO
M ust present coupon to server.
N ot va lid w ith other offers. Z
All You Can Eat Chicken & Dumplings
$6.95 Every Thursday 5-8 pm
No reservations, please
$9.95
w w w .getyoud a nc ing.c om
503-717-1637
Video
Just 15 m in. from the Lew is & Cla rk Bridge on H w y. 30
Hump’s Restaurant
50 W. Columbia River Highway Clatskanie, OR. 503.728.2626
MADDOX
Dance Studio
invites you to our
OPEN HOUSE
AUGUST 20, 21, 22 | 27, 28, 29
1 1 AM -3 P M or by a ppointm ent
• For registration
• Fitting and
ordering required
dance wear
• Tour the studio
• Refreshments
CLASSES B EG IN
Tu es. S ept. 8th
Nu tcracker
Au dition s
SATU RD AY ,
SEPT. 19TH
L ife M em ber of D a n ce E d u ca tors of Am erica ; certified by the Am erica n Aca d em y of Ba llet,
a n d D a n ce M a sters of Am erica m em ber of the Astoria -W a rren ton Cha m ber of Com m erce.
WARRENTON STUDIO: 389 S. Main St. | 503-861-1971
www.maddoxdancers.com | email: maddoxdancers@opusnet.com
TIMBERLANDS CLOSED
DUE TO HIGH FIRE DANGER
Lew is & C la rk Tim b erla n d s
a re closed to a ll pu blic en try a n d w ill
rem a in in effect u n til fu rther n otice.
F or u p-to-d a te in form a tion
plea se ca ll ou r
REC REATION AL
HOTLIN E
5 03 -73 8-63 5 1 Ex t. 2
TIMBERLANDS CLOSED