The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, July 27, 2015, Image 1

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    Hugs at Oregon
Coast Invitational
Forest, farms
and foam
SPORTS • 7A
INSIDE
143rd YEAR, No. 19
MONDAY, JULY 27, 2015
ONE DOLLAR
Road
plan
unlikely
until
2017
Deal could wait
until after elections
By PETER WONG
Capital Bureau
Joshua Bessex/The Daily Astorian
Students in the migrant summer school program, including Karen Zuniga Jiminez, right, work on constructing pinatas at Astoria Middle
School Thursday.
Migrant summer school
provides some stability
Instruction
could help close
achievement gap
By EDWARD STRATTON
The Daily Astorian
A
raceny Borja, 11, sat in a
classroom at Astoria Mid-
dle School Thursday, only
two months after she and her moth-
er moved to the North Coast from
Mexico for what she called “a bet-
ter life.”
Borja, with translation by a new
friend sitting next to her, shared her
trepidation at having to make new
friends in an entirely new place,
and her excitement about being
able to take art classes.
Borja is one of more than 100
students kindergarten through
seventh grade attending a migrant
summer school program offered
through the Northwest Regional
Education Service District and the
Astoria School District.
The program serves students
whose parents have moved around
for work. In Clatsop County, that
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cessing, tourism and other seasonal
industries.
“It’s trying to create an equita-
ble circumstance for these kids,”
said Seth Tucker, a migrant recruit-
er with the service district’s mi-
grant education program.
The district has programs in
Astoria, Tillamook and Scappoose.
Students in the programs must
have moved in the past three years
for their parent’s work.
Last year, Astoria Superinten-
dent Craig Hoppes said, Astoria
had 75 to 80 migrant students. The
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economic activity in the summer.
Running the program at Astoria
Middle School is Astoria kinder-
garten teacher Kellie Clay, along
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ing assistants. The teachers divide
students by grade into all-inclusive
classrooms practicing reading,
writing, math and art.
English learning
“They already understand con-
versational English, but we’re
teaching them academic language,”
said Dindy Fischer, a third-grade
teacher during the school year
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enth-graders at the summer school.
Each class incorporates an En-
glish Learning Development mod-
el to help grow the students’ En-
glish skills.
“For a 5-year-old navigating
two languages, it’s important to
give them the structures early,”
said Betsy Mahoney, a Seaside
kindergarten teacher teaching the
same age group at the migrant sum-
mer school. She has taught kinder-
gartners through fourth-graders at
the migrant summer school.
The students at the migrant
school range from those with a full
handle on English and straight As
to Borja, who speaks almost no
English, has never before attended
American schools and starts mid-
dle school in the fall.
“I mostly get bored at my house,
so I come here,” sixth-grader Kar-
en Zuniga Jimenez said, a common
sentiment among kids who come to
school for the socialization, academ-
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Binational exposure
While helping students come
back to school in the fall with les-
sons fresh in their mind, the service
district also sends a teacher from
Mexico to help remind the largely
Hispanic student body of their cul-
tural history.
Elizabeth Aguilera, a preschool
teacher in Guanajuato, Mexico,
on loan to migrant summer school
programs in Oregon, goes from
classroom to classroom. She led
students in building piñatas, Day of
the Dead-themed paper mache and
other activities to expose students
to Mexican culture.
“This tradition, it’s very im-
portant in Mexico,” Aguilera said.
“I want kids to know those tradi-
tions.”
See SCHOOL, Page 10A
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Active retirement,
with maritime
history — and dogs
R
etirement doesn’t always mean
you stop working. Not for Astoria
resident Marcy Dunning, anyway.
Dunning received her undergradu-
ate degree at Middlebury College and
her master’s degree in library science at
Simmons College. She cofounded the
information research company Access/
Information, Inc. in 1981 in Denver,
Colo.
She’s retired, but she still does work
for some of her old clients.
Dunning spends two afternoons a
week at the Columbia River Maritime
Museum, where she recently began
working.
She has been going through several
SALEM — Even though state
lawmakers say action on a funding
plan for road and bridge repair and
other transportation needs is unlikely
before the 2016 election, advocates
say it’s not too early to start talking
again.
“We need to pick up the work
that has been done and not let it fall
away,” said Craig Campbell, who
represents the American Automobile
Association of Oregon and also is
president of the Oregon Transporta-
tion Forum coalition.
“We need to discuss it and work
it,” said Campbell, whose coalition
includes transportation users, gov-
ernments and some environmental
groups.
While state House Speaker
Tina Kotek vowed recently that
“we still need a transportation
package in this state,” she said the
lead time required for laying out
details is such that action is un-
likely before the next long session
in 2017.
Some say a good starting point
is where a bipartisan group of eight
lawmakers left off this year .
hundred books the museum received,
checking them against the collection
for duplicates and cataloging those that
are unique.
“There are things here that you
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even around the world,” Dunning said.
The museum’s collection contains
materials relating to global maritime
history, not just that of the Columbia
River, according to Jeff Smith, the cu-
rator.
See ROAD PLAN, Page 10A
Svensen
man gets
29 years
for assaults
Mother feared
for her life
By KYLE SPURR
The Daily Astorian
A Svensen man with a record of
assaulting his mother and multiple
law enforce-
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was sentenced
Friday in Clat-
sop
County
Circuit Court
to 29 years in
prison.
Ole Marvin
Hayne, 54, was
found guilty
last month on
Ole Marvin
all charges af-
Hayne
ter a trial where
he represented himself, instead of
hiring a lawyer or having one ap-
pointed.
Judge Philip Nelson convicted
Hayne on each charge of assault-
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arrest, disorderly conduct, criminal
mischief, coercion, aggravated ha-
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menacing and escape.
The charges stem from incidents
in July 2013 and May 2014.
Joshua Bessex/The Daily Astorian
See DUNNING, Page 10A Marcy Dunning
IT’S CA R LOAD D A Y
2014 5 TO M O RRO W ! Everyone
in the ca r a dm itted for $10
C LATS O P
JULY 28
AUGUST 1
C OUN TY F AIR
O PEN IN G D A Y
th ru
F or m ore in form a tion go to w w w .cla tsopfa irgrou n d s.com
F a ir hou rs 10a m -9p m
Ca rn iva l hou rs 2-9p m
See HAYNE, Page 10A